Vinexpo Daily 2020 Paris - Review Edition

cleverdis

REVIEW

THURSDAY

20 TH FEBRUARY

2020

#10

SPECIAL FEATURE

QUALITY VISITORS

MEET QUALITY

EXHIBITORS

EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEWS

#08

"SEEN @ VINEXPO PARIS":

FEEDBACK FROM

EXHIBITORS IS POSITIVE

ACROSS THE BOARD

#09

Marc Almert

Best Sommelier of the

World by the International

Sommelier Association (ASI)

Maggie

Henriquez

CEO, Krug

TRADE TALK

#07

Jean-Michel

Deluc

Co-founder,

Le Petit Ballon


I NEWS I

Forming the first business event of the

calendar year dedicated to wines and

spirits, Vinexpo Paris and Wine Paris, over

three days at Porte de Versailles, became

the global epicentre of the business.

In the heart of the world’s lifestyle capital,

the exhibition welcomed 2,800 exhibitors

and 29,280 trade and industry members –

one in three of them from outside France.

The top 3 countries represented in terms of

visitors were the United Kingdom, Belgium

and the United States.

All of these national and international buyers

(importers, wine merchants, restaurant

and hotel owners, sommeliers, central

purchasing agencies, distributors, specialist

EDITORIAL

Richard Barnes

Editor-in-Chief,

Vinexpo Daily

The first joint Vinexpo Paris

and Wine Paris:

delivering on a promise

wholesalers and sales agents) were able to

taste the latest vintage, find new treasures,

engage with the major brands and get a

grasp of the incredible choice of wines and

spirits from different regions around the

world.

This first joint edition in February thus

marked a major milestone and established

Paris as the world's key annual event for

the industry. The show’s success, fuelled by

exhibitors and visitors alike, confirmed the

relevance of bringing the two complementary

events together.

Looking forward to seeing you in 2021! The

next Vinexpo Paris and Wine Paris will take

place from 15 to 17 February 2021.

VINEXPO

PARIS 2020:

A REWARDING

AND

IMMERSIVE

EXPERIENCE

As was expected by industry players across-theboard,

Vinexpo Paris and Wine Paris delivered an

action-packed programme. Numerous conferences

and round-table discussions, reflecting prime

industry issues (“Trends and major challenges in the

global spirits market”; “Consumer expectations for

organic wines”; “E-commerce: selling wine directto-consumer”;

“The future of French Wines is in the

US”; “Will there be a Winexit in the UK?”, etc.).

Promotion of specific market segments took

place in a variety of settings Environmentallyfriendly

choices (organic, biodynamic, HVE…) were

presented through the “WOW!” (World of organic

wine) area and a “Wonderful Discoveries” route

through the exhibition.

40 young winegrowers were able to look for their

first distribution networks in France and abroad

as part of the “New Wave” section. And the show

was able to offer an immersive experience in the

evening across Paris with an off-site selection of

65 restaurants - chosen to celebrate wine and the

diversity and quality of Parisian gastronomy - and

20 mixologists from the most influential Parisian

bars.

For the next edition, the single-minded objective of

the organisers is to improve and enrich the overall

experience for participants - exhibitors and visitors

alike. For 2021, their shared ambition is to establish

an event with even greater international scope for

both exhibitors and visitors and diversify the markets

represented, both nationally and internationally

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Vinexpo Paris 2020 / Make a difference - Empowering women!

2 • VINEXPO DAILY • THURSDAY 20 TH FEBRUARY 2020

www.vinexpodaily.com


I NEWS I

Thorsten

Hartmann

Director of Custom Analytics,

IWSR.

NOVICE WINE

GROWERS WIN

TOP AWARD

A Franco-Irish "novice" winemaker couple

leveraged Vinexpo to promote their awardwinning

organic wines.

Eco-credentials more

important than ever

- IWSR research

Consumers are becoming increasingly aware

of drinks producers' ethical credentials,

attendees at Vinexpo Paris were told at a

session that gave forecasts for the global

beverage industry.

The trend is driven by

younger drinkers, who

are prioritising good

environmental performance.

"Younger consumers have

different thoughts on the

world to older consumers,"

said Thorsten Hartmann,

director of custom analytics

at IWSR, the drinks market

analysis organisation.

"A company being ethical

is really becoming

very important, almost

indispensable. You have to

be responsible in everything

- from packaging, right

through to marketing and

how your water is treated."

don't want to miss out on

the experience. It has to be

a fantastic product," he said.

