Boxoffice Pro - March 2020

boxofficepro

$6.95 / March 2020

Kyle Marvin

& Michael Angelo Covino

in Sony Pictures Classics’

The Climb

THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF THEATRE OWNERS


grow

make

customers happy

your business

©2020 QSC, LLC all rights reserved. QSC, Q-SYS and the QSC logo are registered trademarks in the U.S. Patent and

Trademark Office and other countries. All other trademarks remain the property of their respective owners.


BOXOFFICE MEDIA

CEO

Julien Marcel

SVP CONTENT STRATEGY

Daniel Loria

EVP CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER

Susan Rich

VP ADVERTISING

Susan Uhrlass

BOXOFFICE® PRO

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Daniel Loria

INTERIM ART DIRECTOR

Rex Roberts

DEPUTY EDITOR

Rebecca Pahle

EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Kevin Lally

MANAGING EDITOR

Laura Silver

CHIEF ANALYST

Shawn Robbins

ANALYSTS

Chris Eggertsen

Jesse Rifkin

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Vassiliki Malouchou

DATABASE

Diogo Hausen

CONTRIBUTORS

Esther Baruh

Alex Rich

Edward Schiessl

ADVERTISING

Susan Uhrlass

63 Copps Hill Road

Ridgefield, CT USA 06877

310-876-9090

susan@boxoffice.com

SUBSCRIPTIONS

Boxoffice

P.O. Box 215

Congers, NY 10920

833-435-8093 (Toll-Free)

845-450-5212 (Local)

boxoffice@cambeywest.com

CORPORATE

Box Office Media LLC

63 Copps Hill Road

Ridgefield, CT USA 06877

corporate@boxoffice.com

Boxoffice® (ISSN 0006-8527), Volume 157, Number 3,

March 2020. BOXOFFICE PRO is published monthly by

Box Office Media LLC, 63 Copps Hill Road, Ridgefield, CT

USA 06877. corporate@boxoffice.com. www.boxoffice.

com. Basic annual subscription rate is $75.00. Periodicals

postage paid at Beverly Hills, CA, and at additional mailing

offices. POSTMASTER: Send all UAA to CFS. NON-POSTAL

AND MILITARY FACILITIES: send address corrections

to Boxoffice, P.O. Box 215, Congers, NY 10920. ©

Copyright 2020. Box Office Media LLC. All rights reserved.

SUBSCRIPTIONS: Boxoffice, P.O. Box 215, Congers, NY

10920 / boxoffice@cambeywest.com. 833-435-8093 (Toll-

Free), 845-450-5212 (Local). BOXOFFICE® is a registered

trademark of Box Office Media LLC.

HELLO.

BY DANIEL LORIA,

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

›› March is finally here, and with CinemaCon around the corner

(starting March 30), we decided to use this issue as an amuse-bouche

to tide you over before our biggest issue of the year. And to keep the

metaphor going, we have some especially tasty features to whet your

appetite. Among them, Rebecca Pahle talks to our friends at GDC

Technology in a look back at the company’s first 20 years in the cinema

industry. With its digital innovations, GDC has played an important

role in the expansion of digital cinema and the rise of overseas box office,

making it a trusted industry partner worldwide.

On the exhibition side, Jesse Rifkin profiles the cinemas that

participated in the Independent Cinema Alliance’s Independent Cinema

Day, the first of what we hope will become an annual tradition. The

ICA’s answer to Small Business Saturday, Independent Cinema Day was a

success, bringing moviegoers to hometown cinemas nationwide.

Always tracking the latest trends, Kevin Lally talks to our partners

at Proctor Companies for advice on incorporating a bar area into your

theater. Alcohol service is one of the hottest food & beverage trends in

exhibition today, and it’s a topic we’ll explore in greater depth in next

month’s CinemaCon edition.

As we continue our centennial celebrations, Vassiliki Malouchou

delves into our archives to track the industry’s evolution during WWII

and the continuing saga of the Paramount Consent Decrees. It’s another

great read from our history and a regular editorial feature that we’ll

continue throughout the year.

Thank you again for your continued support of our publication. If

you’re attending CinemaCon and would like to meet in person, feel free

to drop me a line. My email address is below, and I’ll be happy to find

some time to chat.

Daniel Loria

Editorial Director

daniel@boxoffice.com


MARCH 2020 TABLE OF CONTENTS

Kyle Marvin as Kyle, Michael Angelo Covino as Mike,

Gayle Rankin as Marissa in The Climb, page 34

ZACH KUPERSTEIN/ SONY PICTURES CLASSICS

FEATURES

Digital Decades.. . . . . . . . . . 22

GDC Technology celebrates

its 20th year

The Sound of Silence .. . . . . 30

A Quiet Place Part II sound editors

speak up

Uphill Battlers.. . . . . . . . . . 34

Michael Angelo Covino

and Kyle Marvin play

comic alter egos in The Climb

Indies, Unite. . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

Independent Cinema Day

marks a successful debut

Building a Bar.. . . . . . . . . . . 40

Alcohol service in theaters

requires extensive pre-planning

Dr. Man-Nang Chong, CEO and founder

of GDC, p. 22

DEPARTMENTS

HELLO ......................... 1

TRADE TALK .................... 4

NATO MEMBER NEWS. .......... 14

INDIE FOCUS. .................. 16

CHARITY SPOTLIGHT. . . . . . . . . . . 20

ON SCREEN. ................... 50

EVENT CINEMA CALENDAR. ..... 56

BOOKING GUIDE ............... 58

Century in Exhibition .. . . . . 44

1940s: Global conflict

and consent decrees

Coming Attractions. . . . . . . 48

Forthcoming new releases

with promising box office potential

A Century in Exhibition: 1940s, p. 44

Boxoffice Pro has served as the official publication of the National Association of Theatre Owners (NATO) since 2007.

As part of this partnership, Boxoffice is proud to feature exclusive columns from NATO while retaining full editorial freedom

throughout its pages. As such, the views expressed in Boxoffice Pro, neither reflect a stance nor endorsement from the

National Association of Theatre Owners.


#SonicsGotYouCovered

1 DESIGN

2 BUILD

3 EQUIP

4

SERVICE & S.O.S.

CALL CENTER

S O N I C E Q U I P M E N T . C O M

i n f o @ s o n i c e q u i p m e n t . c o m 8 0 0 - 3 6 5 - 5 7 0 1


TRADE TALK EDITED BY LAURA SILVER

Comscore Expands Box Office

Measurement to Saudi Arabia

Comscore Inc. has expanded its box office measurement service

into Saudi Arabia. The global expansion will provide box

office data for all theatrical film releases in the kingdom. This

follows the opening of commercial cinemas across the kingdom

after a 35-year pause.

“We are delighted to be able to expand our offering to cover

the new commercial film industry in Saudi Arabia,” said Arturo

Guillén, senior vice president and global managing director for

Comscore Movies. “Our partners welcome the opportunity to

leverage audience insights from a massive untapped market in

which we expect to see rapid growth for the film industry. The

kingdom of Saudi Arabia is set to be a top 10 cinema market

over the coming years, and we look forward to helping the

industry grow as a whole through our data and analytics.”

The expansion also marks another milestone for Comscore.

Previously, in May 2019, Comscore announced operations into

southern and West Africa and the expansion of its real-time box

office and polling solution, PostTrak, to Australia, Germany,

Mexico, and the United Kingdom.

NEC Announces First-Ever

Digital Projectors

with Replaceable Laser Modules

NEC Display Solutions of America has released a new

18,000-lumen digital cinema projector to complete the world’s

first series of modular laser projectors. With the option to

replace the laser light module in the projector head, the NC

Series delivers 2K imagery on small to medium screens while

allowing for simple installation and maintenance.

With the NEC NC1802ML (shown below left) and its three

swappable light modules (24,000, 20,000, and 18,000 lumens),

cinema operators can adapt the projector for various screen sizes

up to 72 feet. This functionality allows operators to get more

out of their investment and ensures they can always showcase

premieres, whether 2-D features or 3-D showpieces.

“With the NC1802ML rounding out the series, we’ve

created a digital cinema projector without limits,” said Rich

McPherson, senior product manager at NEC Display. “We’re

looking at the future of laser projection: a single solution that

can operate as many. With this revolutionary design, we can

alleviate many of the concerns that came with traditional laser

projectors and lower the cost of operation as much as we can.”

The innovative design of this series also extends to its installation:

The unit features an internal liquid chiller, removing

the need for an external cooling system and thereby making it

easier to install into tight spaces.

Santikos Announces 11 TH Location

Santikos Enterprises has announced the next location for a

state-of-the-art theater and entertainment center on Bulverde

Road in San Antonio, Texas. This new location is planned to be

a 50,000-square-foot building filled with 10–12 auditoriums,

the AVX viewing experience, a fully stocked bar, and an arcade.

“The announcement of an 11th location is extremely exciting

for us,” said Tim Handren, CEO of Santikos Enterprises.

“Our continual goal is not just to create space for families

and friends to come together for an unmatched experience.

The goal is to carry on John Santikos’s legacy and make an

impact in our community. Our company is unique in that

100 percent of our profits go directly back into the community

through the San Antonio Area Foundation. This is

what separates Santikos from all other entertainment venues;

they can’t say their profits are truly staying local. We believe

this location will only expand our ability to make a positive

community impact and solidify our presence in this city and

surrounding counties. John Santikos’s vision was to have his

businesses grow and continue operating for the benefit of the

community. We work hard every day to be good stewards of

those assets and his legacy.”

4 / MARCH 2020


TRADE TALK

PETER AARON -– OTTO

Film Forum Receives

$1M Anniversary Gift

from King Family

Karen Cooper, director of New York City’s

Film Forum since 1972, announced more than $1

million in gifts to commemorate the theater’s 50th

anniversary this year, including a $1 million gift

from the Charles & Lucille King Family Foundation

in memory of the foundation’s founder and

longtime chair and president, Diana King, who

passed away in January 2019. Film Forum has

received funding from the foundation every year

since 2005, and since 2015 specifically to support

its “Film Forum Jr.” program of weekend classics

for children. Film Forum is honoring King’s legacy

with the naming of the Diana King Theater.

The Robert Jolin Osborne Trust will make a

$250,000 gift to Film Forum during its anniversary

year, to establish the Robert Jolin Osborne

Endowed Fund for American Classic Cinema

of the 1930s, ’40s, and ’50s. Robert Osborne

(1932–2017) was the iconic silver-haired host on

Turner Classic Movies (TCM) for more than two

decades; he was termed “a one-of-a-kind cinematic

savant” by The New York Times.

Having opened on the Upper West Side in

1970 with 50 folding chairs, the nonprofit cinema

has grown to its present incarnation: four screens,

469 seats, open 365 days year, with a $6 million

operating budget. Film Forum maintains a dual

profile—as a leading cinema for NYC premieres

of independent foreign and American features,

and as a leading repertory cinema, championing

classic movies and overlooked masterpieces.

In addition to the naming of the Diana King

Theater and the establishment of the Robert Jolin

Osborne Endowed Fund, Film Forum is marking

its 50th anniversary with projects including

in-person filmmaker presentations, special series

presentations, two celebrity-studded anniversary

trailers, a six-minute original film, and a new

Film Forum T-shirt design.

6 / MARCH 2020


ORDER

NOW


TRADE TALK

GEORGIA THEATRE

COMPANY’S

BILL STEMBLER:

“Our employees

are the foundation

of Georgia

Theatre Company.

By transitioning

to an

employee-owned

company, we

are empowering

them to play an

integral role in

the company’s

future.”

Georgia Theatre Company

Becomes Employee-Owned

Circuit

Georgia Theatre Company, a fourth-generation,

family-owned theater circuit based in St.

Simons Island, Georgia, has completed a sale of

100 percent of its stock to the Georgia Theatre

Company Employee Stock Ownership Trust

(ESOT).

The original company, founded in the mid-

1920s, has operated theaters in Georgia for nearly

100 years. Over the past three decades, founder

and chairman William (Bill) J. Stembler has grown

this latest company from just a few locations with

about $5 million in annual revenue to 25 locations

with revenue surpassing $75 million annually and

a team of approximately 700 employees.

“Our employees are the foundation of Georgia

Theatre Company,” said Stembler. “By transitioning

to an employee-owned company, we are

empowering them to play an integral role in the

company’s future. My family and I are grateful for

this opportunity to reward our employees for their

hard work, loyalty, and contributions by creating

the Employee Stock Ownership Plan [ESOP].”

An ESOP is an employee benefit plan that

provides company stock to eligible employees.

Eligibility is governed by ERISA and administered

by an independent trustee. By becoming

100 percent ESOP-owned, all company stock is

now held in trust by the ESOT. As an employee-owned

company, Georgia Theatre Company

will retain the same management structure, with

Stembler remaining chairman of the board.

CFO Mike Warren and president Bo Chambliss

will also continue in their positions of

leadership of the company. “This is an exciting

day for Georgia Theatre Company,” said Chambliss.

“Employee-owned companies are renowned

as some of the world’s best companies to work for,

and we are honored to be joining the list.”

Artists Den & CineLife

Partner on Cinema Series

CineLife Entertainment, a division of Spotlight

Cinema Networks, has signed a partnership with

Artists Den Entertainment to host its Emmy-nominated

television music series, “Live from the Artists

Den,” as an in-cinema feature this year. The series

will be a selection of shows from the brand’s extensive

catalog and a mix of new seasons for the series.

This partnership further expands Artists

Den’s global reach and provides music content to

CineLife Entertainment, Spotlight Cinema Networks’

newest event-cinema division. Audience

members are randomly selected through ticket

sweepstakes for live Artists Den shows, available

exclusively via the Artists Den mailing list.

Unlike other televised music series, “Live from

the Artists Den” unveils new, unexpected venues

for each concert, with the venue serving as the

co-star alongside each featured artist.

This partnership allows consumers access to

experience these unique shows, featuring extraordinary

artists performing in nontraditional, often

historic settings that are complemented by the art

house cinemas they will be shown in.

“We can’t think of a better partner for our series

than Spotlight and CineLife Entertainment,

who specialize in bringing cultural audiences

around the country together with important art

house theaters,” said Mark Lieberman, CEO, Artists

Den Entertainment. “Given our major focus

on the sense of place in our shows, this is an ideal

alignment for Artists Den in cinema.”

GTC EMPLOYEE-

OWNED

Georgia Theatre

Company ranked

as the #18 circuit in

Boxoffice Pro’s 2020

Giants of Exhibition

8 / MARCH 2020


TRADE TALK

Multicines Opens

First 4K RGB Laser Cinema

in Ecuador

Ecuador’s first cinema equipped with 4K RGB

laser projection has opened in the Condado

de Quito shopping mall. The integrator CES+

(Cinema Equipment & Supplies) recently

installed a Christie CP4330-RGB projector with

RealLaser illumination in the MCX Multicines

Xtreme theater.

The new theater, part of the Multicines exhibition

chain, has 257 premium seats, a 15-meter

screen, and Dolby Atmos sound. “With this new

theater we wanted to replicate the quality of image

and sound that film directors and producers

aspire to convey in their movies,” said Gonzalo

López, general manager of Multicines. “The fact

we have introduced the first 4K RGB laser cinema

theater in Ecuador reinforces our reputation as

leaders in technological innovation, which is part

and parcel of Multicines’ DNA.”

López also took note of “the economical operating

costs of the projector with its low energy

consumption and maintenance, which help to

safeguard our company’s bottom line.”

When Multicines began operating in Ecuador

in 1996, it pioneered the use of new technology

and multi-theater complexes in the country. It

currently has 54 screens in different cities around

the country, many of them equipped with Christie

cinema projectors.

ICA Partners with Eclair

The Independent Cinema Alliance (ICA)

and the Cinema Buying Alliance (CBA) have

announced a partnership with Eclair USA

to include Eclair’s DCP delivery platform

EclairPlay in ICA’s portfolio of discounted

product offerings for its exhibitor membership.

Current Eclair contracted exhibitors that join

ICA will also receive a discounted membership.

“The partnership with Eclair is our first step in

bringing a valuable specialized content program

to our members,” said Rob Del Moro, managing

director of the CBA. “Eclair is a leader in the

industry that is already serving numerous

independents worldwide.” The CBA is an entity

wholly owned and managed by ICA.

“Like the ICA, Eclair considers the independent

exhibitor our core customer, and we look

forward to working with the ICA and CBA to

bring new efficiencies to support those cinemas,”

said Chris Sharp, general manager of Eclair USA.

Developed specifically with independent

exhibitors in mind, EclairPlay provides cinemas

4K RGB

LASER

PROJECTION

Multicines

Xtreme theater

is the first of its kind

in Ecuador.

10 / MARCH 2020


UPCOMING EVENTS

CinemaCon

Caesars Palace

Las Vegas, Nev.

March 30–April 2

North Central

States NATO

Sheraton West

Des Moines, Iowa

April 20–April 22

Mid-Atlantic NATO

“Cinema Show

& Tell”

Maryland Live!

Hotel

Arundel Mills–

Hanover, Md.

May 13–14

ShowCanada

The Explorer Hotel

& Chateau Nova

Yellowknife

Yellowknife, N.W.T.

May 26–28

CINEMA STUDIES

QSC’s online course

for cinema engineers

with access to a wide range of first-run specialized

film and event-cinema product from a growing

list of distributors, with DCPs available for

secure download from its website. The platform

gives exhibitors a cost-efficient solution to order

and receive both trailers and features and an

electronic delivery option for independent and

specialty titles unavailable by satellite or other

digital means.

QSC Introduces New Training

for Q-SYS Cinema Applications

QSC has recently implemented Q-SYS Level

One for Cinema, a modular online course specially

constructed for cinema engineers who want to

learn how to use Q-SYS in cinema auditoriums.

Students will learn the basics of designing

a multiplex cinema with the Q-SYS ecosystem

while receiving an overview of Q-SYS designer

software. Much of the course material is shared

with the Q-SYS Level One training, but users

will also learn about peripherals and components

that are exclusive to cinema applications.

The six-module course covers topics ranging

from basic Q-SYS ecosystem for cinema introduction,

including hardware introductions to Q-SYS

core cinema processors, the DCIO, and DPA-Q

Series network amplifiers, to user control interfaces.

The curriculum culminates with a walkthrough

of an entire cinema design signal path

and troubleshooting exercise, with each student

receiving written feedback on the final exam from

cinema training experts. The course provides

students with 4.0 InfoComm CTS RU credits.

Additionally, it is a prerequisite for purchasing

Q-SYS products and for attending advanced

Q-SYS training.

MARCH 2020 / 11


TRADE TALK

CINEMARK

BRINGS THE MOVIES

BACK TO SALEM, N.H.

Cinemark Holdings

Inc. has opened

a brand-new 12-

screen theater,

located adjacent to

The Mall at Rockingham

Park, in Salem,

New Hampshire.

Cinemark

Rockingham Park is

the first Cinemark

theater in New

Hampshire, and it

marks the return

of first-run films to

Salem after 17

years.