Soft drinks companies have

yet to make significant

inroads into the market

for no-alcohol versions

of traditional drinks, but

Hartmann forecast that this

would change.

market", not least because

their cachet rubs off on

lower-end products.

Some super premium

limited editions are destined

to never be consumed,

according to Hartmann,

instead, being traded purely

as investments.

In terms of the overall drinks

market, IWSR's global

forecast for 2018 to 2023

suggests that wine will be the

only major drinks category

to see sales fall, with an

A COMPANY BEING ETHICAL

IS REALLY BECOMING

VERY IMPORTANT, ALMOST

INDISPENSABLE.

Irish harpsichordist Emer

Kirwan-Buckley and her

husband Fabrice Priou

bought the Graves AOP

Chateau Sirio in 2015

to fulfil their dream of

running an organic winery,

and have since won four

awards.

Despite having no

background in viticulture,

the awards for the wines

culminated in the "Trophée

des Crus de Graves", which

they bagged in 2019 for the

Chateau's dry white 2018

vintage. The prestigious

award places them in

the top ten of the Graves

Appellation d'Origine

Controlée (AOC).

From the outset, the

Franco-Irish couple aimed

to take a sustainable

approach to the

cultivation of vines and the

environment, prioritising

quality over quantity.

The 18 ha estate has six

ha currently in production

of Merlot and Cabernet

Sauvignon grapes for red

wine and Sauvignon Blanc

and Semillon for white wine.

The red wines are aged in

French oak barrels, while

the Sauvignon grapes are

aged in thermo-regulated

vats and Semillon in oak

barrels.

Chateau Sirio participated

in the official Graves/

Sauternes stand at

Vinexpo Paris for the first

time this year

The IWSR also highlighted

the increasing demand for

healthier drinks, including

low and no alcohol, low sugar,

low carbohydrates and "free

from". However, Hartmann

said that health-conscious

consumers were just as

demanding about quality.

"They want to reduce their

alcohol intake, but they

Another trend is for the

"premiumisation" of spirits.

People are drinking less, but

better.

In terms of "super premium"

products, limited edition

versions of well-known

brands are "becoming a

really important part of the

annual 0.2% reduction

forecast. Spirits sales are

set to increase 0.6% a year,

beer 0.7%, cider 2.0 percent,

while ready-to-drink (RTD)

beverages are set for a 5.6%

annual sales increase

Emer Kirwan-

Buckley

& Fabrice Priou

Owners of Chateau Sirio

VINEXPO DAILY • THURSDAY 20 TH FEBRUARY 2020 • 3


I NEWS I

Wine from Lebanese

monks has great

potential in France

A wine produced by the Lebanese Maronite

Order was among the organic beverages

that were showcased at Vinexpo Paris.

The Vinexpo Academy session on Brexit

WSTA calls for "light-touch"

import regime after Brexit

The UK’s wine and spirits trade body will press the British government

to introduce a simplified certification system for wine imported from

Europe in January 2021, its overseas affairs director has said.

The Adyar brand, offering

a range of organic red,

white, rose, sweet and ice

wines, plus the traditional

Lebanese drink Arak,

exhibited in the WOW!

section as it looks to

increase sales in France.

The Lebanese Maronite

Order cultivates vines in

eight regions at altitudes

between 410 metres and

1600 metres.

Yara Haddad from Adyar

claims that even when

French or Spanish grapes

are used, the wine has

a character unique to

Lebanon, because of the

climate and soil, adding:

"This kind of wine has

great potential. We would

like to grow our business in

France. "

Most Adyar wines are

associated with a particular

monastery, although some

are the product of grapes

from more than one

The news was announced on 10 February at

Vinexpo, Paris, during the Vinexpo Academy

session on Brexit.

European and international affairs director

Simon Stannard announced that the Wine

and Spirit Trade Association would be

meeting with government officials from 17-

21 February, calling for a “light touch” shortterm

approach to certification after Brexit.

The European Union requires importers of

wines from other countries to complete a

VI1 certificate, requiring seven lab tests to

assess the alcohol strength and levels of

acidity and sulphur dioxide in the wine, and

ensure standard units of measurement are

accurate.

Stannard says the VI1 certificate isn't

favoured from a UK perspective, because it is

not a useful tool for enforcement purposes,

and the development of a new high-tech

system that can be accessed from vineyard

to point of retail should be pursued as a longterm

solution.