All auditoriums

offer reserved

seating and feature

Cinemark’s heated

Luxury Lounger

recliners in addition

to immersive wallto-wall

screens,

advanced sound

systems, enhanced

food offerings, and

an XD premium

large-format auditorium.

“We are excited

to celebrate the

opening of our

first Cinemark

New Hampshire

theater right in the

heart of the Salem

community,” said

Mark Zoradi, CEO,

Cinemark. “We’re

always developing

new ways to augment

the entertainment

experience

for our guests, and

this new multiplex

will provide our

Salem guests with

innovative theater

technology as well

as a multitude of

food and beverage

offerings for the

optimal viewing

experience.”

“The Q-SYS training program has become

a benchmark for the AV industry,” said Patrick

Heyn, senior director of system marketing and

training. “We are proud to bring the same engaging

curriculum style and deployment methodology

to our cinema integrators, consultants, and

venue owner community.”

SMG Announces Expansion

in 2020

Dallas-based Studio Movie Grill (SMG) has

announced its plans to open five new locations

during the first three quarters of 2020: Fort

Worth, Texas (SMG Chisholm Trail, opening

Q2); Atlanta (SMG Northpoint, opening Q2);

Sacramento, California (SMG Citrus Heights,

opening summer); Philadelphia (SMG Willow

Grove, opening summer); and Richmond, Texas

(SMG Aliana, opening Q4). All are markets in

which SMG already has a presence.

“We are extremely excited to confirm further

expansion for SMG in 2020,” said COO Ted Croft

in a statement. “New locations will add 62 screens

to our existing 353 screens operating nationwide,

bringing our screen count to over 400. Not only

does this expansion offer SMG and our guests

more screens and seats, it also allows us to grow

our outreach into the communities we serve.”

Of particular note among the new theaters is

SMG Aliana, near Houston, which, per SMG’s

official press release, will “be a new prototype

THE MOTION IS PASSED

D-Box Technologies will code

Onward, Mulan, and Top Gun:

Maverick, among other major

releases for 2020.

for SMG and house 12 screens and 1,160 luxury

recliners, plus an outdoor viewing area for movies

on the yard.” All five theaters will have luxury

recliners and SMG’s signature dine-in menu.

D-Box Announces Slate

for First Half 2020

D-Box Technologies Inc. will release a new

slate of movies in the first half of 2020 that has

been coded using D-Box’s motion technology.

The company is planning to add its motion

technology to 80 titles, including movies from

the international market (Europe, South America,

Asia, and Southeast Asia).

Among these are Onward: March 6; Bloodshot:

March 13; A Quiet Place Part II: March 20;

Mulan: March 27; Trolls World Tour: April 17;

Black Widow: May 1; Greyhound: May 8; F9 The

Fast Saga: May 22; Wonder Woman 1984: June 5;

Top Gun: Maverick: June 26; Ghostbusters: Afterlife:

July 10; and Morbius: July 31.

“The ongoing collaboration with all these

different film studios is proof that our motion

technology works with all types of feature films

including action, thrillers, horror, epic dramas,

family, and adventure,” said Claude Mc Master,

president and CEO of D-Box. “We are excited to

offer moviegoers an unprecedented opportunity

to enjoy the latest blockbusters in an entirely

new and innovative way for an unforgettable

night out.”

12 / MARCH 2020


‘HAMILTON’

TO THE BIG SCREEN

Daveed Diggs,

Okieriete

Onaodowan,

Anthony Ramos,

and Lin-Manuel

Miranda

JOAN MARCUS

Disney to Release

‘Hamilton’ to Theaters

The Walt Disney Company, Lin-Manuel

Miranda, Jeffrey Seller, and Thomas Kail have

announced an agreement for the worldwide distribution

rights that will bring the 11-time-Tony

Award–, Grammy Award–, Olivier Award–, and

Pulitzer Prize–winning stage musical Hamilton to

cinema screens. The film will be released by The

Walt Disney Studios in the United States and

Canada on Oct. 15, 2021.

Producers for Hamilton, the film of the original

Broadway production, include Miranda, Seller,

and Kail, who also directs.

“I fell in love with musical storytelling growing

up with the legendary Howard Ashman–Alan

Menken Disney collaborations—The Little Mermaid,

Beauty and The Beast, Aladdin,” Miranda

said. “I’m so proud of what Tommy Kail has been

able to capture in this filmed version of Hamilton—a

live theatrical experience that feels just as

immediate in your local movie theater. We’re excited

to partner with Disney to bring the original

Broadway company of Hamilton to the largest

audience possible.”

so it is particularly rewarding to launch our 10th

California location here,” said Luis Olloqui, chief

executive officer of Cinépolis Luxury Cinemas.

“We’re excited to introduce our latest building

design, featuring an expanded bar area and new

chef-driven menu, to a community that has been

so supportive of us over the last eight years.”

Theater auditoriums at Cinépolis Luxury

Cinemas La Costa Town Square will offer guests

fully reclining leather seats, a full gourmet menu,

and in-theater waiter service available via the push

of a button. An upscale lounge-style lobby area anchors

the entry space and provides seating options

for guests to mingle and relax before and after a

movie. Cinépolis will also offer a full bar menu

that includes craft beer, specialty cocktails, and a

hand-selected wine program. New to the menu are

the “bottomless” options such as bottomless sodas,

bottomless Icees, and bottomless popcorn: one

size at one price with endless same-stay refills.

LUXURY SEATS,

GOURMET MENU

The Cinépolis

Luxury Cinemas

La Costa Town Square

Cinépolis Luxury Cinemas

Debuts New Cinema in San Diego

Cinépolis Luxury Cinemas has officially opened

the Cinépolis Luxury Cinemas La Costa Town

Square. The 33,368-square-foot, eight-screen,

570-seat luxury concept, located in Carlsbad, California,

will serve as the entertainment anchor for

the La Costa Town Square shopping center. The

Carlsbad Chamber of Commerce celebrated the

opening on February 7 with a ribbon-cutting ceremony

that included music, prizes, and giveaways.

“We opened our first U.S. cinema in San Diego,

MARCH 2020 / 13


MEMBER NEWS BY ESTHER BARUH, DIRECTOR OF GOVERNMENT RELATIONS, NATO

AND ALEX RICH, MANAGER OF STATE GOVERNMENT RELATIONS, NATO

BUILDING COMMUNITIES

AT THE MOVIES

NATO STAFF HITS THE ROAD

TO VISIT MEMBER LOCATIONS

Penn Cinema

Lititz, Pa.; Wilmington, Del.;

Huntingdon Valley, Pa.; Ephrata, Pa.

www.penncinema.com

Penn Ketchum, Owner/Usher/Manager

Visit Date: Monday, January 6, 2020

›› In January, my colleague Alex Rich and

I had the delightful occasion to visit with

Penn Ketchum (shown above and at right

at promotional event) at his Penn Cinema

Riverfront 14 + Imax in Wilmington, Delaware.

As we toured his theater, Penn shared his

thoughts on industry trends, what it is like to

open a new theater from the ground up, and

the range of movies exhibited in theaters. Penn

represents the best of NATO’s small-business

members—an imaginative and creative movie

lover who brings that joy to new communities

while maintaining a great sense of humor no

matter what.

Following our visit, Penn was gracious enough

to share some additional background about his

cinemas. We are very pleased to profile him in

this month’s edition of BoxOffice Pro.

What attracted you to the cinema industry, and how

did you start?

My story is simple: I always loved the movies. When I

had the chance growing up, I would go to the movies. I grew

up in Brooklyn so I never did hunt, fish, golf, or whatever;

it was really about the magic of the movies. That began for

me in 1977 when my parents took me to see Star Wars in

Manhattan, and I never looked back. Eventually I got a

grown-up job with a desk and an office, but it was no fun.

Meanwhile, I lived in an area where there was no good movie

theater. So naturally, one day I said, “They should build a

movie theater in Lititz.” I did not know who “they” was, so I

decided to do it myself. I snuck into ShoWest 2004 (literally)

and began learning all about the movie business. I heard

M. Night Shyamalan speak, and I will never forget it. He

spoke so eloquently about the magic of the movies. It was a

wonderful night and really validated all the crazy energy I was

putting into this movie theater idea. My family and I were

taking a lot of risks, so it meant a lot for us to hear him talk

like that. In some ways, it kept us in the game when it was

not easy to keep at it. Eventually, I was able to recruit some

partners and we got it done. Therefore, in November of 2006,

my partners and I opened Penn Cinema and I started in the

movie business as a theater owner/usher/manager all at once.

We opened with Casino Royale and Happy Feet. To say that we

had a steep learning curve would be an understatement, but

we worked it out. It was great.

What do you appreciate most about your customers?

Our customers are amazing. They are so smart, and they

regularly let me know about what is happening out there

beyond the Penn Cinema walls and how they would or would

not like to see certain trends play out in their theater. Yeah, it

is their theater. They love it, they support it, and they see it as

their own, which is really great.

I recently (one year ago) began doing a weekly Penn

Cinema Podcast (available on iTunes, all podcast platforms,

and Facebook). This has been a wonderful experience for me.

It has taken me out of my sometimes-narrow field of vision

related to studios, film rent, schedules, and put me squarely

back in touch with what the movies mean. We record the

show, take listeners’ notes, and sometimes present “live” with

our customers in the audience. It has given me a great chance

to interact with customers at all our locations and a great

place for customers to share their views too. It is a really fun

escape … just like the movies.

Our customers are responsible for so many of our best

innovations. We were among the early adopters on the

Metropolitan Opera series through Fathom Events. We have

enjoyed great success with them. That was an idea that came

from our guests. It is just one example, but often our best

14 / MARCH 2020


ideas begin in the lobby with me chatting with a

customer as I drink my coffee.

I joined my friend (and one of our regular

customers), who bought two tickets to see

Avengers: Endgame in Imax at my movie

theater, and then did the same thing when

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker came out.

We waited in line, got our seats in the soldout,

jam-packed theater, and soaked up

the experience. I’ve worked countless “big

openings” and premieres, and these were the

first two where I took it all in exactly as our

customers did. It was cool. We had a blast

and I recommend the experience to any senior

managers or theater owners who may not have

recently enjoyed this type of experience. It is

awesome in a way that calls back the magic that

M. Night spoke about way back when.

How has your theater grown?

When we opened in 2006, it was a 10-screen

theater and we quickly added four more screens.

Then we installed an Imax. In 2010, we opened

our second location in Wilmington, Delaware

(also 15 screens), and recently opened Penn Cinema

Huntingdon Valley, a 7-plex outside Philly.

My wife and I also took over an old-school

twin in Ephrata, Pennsylvania, called The Main

(www. facebook.com/TheNewMain/). It’s funny

because I have four sites to manage and book

films for, which feels massive to me. I do not

know how you guys with tons of sites manage

it all! However, it is fun and I enjoy working

with the studios. When we opened, we used

a third-party film broker, but we eventually

decided to book our films directly. This has

been great. I love working directly with the

studios and have formed great relationships and

friendships over the years with our “friends in

distribution,” as NATO refers to them. But it’s

true, they are our friends, and they do want

the same things we want, namely to deliver

the best possible content to the most possible

people. Sometimes we have to work through

some things, but in the end it has been a terrific

experience for me. I believe it makes me a better

theater owner for putting in the effort. (“So

then, I say, ‘Hey, Lama, hey, how about a little

something, you know, for the effort, you know?’

And he says, ‘Oh, uh, there won’t be any money,

but when you die, on your deathbed, you will

receive total consciousness.’ So I got that goin’

for me, which is nice.”)

What is your biggest challenge (i.e., does

anything keep you up at night)?

I think the greatest challenge facing anyone

with more than one location is the inability to

be in more than one place at a time. I would love

to be on-site at each theater every day, but that is

just not realistic.

Luckily, our management team is second to

none, and they got it all under control. So with

that challenge sort of under control, I think the

next greatest challenge, and this probably should

be discussed in a deeper way somewhere else,

but I think the exhibition industry faces some

real challenges related to the frequent lack of

choices from certain types of vendors. In many

aspects of our operations, often important ones,

we only have one or two choices. So when there’s

nowhere else to turn it can be frustrating when

the “one vendor” falls short of our expectations,

but maybe there’s nowhere else to turn so we are

left just trying to tolerate subpar service. That

is a real challenge that in many ways limits our

industry’s ability to really excel.

What’s your favorite movie and what concessions

would you have while watching it?

I am a Godfather guy, but I also need to give

a shout-out to Moonstruck, Christmas Vacation,

and Rocky. My most typical movie routine is to

get fresh bagels and hot coffee at my local bagel

shop (what’s up, Dosie Dough!) and go watch a

movie by myself at 7 a.m., or whatever. When

I go out with a gang of friends and either check

up on our colleagues’ operations at another

theater or join the audience in our own theater,

I’m a Twizzlers guy with a water. That is not to

say I have not grabbed an odd box of Goobers

too! I am an easy film critic. Sit me up front

with some treats and I am happy.

PENN KETCHUM

“I recently [one

year ago] began

doing a weekly Penn

Cinema Podcast

[available on

iTunes, all podcast

platforms, and

Facebook]. This has

been a wonderful

experience for

me.… We record

the show, take

listeners’ notes,

and sometimes

present ‘live’ with

our customers in

the audience. It has

given me a great

chance to interact

with customers at

all our locations

and a great place

for customers to

share their views

too. It is a really fun

escape … just like

the movies.”

MARCH 2020 / 15


INDIE FOCUS

SPONSORED BY SPOTLIGHT CINEMA NETWORKS

Broadway Metro

Eugene, Oregon

CONTRIBUTOR: EDWARD SCHIESSL, MANAGING DIRECTOR

EDWARD SCHIESSL

“We do everything

we can to

subsidize and incentivize

community

groups, festivals,

and local filmmakers

to make our

venue their home

for screenings

and other social

events.”

SINGLE-SERVING

PLASTICS BEGONE!

Bulk candies

are served in compostable

cups.

SCREENS

7 Screens / Total Capacity: 329

TOP HISTORICAL TITLES

What We Do in the Shadows holds the record

for our longest run of 26 weeks (Free Solo came

close at 22 weeks). The Shape of Water, Moonlight,

Manchester by the Sea, Hunt for the Wilderpeople, I,

Tonya, and Birdman are also among our top-grossing

films.

HISTORY

In 2010, my partners and I bought Eugene’s

only art house—a 30-year-old 200-seat twin

cinema housed in a historic chapel—from the

estate of the cinema’s late founder. Having worked

at the theater for several years, we were already well

aware of the struggle we would face operating a

twin cinema in today’s market and immediately set

about building a supplemental location. This took

shape as a tiny “boutique miniplex” in the heart

of Eugene’s newly revitalized downtown. The new

venue—dubbed The Broadway Metro—initially

housed just four screens ranging in size from 20 to

34 seats, with standard concessions fare, and both

digital and 35-millimeter film projection systems.

The plan was to use the venue mostly for moveovers

and niche-market product, as well as classic

and genre series, but the community

response was so overwhelmingly

positive that it quickly began outperforming

the flagship location.

While our original twin cinema

continued to struggle, packed

houses and turn-aways were common

year round at the Metro—even

on weeknights—so

we decided to refocus our

energies and transferred

ownership of the twin to a former partner.

Now, just a few short years later, not only have

we expanded the Metro into an adjacent property,

but we’ve upgraded the experience in every way

possible. With seven screens totaling over 300

seats, deluxe stadium-style seating in auditoriums

of every size, a comfortable lounge and dining area,

and splashy lobby decor, we can now offer an experience

unlike any other available in our area.

COMMUNITY

Our business has long been reliant on the

senior community—and they’re still a substantial

part of our audience—but after years of trying to

attract a younger audience, our efforts are finally

starting to pay off. Being a part of the downtown

nightlife has helped us appeal to a younger crowd,

and maintaining an energetic programming mix of

both art house and mainstream product has helped

make college students and 30-somethings our core

demographic.

We do everything we can to subsidize and

incentivize community groups, festivals, and local

filmmakers to make our venue their home for

screenings and other social events. Supporting

local visual artists and facilitating visual literacy as

much as possible is our way of giving back to the

community, and making ourselves available as a

hub for any and all cinema-related events benefits

us by bringing in fresh faces all the time.

FOOD & BEVERAGE

With the expansion project this summer, we

have added a kitchen and now offer a wide variety

of house-made food and beverages. Our menu is

mostly made up of finger foods—spring rolls,

skewers, dips, paninis, charcuterie,

cookies, etc.—and

was designed

16 / MARCH 2020


INDIE FOCUS

METRO & SPOTLIGHT

“Knowing the

risk of customer

blowback from a

too-long or overly

aggressive preshow

ad reel, I was

happy to learn that

Spotlight allowed

each theater to

curate its national

ad content on a

case-by-case basis

and signed up right

away.”

UPGRADING

FOOD OPTIONS

“With the expansion

project this

summer, we have

added a kitchen

and now offer a

wide variety of

house-made food

and beverages.”

with short ticket times in mind so that food can be

picked up by the customer within minutes of ordering,

avoiding any in-theater disruptions. Another

huge hit coming out of our new kitchen is our delicious

house-made caramel corn, which we can hardly

churn out fast enough to accommodate demand!

As long as we were upgrading the food options,

we decided to move away from bottles and cans and

now make most of our drinks in-house, featuring

such items as fruit-infused iced teas, ginger ale, and

lemonades. We’ve always served craft beer, cider,

and wine but have now added mulled wine, sangria,

boozy slushees, and batch-made cocktails, which we

serve on draft for speed and precision.

All of these offerings are unique to our cinema

and create a sense of excitement and exclusivity

when patrons visit the concession stand. Our per

capita sales for both food and beverage have nearly

doubled since the expansion, and promoting specials

and new products on social media has been a

driver of ticket sales as well.

The other big change we’ve made is a shift

away from single-serving plastics in our concession

stand. In addition to dropping most of our bottled

beverages, we’ve begun buying most of our candies

in bulk and serving them in compostable cups.

Making our business model more sustainable and

decreasing our waste has helped customers feel

good about visiting the theater and less guilty about

spending at the concession stand.

PROGRAMMING

With seven screens, we’ve been doing our best

to cater to as many niche audiences as possible.

Playing smaller releases in our cozy 20-seat rooms,

alongside the newest blockbusters in our largest

rooms, helps us bring in the broadest audience

SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE

“We make our space afforable and partner

with local filmmakers and festival organizers.”

possible. Giving films the breathing room they need

to build word of mouth is a luxury we’ve never had

before, and it has been hugely beneficial for films

like Peanut Butter Falcon (which is currently still

selling out shows in week 12). We make our space

affordable and partner with local filmmakers and

festival organizers to make sure they’re able to put

on successful events, which helps keep a level of

buzz about what’s going on at the Metro—whether

it’s a director Q&A, a local film premiere, or a latenight

genre film, we have something special going

on almost every night.

MARKETING

It’s hard to name a single program that’s been a

major driver for us—we’ve always gone in so many

directions at once. Jumping at every chance to

collaborate or support other businesses and organizations

has served us well and built the broadest

support in our community we could hope for.