“But I think in the short term, there is the

option to have a simplified VI1 procedure,” he

says. “At the very least, we should, between

the UK and the EU, negotiate a simplified

procedure from the first of January next

year. Ideally, we would like to see something

that gets us from where we are now to where

we would like to be in future, with a sensible

transition.”

Stannard said he was “hopeful” that mutual

recognition for organic wine regulations

between the EU and the UK would be

achieved before the end of the year

The Adyar wines from Lebanon

4 • VINEXPO DAILY • THURSDAY 20 TH FEBRUARY 2020

www.vinexpodaily.com


© DR

Be Spirits exhibitors at

Vinexpo Paris 2020

A show within the show

Be Spirits attracts an “eclectic depth of exhibitors”

Be Spirits by Vinexpo created a show within the show,

designated specifically for spirits exhibitors coming

together from across the world, including Canada, Tibet,

Guatemala and Mexico.

The section attracted what organisers

describe as “an eclectic depth of

exhibitors” in Vinexpo’s first ever

dedicated spirits area, ranging from

UK-based Halewood Wines & Spirits

– the first major spirit company to

launch a CBD rum, “Dead Man’s

Fingers Hemp” – to a Single Malt

from Tibet specialist supplier, and

an artisanal “Ancestral Mezcal” from

Mexico.

“The product is the star” explained

Jerome Delord of four-generational

family distillery Armagnac Delord,

founded in 1893. “All stands are the

same size, and this helps the focus

to be on the product.” The Infinite Bar

running 50 metres down the length

of the Be Spirits area was a popular

attraction with its 20 mixologists

coming from the most prestigious

bars and hotels in Paris.

Be Spirits was also about conferences

that were grouped under two themes

(Be Mixology and Be Brand) with a

series of conferences and seminars

running daily throughout the show.

They included one on Global Spirits

Market Trends and another with a

focus on the “No/Low Trend – why are

alcohol-free spirits so popular?”

A number of industry trends were

summarised and presented by

Thorsten Hartmann, Director of

Consulting at London-based IWSR

(International Wine & Spirit Research)

followed by animated audience

discussion:

Global - the ‘Experience Economy’

with old established brands

continuing to dominate

Ethical issue-drivers, e.g. packaging

Health Drivers, explosion in low and

no-alcohol products as younger

generation modify drinking habits

which are becoming the norm

(drinking by occasion rather than by

habit) e.g. 0.5% gluten-free cider,

BrewDog No-Alcohol Bar in central

London, White & Mackay Light

(whisky) at 20% ABV etc.

The Power of Plants – growth of CBD

i.e. cannabis-derived products

The rise of contemporary spirits

– producers starting to put their

customers first and for example

for whisky, dropping traditional

‘Highlands’ scenery, stags etc and

Johnny Walker introducing ‘White

Walker’ on the back of the popularity

of Game of Thrones, deliberately

targeting the younger generation

drinkers

The rise of the Pre-mix / Batched

Cocktail, which poses a threat to the

individual brands as they are not

specified in the mixes

Convenience or one-off expenditure

vs value-for-money; 50cl spirits in

sachets and tetrapak boxes

The rise of Hard Seltzers in the US

(alcoholic sparkling water) which

have damaged the wine market in the

US, and pose a real threat to spirits

market if they make international

jump from the US

VINEXPO DAILY • THURSDAY 20 TH FEBRUARY 2020 • 5


Putting some

sparkle into the

lives of female

drinkers

Slingsby Rhubarb gin,

produced by Spirit of

Harrogate

A spa town gin

that aims to

spark foreign

interest

A gin range that celebrates the man credited with

discovering spa waters in the English town of Harrogate

was present at Vinexpo as part of a new export drive.

The Slingsby range of gins, named

after a soldier called Sir William

Slingsby, born in the 16 century, is

looking to find new markets around

the globe. The brand showcased its

wares in Vinexpo Paris's Be Spirits

section.

Harrogate in Yorkshire has long

been celebrated as a spa town, and

Slingsby markets itself as "Restoring

the Spirit of Harrogate".

About 95% of sales are currently

in the United Kingdom, with the

rest mostly coming from Denmark,

Finland, Australia, New Zealand and

Croatia.

"The plan now is to expand. We think

the big opportunity for ultra-premium

gin is export markets," said Tony Ince,

director of sales for Slingsby's owner,

Spirit of Harrogate.