There’s just such a wide range of niche markets to

serve, we try to have something for everyone, and

having such a wide range of auditorium sizes makes

accommodating even the smallest events viable.

CINEMA ADVERTISING

On-screen advertising (both our local digital

slideshow and Spotlight’s trailer ads presentation)

18 / MARCH 2020


is one of our largest revenue streams, and Spotlight

Cinema Networks accounts for the lion’s share of

that income. We love having the opportunity to

showcase our local business partners in our digital

slideshow, but Spotlight’s programming is what really

makes on-screen advertising such an important

part of our model.

Knowing the risk of customer blowback from a

too-long or overly aggressive pre-show ad reel, I was

happy to learn that Spotlight allowed each theater

to curate its national ad content on a case-bycase

basis and signed up right away. After I began

reviewing the content, I quickly discovered that

everything Spotlight had to offer was very high end,

often cinematic, and not of the abrasive sort I’ve

experienced in other theaters. At this point it’s been

several years and I’ve never declined an ad placement!

Audiences are happy with the presentation,

we can be proud of what we show, and the extra

revenue helps us keep our ticket and concessions

prices competitive. Everyone at Spotlight is an

absolute pleasure to work with, and I can’t imagine

operating without them as a partner.

UPGRADING THE EXPERIENCE

The Broadway Metro has grown to seven auditoriums from an original four screens.

FACILITATING VISUAL LITERACY

“Supporting local visual artists and facilitating visual literacy as much as possible is our way of giving back to the community,

and making ourselves available as a hub for any and all cinema-related events benefits us by bringing in fresh faces all the time.”

MARCH 2020 / 19


CHARITY SPOTLIGHT

In celebration of

National Popcorn

Day, volunteers

from Cinemark

visited the Boys

and Girls Club of

Plano, Texas. Over

130 youth got to

try Cinemark’s

special “mystery

flavor” popcorn,

play movie trivia

On January 20, Variety of the Desert held

the second annual Shottenkirk Desert Lexus Variety

Golf Scramble, presented by Contour Dermatology

at Palm Valley Country Club. It was

a great success, with more than 80 participants

generously supporting Variety and the children

of the Coachella Valley most in need.

games, and hear

“corny” jokes from

Team Cinemark. The

children left their

after-school program

with fun prizes

and smiles on their

faces. Elsewhere in

Plano, volunteers

from Cinemark

visited all 13 of the

city’s fire stations to

hand out four tasty

flavors of Cinemark

popcorn. The first

responders were

delighted to receive

the treat.

Amy Poehler helped Lollipop

Theater Network make Christmas Day

a little bit more joyful for some special

kids and families. She joined Lollipop in

a visit to Hassenfeld Children’s Hospital

in New York City and made it extra special by

enlisting the support of her friends at Xbox, who

gifted the kids with their own consoles.

Variety of Detroit’s Sliders, Spuds &

Soup(er) Bowl was held January 24 at the

Townsend Hotel. Nine restaurants competed in

a friendly competition. Proceeds raised from the

event support Variety of Detroit’s six core programs,

helping local children who have special

needs or are disadvantaged. Pictured (l–r) are

Variety of Detroit co-chair Dante Rosa, president

David King, and co-chair Aubrey Tobin.

On December 20, Lollipop Theater Network

brought artists from DreamWorks Animation

to spend some time with the children at

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. They created some

wonderful artwork and even incorporated one of

the kids into her very own drawing!

20 / MARCH 2020


GEORGIA THEATRE COMPANY

EMPOWERS ITS EMPLOYEES TO GIVE BACK by Rebecca Pahle

In the aftermath of 9/11, NATO helped

organize a one-day event that saw theaters

nationwide donate 100 percent of their ticket

and concessions sales to those affected by the

attacks. One of the participating theaters was

the Georgia Theatre Company. In 2004, the St.

Simons Island–based chain decided they liked

the idea so much that they were going to bring it

back. There are some changes to the initiative—a

new name, Cinema for a Cause, and different

organizations that benefit—but the spirit of

charity is the same.

Cinema for a Cause celebrated its 16th

year on September 29, 2019; all 25 of the

Georgia Theatre Company’s locations,

spread across Georgia, Florida, South

Carolina, and Virginia, participated. As in

the 2001 event, 100 percent of ticket and

concessions sales on that day were donated to

charity. The total 2019 sum was $179,902; add all

16 years together, and the amount donated to

charity comes to a staggering $1.85 million.

Ten percent of proceeds each year goes to

Variety of Georgia. In a move that strengthens

the connection between individual Georgia

Theatre Company locations and the communities

they serve, each theater gets to choose two local

charities to split the remaining 90 percent. For

the 2019 Cinema for a Cause, 34 charities were

chosen by local theater managers. Those include

local chapters of the Humane Society, Habitat

for Humanity, and United Way, in addition to

the Jacobs’ Ladder Therapeutic Riding Center,

selected by the Valdosta, Georgia, location; Camp

Hooray (“Where Every Camper Can”), selected by

the Commerce, Georgia, location; and the Grace

Gate Free Clinic, selected by Habersham Hills

Cinemas in Mt. Airy, Georgia.

Said Georgia Theatre Company president Bo

Chambliss in a statement following the 2019 Cinema

for a Cause: “We were honored to be able to

give back once again to the communities that support

us. Our employees are the foundation of our

company and interact with their communities on

a daily basis. Georgia Theatre Company is grateful

to allow our employees to select the charities

that matter the most to them to benefit

from this impactful event.”

The benefit provided to

these charities is not just

a short-term infusion

of cash. According to

Kate Sabbe, marketing

manager at Georgia

Theatre Company, the

chosen charities are

invited to set up tables

in the lobby on the day of

Cinema for a Cause, so they can

“have a platform to talk about what they do …

hopefully we’re giving a platform and exposure

to [people they] wouldn’t normally interact with.”

Customers, meanwhile, “get to see where their

money is going.”

To drive attendance—and thus money to the

chosen charities—in the run-up to Cinema for

a Cause, the Georgia Theatre Company works

with its charity partners to market the event.

“We really empower the charities to help us out

with that and reach their local connections,”

Sabbe notes. “I produce all the marketing

material in-house, but we really use them to

help us get the word out. We’ll print posters for

inside the lobby. We find that people come both

because they know about the event, and also

because it’s a Sunday and they want to go the

movies. But we really try to get as many people

in the door as possible.”

MARCH 2020 / 21


Cinemark Theatres was a proud supporter of the recent Dallas Film

Society Fundraiser Luncheon. Established in 2006, the DFS is a nonprofit

organization that exists to celebrate film—the past, present, and future—

in the Dallas community. This year’s luncheon honored producer and

publisher Dallas Sonnier; proceeds went to the DFS’s Mercury One High

School Film Labs series, which gives high schoolers in North Texas handson

experience with various aspects of film production.

The team at Cinemark 18 and XD,

located in Los Angeles, welcomed over 1,000

children and families for their annual Children’s

Holiday Movie event. In partnership

with the Venice Family Clinic and numerous

other sponsors, Cinemark team members

made sure that everyone had a fun time at the

special screening of Dora and the Lost City of

Gold. Attendees enjoyed free popcorn from

Cinemark and Honest juice pouches and

Dasani water provided by Coca-Cola.

The annual event raises funds for the

Venice Family Clinic’s programs for children.

These programs provide educational,

preventive, and health care services through

the clinic’s pediatric medicine programs and

its Children First Early Head Start program.

Special activities at the Cinemark event

included face painting, visits with Santa,

music, and games.

On January 25, in collaboration with Variety – the Children’s Charity, the team at Studio Movie Grill’s new Prosperity Village location in Charlotte, N.C.,

kicked off their Special Needs Screening Series with a bike giveaway. Three-year-old Max and his parents were excited to receive his special adaptive bike.


UPCOMING EVENTS

Variety of the Desert

Dancing with Our Stars

March 1 / Rancho Mirage, Calif.

This dancing competition and

fundraising event—held in the

Agua Caliente Casino’s Cahuilla

Ballroom—showcases local celebrity

and Channel 3 meteorologist

Patrick Evans as Variety of

the Desert’s dancer. The dancer

with the most votes wins! Variety

of the Desert will be filling

two tables at this event, and you

may contact them to purchase a

ticket—including one vote—for

$90. Additional votes are $20.

There is no maximum number of

votes that you may cast. Seats

may be reserved. Votes can

be purchased by contacting

Variety of the Desert at variety@

varietyofthedesert.org or

(760) 773-9800.

Variety of Detroit

SHINE Fashion Show

March 15 / Troy, Mich.

Proceeds from Variety of

Detroit’s SHINE Fashion Show,

held at the Somerset Collection

mall, benefit the summer programs

of FAR Therapeutic Arts &

Recreation and the Variety 4-H

Horseback Riding Program. To

purchase tickets, visit http://

bit.ly/2u4FqaZ.

Get the Latest Headlines

from Theatrical Exhibition

Delivered Directly

to Your Inbox

• Daily Box Office Results

• Box Office Tracking

and Forecasts

• Filmmaker Interviews

• Industry News

• Executive Profiles

boxofficepro.com/subscribe

Pioneers of cinema screen

technology for over 90 years.

#90YearsOfHarkness

harkness-screens.com

harkness.co

31280 184x1121mm_V1.indd 1 22/10/2019 17:47

MARCH 2020 / 23


Digital Decades

GDC TECHNOLOGY CELEBRATES ITS 20TH YEAR

BY REBECCA PAHLE

›› 2020 marks the 20th year in operation for GDC Technology. Over the past two

decades, the Hong Kong–based company has established itself as an industry leader

in supplying digital cinema solutions, including media servers, integrated media

blocks, and theater management systems. As of November 2019, approximately one

out of every three screens worldwide used some type of GDC product. Twenty-five

of the top 30 chains count themselves as GDC customers.


GDC Technology began in 2000—but

its story started years before. In 1996, Texas

Instruments hosted a contest—the DSP

Solutions Challenge—designed to encourage

innovation in digital signal-processing

technology. The team that won the $100,000

grand prize was led by Dr. Man-Nang Chong,

then a professor at Nanyang Technological

University in Singapore. The winning solution

was a semi-automated restoration processing

system whereby damaged motion picture film

could be rid of scratches and marks. Dr. Chong

would continue his work in the film-restoration

field, but he remained intrigued by the advances

being made in digital filmmaking and projection

during that time.

“When I was working in film restoration, I

thought that people would love to restore classics

like Casablanca, Gone with the Wind, Hitchcock

movies, James Bond, Truffaut. ... Then I realized

that the experts in Hollywood were not in the

archival sections of these companies.”

It was the late ’90s. Texas Instruments

debuted its DLP Cinema projector and Star

Wars: Episode I—The Phantom Menace became

the first film to be screened digitally. Dr.

Chong knew that to be on the cutting edge

of cinema technology meant going digital. So

he did just that. “1999 was the year I sold my

SHANGHAI 2001

GDC’s first

Chinese installation

of digital cinema

equipment, paired

with Christie technology

CINITY 2020

A Cinity screen in

China utilizes GDC’s

SR-6400C media

server.

GDC AT 20

Dr. Man-Nang

Chong and images

of the Bona Film

Group’s Joy City

flagship location

(insets), opened in

2018. The facility

boasts ScreenX and

MX4D technology,

two DTS:X

immersive sound

auditoriums, and an

assortment of GDC

Technology products,

among them

the SR-1000 media

server (shown

opposite, inset),

Cinema Automation

CA2.0, and the SCL-

2000 Centralized

Playback Server.

MARCH 2020 / 25


motion picture restoration company to

Da Vinci [Technologies]. I registered

a company to manufacture equipment

and develop solutions for digital

cinemas.” In 2000, GDC Technology

was officially born.

That same year, GDC Technology

became the first company to develop a

software-based digital cinema server,

allowing theaters to gain access to movies

digitally, without spending thousands

of dollars per film print. That

high cost was particularly prohibitive

for exhibitors in China, who at the

time could typically only afford “a few

hundred prints per blockbuster” at the

maximum, explains Dr. Chong. “I saw

the opportunities. I also went to India.

These are developing countries that

cannot afford to make too many analogue

prints. So I thought that the solution

would be to use digital cinemas.”

“We started early” compared

to other companies working in the

digital cinema space, he notes. “But I

thought the quality was good. … In

those days, the projector’s resolution

was not 4K. Not even 2K. It was

1.3K.” All the same, “I thought that

the digital prints were definitely better

than the film release prints. And the

sound was so great, because it was

always 5.1 uncompressed PCM [pulsecode

modulation] audio. I thought

everything was great. I thought it was

ready! [But] the cost of equipment was

high; it was possibly almost 10 times

the price of what projectors and media

servers would cost today.”

“Year after year, the market for

digital cinema didn’t take off,” he says.

In fact, GDC Technology lost money

for its first nine years. Dr. Chong likens

digital cinema at the time to PLF (premium

large-format) cinema today: a

premium experience. Still, GDC stuck

it out, holding to Dr. Chong’s philosophy

of “listening to what the customer

wants and what the industry needs.”

In an era when so much of filmmaking

was increasingly going digital, the industry

needed an alternative to expensive,

analogue projection norms, even if

it didn’t realize it yet.

During the first half of GDC’s exis-

26 / MARCH 2020


tence, the company made technological

strides, although it didn’t make money.

In April 2002, they paid for two DLP

Cinema projectors and installed them

with GDC servers at China’s first two

digital theaters, which in turn screened

the country’s first digital print. In 2003,

GDC introduced the DSR Digital

Film Agile Encoder and DSR Digital

Film Server, the first server capable of

handling 2K resolution. Also in 2003,

GDC digital servers entered the U.S.

with an installation of its DSR server

at the AMC in Santa Monica, California.

In 2004, GDC brought 2K servers

to Korea and China; in 2006, GDC

servers were used for the Asian premiere

of Columbia Pictures’ 3-D release

Monster House. By the following year,

the company signed an agreement with

the China Film Group to install 700 2K

digital cinema projection systems across

the country. By the end of 2007, more

GRAND CINEMA SUNSHINE LOBBY

In July 2019, the Grand Cinema Sunshine

in Tokyo installed GDC’s Cinema

Automation 2.0 (CA2.0) and SR-1000

Standalone Integrated Media Block with

CineCache, designed to fully automate

workflow.

AND PROJECTION ROOM

The GDC XSP-1000 in the projection room

than 1,000 GDC 2K servers had been

installed worldwide.

Then came the turning point. With

the introduction of the virtual print

fee, which allowed theaters to upgrade

to digital projection with financial

assistance from a coalition of major

studios, exhibitors in North America

transitioned to digital projection en

masse within a relatively short span

of time. “The market did not take off

until 2008, when the VPF business

models championed by Hollywood

was accepted by exhibitors for only

one good reason: 3-D,” says Dr.

Chong. “3-D really created a catalyst

for exhibitors to quickly jump on the

bandwagon” of digital projection.

Though the high cost and

unfamiliar technology initially bred

skepticism among some exhibitors,

“after they saw the big box office—I

believe at that time 3-D ticket prices

were 25, 30 percent more than the

average ticket price—everyone jumped

in.” And GDC Technology, with years

of developing digital tools for cinemas

already under its belt, was more than

ready to meet them.

When the shift to digital happened,

“we were fortunate enough to be in a

position to mass produce equipment.

In the heydays of 2008 and 2009, we

were producing close to 10,000 media

servers a year. Before that, selling one

digital cinema screen was like, ‘Wow!’

A big celebration. Selling 10 meant we

were having champagne!”

Growth from there

was exponential, both

in North American and

in Asian markets. GDC’s

first major U.S. contract,

inked in April of 2009,

was to install 99 servers

for Premiere Cinemas. In

December of that year, GDC

signed VPF agreements with

major studios and contributed

to the digital transition of

major cinema chains in Japan

and Hong Kong. A year later,

GDC’s VPF program expanded

to North and South America. By

2007, as previously noted, GDC

had installed more than 1,000

2K servers worldwide; fewer than five

years later, in 2011, that number had

ballooned to 10,000-plus.

The technological innovations,

too, kept on coming. In 2004, with

a grant from Singapore’s Media

Development Authority (MDA), GDC

installed the world’s first entirely

digital cinema multiplexes with GDC’s

TMS (Theater Management System).

In 2010, GDC provided a live-content

decoder plug-in for its media servers,

installed at Lotte Cinema for the

Live 3D FIFA World Cup. In 2015,

partnering with DTS Inc., GDC

produced and installed the world’s first

DTS:X media servers in China. The

world’s first DTS:X-encoded movie,

Monk Comes Down the Mountain,

premiered in Beijing immediately

following the installations. In 2017,

in collaboration with Samsung, came

the world’s first LED screen, installed

at the Lotte Cinema World Tower in

Seoul, South Korea.

And then, last year, the

announcement of the Cinity Cinema

System: a combined venture among

GDC, Huaxia Film, and Christie

Digital Systems meant to encourage

advanced filmmaking formats. Director

Ang Lee’s Gemini Man—filmed in

120FPS, 4K, 3-D—was released with

the support of the GDC SR-6400C

media servers, capable of running

240FPS, 4K, 3-D footage with two

projector systems.

On the subject of Cinity, Dr. Chong

says, “We had the computing power

already. No one had really approached

us until Huaxia and Ang Lee said that

they really believe in this super-realistic

type of motion picture exhibition. I

saw the demonstration. I thought it was

like a different canvas altogether. The

3-D, the high brightness, high dynamic

range, and high frame rate, it makes

the exhibition of the movies so real. …

We created the technology as if it were

a new canvas for painters. Sometimes

you have to be patient. You create the

technology, you create the canvas, and

you wait. Some great artist will come

and paint a good picture, tell a good

story, and people will enjoy it.”

Cinity, notes Dr. Chong, represents

MARCH 2020 / 27


the “high end” of digital projection.

But it’s by no stretch of the imagination

the only arena that GDC is interested

in. The company has worked with Sony

and Texas Instruments, Dr. Chong

notes, to “produce projectors that are

quiet and light enough—and have

DCI compliance—to be installed in

the home, in hotels, [and] in small-size

mini-theaters. Because these are lowbrightness

projectors in the range of

5,000 lumens with a laser light source,

they are very reliable.” Their 35dB

ambient noise means “they’re quieter

than air conditioners.” Oftentimes,

these projectors are small enough so

as to not require a standard projection

booth; that was the case with Cinema

Automation 2.0, a fully automatic,

boothless cinema presented by GDC at

CineAsia 2017.

The smaller, more compact

projection and integrated media block

technology that GDC is developing

opens the door for nontraditional

exhibition options. Dr. Chong touts

iconic department store Selfridges in

the U.K., which in autumn of 2019

announced that it will add a cinema to

its London flagship location.

“These are small theaters where

the height of the ceiling is no more

than 12 to 15 feet,” Dr. Chong says of

these more compact locations. “Both

Texas Instruments and Sony saw the

opportunity and approached GDC

in 2017. We believe we have the best

technology in terms of making the

media servers reliably and also making

them cost effective enough to be used

for different markets.”

It’s that diversity of formats—ev-

JOY CITY

The Kids Theater

of the Bona Film

Group’s flagship

location

28 / MARCH 2020


erything from a theater in a department

store to the world’s first LED

screen—that Dr. Chong says he loves

about the movie industry, and what

GDC is able to contribute to it. “I see

cinemas evolving to meet different

needs,” he explains. “The old days of

one gigantic screen for everyone to

watch has evolved into different forms.

Hopefully GDC will be relevant in

whatever forms [cinema] keeps evolving

into, whether it’s high end like Cinity

or mini-theaters. I hope to play a part

in this exciting growth.”

GDC’s 2019 SCHOLARS

GDC Looks to the Future

With Computer Science Scholarship

“I believe in scholarship. I benefited from it,” says Dr. Man-Nang Chong. The

future chairman, CEO, and founder of GDC Technology studied in Scotland in

the 1980s, specializing in electronics and later computer science and image processing.

Because he did not come from a wealthy family, Dr. Chong would later

reflect, without financial assistance he would not have been able to “complete

my Ph.D. I would not have been able to achieve what I have achieved today and

have contributed to the digital cinema industry.”

In 2012, Dr. Chong began paying it forward with its GDC Scholarship.

Granted to between 30 and 50 students every year, the scholarship is given

in cooperation with the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC)

to undergraduate and postgraduate students from three USTC colleges: the

School of Computer Science and Technology, the School of Information Science

and Technology, and the School of Software Engineering.

The scholarship, explains Dr. Chong, is a way for him to “repay society” for

the help he was given decades prior. More than that, however, the GDC Scholarship

is intended to “encourage today’s engineers or engineers-to-be to think

more about media technology,” specifically when it comes to cinemas. “We

wanted to [encourage] bright engineers to think about what they can do for the

industry—not just apps or other technology!”

“I think education is so important,” continues Dr. Chong. “It can change a

person.” Through the GDC Scholarship, Dr. Chong says he hopes to motivate,

encourage, and inspire future innovators in the cinema-technology industry.

“We hope to continue to contribute and to make exhibitors and moviegoers

happy,” he says. “Most important are the moviegoers, [that they] experience

these new technologies in the cinema, so they keep coming back instead of

watching movies on their iPads, their phones, or their tablets. This is what we

want to do:”—through GDC’s technology and its contributions to future generations—“make

[theaters] innovative to bring in more moviegoers.”

MARCH 2020 / 29


The Sound

A Quiet Place Part II

Sound Editors Speak Up

BY JESSE RIFKIN

›› Behind Simon and Garfunkel, the second

most famous duo associated with “the sounds

of silence” may be Erik Aadahl and Ethan

Van der Ryn. The sound editors sculpted the

auditory environment of 2018’s breakout

horror-drama A Quiet Place, about a family

of four attempting to silently survive a world

overrun by blind predatory creatures with

acute hearing. The pair earned an Academy

Award nomination for Best Sound Editing

for their work.

The duo returns for director John

Krasinski’s sequel, A Quiet Place Part II,

in theaters March 20 from Paramount.

Our phone interview got off to an

inauspicious start—their voices were

barely audible due to a weak cell phone

connection. After reconnecting a minute

later on a landline, Van der Ryn quipped,

“We were in a quiet place.”

A QUIET PLACE PART II

SOUND EDITORS SPEAK UP

A Quiet Place, more than perhaps any other film in

recent memory, elicited nearly total silence in the theater.

Moviegoers wouldn’t so much as open their soda bottles.

Did you keep that in mind when doing the sound design?

Ethan Van der Ryn: It was a question in our minds the

whole time, when we were mixing and designing the sound

during the original: Would people be able to stay quiet

enough for the film to actually work? If people are making

too much sound, they’re going to obliterate the story and the

experience, which requires people to be completely silent. It

© 2019 PARAMOUNT PICTURES

30 / MARCH 2020


of Silence

ALL QUIET

From left: Millicent Simmonds,

Noah Jupe, and Emily Blunt

in A Quiet Place Part II

MARCH 2020 / 31


was an experiment, in a way, whether or not that could work.

Fortunately, it did.

Erik Aadahl: Our goal was really to make the audience an

active participant in the movie, putting the audience in the

shoes of the character. When Emily Blunt’s character, Evelyn, is

holding her breath, trying not to make a noise, ideally we’d have

the audience do the exact same thing. We didn’t really know if

the whole thing would work until we premiered it at South by

Southwest. A packed auditorium and the audience just went

with it. They were holding their breath until the very end. It was

such a vindication for this crazy experiment.

What was similar or different about working on the

sequel versus the original?

Van der Ryn: In the first one, we were setting up this

whole universe where creatures have taken control of the earth.

Humanity has had to adapt to be able to survive, by staying

silent. We worked on creating and setting up all the rules of

this whole universe. Obviously, with this one, because it’s a

direct continuation of the story, we have this established set of

rules in which to start playing. We don’t have to start from the

ground up to create the universe. It’s been created, so we can

just take off from there.

Aadahl: The last film was so successful, we feel like we

caught lightning in a bottle. So the challenge is how do we

top it? How do we take it even further? Not just repeat ourselves,

but create a new experience that’s going to be even more

effective. That was the challenge for everybody involved with

the film, not just for us in sound design, but [director] John

[Krasinski] and the incredible cast.

So how did you try to top it?

Aadahl: If the first film was more intimate, this film definitely

expands beyond the borders of the farm and the homestead.

We’re exploring the world a little bit more. [The trailer opens

with the family speeding down a street as dozens around flee on

foot, already showing more people in one scene than the first

film did in total.] The first film opens a certain time after the

invasion, but in this [film] we get a glimpse of day one. That was

pretty fun to work on. Our challenge as a sound designer is, how

do we expand upon the vocabulary and behavior of these creatures,

go deeper with it? There were a lot more moments where

we could play with that tension.

What was the hardest individual sound to create?

Van der Ryn: With the first film, we had to invent the

creature sounds from scratch—something nobody had ever

heard before, reverse engineering their biology. Knowing that

they use sound to navigate the world, that they’re blind, we

developed their palette of sound based on other living creatures

that have a similar use of sound to navigate the world.

For example, animals with echolocation or sonar. It was quite

an experiment, going through and trying things, playing with

sounds of dolphins and whales and bats. All of them use a similar

clicking to reflect objects in their environment, so through

sound they can paint a three-dimensional map. Eventually, we

SILENT FILM

Cillian Murphy

in A Quiet Place Part II

stumbled upon a stun gun, which had this really creepy alien

feel. It was an electric Taser, essentially, that became the spine

of our echolocation sound.

Van der Ryn: We were playing around with this stun gun,

trying to use it on different props that we had lying around our

studio. There were some grapes sitting on a table in the kitchen.

We tried it against the grapes and got the best sound. Grapes

have a thin skin and fleshy interior, similar to humans. So that

ended up being what we used. We just stumbled into that by

accident. That’s why this is a great job! Play is required.

What’s the strangest thing you’ve ever done to create

a sound in a movie?

Aadahl: I was working with Ethan on the first Transformers.

We’d had a late night and I pulled into my driveway at home.

I stepped out of the car and a garden hose was lying out. I

stepped on it in such a way that the liquid in the hose made a

gurgly sound. It almost sounded like a creature. I grabbed the

garden hose, pulled it inside into the bathtub, started recording

it, and those became the splatty vocals for Bumblebee in all the

Transformers movies. If your ears are open, magic can happen.

How did the sound team work with Marco Beltrami

on the score? [Beltrami, who also scored the first film,

is a two-time Academy Award nominee for The Hurt

Locker and the 3:10 to Yuma remake.]

Van der Ryn: We love working with Marco. He just has

such a big-picture, holistic sense of the film. He’s very gracious

with not just where to play music, but where not to play music,

so we can get really, really quiet, make the audience lean in and

hold their breath. He’s doing a gorgeous job expanding on the

musical themes of the first film.

© 2019 PARAMOUNT PICTURES

32 / MARCH 2020


There’s a beautiful scene in the first film where Lee and Evelyn

slow dance to the song Harvest Moon by Neil Young, listening

through earbuds so they won’t attract the creatures. Whose

decision was that—yours, the music supervisor’s, Krasinski’s?

Van der Ryn: That’s John Krasinski, all the way. He wrote that

into the script, specifically to be that song. He talked about it a little

bit with us. The song was expensive, but it was important to him

that it be that song specifically. It was worth securing the rights to

use it and paying the money. For a lower-budget film to spend that

kind of money on one song was obviously a pretty big deal.

Aadahl: That song has special significance for him and his wife,

Emily. That’s a scene that’s based on their real-life relationship.

Between the two of you, you’ve won or been nominated

for multiple awards, including the Oscars. [The pair has been

nominated jointly for Transformers: Dark of the Moon, Argo,

and the first A Quiet Place]. What’s your best awards show

story?

Van der Ryn: My favorite awards experience was at the

BAFTA Awards [in Britain]. I took my mom. As we were walking

to the ball afterwards, all the photographers there started

calling out, “Dame Judi! Dame Judi!” They thought my mom

was Dame Judi Dench. So she started posing!

Aadahl: Before the Oscars, there’s the nominees’ luncheon.

As my date, I brought my godmother. She lives in Washington

state; she has nothing to do with Hollywood. We were standing

next to Glenn Close, who’s her favorite actress of all time. She

was just freaking out on me. “Can I take a picture?” It was fun

to experience it through her eyes.

Why is it important to see A Quiet Place Part II

in a cinema?

Van der Ryn: One of the unique things we experienced

with the first A Quiet Place was that it really brought back the

idea of cinemagoing as a communal experience. It became such

an interactive experience, where audiences were required to be

completely silent in order for the movie to work. Hundreds of

people were gathered together in this temple of cinema, being

hushed, not talking. That’s such a special experience to have in

this age of streaming.

Aadahl: We got a lot of feedback after the first film, people

mentioning that after they saw it in a theater, after the end credits

they heard the world in a completely new way. The sounds

of traffic, the city. They were almost overwhelmed with the

reality of sound in the world after having gone through this

experience of A Quiet Place. I think it would be a very different

experience to watch it on Blu-ray in your home, when

there might be a washing machine going.

AT THE MOVIES

What is your all-time favorite moviegoing memory or experience?

Aadahl: I grew up in the Bay Area. My parents took me to my very first movie when I was about

5 or 6 years old. It was E.T. on a big, beautiful 70-millimeter screen. That was the first movie I ever

saw in a theater. I still remember that feeling of “Whoa!” This big theater, that giant screen. The

movie moved me so much. I was crying when E.T. was dying. My parents were concerned that maybe

they should take me out of there, but I refused. “No, I have to stay and see this film!” It really

had a profound and powerful effect on me. It’s probably one of the reasons I fell in love with cinema

and went into it.

Van der Ryn: It was the [1971] Nicolas Roeg movie Walkabout, which I saw when I was probably

about 7 years old. It just really engaged me in a way that I had never experienced before, in any

other form. It took me on this incredible journey that involved these two kids, an older sister and

her younger brother, who was probably about 7, so I could relate completely to him. They’re on this

journey across the Australian outback. For most of the movie, there’s no talking. It’s a completely

cinematic experience that you can’t have in any other way, where you’re taken on this journey of

sight and sound.

What’s your favorite snack at the movie theater concession stand?

Aadahl: I’m a popcorn guy. Lightly buttered and lightly salted.

Van der Ryn: Of course, in a movie like A Quiet Place Part II, you have to be careful with the crunching,

or the audience might turn on you.

Aadahl: Junior Mints might work better.

Van der Ryn: Or gummy bears. Something soft.

MARCH 2020 / 33


Uphill Battlers

MICHAEL ANGELO COVINO AND KYLE MARVIN

PLAY COMIC ALTER EGOS IN THE CLIMB

BY KEVIN LALLY

›› The buddy comedy is a venerable movie genre, but there have been few movie buddies like

Mike and Kyle, the duo at the center of the acclaimed Sony Pictures Classics release The Climb.

In the opening scene, as the best friends are cycling in the South of France and schlubby Kyle

rhapsodizes about his pending marriage, Mike blurts out that he’s slept with Kyle’s fiancée.

That’s just the first bump in a decade-spanning relationship that’s equally sustaining and toxic.

Mike and Kyle are actually played

by two best friends, director Michael

Angelo Covino and his co-writer, Kyle

Marvin, in comically heightened versions

of their own disparate personalities. (In a

nutshell, Kyle is the gentle pushover and

Mike is the aggressive one.) What also

distinguishes The Climb is its style: That

bike ride, the confession, and its madcap

aftermath are all filmed in one lengthy,

precisely choreographed single take.

And all the sequences that follow, which

often jump far ahead in time, are also

conceived as elaborate single takes. The

ambitiousness of this low-budget indie,

expanded from a short the pair debuted

at Sundance in 2018, earned it the Un

Certain Regard Jury Coup de Coeur at

last spring’s Cannes Film Festival and the

Jury Prize at the Deauville Film Festival.

The original short comprised the

opening bike ride. “What we realized

as we were rehearsing and eventually

shooting is that those characters were

interesting for us to explore in a longer

story,” Covino recalls. “One character is

very giving almost to a fault and the other

character is selfish to a fault, but they

just had this bond that they couldn’t get

rid of. How would that story play out

over a lifetime? That was the thing that

Kyle and I both responded to so strongly,

that made us want to stop everything we

were doing and figure out how to turn it

into a feature.”

“In the early conversations on the

script,” Marvin notes, “we talked about

doing something like Rope, where you

never cut; you just live in this space. But

we ended up pursuing this version where

we travel over longer periods of time and

utilize a similar sort of camerawork, but

consciously add interruptions in between

to give you a break or a palate cleanse

before we throw you into the middle of

a scene and make the audience catch up

and get immersed again.”

Asked about his decision to use long

takes, Covino half-jokingly responds,

“The simple answer is that I hate editing,

so it just made the whole process

easier. But not really. It adds way more

complexity to shoot it in one take, but it

also simplifies the edit in some ways. But

the real decision came from the fact that

there was this immediacy in shooting the

short that way. We found ourselves not

wanting to look away, to just experience

real time and watch these characters

struggle through this uphill battle while

also struggling through their conversation.

The pacing of the conversation just

felt different than it probably would have

if we were cutting it up and covering

it in a more traditional sense. That was

really exciting.”

An essential partner in making this

concept work was cinematographer Zach

Kuperstein (The Eyes of My Mother). “We

developed a really beautiful relationship

throughout the process of making this

movie,” Covino says. “Sometimes he was

operating when it was handheld, and

other times it was our Steadicam operator,

and he and I just creating this sort

of dance. We considered the perspective

of the camera almost a character within

the scene sometimes. It had to move

differently depending on what feelings

we were trying to convey. In that scene

where the camera wraps around the

house [during a Thanksgiving gathering]

and my character is seeing this family for

the first time after betraying them all,

we got this idea of placing the camera

outside and letting it have an outsider

perspective as we’re watching this person

go through this series of hurdles. There

was a constant conversation with Zach

about how the camera contributed to the

story, communicating additional layers

of emotion.”

Audiences might be forgiven for

thinking Covino and Marvin are playing

themselves. So how close are they to

their onscreen characters? “We’re getting

closer and closer the longer this goes on.

I think we projected our future,” Marvin

jokes. “We have inherent traits which

34 / MARCH 2020


CLIMBING TO THE TOP

Kyle Marvin as Kyle,

Michael Angelo

Covino as Mike

in The Climb

ZACH KUPERSTEIN / COURTESY SONY PICTURES CLASSICS

naturally fed into the characters. In the

short, and then for the feature, we leaned

into them to make them more interesting.

Mike hasn’t slept with my wife, as

far as I know. He’s not normally that

kind of a personality, but there are pieces

of the pushover nature that’s inherent in

me and a piece of the aggressive nature

that’s in Mike. It was fun for us to expand

on it. … Part of the reason why we

used our real names was to blur that line

a little and have this conversation. We

thought it would be interesting.”

Covino and Marvin met 10 years

ago working on a commercial and soon

formed their own commercial production

company. “We’d work together in

various capacities but never as writing

partners,” Covino recalls. “And then one

day, like four or five years ago, we were

just like, why don’t we try writing a pilot

together? And we did that and it actually

felt very seamless. What we turned out

ended up being great, and we sold that

pilot and it was like, oh wow, there

might be something here.”

The duo’s comic heroes include

Monty Python and Jim Carrey. “There’s

something about slapstick,” Covino says.

“When I was little, I dressed up like Charlie

Chaplin almost every Halloween for

some reason. My parents and my grandparents

would lead me into watching old

comedy classics, which is probably part

of why we gravitate toward having deeper

emotional moments in the movie that are

interrupted by physical comedy.”

Marvin adds, “There’s something in

our sensibility about pacing that some

of the greats like Jim Carrey have. They

have an authenticity to their characters,

but they also have a command over

timing and pacing. And that I think is

a mark of good comedy. We were given

the luxury of being able to set up a joke

and then pay it off six minutes later. And

luckily our financiers stood by it. It’s

something that takes a little bit of commitment,

both as a performer and as an

audience member, to just say we’re really

gonna commit to this thing and it might

take more time than we’re used to. Unlike

the new style of American comedy,

where it’s pack as many jokes into this

scene as you can, as fast as possible.”

“That’s the best thing about doing

these long takes in a comedy,” Covino

says, “to not be pressured into cutting

in more jokes. By pacing the movie

slower, it allowed us to be a bit more

patient with our comedy, and therefore

certain jokes land harder. We have the

luxury of what a lot of the great comedic

filmmakers in the past had, people like

Mel Brooks and Mike Nichols—filmmakers

who created film at a time when

there was an inherent level of patience

that was greater than what exists today,

when people would go to a theater and

watch The Deer Hunter and a 20-minute

wedding scene and be OK with it. That

stuff doesn’t really fly as much in cinema

anymore, certainly not in comedy. And

that, at times, can be to a fault, because

half of what makes something funny is

the anticipation of it.”

As huge fans of French cinema, Covino

and Marvin say they were “walking

MARCH 2020 / 35


ON THE PISTE

Gayle Rankin as

Marissa, Kyle

Marvin as Kyle,

Michael Angelo

Covino as Mike

in The Climb

ZACH KUPERSTEIN / COURTESY SONY PICTURES CLASSICS

on a cloud” when The Climb debuted

in Cannes. “We shot the opening scene

30 minutes from Cannes, not really

thinking that would be any reason why

anyone would accept it there,” Covino

says. “But we thought, let’s start it there

and maybe we’ll end it there in some

way. That was a conversation between

Kyle and me: How do we make this

comedy, and how do we make it in a way

that maybe if we knock it out of the park

or pull a rabbit out of a hat, we could

go to Cannes with it? Because that is the

pinnacle of world cinema. That’s where

you immerse yourself in French cinema

and inspire yourself to write your American

love letter to French cinema.”

Sony Pictures Classics acquired the

film during Cannes’s closing weekend.