The brand estimates that about 60%

of customers are female. Slingsby's

efforts to grow sales abroad are

targeting markets such as France,

Germany, Holland, Belgium and Spain.

Nick Dunning, Spirit of Harrogate's

export manager, says he believes

the gin market internationally is "still

expanding".

"We see some opportunity with

our flavoured products, because

internationally they're not yet as big

as in the UK. We're one of the leaders

in that," he said.

As well as being available as a London

Dry Gin, Slingsby is offered in Yorkshire

rhubarb, gooseberry and marmalade

flavours. There is also an Old Tom gin,

inspired by an old-style gin popular in

the 18th century, and a Navy Strength

gin, bottled at 57% ABV.

The pink sparkling vodka liqueur Nuvo chose

Vinexpo Paris as its first European show.

A drink targeted at women and billed as the

world's first sparkling liqueur used Vinexpo

Paris as the platform for an ambitious

sales drive.

Nuvo L'Esprit de Paris, created by the

American entrepreneur Raphael Yakoby,

has been available in the United States

since 2006 and is now entering European

markets.

Pink in colour and presented in a

distinctive square bottle - a novelty for a

sparkling drink - it is made of 95 percent

premium French vodka, five percent

French sparkling wine and fruit nectar.

"The creator, Raphael Yakoby, his

thinking behind this product was that

all the brands out there are maleoriented.

The packaging, everything

is skewed to the male," said John

Vasquez, national brand manager for

London Group, the company behind

Nuvo.

"Even if it's a female product, the

bottle is still male-oriented. He said,

'We need something for her.'"

Vasquez said that Nuvo's modest 15

percent alcohol content tied in with

the trend towards lower-alcohol

beverages.

He described the brand's reception

at Vinexpo Paris's Be Spirits section

as "excellent", with interest from

across Europe and further afield,

including South Korea, China and

Japan.

The 700ml bottles needed for the

European market will, says Vasquez,

be ready in March so that distribution

can start in April.

"We're really looking to grow as

quickly as we can into female target

markets."

Yakoby also launched Hpnotiq, a blue

liqueur that he reportedly sold for tens

of millions of dollars

The award winning

Abk6 XO Cognac

6 • VINEXPO DAILY • THURSDAY 20 TH FEBRUARY 2020

www.vinexpodaily.com


I TRADE TALK I

Jean-Michel

Deluc

co-founder,

Le Petit Ballon

© Flavien Prioreau

PRESS CORNER

The essential

wine magazine

Terre de vins has grown a great deal in 10

years, with turnover increasing tenfold.

We asked Managing Director Rodolphe

Wartel to tell us more.

Wine: it's about

more than just the

product

Jean-Michel Deluc co-founded the subscription wine service

Le Petit Ballon in 2011. Deluc is the club's Master Sommelier

and selects the two wines that members receive every month

according to their profile. He discusses what has sustained his

successful career in the drinks trade.

My role is to ensure the quality of our

selected wines, so I taste every wine that

we sell. We try to offer unusual wines that

the consumers cannot find anywhere

else. Beside our boxes, where every

month we propose two bottles that I

have selected, along with technical notes

and a review, we offer a large selection of

wines and spirits. The trend is towards

bio or organic wines, which make up

22% of our wines. We offer a bio box

every month.

What do you like most about the

beverage industry?

What I like about wine is all the things

around it, not just the product: the

history, the geography, the stories, the

social side of wine drinking and the

science behind it. And to be able to help

consumers to understand the subject is

great. With Le Petit Ballon, I feel that I am

everybody's sommelier at home.

What were you hoping to achieve at

Vinexpo Paris?

I was trying to find some new

winegrowers, new cuvées and new

OFTEN I LOOK

AT THE BOTTLE

AND THE PEOPLE

BEFORE I DECIDE

WHETHER TO

TASTE. THE

PSYCHOLOGICAL

SIDE OF TASTING IS

IMPORTANT.

appellations, and to meet and thank

personally the winemakers with whom

we work.

What is the secret to getting the most

out of a busy Vinexpo?

Relationships, conversation and

curiosity. Often I look at the bottle and

the people before I decide whether to

taste. The psychological side of tasting

is important

Terre de vins is today credited with 300,000 readers for

the magazine and 150,000 unique visitors on terredevins.

com. It has become a 360° medium, revealing content

and producing events.

My role is to drive these developments, accelerate them

and maintain double-digit growth every year.