The company has “a love and appreciation

for film,” Marvin says. “For us they were

a good fit in that they give theatrical support

to films that sometimes need a little

bit of time to find their legs. It’s a great

partnership with someone who’s willing to

put us in theaters and keep us on screens

while people discover the film. Because

Mike and I are not household names, and

it’s a tricky time to go into theaters with

comedies, but they check the exact box

that we were looking for. Someone who’d

be willing to support a film in theaters.”

SPC opens the film on March 20, following

a January 26 simulcast (in partnership

with Trafalgar Releasing) in 10 theaters

of its Sundance screening and Q&A with

the filmmakers.

Covino and Marvin have already

written a TV show and are working on

a new feature script. Will it be similar

to The Climb? “I think everything we

do will be character driven, because

that’s our way into writing,” Covino

says. “There’s a bittersweet quality that

our movie has that we love exploring.

Finding humor in sadness and in darker

kinds of experiences is something that

we gravitate toward. That’s my approach

as a director more than anything. I love

a slower-paced approach to filmmaking,

but I don’t think I would ever make

another movie that has long single takes

for each scene. But certainly there are

elements of that aesthetic we would

incorporate into any movie or show that

we would do.”

Covino recently completed filming

a small role as a villain in News of the

World, Paul Greengrass’s post–Civil War

western starring Tom Hanks. Both he

and Marvin say they’re looking to branch

out as actors. “That’s the thrill and the

joy of creating art,” Marvin says. “To try

and do something different.”

“On that note,” Covino jokes, “we

are going to make The Climb 2.”

36 / MARCH 2020


Indies, Unite

INDEPENDENT CINEMA DAY MARKS

A SUCCESSFUL DEBUT

BY JESSE RIFKIN

›› With North America’s

three largest cinema circuits—

AMC, Regal, and Cinemark—

comprising more than half of all

box office revenue, independent

cinemas face a challenge: how

to attract customers with

conglomerates dominating

so much of the market. To

help them in their goal,

independent cinema owners

looked to Small Business

Saturday, created in 2010 as

an alternative to the more

corporate Black Friday. Could

Small Business Saturday

be replicated for the movie

exhibition business?

This germ of an idea

inspired Independent

Cinema Day, which took

place for the first time on

January 18, 2019. Thirty

exhibitors across North America

participated, representing more

than 400 screens. The day was

organized by the Independent

Cinema Alliance (ICA), a

national nonprofit founded

in 2018 to advocate for the

independent segment of the

exhibition industry.

LOVE LOCAL CINEMA

The Villages Movie Theaters in Florida

leveraged indies’ ability to cater movie

selections to local audiences.

BOX OFFICE UP 20 PERCENT

Cinergy, a five-theater company in Texas

and Oklahoma, employed innovative

marketing strategies, including social media,

to spur interest in Independent Cinema Day.

Getting the Word Out

Judging by the numbers, Independent

Cinema Day was a success. Participating

cinemas used unique marketing tactics to

draw customers in, with a resultant jump

in box office compared to the equivalent

day from previous years. (Some good

timing also helped: Independent Cinema

Day coincided with the Saturday of Martin

Luther King weekend, which saw the

$73 million debut of Bad Boys for Life.)

“I was like, ‘Hey, why don’t we give out

popcorn for everybody?’” recalls Deborah

Mills, director of operations at The

Villages Movie Theaters, which has

three locations in Florida. “Then I

went to the party store and got boas,

hats, and beads for cute photos.

People were taking photos in front of

a sign that said ‘Love. Local. Cinema,’

and posting it on social media.”

The company notched 1,533

attendees at its Old Mill Playhouse

and 2,032 at its Barnstorm Theater

on Independent Cinema Day.

“Our total box office was up a

little over 20 percent compared to the

equivalent Saturday last year,” says

Traci Hoey, V.P. of marketing at Cinergy,

a five-theater company in Texas

and Oklahoma. “Overall, all of our

centers were up compared to last year.”

“It went wonderful!” concurs

Maureen Paquet, co-owner of the Gem

Theatre in British Columbia. “We had

a great time. Although, it was the first

[Independent Cinema Day], so people

are not quite as aware of it as they will be

in future years.”

Standing Out from the Pack

Independent Cinema Day is an

example of independent cinemas using

innovative marketing strategies to differentiate

themselves from the competition.

It’s a necessity that participants in the

campaign were already well aware of.

“Our locations range from 14 to 18

bowling lanes,” says Hoey of Cinergy.

“Half of our locations have escape rooms.

We’re adding ax throwing in Kansas City,

when we’re opening there later this sum-

38 / MARCH 2020


mer. We’ve got laser tag, an above-ground

ropes course, and heated seats.”

To promote the wrestling-themed

Fighting with My Family last February,

The Villages Movie Theaters featured a

live wrestling event starring WWE Hall of

Famer Dory Funk Jr., held in a full-sized

wrestling ring. The Villages also hosted a

military-themed film festival in November,

catering to the large number of

veterans in that area of Florida.

Gem Theatre has hosted live concerts—recent

performers include Beatles

and Abba tribute bands—and holds a

weekly “Freebie Friday” memorabilia

giveaway on its Facebook page. Sony

presented the theater with the winter hat

Jack Black wore in December’s Jumanji:

The Next Level, which the theater in turn

gave away to a loyal fan.

“We’ve done ‘Margarita and a Movie,’

which will take a movie like Bad Moms

and make a big party out of it. [Distributor]

STX [Entertainment] was happy

about it, because we overperformed [relative

to most theaters] with that movie,”

says Rich Daughtridge, president and

CEO of HighRock Group, the marketing

company that spearheaded the Independent

Cinema Day campaign.

Looking Forward

Independent Cinema Day participants

hope to expand upon its initial success

in next year’s iteration, attracting a whole

new legion of customers to its offerings.

But that can only occur if those customers

understand why local cinema is important.

“For a healthy exhibition landscape,

you need a mix of large chains but also

smaller operations,” says Daughtridge.

He maintains that independent cinema

comprises about 20 percent of total box

office revenue. “If independents don’t

continue to thrive, don’t continue to

evolve, the hit on the actual industry

would be significant.”

Independent cinemas can serve as

integral parts of their communities.

“I’ve been in the local movie industry

for almost 50 years,” says Gem Theatre’s

Paquet. “The audience supports

us, and we support them. That’s how

it works in your smaller areas. We do

fundraisers for different organizations

and charities. We do celebrations for

the local hockey team.”

Mills of The Villages cites the ability

of indies to cater movie selections to local

audiences, such as the older demographic

in her part of Florida. “The Bucket List

played here forever, probably like 18

months. Book Club, we had one print and

we were the number one theater [for that

movie] in the country,” she says.

“We’re the gateway to content,” she

continues. “It goes on Netflix, and people

might not watch it. But if we play it here,

they go, ‘Oh, maybe this is actually something.’

[Unlike larger national chains],

we’re not forced to have 14 screens of

Avengers: Endgame.”

“I mean, we were selling Avengers

out,” Mills clarifies. “But we only played

it on one screen.”

DIGITAL SIGNAGE

Integrated Digital Signage,

Concession Signs, Lobby &

Directional Signs, Custom Graphics

MOBILE APP &

WEBSITES

Web Management, Website

Design and Programming,

Online Ticket Purchasing,

Mobile App Development,

Mobile Ticketing Sales

INTERNET TICKETING

Online Ticket Sales with Theatre Branded Interface

Your Complete Theatre

Management Solution

Starts Here!

TICKETING & CONCESSION

POINT-OF-SALE

Touch Screen Ticketing,

Concession Point-of-Sale,

Two-in-One Terminals, Kiosk Sales

& Redemptions, Assigned Seating

BACK OFFICE

MANAGEMENT

Show Scheduling, Inventory,

Cash Control, Remote Access,

Labor Management,

Real-Time Corporate Reports

GIFT CARDS & LOYALTY

PROGRAMS

Gift Cards, Virtual Gift Card

Sales, Customer Rewards

888-988-4470 Sales

FILM RENTAL MANAGEMENT

Automatically Calculate Weekly Film Rental, Create

Payment Vouchers, Settle Films & Manage Credits

NETWORK &

IT SERVICES

Network Support, Hardware

Monitoring, Phone & Surveillance

System Support, ISP Monitoring,

Security & Antivirus

RetrieverSolutionsInc.com

MARCH 2020 / 39


Building

a Bar Area

ALCOHOL SERVICE IN THEATERS

REQUIRES EXTENSIVE

PRE-PLANNING

BY KEVIN LALLY

›› More and more cinemas are adding wine,

beer, and cocktail service to their amenities,

part of an ongoing trend to make a night out

at the movies an even more special occasion.

But what do you need to know before making

this momentous business decision? Michael

Giacinto, director of sales at leading cinema

food-service design, construction, and supply

firm Proctor Companies, has the answers.

What factors should exhibitors consider when deciding

whether to add bar service?

• Can I succeed in the face of my local competition?

• Can I secure a liquor license?

• Do I have enough floor space?

• Am I prepared to manage a bar operation?

If you answered yes to these four questions, you’re a good candidate

for a bar. But to fully succeed with your new bar operation,

you’ll also need to ask:

• Will I be serving wine/beer only, or will I serve mixed drinks

as well?

• Do I intend to serve drinks in-theater?

• What equipment is required to support my bar operation?

• Who should I get to build my bar?

What are the biggest construction and operational challenges

involved?

Let’s look at each of these considerations separately.

The biggest construction challenges are space and infrastructure.

Bars not only take up plenty of square footage, they also require tap

lines for beer, soda lines for soft drinks, floor and sink drainage, and

expanded power and refrigeration capabilities. In

addition, local building codes may dictate special

considerations for venting, lighting, access, or fire

suppression. In the case of new construction, most

of these items can be addressed fairly easily; in the

case of a renovation, they can be particularly challenging.

It all hinges on just what type of bar you

intend to build. Will you be creating a full-service

40 / MARCH 2020


ar and restaurant? A stand-alone bar? A service

bar only? Each of these will dictate different design,

space, and equipment needs.

Operationally, the biggest challenge is working

within the parameters of your liquor license.

Serving alcohol is new to most theaters, so training

your staff to check IDs and recognize the signs of

intoxication is critical to managing the increased

liability that comes with a bar operation. Hiring an

experienced manager and requiring TIPS certification

for all bar employees are highly recommended.

What are the optimal locations in the theater

complex for adding a bar?

In a traditional layout, the most common

bar location is in the lobby near the concession

PLENTY OF GLASS

The Malco

Powerhouse in

Memphis, Tenn.

MARCH 2020 / 41


IN-LOBBY BAR

The Verité Lounge

inside Harkins

Camelview Theatre

in Scottsdale, Ariz.

Don’t forget

the lighting.

The right

lighting

design will

make your

bar look

warm and

inviting ...

after all, you

can’t sell

customers

anything if

they don’t

come in.

stand, visible from the entry. In the case of a

renovation, what was formerly arcade space is

often the best place for the bar. (The ROI for a

bar is far greater than the ROI of an arcade.) In

the case of new construction, the bar is typically

located near the restaurant, if there is one. If

not, prominent placement in the lobby is recommended.

For family entertainment centers, the

bar is often placed near the bowling alley.

Are there particular construction materials

you recommend?

Absolutely! At Proctor Companies, we’ve

found that the first concern must be durability

and maintenance. Otherwise, your brand-spanking-new

bar is likely to look dirty and dumpy in

short order. Fortunately, there are a number of

material options that feature striking colors and

textures—and more are being developed all the

time. For instance, quartz, Okite, and natural

stone countertops are particularly well-suited to

bar applications: They’re beautiful, durable, and

easy to clean. Corian is also a good choice and

can be applied to façades as well.

Stainless steel is a must for under-bar

construction and equipment like sinks, bottle

caddies, and backsplashes. We always specify

18-gauge #403 stainless, which has a slight

grain so it resists showing scratches. For ease of

cleaning, floors should be made of concrete, tile,

or linoleum.

What visual/presentation elements do you

recommend to attract customers and boost

sales?

First, we recommend a bold, branded design.

This will set you apart and provide a compelling

customer experience. For instance, if your bar

carries a tropical theme, you’ll want to include

elements that communicate that right away with

things like thatched palm textures, coconut

trees, and tiki torches. Similarly, a bar with an

African theme may include ceremonial masks, a

zebra-pattern carpet, and a crossed-spear entryway.

Whatever your theme is, don’t be afraid to

transform your establishment into an experience

your customers can get nowhere else.

Second, consider visibility. Seeing people

having fun is the best way to get additional customers

to join the party. So we recommend open

floor plans and plenty of glass.

Finally, don’t forget the lighting. The right

lighting design will make your bar look warm

and inviting so your customers feel welcome;

after all, you can’t sell them anything if they

don’t come in. At Proctor Companies, we use

strategic spot and undershelf lighting to highlight

the items that make you the most money.

42 / MARCH 2020


And we specify ambient and task lighting that

helps your employees work efficiently and avoid

accidents. We strongly recommend Hafele

fixtures. Although they initially cost more than

cheap off-shore knockoffs, they last much longer

and require less maintenance, saving you money

in the long run. Many of our designs feature

backlit or under-lit Corian, which creates a striking

visual effect.

What kind of seating do you recommend?

The type of seating depends on the type

of service you provide. If you’ve got just a bar,

high-top seating is all that is necessary. However,

if you also have cocktail or dinner tables,

you’ll need low-top seating as well.

Once you’ve determined the appropriate

mix of high-top and low-top seating, there are

myriad other factors to consider. Will chairs

and stools need to be moved or reconfigured?

If so, are they heavy, do they fold, will they

scuff the floor? How durable is the seating and

can it be repaired if damaged? After the basics,

you’ll want to delve into the details. Does the

bar have a foot rail or will the bar stools need

built-in footrests? Is a swiveling seat preferred?

Does your seating need to be weather resistant

for indoor/outdoor use? How much space is

available for storing spares? Do they need to

stack? How easily can upholstery be cleaned,

refinished, or replaced? Is the bar floor carpeted

or a hard surface? This determines whether felt,

rubber, plastic, polyethylene, or nylon is the best

foot material.

What else do you recommend to add to the

ambiance?

Make your bar space a place in which your

customers feel as comfortable as they do at

home, where they can share great times with

their friends in a friendly setting. In addition

to a general bar area, create niches and nooks

customers can claim as their own. Define

these areas with different floor heights, colors,

materials, fixtures, lighting, and features. Train

your wait staff to be professional, friendly, and

accommodating. Remember, comfortable is the

new profitable! Your customers will reward your

efforts by staying longer and spending more—so

you can sit back and count the cash.

HERE’S LOOKIN’

AT YOU

Rick’s Café

Americain at

The Palms Theatres

& IMAX in Waukee,

Iowa, part of the

Fridley Theatres

circuit

YOUR SOURCE FOR VENTLESS

KITCHEN SOLUTIONS

MEET US AT

CINEMACON

BOOTH

100J

products.com

1-800-348-2976

MARCH 2020 / 43


Century in Exhibition

2020 marks the 100th

anniversary of the founding

of Boxoffice Pro. Though

the publication you hold in

your hands has had different

owners, headquarters,

and even names—it was

founded in Kansas City by

18-year-old Ben Shlyen as

The Reel Journal, then called

Boxoffice in 1933, and more

recently Boxoffice Pro—it has

always remained committed

to theatrical exhibition.

From the 1920s to the

2020s, Boxoffice Pro has

always had one goal: to

provide knowledge and

insight to those who bring

movies to the public. Radio,

TV, home video, and

streaming have all been

perceived as threats to

the theatrical exhibition

industry over the years,

but movie theaters are still

here—and so are we.

We at Boxoffice Pro are

devotees of the exhibition

industry, so we couldn’t

resist the excuse of a

centennial to explore our

archives. What we found

was not just the story of a

magazine, but the story of

an industry—the debates,

the innovations, the concerns,

and above all the

beloved movies. We’ll share

our findings in our yearlong

series, A Century in

Exhibition.

1940S: GLOBAL CONFLICT AND

CONSENT DECREES

BY VASSILIKI MALOUCHOU

›› The exhibition industry started the 1940s rocked by the

wars in Europe and Asia. World War II would impact where

films could be distributed, what films would be made, and

even how theaters could be run. By the end of the decade,

the U.S. government would turn its attention to something

that remains a hot-button issue for our industry today: the

Paramount Consent Decrees.

Although the United States wouldn’t enter the war until 1941, Boxoffice Pro,

and the industry as a whole, was uninterested in neutrality. As early as fall 1938, Boxoffice

Pro spearheaded the cause of “Americanism” to promote American values,

including patriotism and democracy.

Cecil B. DeMille’s documentary Land of Liberty and John Ford’s Young Mr. Lincoln

emphasized patriotic themes, while films like Confessions of a Nazi Spy and Inside

Nazi Germany took direct aim at Hitler and the Third Reich. Boxoffice Pro owner/

editor Ben Shlyen identified these films as an important part of the war effort. There

were more coming; a July 1939 feature identified at least 42 “Americanism” films slated

for release through the end of the year. In that same piece, editor-in-chief Maurice

“Red” Kann wrote, “No one can successfully argue that the screen should not do

everything in its considerable power to maintain and perpetuate the good things in

the American scene.”

Americanism did not fall on sympathetic ears in Washington, however. In

September 1941, a Senate subcommittee launched an investigation into the motion

picture industry, accusing it of warmongering and of violating neutrality law. Boxoffice

Pro fought back against what it perceived as censorship. Red Kann accused the

committee members of using the industry “as a springboard for an isolationist support

of the administration’s foreign policy.” (And in fact, four out of five subcommittee

members were isolationists.)

Both Shlyen and Kann feared that if studios were labeled as peddlers of propaganda,

it would have catastrophic consequences at the box office. Kann warned that “one

grave danger, perhaps the gravest, confronting the industry is the possibility [that the

probe] may succeed in establishing a link in the public mind between the industry

and propaganda, thereby making suspect whatever Hollywood may produce and

newsreels may report with feared effects on the box office.” Kann also applauded efforts

by the Hays Office to stop the probe, writing, “After years of taking it square on

the chin and folding up under the impact of criticism [...] the industry now discovers

its backbone and returns the blows.”

The motion picture industry did not stand alone in this battle. A survey conducted

by the Hays Office and published in our pages in October 1941 found that

90 percent of editorials in American publications were in support of the motion

picture industry rather than the Senate subcommittee. Editorial support from various

outlets praised the industry’s patriotism and attacked the Senators’ attempt to

curtail freedom of expression.

44 / MARCH 2020


Everything changed with the December 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor. As

the U.S. officially entered the war, the probe was dropped. A few days later, Shlyen

urged the industry to unite, less for its own benefit than for the nation’s welfare.

Soon after, the Motion Picture Committee Cooperating for National Defense, established

in 1940, changed its name to the War Activities Committee and began the

work of supporting the war effort.

Boxoffice Pro ran campaigns to inform exhibitors about how they could

contribute as well. The magazine proved a staunch supporter of many industry-wide

drives to collect money to support refugees and encourage the purchase of war

bonds. Throughout the war, the magazine often ran pleas for theater owners to

conserve and recover precious materials, like copper drippings and aluminum (from

projector arc lamps and other equipment), and offered instructions on how to do so.

The pages of Boxoffice Pro also documented—and often applauded—various exhibitor

efforts to encourage patriotism among their patrons, whether through the use

of lobby displays promoting the purchase of war bonds, running “D for Democracy”

banners on marquees, or hosting training for “airstrike wardens.”

The magazine also kept readers up to date on the grim reality that faced theaters

as the war progressed. With rationing,

popcorn became increasingly scarce. Film

shortages caused frequent delays in film

delivery. Fuel shortages forced theaters to

modify their hours or shut down temporarily.

In 1942, the War Production Board

issued orders forbidding the construction

of new theaters for the remainder of

the war. There was a high cost in terms

of manpower as well, as many in the

industry—from exhibition executives

to lower-level staff—joined the military,

putting them alongside Hollywood stars

like Charlton Heston, Jimmy Stewart, and

Clark Gable.

The exhibition community also faced

a crumbling demand, both domestically

and abroad. Just two weeks after the

start of the conflict overseas, Boxoffice

Pro writers joined studio executives and

prominent exhibitors in calling for a self-sufficiency strategy that would rely solely

on U.S. distribution. In 1940, 20th Century Fox’s Darryl F. Zanuck stated, “We’ve

got a grave responsibility—to place ourselves in a position where we are domestically

self-sufficient. When we have done that—and we must do that—then and only then

we’ll last forever with the destiny of our business in our hands.”

By the first six months of 1940, film exports to Europe were down by six million

feet compared to the same period in 1939. A commentator jokingly wrote that Hitler

controlled the largest theater chain in the world. With Europe in turmoil, the industry

turned to Latin American markets for their exports. In May 1940, Red Kann

estimated that the loss of foreign markets would amount to an annual $50 million

deficit during the war.

As the end of the war approached, the film industry looked to the financial

potential of the liberated markets. In 1943, Boxoffice Pro reported that French

director Julien Duvivier believed that the French, “being an emotional people,

[required] substantial food for their minds,” which “must be supplied” in the form

of American films. That same year, we reported that crowds in Italian theaters were

chanting, “We want American films again.”

After 1945, there was a sharp increase in exports, owing to both the postwar eco-

COVERING WWII

Boxoffice Pro promoted war bonds

and owner/editor Ben Shlyen launched

a “United We Stand” campaign.

MARCH 2020 / 45


nomic boom and the presence abroad of

American troops, who were stationed in

such numbers as to offset the impact of

trade tariffs. By 1947, the vice president

of the Motion Picture Export Association

stated that “American pictures have

recaptured their prewar prestige and are

again the preferred entertainment in

every country I visited.” Foreign films

were also becoming popular in the U.S.;

in 1947, 250 theaters showed pictures

from overseas.

0P-EDs DEFEND FREE EXPRESSION

Boxoffice Pro excerpted editorials

and cartoons from a variety

of American newspapers.

Boxoffice Pro expressed hope

for the industry’s prospects, publishing

articles on the postwar “theater of

the future” and praising the return of

innovation. Yet the return of business

as usual also meant the return of a legal

battle that had preoccupied the industry

for decades: the antitrust

question.

It all started in

1921, when the Federal

Trade Commission

declared block booking

anticompetitive and

questioned the studios’

monopolistic practices.

Nine years later, the major

studios were declared

guilty of monopolization,

but the decision was nullified

by the Roosevelt administration

during the Depression.

In 1938, as studios became

more powerful, the Department

of Justice filed another

antitrust suit against the Big

Eight (Paramount Pictures,

Twentieth Century-Fox

Corporation, Loew’s, RKO,

Warner Brothers Pictures,

Columbia Pictures Corporation, Universal

Corporation, and United Artists

Corporation), accusing them of conspiring

to control the industry through

the ownership of both distribution and

exhibition channels.

A 1940 article reported that between

1930 and 1940, exhibitors had filed 793

complaints with the Justice Department.

That same year, studios reached

a deal with the Justice Department:

During a three-year trial period, studios

could keep ownership of their theaters,

but block booking was limited to groups

of five and exhibitors were allowed to

watch movies before purchasing them.

An arbitration system was enacted a

year later. This consent decree ended in

1943, when the Department of Justice

filed yet another lawsuit, which was put

on pause due to the war.

The end of the war led the Justice

Department, with the support of the

Society of Independent Motion Picture

Producers (SIMPP), to renew the case.

In 1948, after two decades of legal battles,

the Supreme Court handed down

its order abolishing block booking,

circuit dealing, and resale price maintenance.

Studios would also be forced to

divest themselves of their theater chains

or spin them off into discrete new

corporate entities.

RKO was the first

studio to sign the

consent decree in

November 1948,

followed by Paramount

in May

of the following

ANTITRUST TROUBLES

The 1940s saw the Justice

Department challenge

movies studios.

Boxoffice Pro GOES TO WAR

The magazine followed

theater manager

Sam Dart to Sicily.

year, and Loew’s, Fox, and

Warner in July 1949. The

series of consent decrees that

were formalized during that

period came to be collectively

known as the Paramount

Consent Decrees.

The exhibition industry was far

from united in how it viewed the

consent decrees. The Motion Picture

Theater Owners of America (MPTOA),

predecessor of NATO, was in favor of

self-regulation over federal regulation.

Its president, E.L. Kuykendall, declared

in April 1940 that “we know [the independent

theater owner] has reached the

stage of favoring any regulation, or law,

whether he would benefit by it or not

since he has little to lose anyway. But,

in any instance, he has allowed a temporary

cloud to blind his vision and he

will eventually learn he will suffer most

if such legislation is enacted.” In reaction

to the decrees, Shlyen wrote, “The

industry has its greatest opportunity

to date to come through with a trade

practice plan designed for elimination

of inter-factional troubles.”

But, like Kuykendall, Shlyen

thought the decrees wouldn’t solve the

industry’s problems. Exhibitors and

distributors, he believed, “must sit down

and agree on terms that will best serve

their mutual interests.” In 1946, Shlyen

wrote that “the government’s failure to

win its ‘main issue’ of divorcement”—

which it would go on to “win” two years

later—“[was] actually a victory for the

independent exhibitor.” Going back to

the self-regulation argument, he wrote

in 1949 that the long legal battle “has

drained the industry of millions of

dollars and the time and thought which

otherwise would have been devoted to

production improvement and merchandising.”

Ultimately, for

Shlyen, it was hard to assess

the real impact of the decrees.

That wouldn’t reveal itself until

future years.

46 / MARCH 2020


Meet us at

CinemaCon to

demo our high

performance

ticketing services

& learn to drive

online sales.

Find us on booth 2207A.

THE

COMPANY

WEBEDIA GROUP


Coming Attractions

FORTHCOMING NEW RELEASES

WITH PROMISING BOX OFFICE POTENTIAL

BY SHAWN ROBBINS

A QUIET PLACE PART II

Paramount | March 20

A Quiet Place was a runaway

success for Paramount two

years ago, following an intense

and effective marketing

campaign that helped generate

excitement for the inventive scifi

thriller. The film delivered a

$50.2 million domestic opening

weekend—the highest ever for

an original film in April.

The original’s ability to build

on that strong opening with

a 3.7-times multiplier proved

it had legs. Staying power

was more like that of the first

Conjuring film than of frontloaded

favorites like It or

Halloween (2018).

Early social metrics for the

sequel are strong: The trailer

has generated sentiment and

impressions comparable to

previous blockbuster openings

from the genre like Us and the

aforementioned Halloween. An

opening on that scale would

land this sequel in the top 10

March openings of all time.

Emily Blunt’s return, as well as

48 / MARCH 2020


another directorial effort from

John Krasinski, provides the

kind of creative consistency that

should continue to fuel interest

in the apparent world-building

sequel. If buzz keeps rolling

and reviews come in positive,

it’s safe to expect one of the

biggest first-quarter horror

openings of all time.

MULAN

Disney | March 27

Second to no one, Disney

has all but mastered the

ability to capitalize on existing

I.P. and nostalgia. In recent

years, they’ve sent remakes

of The Lion King, Beauty and

the Beast, Aladdin, The Jungle

Book, Maleficent, and Cinderella

to varying degrees of big box

office success.

As audiences and the industry

embrace diversity on the big

screen, the appeal of a largescale

English-language film

starring a predominantly Asian

cast could attract a strong

turnout from Asian American

communities and families.

Mulan opens three weeks

after Pixar’s Onward, enough

of a gap to prevent significant

competition—especially given

the earlier film’s lean toward

young male audiences, as

opposed this feature’s reliance

on young women.

Trailer impressions are

notably high, as the film

received a considerable

amount of promotion in front

of blockbusters like Star Wars:

The Rise of Skywalker and Frozen

II over the holidays.

NO TIME TO DIE

United Artists | April 10

Daniel Craig’s final outing

as 007 is likely to generate

significant buzz leading up to

release, and the Good Friday/

Easter weekend debut could

inflate opening earnings.

Whether the films plays as

audience friendly as Skyfall

and Casino Royale—or more

fan-centric like Quantum of

Solace and Spectre—remains

to be seen.

MARCH 2020 / 49


ON SCREEN

WIDE RELEASES

PHOTOS AND ART COURTESY OF STUDIOS / ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Yifei Liu

in Mulan

MULAN

MARCH 27 / DISNEY

Acclaimed filmmaker Niki Caro brings the epic tale

of China’s legendary warrior to life in this live-action

version of the 1998 Disney animated classic. When

the emperor of China issues a decree that one man

per family must serve in the imperial army to defend

the country from northern invaders, Hua Mulan,

the eldest daughter of an honored warrior, steps in

to take the place of her ailing father. Masquerading

as a man (her nom de guerre: Hua Jun), she is tested

every step of the way and must harness her inner

strength and embrace her true potential.

CAST YIFEI LIU, DONNIE YEN, JASON SCOTT LEE,

JET LI, GONG LI, ROSALIND CHAO, YOSON AN,

TZI MA, UTKARSH AMBUDKAR, RON YUAN DIR

NIKI CARO RATING TBA RUNNING TIME TBA

Scan image with Fuze Viewer app to access AR content.

Issa Rae and

Kumail Nanjiani

in The Lovebirds

THE LOVEBIRDS APRIL 3 / PARAMOUNT

A couple experiences a defining moment in their relationship

when they are unintentionally embroiled in a murder mystery. As

their journey to clear their names takes them from one extreme

circumstance to the next, they must figure out how they, and their

relationship, can survive the night.

CAST ISSA RAE, KUMAIL NANJIANI, ANNA CAMP, KYLE

BORNHEIMER, PAUL SPARKS DIR MICHAEL SHOWALTER

RATING TBA RUNNING TIME TBA


Maisie Williams, Henry

Zaga, Blu Hunt, Charlie

Heaton, and Anya Taylor-

Joy in The New Mutants

Ben Affleck in The Way Back

THE NEW MUTANTS

APRIL 3 / DISNEY-20TH CENTURY

This Marvel horror-thriller is set in an isolated hospital where a

group of young mutants is being held for psychiatric monitoring.

When strange occurrences begin to take place, both their new

mutant abilities and their friendships will be tested as they battle

to try to make it out alive.

CAST ANYA TAYLOR-JOY, MAISIE WILLIAMS, CHARLIE

HEATON, ALICE BRAGA, HENRY ZAGA, BLU HUNT DIR JOSH

BOONE RATING TBA RUNNING TIME TBA

PETER RABBIT 2: THE RUNAWAY

APRIL 3 / SONY-COLUMBIA

Bea, Thomas, and the rabbits have created a makeshift family,

but despite his best efforts, Peter can’t seem to shake his mischievous

reputation. Adventuring out of the garden, Peter finds

himself in a world where his mischief is appreciated, but when

his family risks everything to come looking for him, Peter must

figure out what kind of bunny he wants to be.

James Corden

voices Peter Rabbit

CAST JAMES CORDEN, ROSE BYRNE, DOMHNALL GLEESON,

MARGOT ROBBIE, DAISY RIDLEY, DAVID OYELOWO,

ELIZABETH DEBICKI DIR WILL GLUCK RATING TBA

RUNNING TIME TBA

NO TIME TO DIE

APRIL 10 / UNITED ARTISTS RELEASING

James Bond has left active service and is enjoying a tranquil life

in Jamaica. His peace is short-lived when his old friend Felix

Leiter from the CIA turns up asking for help. The mission to

rescue a kidnapped scientist turns out to be far more treacherous

than expected, leading Bond onto the trail of a mysterious villain

armed with dangerous new technology.

CAST DANIEL CRAIG, RAMI MALEK, ANA DE ARMAS,

RALPH FIENNES, LASHANA LYNCH, LÉA SEYDOUX, BEN

WHISHAW, JEFFREY WRIGHT, NAOMIE HARRIS, CHRISTOPH

WALTZ, RORY KINNEAR, BILLY MAGNUSSEN DIR CARY JOJI

FUKUNAGA RATING TBA RUNNING TIME TBA

Daniel Craig

in No Time to Die

Scan with Fuze Viewer app to access AR content.

MARCH 2020 / 51


ON SCREEN

WIDE RELEASES

MONSTER PROBLEMS

APRIL 17 / PARAMOUNT

In this comedy-adventure, a young man learns how to survive a monster

apocalypse with the help of an expert hunter.

CAST DYLAN O’BRIEN, MICHAEL ROOKER, ELLEN HOLLMAN,

JESSICA HENWICK DIR MICHAEL MATTHEWS RATING TBA

RUNNING TIME TBA

TROLLS WORLD TOUR

APRIL 17 / UNIVERSAL

Poppy and Branch discover that they are but one of six different Troll

tribes scattered over six different lands and devoted to six different kinds of

music: funk, country, techno, classical, pop, and rock. A member of hardrock

royalty, Queen Barb wants to destroy all other kinds of music to let

rock reign supreme. Poppy and Branch, along with their friends, set out to

visit all the other lands to unify the Trolls in harmony against Barb.

VOICE CAST ANNA KENDRICK, JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE, JAMES CORD-

EN, SAM ROCKWELL, CHANCE THE RAPPER, ANTHONY RAMOS,

RON FUNCHES, KUNAL NAYYAR, RACHEL BLOOM DIR WALT

DOHRN RATING PG RUNNING TIME TBA

BAD TRIP

APRIL 24 / UNITED ARTISTS RELEASING

Bad Trip follows two best friends on a cross-country road trip full of

inventive pranks, pulling the real-life audience into the mayhem.

CAST ERIC ANDRÉ, LIL REL HOWERY, TIFFANY HADDISH DIR

KITAO SAKURAI RATING R RUNNING TIME TBA

ANTEBELLUM

APRIL 24 / LIONSGATE

Successful author Veronica Henley finds herself trapped in a horrifying

reality and must uncover the mind-bending mystery before it’s

too late.

Lil Rel Howery

in Bad Trip

CAST JANELLE MONÁE, ERIC LANGE, JENA MALONE, JACK

HUSTON, KIERSEY CLEMONS, GABOUREY SIBIDE DIRS GERARD

BUSH, CHRISTOPHER RENZ RATING TBA RUNNING TIME TBA

52 / MARCH 2020


Poppy (Anna Kendrick) and Queen Barb

(Rachel Bloom) in Trolls World Tour

Scan with Fuze Viewer app to access AR content.

ON SCREEN

LIMITED RELEASES

MILITARY WIVES

MARCH 27 / BLEECKER STREET

Military Wives is a fact-based story of a group of women in England

whose partners are away serving in Afghanistan. In their absence, they

form a choir and quickly find themselves at the center of a media

sensation.

CAST KRISTIN SCOTT THOMAS, SHARON HORGAN, EMMA LOWN-

DES, GABY FRENCH, JASON FLEMYNG DIR PETER CATTANEO

RATING R RUNNING TIME 112 MIN.

SAINT MAUD

MARCH 27 / A24

Maud, a newly devout hospice nurse, becomes obsessed with saving

her dying patient’s soul—but sinister forces, and her own sinful past,

threaten to put an end to her holy calling.

CAST MORFYDD CLARK, JENNIFER EHLE, LILY FRAZER, LILY

KNIGHT, MARCUS HUTTON DIR ROSE GLASS RATING R

RUNNING TIME 83 MIN.

MARCH 2020 / 53


ON SCREEN

LIMITED RELEASES

NOMAD: IN THE FOOTSTEPS

OF BRUCE CHATWIN

APRIL 8 / MUSIC BOX FILMS

Veteran director Werner Herzog shares his portrait of travel writer

Bruce Chatwin, the prolific author of In Patagonia and a champion of

the nomadic lifestyle.

FEATURING BRUCE CHATWIN, KARIN EBERHARD, NICHOLAS

SHAKESPEARE, ELIZABETH CHATWIN DIR WERNER HERZOG

RATING TBA RUNNING TIME 85 MIN.

CHARM CITY KINGS

APRIL 10 / SONY PICTURES CLASSICS

Mouse desperately wants to join Baltimore’s infamous Midnight

Clique, a group of dirt bike riders who rule the summertime streets.

When Midnight’s leader, Blax, takes the 14-year-old under his wing,

Mouse soon finds himself torn between the straight and narrow and

a road filled with fast money and violence.

Keri Russell

in Antlers

CAST JAHI DI’ALLO WINSTON, MEEK MILL, TEYONAH PARRIS,

WILLIAM CATLETT, JAMAAL BURCHER DIR ANGEL MANUEL SOTO

RATING R RUNNING TIME 125 MIN.

ANTLERS

APRIL 17 / SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES

A small-town Oregon teacher and her brother, the local sheriff,

discover that a young student is harboring a dangerous secret with

frightening consequences.

THE PAINTED BIRD

APRIL 17 / IFC FILMS

This adaptation of the acclaimed novel by Jerzy Kosinski, set in Eastern

Europe at the bloody close of World War II, centers on a young boy

entrusted by his persecuted parents to an elderly foster mother, who

soon dies. He suffers extraordinary brutality meted out by ignorant,

superstitious peasants, and witnesses terrifying violence by both Russian

and German soldiers.

CAST KERI RUSSELL, JESSE PLEMONS, JEREMY T. THOMAS,

GRAHAM GREENE, SCOTT HAZE, RORY COCHRANE, AMY

MADIGAN DIR SCOTT COOPER RATING R RUNNING TIME TBA

MARTIN EDEN

APRIL 17 / KINO LORBER

Set in a provocatively unspecified moment in Italy’s history yet

adapted from a 1909 novel by American author Jack London, Martin

Eden follows a self-taught proletarian who hopes that his dreams of

becoming a writer will help him rise above his station and marry a

wealthy young university student.

CAST PETR KOTLÁR, UDO KIER, STELLAN SKARSGÅRD, LECH

DIBLIK, HARVEY KEITEL, BARRY PEPPER, JULIAN SANDS DIR

VÁCLAV MARHOUL RATING TBA RUNNING TIME 169 MIN.