What were you looking for at Vinexpo?

We were seeking to meet all the French operators who

have ideas, who innovate, carry projects and want to

make it known.

What are the trends in the French market?

The decline in wine consumption in France, the decline

in red wines and the decline in Bordeaux. The Trump

tax, Brexit but also coronavirus are so many clouds that

accumulate and make us think that French vineyards

must also win at home, which constitutes for many of

them 50-80% of sales.

What are the challenges and opportunities for

winegrowers in 2020?

The first challenge is to convince the political class that

planting vines and producing wine is not a crime but is

part of a virtuous land development, carrying values and

jobs. The other will be to modernise the image of wine

Rodolphe

Wartel

Managing Director,

Terre de vins

VINEXPO DAILY • THURSDAY 20 TH FEBRUARY 2020 • 7


I EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW I

© Dominique-Silberstein

Maggie

Henriquez

CEO Krug

THE RESPONSIBILITY

OF LUXURY HOUSES IS

TO CONTINUE TO LEAD

THE WAY IN THEIR FIELD

THROUGH INNOVATION

AND THE PURSUIT OF

EXCELLENCE.

TODAY, THEY MUST DO

THIS IN WAYS THAT

ALSO PROTECT THE

PLANET AND DO GOOD

TO THEIR EMPLOYEES,

CLIENTS AND THE WIDER

COMMUNITY.

THE RESPONSIBILITY

OF LUXURY

KRUG'S PHILANTHROPIC

FOUNDATION FOCUSES

ON MUSIC, INVESTING IN

RESEARCH, EDUCATION

AND BRINGING MUSIC

TO HOSPITALS AND

SCHOOLS.

Krug CEO Maggie Henriquez shares her philosophy on

how luxury houses can help protect the environment

and promote well-being

Following her talk about the role of luxury brands in

promoting a sustainable environment, we asked her what

the "responsibility of luxury" means for her.

Luxury for me is really the light that

enlightens the path for others. If you

talk about leather goods, 25 years

ago this industry was not half as

beautiful as it is today. Lower brands

all became beautiful because they

were inspired by the leaders. So

the leaders have to continue to be

leaders. The leaders need to continue

to have this light that enlightens the

path for others.

Luxury starts with a founder who

decides to do something that nobody

else has done. But it always has to

go further. It is always to provide

something of a higher quality, of a

higher level, that is going to make

people dream, but it is always in

front. This is why I like to say it is

always the light. And for this light to

continue to give light to others, it has

to be alive.

That is where the responsibility

of luxury houses comes in. Until

today, it was based on creativity and

innovation. But there is something

that is happening today and it comes

with millennials: this consciousness

of the importance of protecting the

planet and doing good. You can give

in many ways but what people are

expecting is: How do you make your

products? Are you taking care of the

planet? How do you care about the

world besides your products? And

this is the future. All luxury houses

have to think in this way.

What are the key ingredients of this

responsibility?

It must involve the planet, you have

take care of how you produce, and

you have to do good to people, to

somebody, to a population that you

select.

In terms of sustainability, what

actions do you favour?

You have to do carbon offsetting

and take it very seriously. Luxury

houses will have to be very careful

and continue to innovate but now

the innovation will have to consider

how they achieve new results and

how they take caring for the planet

into account. It also involves the

methods, and the way you treat

your terroir, and I think everybody

is conscious of this. I’m in favour of

organic – I think everybody is. But

am I a fanatic? No.

How do you give to the wider

community at Krug?

We have a foundation called Fonds K

for Music. We invest in research into

the connection between sound and

taste. I'm sure this can be translated

into well-being. Second, we support

education. We are investing in a

group of solo musicians who couldn't

succeed as soloists and are helping

them to play together. And thirdly,

we pay musicians to go and play in

places where music rarely arrives - in

schools, in hospitals. We are doing

this now in France and next year, we

will start doing this wherever Krug

can be found

8 • VINEXPO DAILY • THURSDAY 20 TH FEBRUARY 2020

www.vinexpodaily.com


I EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW I

MARC ALMERT,

WORLD'S BEST

SOMMELIER,

DISCUSSES

AUSTRIAN

WINE

© Jean Bernard

Marc Almert, named last year as the Best Sommelier of the

World by the International Sommelier Association (ASI)

The man named last year as the Best Sommelier

of the World by the International Sommelier

Association (ASI), showcased wines from Austria

at a special Vinexpo event.

Organised by the Austrian Wine

Marketing Board, the Discover

Austria's Wine masterclass

highlighted the many regions

and types of wine that Austria

has to offer at a time of growing

interest from the public.

"I think Austria has really come

a long way in the last couple

of decades. To me it's really

interesting to see there are

many different grapes on offer,"

said Almert. "There are many

whites and reds, and you have

many interesting sweet and rose

wines, and the quality to price

ratio is really good. They're good

for sommeliers and wine buyers

to put on their lists. On many of

the key estates you're seeing

the second and even the third

generation coming up and so

they're at an interesting point in

their development."

Almert said the Zurich hotel

where he works as head

sommelier, the Baur au Lac,

which includes the Pavillon

restaurant, offers several

Austrian wines, including some

by the glass. Certain Austrian

wines, he said, can be enjoyed

in their youth while also having

great ageing potential: "We

definitely see a growing interest,

especially in the red wines

and sparkling wines. They're

more established and popular

in Switzerland because many

guests know Austria from their

skiing holidays and want to enjoy

Austrian wines when they're

back at home."

All the wines at the event were

from exhibitors who were on

site, so attendees were able to

visit their stands to taste some

more.

Almert's diary during the three

days of Vinexpo Paris was a

full one and Discover Austria's

Diversity was not the only event

in which he took part. He was also

hosting the Vinexpo Challenge,

during which participants

attempted to identify wines by

grape variety, country of origin

and vintage. Almert gave tips on

how to approach a blind tasting.

The wine expert's schedule

has been full for most of the

past year since he was named

Best Sommelier of the World

in early 2019. "It's been a

very exciting year with a lot of

travelling and a lot of chances to

discover new people. It's been

a really fascinating years," he

said, adding, "I think it's a very

exciting time because the nice

thing about the wine world is

that it never stands still."

"We see new wine regions

entering the market, including

China and others, some with

a long wine-growing history -

Eastern Europe, Portugal and

Greece. As any industry, we

always face challenges, but we

have enough dynamism to face

the challenges and turn them

into opportunities," concluded

Almert

LE PAVILLON,

ZURICH

Le Pavillon is gourmet restaurant in the

heart of Zurich. As one of the top restaurants

in Switzerland, the restaurant boasts two

Michelin stars and 18 Gault Millau points

awarded to Chef Laurent Eperon.

BEST

SOMMELIER ASI

The Association de la Sommellerie

Internationale (ASI) participates in all events

related to wine, spirits and other drinks, and

runs a competition to find the World's Best

Sommelier.

France will host the next Best Sommelier of the

World Contest from 8-13 May 2022.

Contestants were given tips by Almert on how to taste wines

VINEXPO DAILY • THURSDAY 20 TH FEBRUARY 2020 • 9


For this Review Edition of Vinexpo Daily, we

took a quick tour of some of the stands at the

show to ask what the exhibitors thought of the

first edition of Vinexpo Paris...

SEEN @ VINEXP

Nino Mchedlishvili

Marketing Manager,

National Wine Agency, Georgia

Isabella Antollini

Director, Aurian

AURIAN

We liked the quality of the visitors, the stand and the organisation.

The space in Be Spirits was nicely designed and it was a very good

concept. It gave equal area for everyone to showcase their products

without any particular brand having an enormous, lavish stand.

Everybody got a bit of the spotlight. This was the first time that we took

part in Vinexpo and it was a positive experience. The quality of the

visitors was higher than we've experienced elsewhere.

NATIONAL WINE AGENCY,

GEORGIA

There were many visitors from different kinds of companies. We

had eight Georgian vineyards here and they liked the expo. The visitors

who came here were really interested in the products. The vineyards

had negotiations and talked about future cooperation, so the show was

useful for the future plans of each of the wineries. It was a nice and

comfortable place to have meetings.

Johann Gendron

Sales Export Manager, Beaumont des

Crayères Champagne and Vincent d'Astrée

Champagne

BEAUMONT DES CRAYERES CHAMPAGNE

AND VINCENT D'ASTREE CHAMPAGNE

The organisation of the show was good and we made some very good contacts,

so it was very positive in that way. It was also positive because we could visit some

of our customers as well. Some of them will probably not visit the other shows, but

they decided to come to Vinexpo Paris. We had good discussions with them. It

reminded me very much of Vinexpo Bordeaux, which is a good thing. Overall it was

a good opportunity to review our business.

Andrew Thomas

International Commercial

Manager, Borie Manoux

BORIE MANOUX

The business took part in Vinexpo for the first time last

year and found it beneficial, so we wanted to come back this

year. It was great to be part of Vinexpo. I think Vinexpo is one

of those shows where people are there to do business. I run

the UK business and we wanted to be part of it. The show

particularly highlighted the French side of the industry. We

had a few customers who could come for the day. They could

catch the early train here and take the late train back. That

was the really positive thing about the Paris show.

10 • VINEXPO DAILY • THURSDAY 20 TH FEBRUARY 2020

www.vinexpodaily.com


O PARIS 2020

Judith Barat

Communications assistant,

Château Fonroque

CHÂTEAU FONROQUE

The WOW! (World of Organic Wines) area was a good idea - a place

to gather all of the organic and biodynamic estates together. People

were quite happy because they knew what they would get when they

came to the WOW! area. We made some good contacts at the show this

year. We had some buyers and some retailers speaking to us and the

quality of the contacts that we had this year was good.

Matthieu Verhaeghe

Owner, Château Forge Celeste

CHATEAU FORGE CELESTE

For me the concept of the WOW! (World of Organic

Wines) area was a good thing. It was professional and for a

small winemaker, it was an easy and familiar atmosphere.

We're trying to have a new system of distribution, so for me

this show was a good solution. We had good contacts with

agents and buyers. The quality of the people who came her

was high - there were retailers, big companies and the press.

A large number of journalists came and spoke to me after

seeing me in the Vinexpo Daily.

Eugenie Leong

Trade Marketing Manager,

Maison Villevert

MAISON VILLEVERT

This was our first experience here. For many years we

didn't participate in any professional shows. We decided to

exhibit at Vinexpo because a lot of our customers and contacts

were coming to visit. Our contact at the show organisers, each

time we had any issue, she provided me with answers. We

were surprised at the number of people coming to us and

asking questions, people who were very curious and wanted

to know what we did. The Be Spirits area was a good idea.

Bryan Furlong

President, Furlong

FURLONG

This was our first show. We are a new distillery in Quebec. We

launched a year ago and we've only been in Canada until now, but we

want to expand. We have a maple whiskey that caters to Europeans.

Everybody really liked it at the show and it was a surprise for them. It's

a new type of whiskey. People are used to Scotch and American

whiskey, but there are not too many Canadian whiskies. We made good

contacts and the number of buyers at the show was high. Overall it was

a great experience.

VINEXPO DAILY • THURSDAY 20 TH FEBRUARY 2020 • 11


© Emilio Del Prado

WHERE

TO GO IN

PARIS

Discover the city through

its wine culture

You may think Paris is not the place to visit when it

comes to wine production. Think again!

Paris is a city that comes to mind when one wants

to appreciate wine rather than grow some. But that

is is only half true. Every October in the village of

Montmartre, a harvest takes place accompanied by

a five-day long festival called La Fête des Vendanges.

It is then possible to try and taste the wine from

Montmartre.

Vines in Montmartre

Surprisingly, while the vineyard occupies only half a

hectare, it produces 500 litres of wine, representing

a production fluctuating on average between 1,000

and 1,500 bottles. 75% of the production falls in the

Gamay family and 20% under Pinot.

The vineyard was created in 1933 by the city of Paris,

which owns the parcel. It is not open to the public,

but is visible through its outer fences, with the best

view from the Renoir Gardens inside the Musee de

Montmartre. Here, breathtaking views are offered

over the vineyard with Paris’ skyline as a background.

And the museum’s shop even sells bottles of Clos de

Montmartre…

Facing the Eiffel Tower is the Musee du Vin, located

next to the Paris Museum of Modern Art. Covering

over 150 cellar year, some 2,000 objects related to

wine culture are exposed. Seminars, special events,

tasting sessions are organised there but it is also

possible to eat in the restaurant located inside the

cellars. “Les Echansons” offers a traditional French

cuisine made of fresh ingredients with various set

menus. Still looking to explore Paris's wine past?

The former Bercy Wine Market along the Seine River

reminds one of Europe largest wine sellers' area.

19 th century wine warehouses have been restored,

offering a number of shops, restaurants and,

naturally, wine bars.

GETTING THERE

Montmartre vineyard,

metro stations Lamarck-Caulaincourt,

Anvers or Pigalle

Musée du vin

metro station Iena

Bercy Village,

metro station Cours Saint-Emilion

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