PROMISING YOUNG WOMAN

APRIL 17 / FOCUS FEATURES

Everyone said Cassie was a promising young woman ... until a mysterious

event abruptly derailed her future. But nothing in Cassie’s life is

what it appears to be: She’s wickedly smart, tantalizingly cunning, and

she’s living a secret double life by night. Now, an unexpected encounter

is about to give Cassie a chance to right the wrongs of the past.

CAST LUCA MARINELLI, JESSICA CRESSY, DENISE SARDISCO,

MARCO LEONARDI, VINCENZO NEMOLATO DIR PIETRO

MARCELLO RATING TBA RUNNING TIME 129 MIN.

CAST CAREY MULLIGAN, BO BURNHAM, LAVERNE COX,

ALISON BRIE, CONNIE BRITTON, CLANCY BROWN, JENNIFER

COOLIDGE, MOLLY SHANNON, ADAM BRODY, ALFRED MOLINA,

CHRISTOPHER MINTZ-PLASSE DIR EMERALD FENNELL RATING

TBA RUNNING TIME 113 MIN.

54 / MARCH 2020


THE SECRET:

DARE TO DREAM

APRIL 17 / GRAVITAS VENTURES

Miranda Wells is a hard-working young widow struggling to raise

three children on her own. A powerful storm brings a devastating

challenge and a mysterious man, Bray Johnson, into her life. In just

a few short days, Bray’s presence reignites the family’s spirit, but he

carries a secret—and that secret could change everything.

CAST KATIE HOLMES, JOSH LUCAS, CELIA WESTON,

JERRY O’CONNELL DIR ANDY TENNANT RATING PG

RUNNING TIME TBA

Y CÓMO ES ÉL?

APRIL 17 / LIONSGATE-PANTELION

Tomás is a meek man on the verge of a nervous breakdown. Despite

his situation, he decides to fake a work trip to go to Vallarta to confront

Jero, a taxi driver who is sleeping with his wife.

CAST MAURICIO OCHMANN, OMAR CHAPARRO, ZURIA

VEGA, MIGUEL RODARTE DIR ARIEL WINOGRAD RATING TBA

RUNNING TIME TBA

FÁTIMA

APRIL 24 / PICTUREHOUSE FILMS

A 10-year-old shepherd and her two young cousins in Fátima, Portugal,

report seeing visions of the Virgin Mary. Their revelations inspire believers

but anger officials of both the Church and the secular government, who

try to force them to recant their story. As word spreads, tens of thousands

of religious pilgrims flock to the site in hopes of witnessing a miracle.

CAST GORAN VISNJIC, SONIA BRAGA, HARVEY KEITEL, JOACHIM

DE ALMEIDA, STEPHANIE GIL, LÚCIA MONIZ DIR MARCO

PONTECORVO RATING TBA RUNNING TIME TBA

THE TRUE HISTORY

OF THE KELLY GANG

APRIL 24 / IFC FILMS

This film tells the story of Australian bush ranger Ned Kelly and his

gang as they flee from authorities during the 1870s. Based on Peter

Carey’s novel.

CAST GEORGE MACKAY, CHARLIE HUNNAM, NICHOLAS HOULT,

RUSSELL CROWE, ESSIE DAVIS, THOMASIN MCKENZIE, EARL CAVE

DIR JUSTIN KURZEL RATING TBA RUNNING TIME 124 MIN.

MARCH 2020 / 55


EVENT CINEMA CALENDAR

PHOTOS PUBLISHED WITH PERMISSION / ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

CINELIFE ENTERTAINMENT

cinelifeentertainment.com

COMÉDIE-FRANÇAISE: ELECTRA/

ORESTES

Weds. 3/4, Sun. 3/8 • Theater

ENGLISH NATIONAL BALLET–

AKRAM KHAN’S GISELLE

(U.S. RELEASE)

Fri. 3/6 - Fri. 3/13 • Ballet

CELEBRATING THE SOPRANOS

Tues. 4/14 - Mon. 4/27

Documentary

COMÉDIE-FRANÇAISE:

A FLEA IN HER EAR

Weds. 4/22, Sun. 4/26

Theater

THE BROKEN HEARTS CLUB:

A ROMANTIC COMEDY

(20TH ANNIVERSARY)

May • Classics

COMÉDIE-FRANÇAISE:

SCAPIN THE SCHEMER

Weds. 5/27, Sun. 5/31

Theater

MA VIE EN ROSE

June • Classics

A FANTASTIC WOMAN

June • Classics

CALL ME BY YOUR NAME

July • Classics

FREDERICO GARCÍA LORCA:

MOONS OF NEW YORK

& GIANT MOON

Sept. • Documentary

DRACULA

Thurs. 10/1 - Sat. 10/31

Ballet

CERVANTES: THE SEARCH

Oct. • Documentary

THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR

FROM SHAKESPEARE’S GLOBE

Oct. • Theater

THE WINTER’S TALE

FROM SHAKESPEARE’S GLOBE

Nov. • Theater

EXHIBITION ON SCREEN

Exhibitiononscreen.com

EASTER IN ART

From Tues. 4/7

Art

FRIDA KAHLO

From Mon. 7/6

Art

FATHOM EVENTS

Fathomevents.com

855-473-4612

TOKYO GODFATHERS

Mon. 3/9, Weds. 3/11

Anime

THE MET: LIVE IN HD:

DER FLIEGENDE HOLLÄNDER

Sat. 3/14 (live),

Weds. 3/18 (encore)

Opera

TCM BIG SCREEN CLASSICS:

KING KONG (1933)

Sun. 3/15

Classics

CBN: I AM PATRICK

Tues. 3/17, Weds. 3/18

Inspirational

DINO DANA THE MOVIE

Sat. 3/21 • Family

DIGIMON ADVENTURE:

LAST EVOLUTION KIZUNA

Weds. 3/25 • Anime

BOLSHOI BALLET:

ROMEO AND JULIET

Sun. 3/29 • Ballet

SIGHT AND SOUND

PRESENTS JESUS

Tues. 4/7, Thurs. 4/9, Sat. 4/11

Inspirational

THE MET:

LIVE IN HD: TOSCA

Sat. 4/11 (live), Weds. 4/15 (encore),

Sat. 4/18 (encore)

Opera

BOLSHOI BALLET:

JEWELS

Sun. 4/19 •Ballet

CLIMATE HUSTLE 2

Tues. 4/21 • Documentary

TCM BIG SCREEN CLASSICS:

A LEAGUE OF THEIR OWN

Sun. 4/26, Mon. 4/27, Weds. 4/29

Classics

PATTERNS OF EVIDENCE:

RED SEA MIRACLE PART 2

Tues. 5/5 • Inspirational

THE MET: LIVE IN HD:

MARIA STUARDA

Sat. 5/9 (live), Weds. 5/13 (encore)

Opera

TCM BIG SCREEN CLASSICS:

AIRPLANE! 40TH ANNIVERSARY

Sun. 5/17, Weds. 5/20

Classics

TCM BIG SCREEN CLASSICS:

THE SHINING 40TH ANNIVERSARY

Sun. 5/31, Weds. 6/3

Classics

TCM BIG SCREEN CLASSICS:

ANNIE

Sun. 6/14, Weds. 6/17

Classics

56 / MARCH 2020


TCM BIG SCREEN CLASSICS:

THE BLUES BROTHERS

40TH ANNIVERSARY

Sun. 6/28, Weds. 7/1

Classics

TCM BIG SCREEN CLASSICS:

GHOST 30TH ANNIVERSARY

Sun. 7/19, Weds. 7/22

Classics

TCM BIG SCREEN CLASSICS:

BABE 25TH ANNIVERSARY

Sun. 8/9, Weds. 8/12

Classics

TCM BIG SCREEN CLASSICS:

CLOSE ENCOUNTERS

OF THE THIRD KIND

Sun. 9/13, Mon. 9/14, Thurs. 9/17

Classics

TCM BIG SCREEN CLASSICS:

PSYCHO 60TH ANNIVERSARY

Sun. 10/11, Mon. 10/12

Classics

TCM BIG SCREEN CLASSICS:

ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO’S

NEST 45TH ANNIVERSARY

Sun. 11/8, Mon. 11/9 • Classics

TCM BIG SCREEN CLASSICS:

FIDDLER ON THE ROOF

Sun. 12/13, Mon. 12/14

Classics

MORE2SCREEN

www.more2screen.com

RIVERDANCE

25TH ANNIVERSARY SHOW

Tues., 3/3 • Dance

BERLINER PHILHARMONIKER

LIVE SEASON FINALE CONCERT

Fri. 6/12 (U.K./Republic of Ireland)

Music

MYCINEMA

www.mycinema.live

THE ORDER OF RIGHTS

Mon. 3/9 • Inspirational

RIGHT BEFORE YOUR EYES

Mon. 3/23 • Inspirational

COWBOY AND INDIANA

Mon. 3/30 • Inspirational

APOCALYPSE NOW FINAL CUT

March • Classics

DARK STAR

March • Horror

FORGIVEN

Sat. 4/4 • Inspirational

FEARLESS FAITH

Sun. 5/10 • Inspirational

HELL NIGHT

Sun. 5/10 • Horror

ROYAL OPERA HOUSE

roh.org.uk/cinemas

cinema@roh.org.uk

FIDELIO

Tues/ 3/17 • Opera

SWAN LAKE

Weds. 4/1 • Ballet

CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA /

PAGLIACCI

Tues. 4/21 • Opera

THE DANTE PROJECT

Thurs. 5/28 • Ballet

ELEKTRA

Thurs. 6/18 • Opera

TRAFALGAR RELEASING

trafalgar-releasing.com

NICK MASON’S SAUCERFUL

OF SECRETS: LIVE AT THE

ROUNDHOUSE

Tues. 3/10 • Music

RIVERDANCE

25TH ANNIVERSARY SHOW

Sun. 3/15 (U.S.) • Dance

CINELIFE ENTERTAINMENT

SCAPIN THE SCHEMER

May • Theater

MYCINEMA / APOCALYPSE NOW FINAL CUT

March • Classics

TRAFALGAR RELEASING / MORE2SCREEN

RIVERDANCE • March • Dance

MARCH 2020 / 57


BOOKING GUIDE

101 STUDIOS

LA BELLE ÉPOQUE

Fri, 5/22/20 LTD

C Daniel Auteuil, Guillaume Canet

D Nicolas Bedos

NR • Com/Dra

CITY OF A MILLION

SOLDIERS

Fri, 6/12/20 LTD

C Waleed Elgadi, Hayat Kamille

D Matthew Michael Carnahan

NR • Dra, War

A24

646-568-6015

FIRST COW

Fri, 3/6/20 LTD

C John Magaro, Orion Lee

D Kelly Reichardt

NR • Dra/Wes

SAINT MAUD

Fri, 3/27/20 LTD

C Jennifer Ehle / D Rose Glass

NR • Dra

ABRAMORAMA

914-741-1818

A DOG CALLED MONEY

Fri, 3/18/20 LTD

C Seamus Murphy

NR • DOC

THE MINDFULNESS

MOVEMENT

Fri, 3/31/20 LTD

C Rob Beemer

NR • DOC

AMAZON STUDIOS

THE VAST OF NIGHT

Fri, 3/13/20 LTD

C Sierra McCormick, Jake Horowitz

D Andrew Patterson

PG-13 • SF

BLUE FOX

ENTERTAINMENT

William Gruenberg

william@bluefoxentertain

ment.com

SOMETIMES ALWAYS

NEVER

Fri, 3/6/20 LTD

C Bill Nighy, Sam Riley

D Carl Hunter

NR • Com/Dra

BLEECKER STREET

THE ROADS NOT TAKEN

Fri, 3/13/20 LTD

C Javier Bardem, Elle Fanning

D Sally Potter

Dra • R

MILITARY WIVES

Fri, 3/27/20 LTD

C Kristin Scott Thomas,

Sharon Horgan

D Peter Cattaneo

NR • Dra

DREAM HORSE

Fri, 5/1/20 LTD

C Toni Collette

D Jan Vokes

NR • Dra

DISNEY

818-560-1000

Ask for Distribution

ONWARD

Fri, 3/6/20 WIDE

C Chris Pratt, Tom Holland

D Dan Scanlon

NR • Ani / • 3D/Dolby Vis/

Atmos

MULAN

Fri, 3/27/20 WIDE

C Yifei Liu, Donnie Yen

D Niki Caro

NR • Fan/Act/Adv • 3D/

IMAX

BLACK WIDOW

Fri, 5/1/20 WIDE

C Scarlett Johansson, David Harbour

D Cate Shortland

NR • Act/Adv • 3D

ARTEMIS FOWL

Fri, 5/29/20 WIDE

C Ferdia Shaw, Josh Gad

D Kenneth Branagh

NR • Fan • 3D

SOUL

Fri, 6/19/20 WIDE

C Jamie Foxx, Tina Fey

D Pete Docter

NR • Ani • 3D/Dolby Vis/

Atmos

JUNGLE CRUISE

Fri, 7/24/20 WIDE

C Dwayne Johnson, Emily Blunt

D Jaume Collet-Serra

NR • Act/Adv • Dolby Vis/

Atmos

THE ONE AND ONLY

IVAN

Fri, 8/14/20 WIDE

NR • Ani

THE ETERNALS

Fri, 11/6/20 WIDE

C Richard Madden, Angelina Jolie

D Chloé Zhao

NR • Act/Adv/SF

RAYA AND THE LAST

DRAGON

Fri, 11/25/20 WIDE

C Awkwafina, Cassie Steele

D Paul Briggs, Dean Wellins

NR • Ani • 3D

SHANG CHI

AND THE LEGEND

OF THE TEN RINGS

Fri, 2/12/21 WIDE

C Simu Liu, Awkwafina

D Destin Daniel Cretton

NR • Act/Adv/Fan

UNTITLED DISNEY

LIVE ACTION

Fri, 3/12/21 WIDE

NR

FOCUS FEATURES

424-214-6360

NEVER RARELY

SOMETIMES ALWAYS

Fri, 3/13/20 LTD

C Sidney Flanigan, Talia Ryder

D Eliza Hittman

NR • Dra

PROMISING YOUNG

WOMAN

Fri, 4/17/20 LTD

C Carey Mulligan, Laverne Cox

D Emerald Fennell

NR • Cri/Thr • Dolby Vis/

Atmos

COVERS

Fri, 5/8/20 LTD

C Dakota Johnson, Tracee Ellis Ross

D Nisha Ganatra

NR • Com • Dolby Vis/

Atmos

IRRESISTIBLE

Fri, 5/29/20 LTD

C Steve Carell, Rose Byrne

D Jon Stewart

NR • Com

LET HIM GO

Fri, 8/21/20 LTD

C Kevin Costner, Diane Lane

D Thomas Bezucha

NR • Thr

LAST NIGHT IN SOHO

Fri, 9/25/20 WIDE

C Anya Taylor-Joy,

Thomasin Harcourt McKenzie

D Edgar Wright

NR • Hor/Thr • Dolby Vis/

Atmos

58 / MARCH 2020


UNTITLED TOM

MCCARTHY PROJECT

Fri, 11/6/20 LTD

C Matt Damon, Abigail Breslin

D Tom McCarthy

NR • Thr

20TH CENTURY

STUDIOS

310-369-1000

212-556-2400

THE NEW MUTANTS

Fri, 4/3/20 WIDE

C Anya Taylor-Joy, Maisie Williams

D Josh Boone

NR • Act/Hor/SF • Dolby

Vis/Atmos

THE WOMAN

IN THE WINDOW

Fri, 5/15/20 WIDE

C Amy Adams, Gary Oldman

D Joe Wright

R • Cri/Dra/Mys

FREE GUY

Fri, 7/3/20 WIDE

C Ryan Reynolds

D Shawn Levy

NR • Com/Act

BOB’S BURGERS

Fri, 7/17/20 WIDE

C H. Jon Benjamin, Kristen Schaal

NR • Ani

EMPTY MAN

Fri, 8/7/20 WIDE

NR • Cri/Dra/Hor

THE KING’S MAN

Fri, 9/18/20 WIDE

C Ralph Fiennes, Gemma Arterton

D Matthew Vaughn

NR • Act/Adv • IMAX

DEATH ON THE NILE

Fri, 10/9/20 WIDE

C Tom Bateman, Annette Bening

D Kenneth Branagh

NR • Cri/Dra/Mys

EVERYBODY’S TALKING

ABOUT JAMIE

Fri, 10/23/20 WIDE

NR • Dra/Mus

DEEP WATER

Fri, 11/13/20 WIDE

C Ana de Armas, Ben Affleck

D Adrian Lyne

NR • Thr

WEST SIDE STORY

Fri, 12/18/20 WIDE

C Ansel Elgort, Rachel Zegler

D Steven Spielberg

NR • Mus

THE LAST DUEL

Fri, 12/25/20 LTD

C Matt Damon, Ben Affleck

D Ridley Scott

NR • Dra

RON’S GONE WRONG

Fri, 2/26/21 LTD

NR • Ani

SEARCHLIGHT

PICTURES

212-556-2400

ANTLERS

Fri, 4/17/20 LTD

C Keri Russell, Jessie Plemons

D Scott Cooper

NR • Hor

THE PERSONAL

HISTORY OF DAVID

COPPERFIELD

Fri, 5/8/20 LTD • NR

FREESTYLE

RELEASING

310-277-3500

CLOVER

Fri, 4/3/20 LTD

C Mark Webber,

Nicole Elizabeth Berger

D Jon Abrahams

NR • Com

brought to you by the point of sale you know

RTS

MARCH 2020 / 59


BOOKING GUIDE

THE FRENCH DISPATCH

Fri, 7/24/20 LTD

C Timothée Chalamet,

Saoirse Ronan

D Wes Anderson

R • Com

GOOD DEED

ENTERTAINMENT

EXTRA ORDINARY.

Fri, 3/6/20 LTD

C Maeve Higgins, Barry Ward

D Mike Ahern, Enda Loughman

R • Com

GREENWICH

ENTERTAINMENT

THE BOOKSELLERS

Fri, 3/6/20 LTD

C Parker Posey

D D.W. Young

NR • Doc

DEERSKIN

Fri, 6/19/20 LTD

C Jean Dujardin,

Adèle Haenel

D Quentin Dupieux

NR • Com

IFC FILMS

BOOKINGS@IFCFILMS.COM

SWALLOW

Fri, 3/6/20 LTD

C Haley Bennett,

Austin Stowell

D Carlo Mirabella-Davis

R • Thr

THE TRUTH

Fri, 3/20/20 LTD

C Catherine Deneuve,

Juliette Binoche

D Hirokazu Kore-eda

PG-13 • Dra

RESISTANCE

Fri, 3/27/20 LTD

C Jesse Eisenberg, Ed Harris

D Jonathan Jakubowicz

NR • Dra

THE PAINTED BIRD

Fri, 4/17/20 LTD

C Petr Kotlae, Udo Kier

D Václav Marhoul

NR • Dra

TRUE HISTORY

OF THE KELLY GANG

Fri, 4/24/20 LTD

C George MacKay, Russell Crowe

D Justin Kurzel

R • Dra

THE WRETCHED

Fri, 5/1/20 LTD

C John-Paul Howard, Piper Curda

D Brett Pierce, Drew T. Pierce

NR • Hor

HOW TO BUILD A GIRL

Fri, 5/8/20 LTD

C Beanie Feldstein, Alfie Allen

D Coky Giedroyc

NR • Com

KINO LORBER

BACURAU

Fri, 3/6/20 LTD

C Sônia Braga, Udo Kier

D Kleber Medonça

Filho, Juliano Dornelles

NR • Dra

CAPITAL

IN THE TWENTY-FIRST

CENTURY

Fri, 4/3/20 LTD

C Justin Pemberton

NR • Doc

MARTIN EDEN

Fri, 4/17/20 LTD

C Luca Marinelli, Jessica Cressy

D Pietro Marcello

NR • Dra

LIONSGATE

310-309-8400

I STILL BELIEVE

Fri, 3/13/20 WIDE

C K.J. Apa, Gary Sinise

D Jon Erwin, Andrew Erwin

NR • Dra

Y CÓMO ES ÉL?

Fri, 4/17/20 MOD

C Mauricio Ochmann,

Omar Chaparro

D Ariel Winograd

NR • Com

ANTEBELLUM

Fri, 4/24/20 WIDE

C Janelle Monáe

D Gerard Bush,

Christopher Renz

NR • Thr

RUN

Fri, 5/8/20 WIDE

C Sarah Paulson,

Kiera Allen

D Aneesh Chaganty

NR • Thr

UNTITLED SAW FILM

Fri, 5/15/20 WIDE

C Chris Rock,

Samuel L. Jackson

D Darren Lynn Bousman

NR • Hor

BARB AND STAR GO

TO VISTA DEL MAR

Fri, 7/31/20 WIDE

C Kristen Wiig,

Annie Mumolo

D Josh Greenbaum

NR • Com

THE HITMAN’S

BODYGUARD 2

Fri, 8/22/20 WIDE

C Ryan Reynolds, Samuel L. Jackson

D Patrick Hughes

NR • Act/Com

FATALE

Fri, 10/9/20 WIDE

C Hilary Swank, Michael Ealy

D Deon Taylor

NR • Sus

JESUS REVOLUTION

Fri, 3/26/21 WIDE

C Jon Gunn

D Jon Erwin, Andrew Erwin

NR

MAGNOLIA

PICTURES

212-379-9704

Neal Block

nblock@magpictures.com

SLAY THE DRAGON

Fri, 3/13/20 LTD.

C Barak Goodman,

Chris Durrance

NR • Doc

MYCINEMA

480-430-7017

DARK STAR

Fri, 3/9/20 LTD.

C Brian Narelle, Cal Kuniholm

D John Carpenter

G • Com/SF

FORGIVEN

Sat, 4/4/20 LTD.

C Kevin Sorbo, Jenn Gotzon

D Kevan Otto

NR • Dra/Thr

FEARLESS FAITH

Sat, 5/10/20 LTD.

C Jason Burkey, Ben Davies

D Kevin Rushing

NR • Dra/Thr

HELL NIGHT

Sat, 5/10/20 LTD.

C Linda Blair,

Vincent Van Patten

D Tom DeSimone

R • Hor

60 / MARCH 2020


OSCILLOSCOPE

LABORATORIES

RUN THIS TOWN

Fri, 3/6/20 LTD

C Ben Platt, Mena Massoud

D Ricky Tollman

R • Dra/Thr

PARAMOUNT

323-956-5000

A QUIET PLACE PART II

Fri, 3/20/20 WIDE

C Emily Blunt, Cillian Murphy

D John Krasinski

NR • Hor/Thr • IMAX/Dolby

Vis/Atmos

THE LOVEBIRDS

Fri, 4/3/20 WIDE

C Anna Camp, Kumail Nanjiani

D Michael Showalter

R • Rom/Com

MONSTER PROBLEMS

Fri, 4/17/20 WIDE

C Dylan O’Brien

D Michael Matthews

NR • Adv

THE SPONGEBOB

MOVIE: SPONGE

ON THE RUN

Fri, 5/22/20 WIDE

C Tom Kenny, Bill Fagerbakke

D Tim Hill

NR • Ani

TOP GUN: MAVERICK

Fri, 6/26/20 WIDE

C Tom Cruise, Miles Teller

D Joseph Kosinski

NR • Act/Adv •IMAX/Dolby

Vis/Atmos

INFINITE

Fri, 8/7/20 WIDE

NR • SF

SPELL

Fri, 8/28/20 WIDE

NR • Hor/Thr

TOM CLANCY’S

WITHOUT REMORSE

Fri, 9/18/20 WIDE

NR • Thr

THE TRIAL

OF THE CHICAGO 7

Fri, 9/25/20 LTD

D Aaron Sorkin

NR • Dra

SNAKE EYES

Fri, 10/23/20 WIDE

C Henry Golding, Andrew Koj

D Robert Schwentke

NR • Act/Adv

CLIFFORD

THE BIG RED DOG

Fri, 11/13/20 WIDE

NR • Fam

COMING 2 AMERICA

Fri, 12/18/20 WIDE

NR • Com

THE TOMORROW WAR

Fri, 12/25/20 WIDE

C Yvonne Strahovski, Chris Pratt

D Chris McKay

NR • Act/SF

RUMBLE

Fri, 1/29/21 WIDE

NR • Ani

JACKASS

Fri, 3/5/21 WIDE

NR • Com

UNTITLED PARANORMAL

ACTIVITY MOVIE

Fri, 3/19/21 WIDE

NR • Hor

ROADSIDE

ATTRACTIONS

323.882.8490

HOPE GAP

Fri, 3/6/20 WIDE

C Annette Bening, Bill Nighy

D William Nicholson

PG-13 • Dra

THE SECRET:

DARE TO DREAM

Fri, 4/17/20 LTD

C Katie Holmes, Josh Lucas

D Andy Tennant

PG • Dra

SAMUEL GOLDWYN

FILMS

BULL

Fri, 3/20/20 LTD

C Rob Morgan,

Amber Havard

D Annie Silverstein

NR • Dra

SONY

212-833-8500

BLOODSHOT

Fri, 3/13/20 WIDE

C Vin Diesel, Eiza González

D David S. F. Wilson

NR • Act • Dolby Vis/Atmos

PETER RABBIT 2:

THE RUNAWAY

Fri, 4/3/20 WIDE

C James Corden, Rose Byrne

D Will Gluck

NR • Ani

GREYHOUND

Fri, 5/8/20 WIDE

C Tom Hanks

D Aaron Schneider

NR • Dra/War

GHOSTBUSTERS:

AFTERLIFE

Fri, 7/10/20 WIDE

C Carrie Coon,

Finn Wolfhard

D Jason Reitman

NR • Hor/Com/SF

MORBIUS

Fri, 7/31/20 WIDE

C Jared Leto, Matt Smith

D Daniel Espinosa

NR • Act/Thr/SF • Dolby

Vis/Atmos

ESCAPE ROOM 2

Fri, 8/14/20 WIDE

C Kristen Stewart,

Mackenzie Davis

D Clea DuVall

NR • Hor/Thr

MONSTER HUNTER

Fri, 9/4/20 WIDE

C Milla Jovovich, Tony Jaa

D Paul W.S. Anderson

NR • Act/Fan

THE MITCHELLS VS.

THE MACHINES

Fri, 9/18/20 WIDE

C Mike Rianda

NR • Ani

UNTITLED SONY/

|MARVEL

Fri, 10/2/20 WIDE

NR • Act/SF

MAN FROM TORONTO

Fri, 11/20/20 WIDE

C Kevin Hart, Jason Statham

NR

HAPPIEST SEASON

Fri, 11/25/20 WIDE

C Kristen Stewart,

Mackenzie Davis

D Clea DuVall

NR • Rom/Com/Hol

UNTITLED SPA

ANIMATED ORIGINAL

Fri, 12/11/20 WIDE

NR • Ani

FATHERHOOD

Fri, 1/15/21 WIDE

C Kevin Hart, Melody Hurd

D Paul Weitz

NR • Dra

CINDERELLA

Fri, 2/5/21 WIDE

NR • Fan

UNCHARTED

Fri, 3/5/21 WIDE

C Tom Holland, Mark Wahlberg

NR • Act/Adv

MARCH 2020 / 61


BOOKING GUIDE

SONY PICTURES

CLASSICS

Tom Prassis

212-833-4981

BURNT ORANGE

HERESY

Fri, 3/6/20 LTD

C Elizabeth Debicki,

Donald Sutherland

D Giuseppe Capotondi

R • Act/Thr

THE CLIMB

Fri, 3/20/20 LTD

C Kyle Marvin,

Michael Angelo Covino

D Michael Angelo Covino

R • Com/Dra

CHARM CITY KINGS

Fri, 4/10/20 LTD

C Teyonah Parris,

Jahi Di’Allo Winston

D Angel Manuel Soto

R • Dra

THE LAST VERMEER

Fri, 5/22/20 LTD

C Claes Bang,

Guy Pearce

D Dan Friedkin

R • Dra

THE HUMAN FACTOR

Fri, 6/26/20 LTD

C Dror Moreh

NR • Doc

STX

ENTERTAINMENT

310-742-2300

MY SPY

Fri, 3/13/20 WIDE

C Dave Bautista,

Kristen Schaal

D Peter Segal

PG-13 • Com

UNITED ARTISTS

RELEASING

310-724-5678

Ask for Distribution

NO TIME TO DIE

Fri, 4/10/20 WIDE

C Daniel Craig, Rami Malek

D Cary Joji Fukunaga

NR • Act/Thr • IMAX/Dolby

Vis/Atmos

BAD TRIP

Fri, 4/24/20 WIDE

C Eric André, Lil Rel Howery

D Kitao Sakurai

NR • Com

VALLEY GIRL

Fri, 5/8/20 WIDE

NR • Com

RESPECT

Fri, 8/14/20 WIDE

C Jennifer Hudson, Forest Whitaker

D Liesl Tommy

NR •Dra/Mus

BILL & TED

FACE THE MUSIC

Fri, 8/21/20 WIDE

C Keanu Reeves, Alex Winter

D Dean Parisot

NR • Com/Adv

SAMARITAN

Fri, 11/20/20 WIDE

C Sylvester Stalone D Julius Avery

NR • Act/Thr

UNITED GUY RITCHIE

Fri, 1/15/21 WIDE • NR

UNIVERSAL

818-777-1000

TROLLS WORLD TOUR

Fri, 4/17/20 WIDE

C Anna Kendrick , Justin Timberlake

D Walt Dohrn

PG • Ani •Dolby Vis/Atmos

F9

Fri, 5/22/20 WIDE

C Vin Diesel,

Charlize Theron

D Justin Lin

NR • Act/Adv • IMAX/Dolby

Vis/Atmos

CANDYMAN

Fri, 6/12/20 WIDE

C Nia DaCosta

NR • Hor

THE KING

OF STATEN ISLAND

Fri, 6/19/20 WIDE

D Judd Apatow

NR • Com

MINIONS:

THE RISE OF GRU

Fri, 7/3/20 WIDE

C Steve Carell

D Kyle Balda

NR • Ani

UNTITLED NEXT PURGE

CHAPTER

Fri, 7/10/20 WIDE

NR • Hor

NOBODY

Fri, 8/14/20 WIDE

C Bob Odenkirk

D Ilya Naishuller

NR • Act/Thr

PRAISE THIS

Fri, 9/25/20 WIDE

NR • Com

BIOS

Fri, 10/2/20 WIDE

C Tom Hanks

D Miguel Sapochnik

NR • SF

HALLOWEEN KILLS

Fri, 10/16/20 WIDE

C David Gordon Green

NR • Hor

UNTITLED UNIVERSAL

EVENT COMEDY

Fri, 10/23/20 WIDE

NR • Com

UNTITLED UNIVERSAL

EVENT FILM

Fri, 11/13/20 WIDE

NR

UNTITLED AMBLIN

PROJECT

Fri, 11/20/20 WIDE

C Joel Crawford

NR

THE CROODS 2

Fri, 12/23/20 WIDE

NR • Ani

NEWS OF THE WORLD

Fri, 12/25/20 WIDE

C Tom Hanks

D Paul Greengrass

NR • Dra

UNTITLED BLUMHOUSE

PRODUCTIONS

Fri, 1/8/21 WIDE

NR

355

Fri, 1/15/21 WIDE

C Jessica Chastain,

Lupita Nyong’o

D Simon Kinberg

NR • Thr

UNTITLED UNIVERSAL

ROMANTIC COMEDY

Fri, 2/12/20 WIDE

NR • Rom/Com

UNTITLED M. NIGHT

SHYAMALAN THRILLER

Fri, 2/12/20 WIDE

D M. Night Shyamalan

NR • Thr

UNTITLED UNIVERSAL

EVENT FILM

Fri, 3/5/20 WIDE

NR

62 / MARCH 2020


THE BOSS BABY 2

IN THE HEIGHTS

THE CONJURING:

GODZILLA VS KONG

Fri, balance, 3/26/20 sparking WIDEboth an intense rivalry Fri, 6/26/20

THE

WIDELODGE

THE DEVIL MADE comes from spending Fri, 11/20/20 a lifetime WIDEtogether.

NR and • romantic Ani desire that may cause C him Jon M. Chu FEB. 7 / NEON ME DO IT When Joan is C diagnosed Millie Bobby with Brown, breast cancer,

to risk his future in dance as well as NR his • Mus/Rom/Dra From the directors of Goodnight Fri, 9/11/20 Mommy,

this chiller follows a C family Patrick Wilson, who

WIDE

relationships with Mary and his family. Dolby Vis/Atmos

the course Eiza of her González treatment shines a

light on their D enduring Adam Wingard devotion, as they

WARNER CAST LEVAN GELBAKHIANI, BROS. BACHI VALISH-

818-977-1850

VILI, ANA JAVAKISHVILI, GIORGI TSERETELI, TENET

retreat to their remote winter Vera Farmiga cabin over

the holidays. When the D father Michael is Chaves forced

must find the NR humor • SF/Act and • grace IMAX/3D/ to survive

a year of adversity. Dolby Vis/Atmos

KAKHA GOGIDZE DIR LEVAN AKIN RATING Fri, 7/17/20 to WIDE abruptly depart for work, NR • Hor he leaves his CAST LIAM NEESON, LESLEY MANVILLE,

TBA THE RUNNING WAY BACK TIME 113 MIN.

C John David Washington, children in the care of his Dolby new Vis/Atmos girlfriend, AMIT SHAH, DAVID KING WILMOT RICHARD DIR LISA

Fri, 3/6/20 WIDE

Robert Pattinson

Grace. Isolated and alone, a blizzard

Fri, 11/25/20 WIDE

BARROS D’SA, GLENN LEYBURN RATING R

C Ben Affleck / D Gavin O’Connor D Christopher Nolan

THE MANY SAINTS

NR • Dra/Bio

CANE RIVER

traps them inside the lodge as terrifying RUNNING TIME 92 MIN.

NR • Dra • Dolby Atmos NR • Act/Thr

OF NEWARK

FEB. 7 / OSCILLOSCOPE

events summon specters from Grace’s

Fri, 9/25/20 WIDE

DUNE

SCOOB!

This drama about an African American

MALIGNANT

dark past.

C Alessandro Nivola,

GREED

Fri, 12/18/20 WIDE

Fri, college 5/15/20 football WIDE star who returns to Fri, his 8/14/20

CAST

WIDE

RILEY KEOUGH, RICHARD Vera Farmiga ARMITAGE, FEB. 21 / SONY NR • SFPICTURES

C hometown Kiersey Clemons, in Louisiana Zac Efron and falls in C James WanALICIA SILVERSTONE, JAEDEN D Alan LIEBERHER, Taylor CLASSICS

D love Tony with Cervone a local tour guide was filmed NR • Hor

NR in 1982 • Ani and • Dolby is just Vis/Atmos now receiving its

LIA MCHUGH DIR SEVERIN NR FIALA, • Dra/Cri

VERONIKA FRANZ RATING Dolby R RUNNING Vis/Atmos

Veteran British UNTITLED filmmaker TOM Michael &

Winterbottom JERRY wrote FILM and directed

theatrical debut after being presumed THE lost UNTITLED TIME 100 MIN.

this satire of Fri, the excesses 12/23/20 of WIDE the

WONDER for many years. WOMAN It’s the only 1984feature FRED by HAMPTON

THE WITCHES fashion industry, NR • starring Ani his frequent

Fri, Horace 6/5/20 B. Jenkins, WIDE who died soon after PROJECT ORDINARY LOVE Fri, 10/09/20 WIDE collaborator, Steve Coogan.

C filming Gal Gadot, was Kristen completed. Wiig

Fri, 8/21/20 FEB. WIDE 14 / BLEECKER C STREET Anne Hathaway CAST STEVE COOGAN, MORTAL ISLA KOMBAT FISHER, ASA

D Patty Jenkins

NR

D Robert Zemeckis

Fri, 1/15/20 WIDE

CAST RICHARD ROMAIN, TÔMMYE

Joan and Tom have been married for BUTTERFIELD, SHIRLEY HENDERSON,

NR • Act/Adv/Fan • IMAX

NR • Adv/Com

NR • Act

MEYRICK, CAROL SUTTON, BARBARA many years. They are an everyday couple SOPHIE COOKSON DIR MICHAEL

/3D/Dolby Vis/Atmos

TASKER DIR HORACE B. JENKINS RATING with a remarkable love, and there is an WINTERBOTTOM RATING TBA RUNNING

TBA RUNNING TIME 90 MIN.

ease to their relationship which only

TIME 104 MIN.

JANUARY 2020

69

MARCH 2020 / 63


OUR SPONSORS

The Boxoffice Company .. . . . . . 9, 47

Cardinal Sound Systems .. . . . . . . 64

CinemaCon.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Dolphin Leadcom VIP Seating.. . . . 7

Enpar Audio.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63

MOC Insurance Services.. . . . . . . . 2

Moving Image Technologies.. . . . . . 7

MTI Products Autofry .. . . . . . . . 43

Omniterm. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55

QSC.. . . . . . . . . . . inside front cover

Ready Theatre Systems.. . . . . . . . . 59

Retriever Solutions.. . . . . . . . . . . 39

Sensible Cinema Software.. . . . . . 64

Sonic Equipment Co. .. . . . . . . . . . . 3

Spotlight Cinema Networks. . . . . 17

St. Jude Children’s Hospital. . . . . 37

Telescopic

Seating Systems.. . inside back cover

Tivoli.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . back cover

VIP Cinema Seating.. . . . . . . . . . . . 5

JULY 6, 1933, MARKED THE FIRST COVER USING THE FONT

AND COLOR RETURNED TO SERVICE BY Boxoffice Pro:

THE PULSE OF THE MOTION PICTURE INDUSTRY SINCE 1920.

ADVERTISE IN THE APRIL ISSUE:

CINEMACON 2020

RESERVE SPACE BY FEBRUARY 28

64 / MARCH 2020

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines