BeatRoute Magazine AB Edition - March 2020

beatroute

BeatRoute Magazine is a music monthly and website that also covers: fashion, film, travel, liquor and cannabis all through the lens of a music fan. Distributed in British Columbiam Alberta, and Ontario. BeatRoute’s Alberta edition is distributed in Calgary, Edmonton, Banff and Canmore. The BC edition is distributed in Vancouver, Victoria and Nanaimo. BeatRoute (AB) Mission PO 23045 Calgary, AB T2S 3A8 E. editor@beatroute.ca BeatRoute (BC) #202 – 2405 E Hastings Vancouver, BC V5K 1Y8 P. 778-888-1120

MARCH 2020 • FREE

KENNY

+

CARIBOU

U.S. GIRLS

KESHA

THUNDERCAT

& MORE

UNLOCKED & LOADED:

HOW HIP-HOP’S

DUO OF THE

MOMENT MADE

AN ALBUM IN

THREE DAYS



Contents

Photographer Inés Ziouane goes into the night with Brighton’s Black Honey

(pictured) and others, documenting international stars on the rise.

Visit beatroute.ca for a sneak peak behind the scenes through her camera lens.

INÉS ZIOUANE

Music

4n UP FRONT

Looking forward to the 2020

Juno Awards, we check in to

host city Saskatoon, SK to find

out why it’s called the Paris of

the Prairies.

6n Artist Features

Thundercat, Kesha, U.S. Girls,

Caribou, and more.

21n Monthly Playlist

All the singles we can’t stop

listening to this month.

24nAlbum Reviews

Little Dragon, Phantogram, The

Garden, Jessie Reyez, D.O.A.,

Porches, and more.

+

CARIBOU

U.S. GIRLS

KESHA

THUNDERCAT

& MORE

UNLOCKED & LOADED:

Cover Story

KENNY

HOW HIP-HOP’S

DUO OF THE

MOMENT MADE

AN ALBUM IN

THREE DAYS

16 Denzel Curry & Kenny

Beats

A hip-hop match made

in heaven, Kenny Beats

and Denzel Curry channel

their manic chemistry into

Super Bowl-level energy on

Unlocked.

MARCH 2020 • FREE

LifeStyle

26nStyle

Beyoncé’s Ivy Park x adidas

collab is gender-neutral

and features a stunning

orange and maroon colour

palette borrowed from her

signature bold style.

30nTravel

Boise, Idaho: Spuds, buds,

and destinationless exploration

in the City of Trees.

YYC

33nSanta Le

Los Angeles multicultural

collective thrives on street

corner spontaneity.

35nYYC Agenda

Stu Connor at the Oak Tree

gives us the lowdown on

whiskey while Downstage

Theatre’s Men Express

Their Feelings explores

hockey and its complex

emotions in a comedic

production that will crush

you into the boards.

36nThe Slocan Ramblers

Canadian bluegrass heavyweights

keep it fresh and

physical.

37n YYC Local Artist

Spotlight

Justine Vandergrift finds

motivation in unfulfilling relationships

and heartbreak,

while indie outfit Young

Neighbours find deep

friendships in long-term

songwriting project.

40nEssential Edmonton

Marlaena Moore confronts

her imposter syndrome

head-on with the release of

her new album, Pay Attention,

Be Amazed.

41n Cheat Sheet

BeatRoute’s Essential List

— the must-see shows this

month in Calgary.

Jessie Reyez turns pain into beauty on

Before Love Came To Kill Us. Page 25

MARCH 2020 BEATROUTE 3


UpFront

MARCH

Publisher

Julia Rambeau Smith

Editor in Chief

Glenn Alderson

Associate Editor

Brad Simm

Lead Designer

Alex Kidd

Layout/Production Manager

Rachel Teresa Park

Managing Editors

Josephine Cruz

Melissa Vincent

Contributing Editors

Sebastian Buzzalino

Dayna Mahannah

THE 2020 JUNO AWARDS

SASKATOON MUSIC SCENE SECRETS

VENUES:

ndearingly known as the “Paris of the

EPrairies” or “Bridge City”, Saskatoon

is this year’s host city for the Juno

Awards. Known for its disproportionate

number of bridges over water (weird flex),

here are five Saskatoon music scene

gems to

watch for on the ground at this year’s

Juno Awards.

Amigos

Earning its place at Canada’s National

Music Centre, Amigos has been a

cornerstone venue for over 20 years,

known for its undefeated artist hospitality

and Tex-Mex food.

Broadway Theatre

Originally a heritage theatre, this

non-profit and promoter now presents

countless shows across Saskatoon,

bringing in diverse acts spanning from

GZA to Godspeed You! Black Emperor.

Hip-Hop House Party

at The Common Room

DJs Mikey Dubz & Kidalgo’s Hip-Hop

House Party is Saskatoon’s longest

running hip-hop night. Hosted at

The Common Room by Coors Event

Centre, it offers free entry, pool tables,

and popcorn.

Tefrondon & Trifecta Sound Co.

Tefrondon, Saskatoon’s current DJ boywonder,

has hosted two of the city’s most

packed party nights, Lituations and Soiree.

He also runs shows with his crew Trifecta

Sound Co. Keep an eye out for anything

Tefrondon-related, as well as other Trifecta

Sound Co. artists in the JUNOfest lineup.

The Bassment

This original Saskatoon jazz venue holds

the vibes of LA’s 70s-era supper clubs.

LOCAL MUSIC:

lthough largely known for folk and

Arock acts like The Sheepdogs and

The Dead South, Saskatchewan and

Saskatoon are also home to electronic

and urban artists gaining international

acclaim. Catch some of these artists also

performing at JUNOfest.

Alex Bent + The Emptiness* - "Coolin"

If Frank Ocean, Post Malone, and Our

Lady Peace had a baby, this is that baby

(from his album, “Baby”).

Denise Valle* - "Repeat Affections"

Saskatoon’s own El Salvadorian “Queen

of Soul”.

respectfulchild - "Glitter"

Non-binary, classically trained Malaysian-

Chinese violinist finds a loop pedal.

Toria Summerfield - "Kiss Me Lean"

Introverted Myspace bedroom-pop with

the heart of a Soundcloud rapper.

VBND & Katie Tupper - "Name

(On My Tongue)"

Charlotte Day Wilson had better watch

her back! Keep an eye out for Tupper’s

solo work in 2021.

Samurai Champs* - "Still Mine"

The Southeast Asian hip-hop boy band

from the middle of nowhere.

VBRTR & Sienna Lee - "Want You"

Future-R&B Filipino DJ-producer duo.

*performing at JUNOfest

By MARVIN CHAN

The Juno Awards air on CBC, Sunday,

March 15 at 5 p.m. PST/8 p.m. EST.

Samurai Champs

Contributors

Ben Boddez • Marvin Chan

Jordan Currie • John Divney

Aerin Fogel • Isaac Nikolai Fox

Fraser Hamilton • Natalie Harmsen

Christian Kindrachuk • Brendan Lee

Christine Leonard • Sarah Macdonald

Kayla MacInnis • Max Mertens

Yasmine Shemesh • Matt Williams

Sumiko Wilson • Aurora Zboch

Contributing Photographers

Johan Bergmark • Jeff Berk

Sebastian Buzzalino • Aris Chatman

Parker Day • Christine Do

Christopher Good • Phillip Harris

Max Hirschberger • Richmond Lam

Shervin Lanez • Jerris Madison

Colin Medley • Thomas Neukum

Ines Ziouane

Coordinator (Live Music)

Darrole Palmer

Advertising Inquiries

Glenn Alderson

glenn@beatroute.ca

778-888-1120

@beatroutemedia

Distribution

BeatRoute is distributed in

Vancouver, Victoria, Calgary,

Edmonton, Winnipeg,

Saskatoon and Toronto

Contact Us

26 Duncan Street,

Suite 500, Toronto ON, M5V 2B9

editor@beatroute.ca

@beatroutemedia

beatroutemedia

beatroute.ca



THUNDERCAT IS LOOKING

ON THE BRIGHT SIDE OF LIFE

LA’S MOST IN-DEMAND BASSIST AND SINGER

LOOKS FOR LIGHT AND LAUGHTER IN DARK TIMES.

By MAX MERTENS

Over the course of his prolific career, Los

Angeles bassist and singer Thundercat

(born Stephen Bruner) has never stopped

moving.

In the past decade, he’s released three

critically-acclaimed albums, collaborated

with the likes of Kendrick Lamar, Pharrell Williams,

and Kenny Loggins (winning a Grammy for his work

on 2015’s To Pimp a Butterfly), and toured around

the world. He had no immediate plans of slowing

down, until a tragic death in late 2018 forced him to

reconsider. Bruner was scheduled to open for frequent

collaborator and close friend Mac Miller on his North

American tour shortly before the Pittsburgh rapper

died of an accidental drug overdose.

“That was my best friend,” Bruner says over the

phone from his home in Los Angeles. “It was one of

those moments that was hard for me to process. I had

to sit down and let that in — that was nobody else’s

weight to carry, it was mine. As much as I wanted to

try and push through and go wherever I wanted to go

mentally about it life took precedent.”

It Is What It Is, his fourth album on Brainfeeder

Records, finds Bruner waxing philosophical about love

(“At this point, I’m definitely starting to feel more like

Future than Drake,” he jokes), loss, and navigating life’s

many ups and downs. The 15 songs on the album are

honest, sometimes heartbreaking, and frequently very,

very hilarious. There’s a song about wearing a Dragon

Ball Z durag (“Dragonball Durag”) and another about

joining the mile-high club featuring comedian (and

occasional rapper) Zack Fox (“Overseas”).

This tongue-in-cheek humour is nothing less than

what you’d expect from the man who describes

himself as an “internet troll,” and who shared his North

American tour dates in a short video showing him

“working out” in Uma Thurman’s Kill Bill outfit, eating

cat food, and pretending to hump a stuffed Pokemon.

“I prefer to laugh at most things, I guess,” he admits,

when asked if comedy helps him process these

personal experiences that feel like being stuck in a

never-ending dark tunnel. “There’s always the old

saying: ‘Every musician wants to be a comedian and

every comedian wants to be a musician.’”

Similar to his 2017 album, Drunk, It Is What It Is brings

a laundry list of collaborators into Bruner’s intergalactic

world. But rather than falling victim to the streaming

era’s tendency to encourage overstuffed, feature-heavy

albums, It Is What It Is weaves in its supporting cast —

like saxophonist and bandleader Kamasi Washington,

Canadian jazz outfit BADBADNOTGOOD, and

enigmatic rapper Lil B (“He’s got a really big heart and

he really wants stuff to be dope, but he’s also about his

business, and I fuck with that”) — naturally.

“Black Qualls,” which he’s described as a meditation

on what it means to be a young black American, sees

him trading vocals with Steve Lacey, Childish Gambino,

and Steve Arrington of 70s funk group, Slave.

For Bruner, whose upbringing in an incredibly

musical family (both of his brothers are musicians, and

his father was a drummer who played with Diana Ross,

the Temptations, and Gladys Knight) gave him the

chance to meet many LA jazz greats, he welcomes the

opportunity to learn from his forebears and give them

their flowers while they’re able to smell them.

“If you get a chance to connect those dots on any

level, it’s amazing, because you don’t always get to

do that,” he says. “Having Steve Arrington and Steve

Lacey and Donald Glover on a track, I feel like if we

would’ve been a band back when the Ohio Players was

popping, they would have had some competition.”

Now at 35 years old, Bruner’s armed himself with

collected wisdom, like recognizing the pitfalls of social

media. There’s a repeated line on “Black Qualls,” where

he’s embroiled in conflict: “Wanna post this on the 'gram,

but don't think I should.” It’s a statement that reads like

a 21st century parable. Though Bruner insists that he

doesn’t take his internet presence too seriously, he’s still

self-aware. “I don’t want to be the guy that’s oblivious to

where they’re at. I still pay attention.”

He's not alone in his ability to split his attention

between a cheeky remark and a sincere response. Is

there another way to navigate timelines where we can

expect to be fed a dank meme right before a eulogy?

Bruner’s quick to point out that while the mediums

may have changed, outrage and grief are not new

phenomena to humankind. In the past year, Los

Angeles abruptly and shockingly lost two cultural

icons, rapper Nipsey Hussle and NBA player Kobe

Bryant. “I think what was surprising was that Nipsey

got killed in broad daylight, and the disregard for him

not just as a rising star, but as a person,” he says.

Bruner also paid tribute to Bryant by sharing a photo

on Twitter of his cat wearing a #24 purple and gold

Lakers jersey. “You can feel the broken heart of

Los Angeles right now,” he says. “It put things into

perspective, I think, for everybody out here, how

important the time is you have with each other, and

how fragile life is.”

“My music teacher — he was kind of like a

second dad to me — he always said things

like ‘Prepare for the worst and hope for the

best,’” Bruner continues. “Those moments

when he said stuff like that to me have

never meant more than they do

right now, in

these moments

when we’re

experiencing some

of the gnarliest stuff

in our generation. You

just try to find the good

in these moments, that’s

all you can do.” STAR

6 BEATROUTE MARCH 2020


PHOTOS BY PARKER DAY

MARCH 2020 BEATROUTE 7


KESHA’S

RECLAMATION OF JOY

In late January, the day before the

release of her fourth full-length album,

High Road, I’m on the phone with

Kesha telling her about my bad father.

I didn’t intend on it. It sort of spilled

out. High Road includes a ballad called

“Father Daughter Dance,” a track I took to

immediately. The song, about Kesha never

knowing her father, opens with “Oh, I wish

my heart wasn’t broken from the start / I

never stood a chance.” I surprised myself

by crying to those first lines. Because of

my soft Scorpio heart, I tell Kesha this. I

tell her all about it.

“Oh my goodness, I have chills,” she

says slowly.

I’ve written about the estranged

relationship I have with my father before.

By being so public about a private pain,

it’s too often a vain pursuit of mine to seek

out a loose camaraderie. Maybe I’m not

so alone. Maybe someone in my small

corner of the Internet will relate and tell

me that we’ll be okay. Kesha echoes this

thought back to me with far more precise

articulation.

“I really never intended on talking about

that side of my life publicly just because it

kind of seemed off limits.” But she pushed

herself to examine why she felt compelled

to—for such an honest person—leave

this portion of her life untouched. “It was

nothing I ever thought I would discuss

publicly, especially in the form of a song.

To hear somebody say that they relate to

[the song] is why I put it out, even though

it makes me incredibly uncomfortable and

feel emotions that I haven't even quite

worked out yet.”

For more than a decade, Kesha has

given us permission to feel but also to

have a really good fucking time. The pop

star, formerly Ke$ha, defined the 2010s

with her vivacious, youthful, and trashy

songs like “TiK ToK,” which spent nine

weeks at number one on the Billboard Hot

100, and became one of the best selling

digital singles of all time, collecting over

$25 million in sales. Her debut record,

2010’s Animal, was a revelatory, partypraising,

unpretentious pop record. And

despite profiles at the time that attempted

to reduce her work to superficial club

bangers, Kesha spoke assuredly about

her future as a pop singer with enduring

talent.

It feels foreign now to tap into that

particular category of sizzling, temporary

fun. This concept of fun seems restricted

to a certain age range; that when you

age out and leave your early 20s or begin

“adulting,” that fun is lost to that moment

of time.

And this is what Kesha, now 33, is

trying to do still for herself: reclaim a

familiar, but more honest, joy that’s

entirely on her own terms.

High Road is Kesha fully formed. It

takes all the best parts of her career and

firmly places them in her own hands,

moulding a fun, thoughtful, prickly and

sweet record. Kesha executive produced

it — a task she enthusiastically took to.

“I like being able to control the narrative

of what this record is because it will live

far beyond my lifespan,” she explains.

“I wanted to represent myself in a really

honest, authentic way.”

High Road runs through pop, hip-hop,

and country. It even finds Kesha rapping

again. All emphasize her I-don’t-give-ashit

attitude (so enviously formed on the

biting “Honey”) and her propensity to fuck

all the way off into whatever experience

she’s in. Both Sturgill Simpson and Beach

Boys legend Brian Wilson join her on

“Resentment;” cruisemate and legend

herself Big Freedia features on the single

“Raising Hell.”

On “Shadow,” Kesha’s exultation is

more a deft proclamation as she sings,

“I’m so happy and you hate that, I love

love, I love life” and “get your shadow

out of my sunshine.” Here, she sounds

liberated. I asked Kesha how she

managed to find happiness. It’s a daunting

task for an everyday person, but for a pop

star? It seems mountainous.

“To maintain your sense of self and,

at the same time, entertain and provide

people with what they want — I feel like

I've earned my happiness.

“I put a lot of work into reclaiming my

voice, reclaiming the right to be happy and

joyful. I have no reason to be ashamed or

to shy away from talking about going out

and having a wild party night or having an

amazing sex life. These are all things that

are realistic in my life and part of living as

a human being.”

It invites a moment of pause, and an

opportunity to investigate how we treat

women who have been generous with

us by publicly coming forward with the

most difficult moments of their life. Should

that trauma remain integral to their art or

person and define them going forward? At

what point do we say, yes, you deserve to

be happy again in whatever way that takes

shape?

It should go without saying that Kesha

deserves to feel joy. That for everything

the pop star has sung about or gone

through in the most public way imaginable,

at the end of the day, she has more than

earned to feel normal and content with

her life.

“When people see me for who I really

am, I think that's one of the things that

guide me,” she says. STAR

By SARAH MACDONALD

8 BEATROUTE MARCH 2020


MUSIC BC

MERGE

MARCH 2020 BEATROUTE 9


SHINE

A LIGHT

ALLOW U.S. GIRLS TO

REINTRODUCE HERSELF

If Heavy Light, the eighth and latest studio album by

U.S. Girls, had a thesis, it would be that you can’t move

forward without first looking behind. The 13-track LP by

Meg Remy’s acclaimed experimental post-pop project

plays like a shifting gaze between the person Remy

was on past records, and who she’s evolved into on her

newest release.

The nostalgia infused in the sounds and messages of

each track is refreshing. More often than not, the swift

emergence of adulthood sweeps in before you even realize

that your adolescence has been left behind. Instead, Heavy

Light chronicles Meg Remy taking the time to share a fond

goodbye with earlier iterations of herself, all while stepping

into a new era of her artistry.

“A lot of the record is about looking back,” Remy explains

at a Bloor West coffee shop on a chilly February afternoon

in Toronto. “People always say, ‘If I could go back, I would

do this,’ or ‘if I knew what I know now, here’s what I would

do.’ I don’t think that’s really true.” While peeking from

beneath her shaggy, flaxen bangs, she speaks softly, but

with comfortable conviction.

But despite acknowledging that you can’t go back, she

spends much of her new album looking back.

If Remy’s last project, In a Poem Unlimited (2018), was her

meditation on anger, then Heavy Light is her reckoning with

the past–before her abbreviation and her alias were born.

Before she was U.S. Girls, she was Meg Remy, and

before Meg Remy, she was Meghan Ann Uremovich. “I

come from a really specific (background),” she says of

her upbringing. “I’m American and I’m white. I was raised

Catholic and went to private school.” Having recognized

that elements of her identity afford certain privileges, her

storytelling has changed. “I can’t speak to anybody else’s

experience. All I can do is present mine and listen when

others present theirs.”

In 2011, Artforum’s Andrew Hultkran concluded that

Remy was “a woman who clearly spends a lot of time in her

apartment with the shades drawn.” But a decade later, this

assertion is less true than ever. “I wouldn’t have finished the

record if I was alone,” Remy admits. During our chat Remy

explained that she chose to record the album live with a full

band and backing vocalists. She even tapped her husband,

musician Max Turnbull, to do the mixing and mastering.

The collaborative spirit on Heavy Light is a true sign of

how Remy’s approach to her craft has shifted. “To make

something with 15 amazing people, to hear what they want

and incorporate it into my thing so that it’s not just about

me, is so different from being alone in a bedroom.” Though

her creative process still “always starts there,” over a

decade into her career as a solo artist she’s comfortable

letting other people in. “Now I can turn away from [the

bedroom], or let other people be reflected in there.”

Other voices are reflected on the album too — literally.

Tracks on Heavy Light are woven together by interludes

that Remy likens to sonic collages, where she and her

collaborators answer deeply personal questions. Between

tracks, they serve as palette cleansers, where Remy’s

personal narrative is interjected by voices sharing advice

that they would give to their teenage selves, the most

hurtful thing that they have been told, and the colour of

their childhood bedrooms.

The revelations on the interludes and the tracks were

intentionally cathartic. The writing and recording of Heavy

Light aligned with Remy’s introduction to somatic therapy,

which she describes as “a body-based therapy that is all

about clearing the nervous system of trauma.”

Her eyes widen as she explains that “in nature when an

animal gets scared, they freeze, flee or fight. Once they’re

safe, they shake and shimmy to get the tail ends of that

traumatic energy out of their system,” In contrast, Remy

says that “human beings store it.” On Heavy Light, we hear

the release. “The kind of therapy that I was doing opens

you up to pull that out. It helps you so that you don’t store

things going forward.”

One of the things she held onto was “Red Ford Radio,”

one of Remy’s hallmark singles. To close the album, Remy

chose to re-record a reprise of the song and, ironically, it’s

one of the most vivid markers of her metamorphosis.

“My voice has changed,” she reflects. “I have control

over my voice but I don’t have control over the emotion. It’s

about figuring out how to sing these songs without crying

but knowing that it’s ok if I do cry.”

In spite of this, ending her new album with a rerecording

of an early hit was Remy challenging herself. “After working

on this project for 13 years, to go back to these songs that

I wrote and see if they’re sturdy or not; to see if I relate to

them. I wrote that song when I was 22 and I’m 34 now. Do I

still relate to it? Can I stand behind it?” She can.

While the message is the same, her relationship to that

song has grown. “I think I was hiding behind that song

then,” she says. “Now I’m saying, ‘No. This is me.’” STAR

By SUMIKO WILSON

10 BEATROUTE MARCH 2020


JEFF BIERK

MARCH 2020 BEATROUTE 11


CARIBOU

REFLECTING ON MORTALITY WITH LOVE AND OPTIMISM

It happens to nearly everyone at some

point in life. We reach a certain age

or something takes place that grabs

hold of our world and rattles it so hard

we feel it in the depths of our soul.

Relatively ordinary life events, like

birth and death, can cause these seismic

changes within. Whatever the catalyst, it

encourages a different perspective and

we begin to reassess the meaning of

everything around us.

This shift has been happening to Dan

Snaith, the London-based, Ontario-born

composer and musician, over the last

five years. One of the most significant

contributors was the shocking sudden

death of a loved one not much older

than Snaith that ricocheted through his

extended family. Then, both of his parents

experienced health crises that they,

fortunately, overcame. But tragedy, and the

threat of more, prompted a stark awareness

of mortality.

“I feel like I've been very lucky in my life,”

says Snaith, over Skype from the basement

studio of his home in London, England.

“I’ve been, just by good fortune, insulated

from those things. Or maybe, my parents

provided me with a very stable life. But I'm

41 years old. None of us are going to be

immune from those circumstances forever.”

Alongside those personal challenges,

there have been happy moments that

have impacted Snaith just as dramatically,

such as the birth of his second child—who

arrived in the back of a car, no less. This

past Christmas was profound, too: It was

the first Snaith and his wife hosted at their

house. “It was the kind of holiday that I

pictured from my childhood,” Snaith smiles.

“[And] it’s shifted from being about going to

see my parents to my children's experience

and building those memories for them.”

These formative moments—Snaith’s life

experiences—often inform the content

of his music. His last release under

the Caribou moniker, 2014’s Grammynominated

Our Love, played with both

austere and bright arrangements to

delicately reflect on the intricate emotions

that accompany new fatherhood, as well

as complexities existing in his personal

relationships with family and friends.

It makes sense that a contemplation

on the asymmetry between the gradual

way we age, grow, our perceptions of

the person that we are becoming, and

the unanticipated thwack of something

completely reshaping that outlook would

follow on Caribou’s latest effort.

Snaith’s new album, Suddenly, is aptly

named. His record labels (Merge in North

America and City Slang in Europe) were

“The kinds of things that are resonating

in my life right now are maybe not what a

21-year-old expects to hear in the music

that they're listening to...”

hesitant at first, concerned that the

more obvious subject matter might not

appeal to the listeners who championed

the subtleties of Our Love. But for it to

thematically be about anything else would

have been an evasion. It was unavoidable.

“The kinds of things that are resonating

in my life right now are maybe not what a

21-year-old expects to hear in the music

that they're listening to,” Snaith muses. “I

don't know. I feel like there was a real sense

of purpose [on this album]. My music has

always documented, to some degree, my life

and where it's at, but much more so with this.”

Snaith sourced from over 900 song ideas

for Suddenly. A mind-boggling number, but

not so much when considering he makes

music every single day. It is a ritual as much

as it is his creative process, and, as such,

the tracks intrinsically reflect his thoughts

and, inevitably, his truth. “I never listen to

them as an album together until the album's

done.”

“And that’s always an eerie experience to

me, because I listen to [the songs] and I'm

like, ’It fits together. It's somehow a story.

It's somehow a narrative,’ which is what I

want. But I don't have the foresight to be

able to put that together while I'm working

on it. It happens, somehow, by accident,

except that it's not by accident. I think that's

part of the thrill for me—there's this kind

of chase, even after 20 years or more of

making music.”

Similar to, and a deeper exploration than

its predecessor, Suddenly is anchored in

the complex concept of love. And during

a cultural moment so defined by urgent,

polarizing politics, it almost feels like a

brave thing to investigate. Snaith is far from

immune to it all. “I had this idea of progress,

that we would learn more and, as we learn

more as a society, society progresses and

gets better,” he deliberates. “And that's

been shaken by all sorts of things.”

The #MeToo movement is certainly one

of them. And something that hit close to

home when two industry acquaintances

were accused of sexual assault. “You meet

somebody and you think, ‘This is somebody

who has, it seems, the same values as

me. They talk about progressive issues

in a progressive way,’” Snaith says. “And

it undermined this assumption that I had.

They seem nice and you think, ‘Well, they

probably are nice.’ And it made me realize,

‘No, that's not reliable.’ You can't trust that.

“In the same way that those major life

changes just shifted the lens on everything,

the world all of a sudden looks different after

you hear some kind of cataclysmic news.”

That is why, for Snaith, ruminating on love

is requisite. It is a reflection of his underlying

optimism—a natural inclination that is

evident in the way he responds to the rocky

terrain of life (and the world at large) in the

gentle electronic textures of his work.

A significant influence on Suddenly’s

empathetic sonic approach was Beverly

Glenn-Copeland, particularly the ambient

musician’s glimmering 1986 album

Keyboard Fantasies. “It's something that

you listen to and it's a big hug that makes

you feel like things are okay—but not in a

facile way,” Snaith enthuses. “His music is

something that really engages with difficulty

and challenges.”

“Cloud Song” is the most obviously

Glenn-Copeland inspired, with its warm,

rippling synthesizers. But the dreaminess is

very much present throughout, whether in

shimmers underneath drum-driven beats,

like on

“Home,”

which also

samples soul

singer Gloria

Barnes; or as a

delicate ramble

that unexpectedly

hurtles towards

screaming guitar, as

it does on “You and

I.” Together, it makes

for a nuanced, intimate,

and meditative listen that

coats the soul in familiarity

and then turns it into

unanticipated shapes.

As someone who pays careful

attention to details, Snaith thinks

often—and deeply— about the

complicated state of our current

reality. Its knots are something he,

being somewhat of an idealist, is

unsure he has entirely untangled within

himself. But then, there is the music.

It helps make sense of things and

it allows him to engage in the most

powerful way he can.

“I’ve always felt that it was a failing

of my music to relate to the political

dynamics in our world,” Snaith adds.

“And I thought: ‘Why am I not making an

album explicitly about climate change

or explicitly about unfortunate political

circumstances?’

Then I talked to somebody who is

very wise in my life and often gives me

good advice, a photographer friend of

mine named Jason Evans, who does

the covers for all of my records. And

he was like, ‘To make music that aims

to unite’—and hopefully not in a kind of

vacuous way, hopefully in a way that's

somewhat meaningful—‘is actually a

political statement.’ I think a kind of

open-armed embrace is the closest

thing that I can come to reaching out to

people in that way.” STAR

By YASMINE SHEMESH

12 BEATROUTE MARCH 2020


Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra

27 + 28 March 2020 / 7:30PM

Jack Singer Concert Hall

Hits of the '70s:

A Classic Rock

Songbook

The Orchestra and guest singers pay tribute

to the biggest bands of the vinyl years —

Fleetwood Mac, The Doobie Brothers,

Led Zeppelin, and more!

THOMAS NEUKUM - MURAL, STAMFORD HILL ESTATE, BY ARTIST AMBER ELISE

MON. MAR 2

THEATRE CALGARY: SPOTLIGHT

AT THE EDDY

OUT LOUD EDITION

FRI. MAR 6

HONEY DEER WITH S.K.

WELLINGTON

SAT. MAR 7

TIM HUS

FRI. MAR 13

R GRUNWALD WITH JOSHUA

VAN TASSEL

SAT. MAR 14

AB MUSIC 35 FT. MOURAINÈ,

DEBRA POWER, JOSH SAHUNTA

FRI. MAR 20

JACK LUMBER BAND WITH

BACK AT THE WHEEL

SAT. MAR 21

YOUNG NEIGHBOURS

ALBUM RELEASE PARTY

TICKETS AT KINGEDDY.CA

438 9 AVE SE

CLUTCH

FOOD • DRINK • LIVE MUSIC

every week

no cover

JAMIE ALLANACH

LIVE AT LUNCH

12 PM • TUES. TO FRI.

HAPPY HOUR

WITH

WITH

WITH

WITH

calgaryphil.com | 403.571.0849

J O R Y K I N J O

HOWLIN ’

PETE

BOOTS & THE HOOTS

MATT

FRI

MASTERS

PRESENTED

BY

WED

NES

DAY

DAY

TUESDAY

THURSDAY

MARCH 2020 BEATROUTE 13


Artist to Watch

A

ALADEAN KHEROUFI

MELANCHOLIC R&B ANTHEMS BRING

THE SOUL ON VIBRANT DEBUT

ladean Kheroufi is one

of Edmonton’s most

recognizable figures.

The Canadian-Algerian multiinstrumentalist,

DJ, producer, and

arranger is a fixture in some of the

city’s most visible bands, playing

and touring with the likes of The

Velveteins, Marlaena Moore, and

Lucas Chaisson. But far from a

forever-sideman, between constant

tours Kheroufi’s been hard at work

on his debut solo album, a nostalgic,

R&B-inspired 7-inch, titled “Sorry

If Hurt You” b/w “Nothing Ever

Changes.”

“I started recording [the songs] in

my home studio in Edmonton,” says

Kehroufi. “I ended up cutting vocals

in an Airbnb just outside of Munich

while on tour with The Velveteins,

recorded extra guitars and trumpet

courtesy of Billy Aukstik of Charles

By SEBASTIAN BUZZALINO

Bradley & His Extrodinaires in NYC,

and finally brought it back home to

Edmonton to add finishing touches.”

Stepping into the limelight for

his solo debut, Kheroufi shines on

the two tracks that draw on Curtis

Mayfield’s timeless funk, Sonny

Ozuna’s confident genre bending,

and his own assertive songwriting. As

he explains, it’s a natural extension

of his experience playing in others’

bands, but this time, it’s his name on

the album cover.

“Putting out my own music doesn’t

feel much different than playing with

other artists I love,” he says. “The

main goal is making sure more good

music is in the world. Of course, it’s

nice being able to express myself

with my own lyrical content as the

songs are a true representation of

times I’ve gone through.”

“Sorry If I Hurt You” is a soulful

ode to the devastation of the postbreakup

introspection while “Nothing

Ever Changes” is about admitting

defeat, a melancholic party anthem

made for dancing on your own.

With Kheroufi’s trademark sense

of humour and optimism, his debut

7-inch deals with the heavy emotions

putting them to wax and putting good

music out in the world. After all, that’s

what it’s all about, in his own words:

“To ensure more good music is in the

world than bad music. If you don’t

like what you’re doing, why should

anyone else?”

STAR

“Sorry If Hurt You” b/w “Nothing Ever

Changes,” is digitally out now and

will be released as a 7-inch on March

27 via Kimberlite Records. Catch

Aladean Kheroufi live on March 27

at 9910 with Marlaena Moore for a

double album release.

KEETON CHRAPKO

14 BEATROUTE MARCH 2020


Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra

3 April 2020 / 6:30PM

Jack Singer Concert Hall

APRIL 28

JOEL PLASKETT

Rush Hour:

Best of Mozart

Experience Mozart’s greatest hits — join us for

happy hour at 5:30PM followed by a one-hour

concert at 6:30PM.

MARCH 8

ELMER ISELER SINGERS

MARCH 14

DERVISH — THE GREAT IRISH

SONGBOOK

APRIL 5

THE FRETLESS

WITH THE CALGARY YOUTH ORCHESTRA

APRIL 15

DAVE KELLY LIVE – ICONS

LONG & McQUADE

FREE CLINICS

DURING MARCH

calgaryphil.com | 403.571.0849

A series of free career-enhancing clinics specifically

tailored to the needs of musicians, songwriters, producers

and home studio enthusiasts.

APRIL 25

SARAH HARMER

AT THE BELLA

TAYLORCENTRE.CA

3404 5 Avenue NE ∙ (403) 245-3725

calgaryeast@long-mcquade.com

At all Long & McQuade locations, including:

225 58 Avenue SE ∙ (403) 244-5555

calgary@long-mcquade.com

10 Royal Vista Drive NW ∙ (587) 794-3195

calgarynorth@long-mcquade.com

MARCH 2020 BEATROUTE 15


THE FRENETIC CHEMISTRY OF DENZEL CURRY AND KENNY BEATS

By ISAAC NIKOLAI FOX

Denzel Curry is all energy.

Live in concert, this means

mosh pits and only mosh

pits. The centrepoint of all

of the Carol City rapper’s

live shows is “Ultimate,” the

viral 2015 breakout single

that’s become his signature

song. When the drums kick

in over top of producer Ronny J’s mangled

piano loop, limbs and bodies careen together

as he screams into the chaos, completely in

command.

For the better part of a decade now, Curry

has been one of the most explosive, passionate

voices to have emerged from South Florida.

Psychedelic, politically-charged, guttural, loud,

and undeniably catchy all at once, he has carved

out a lane for himself with his rapid-fire stories

of life growing up in Miami Gardens’ Zone 3

neighborhood. Plus, he’s part of a rare group of

artists, like Henry Rollins or JPEGMAFIA, who

can completely thrash their vocal chords for the

sake of a song without coming off as preening

or self-indulgent.

Curry’s uncontainable energy is part of what

drew Kenny Beats, one of rap’s most chameleonic

and charismatic producers of the moment,

to collaborate with him on UNLOCKED, their

newly-released joint project which dropped

in early February. Over the phone from Los

Angeles, he’s still in awe of Curry’s magnetism,

both in-studio and on stage. “I’ve known about

Denzel since he was 17 years old, and once I

saw him at Bonnaroo, I couldn’t fucking believe

what a live performer he was.”

“A lot of artists will rap or scream over their

studio recordings, and you don’t really get the

full performance experience, but Curry has the

crowd control of a rock band at Woodstock.”

UNLOCKED opens with a blast of Madvillain-esque

punk energy, as the vintage

supervillian dialogue implodes, giving way

to a throbbing boom-bap pulse and another

layer of scratched vocals. Effectively, this is

the mood throughout the entire 20-minute

project: the raucous energy of the new South

Florida ragers mixed with a sleek revitalization

of New York’s sample-heavy underground

rap.

16 24 BEATROUTE MARCH 2020


According to Curry, UNLOCKED was based

around their shared joy in exploring the outer

boundaries of their capabilities as musicians.

“We needed to challenge ourselves—but it was

still no challenge for us. It was just a fun, new

thing to do. Creating keeps me going, you know,

and I think it does for Kenny too.”

UNLOCKED’s nu-retro sonic direction is a

major pivot for both artist and producer. Curry’s

most recent projects Zuu and TA13OO were

classic Florida records, loaded front-to-back

with the frantic, syncopated flows and distorted

instrumentals that brought him to fame in the

middle of the 2010s.

Kenny Beats spent most of the past decade

as half of the now-defunct EDM duo Loudpvck.

When that project folded, he locked himself

in the studio and reemerged with progressive,

floor-filling trap instrumentals for everyone

from Rico Nasty (Anger Management), to Key

(777), to FKA Twigs and Future (“Holy Terrain”),

and even Ed Sheeran (“Take Me Back to

London”). Most recently, he’s become the most

popular producer on YouTube with his series

The Cave, where his extended universe of famous

collaborators will often drop by to record

impromptu, high-octane freestyles.

On paper, the two would have seemed like

an obvious combination, but in practice, they

found that the overlap between their trademark

sounds drained their early, unreleased collaborations

of their urgency. Plus, Curry needed time

to move past his (understandable) frustration

with Beats giving another artist a beat he

thought he had claimed for his own. Now, Curry

laughs when asked about the long-dead conflict.

“I was mad as fuck and didn’t want to deal

with him for a while. But time passed and my

cousin showed me The Cave and told me I had

to do an episode of my own. I did, and that got

us back together in the studio last summer.”

The more diplomatic of the two, Beats never

brought up this disagreement, but he did

agree that the UNLOCKED sessions were a

break from their previous experiences working

together. “Our whole conversation that first

day in November was about the new Wu-Tang

documentary on HBO. We started with a drum

break, I pulled up weird old movie samples

for the intro, and we made “Lay_Up.m4a” and

“Pyro (leak 2019)” that first day. When I played

them back the next day, I thought: ‘what the

fuck is this?’ I had two sessions that day with

other people, and I cancelled them both and

told Curry he needed to come back so we

could do more.”

Curry was equally enthusiastic about the new

direction: “Kenny was like ‘bruh, keep coming

back, keep coming back.’ I’d go to his studio,

come back with two more tracks, play them for

my girl, she’d say ‘oh shit, this is fire,’ and then I’d

go back to Kenny’s the next day to do it again.

After three days, we had the project done.”

"DENZEL’S PERSONALITY

IS LIKE HE’S IN THE MIDDLE

OF THE SUPERBOWL AT ALL

TIMES. HE’S SO HYPE, HE’S

GOT SO MUCH PASSION AND

ENERGY, AND HE’LL PUT

ANYTHING ON THE LINE

TO GET HIS POINT ACROSS"

KENNY

Curry isn’t lying about the remarkable speed

of the duo’s recording process allowing them

to enter, almost effortlessly, an entirely new

sonic territory. On “DIET_”, he slides seamlessly

into DMX’s raspy-voice lane, growling into the

microphone as Beats pitch-shifts his voice

to fit the lurching beat. “So.Incredible.pkg” is

the most quintessential New York track on

UNLOCKED, and wouldn’t sound out of place on

a Busta Rhymes or Nas album. Beats builds the

instrumental off of punchy, sampled drums and

washed-out Rhodes lines, giving Curry plenty of

space to combine interpolations of glossy Puff

Daddy hits with straightforward death threats.

Carrying over the nostalgic groove from

“So.Incredible.pkg,” “Track07” combines

the filtered low-end groove of A Tribe Called

Quest’s early albums with the crisp horns

that permeated so many of Pete Rock and DJ

Premier’s classics. Here, Curry plays the party

host, as his warped vocals wash in and out of

the mix. It’s the soundtrack to a mid-1990s

BBQ, composed by two men who were barely

out of infancy at the time.

“Pyro (leak 2019)” is another clear standout

– it might be the closest we ever get to a Kenny

Beats-chipmunk soul crossover episode. A

spectral choir that sounds like it’s being played

underwater washes throughout the background,

while the slow-crawling drums reinforce

Curry’s every lyric. The Floridan pours his

rhymebook out as if his life depended on it, and

delivers hands-down the best opening line on

the entire project: “My bitch bad like battle rappers

that make albums with no [Alchemist]”

Beats laughs when I bring this line up—it’s

one of his favorites, too. He’s clearly proud of

how Curry’s lyrics bring energy to a room.

MARCH 2020 BEATROUTE 25 17


UNLOCKED

is out now

via PH

Recordings

“No matter who I played the album for,

Rick Rubin, Madlib, Ski Mask the Slump

God—that line made EVERYBODY laugh.

I’m playing this for people in their mid-50s

and people in their early 20s, and everyone

is having the same reaction. That’s how you

can tell Curry is really striking a chord.”

Their frenetic recording speed was helped

by the fact that both Curry and Beats are

magnetic, energetic extroverts, permanently

dialed up to 11. “Denzel’s personality is like

he’s in the middle of the Superbowl at all

times. He’s so hype, he’s got so much passion

and energy, and he’ll put anything on the

line to get his point across,” Beats explains

excitedly when talking about the younger

rapper. Curry says the exact same about his

counterpart: “Kenny’s just as animated as I

am. We’ll goof off in the studio, but when we

get to work, we get to work and we get shit

done. That’s how it was, and why we were

able to do this whole project in three days.”

The track titles on UNLOCKED are a sly

nod to the mid-’00s piracy era of the music

industry. Before streaming and Soundcloud

swallowed the music industry whole, The

Pirate Bay and its sketchier predecessor

LimeWire were must-haves for any industrious

young person looking to reload their

iPods with brand-new MP3s. More often

than not, the downloads would come with

unpolished name like “Take_it_Back_v2,”

“Pyro (leak 2019),” and “So.Incredible.pkg”

– to name just a few of the many memorable

track titles on UNLOCKED.

According to Curry, this naming scheme

was a premature middle finger to critics.

“We made this project in three days, and we

knew critics were going to say ‘oh, it doesn’t

sound finished, blah, blah, blah.’ We

wanted to say ‘shut the fuck up’

before they even had the chance to

say it, so we made our track names

look like our session file names or

some shit you’d get when you pirate

music.” They got their point across:

on repeated listens, UNLOCKED’s

deliberate rawness feels like a

feature, not a drawback.

Despite the multi-faceted rollout,

which included the pair getting into a fake

spat, leaking their project, and then releasing

a short movie slash music video where

the two transmogrify themselves inside a

series of animated cartoons, UNLOCKED

avoids gimmick entirely. Made at breakneck

pace and stripped of any excess, it’s a pure

exercise in experimentation by two technicians

who are at the peak of their abilities

and know it.

Curry’s main takeaway from the collaboration

is that while there’s value in honing his

work to perfection, his first instinct is usually

the right and most exciting one. “I knew

me and Kenny were good, but I didn’t know

that we were good enough to make an album

in three days. We didn’t plan it, it was just

on the fly. We figured out the sound, how we

wanted to package it, everything all at once.”

For Beats, UNLOCKED symbolizes the

way that creative discomfort and uncertainty

can be channeled into urgent, immediate

art. “The number one selling-solo piano

album of all time is Keith’s Jarrett’s Köln

Concert, and that was played on a broken,

detuned piano,” he muses. “The greatest

piano album of all time is on a broken instrument,

you see what I’m saying? Sometimes

it takes that discomfort to break through.

When you don’t know where you’re going,

where you can end up is boundless.”

By ISAAC NIKOLAI FOX

ARIS CHATMAN

COVER

“I KNEW ME AND KENNY WERE

GOOD, BUT I DIDN’T KNOW

THAT WE WERE GOOD ENOUGH

TO MAKE AN ALBUM IN THREE

DAYS. WE DIDN’T PLAN IT, IT

WAS JUST ON THE FLY. WE

FIGURED OUT THE SOUND”

DENZEL

18 26 BEATROUTE MARCH 2020


MARCH 2020 BEATROUTE 19



The Playlist

BEATROUTE

RIGHT

BEATROUTE

BEAT

ROUTE

BR

BRLIVE

BRYYZ

10 SONGS IN

HEAVY ROTATION

AT THE BR OFFICES

NOW

CHECK OUT

BEATROUTE.CA

FOR MORE HOT

TRACKS ON

OUR ROTATING

PLAYLIST

+ VIDEOS,

ARTIST

INTERVIEWS

AND MORE!

NOBRO

Don’t Want To Talk

About It

The all-female

Montreal punk

quartet dubbed

this track “as

close to a love

song as we’re

going to get.”

Frontwoman

Kathryn

McCaughey

screams out the

joys of finding

someone new

over crunchy

guitar chords,

but the entire

track is quickly

taken over by

an absolutely

virtuosic drum

solo in the

middle before

the final chorus

roars back in.

Phoebe

Bridgers

Garden Song

Bridgers often

performs

while wearing

a skeleton

bodysuit, which

also appears

on the album

artwork of this

new single. It’s

appropriate

for just how

vulnerable many

of her songs

get. Singing over

a quietly plucked

acoustic pattern

with her paperthin

vocals, she

reflects upon

the passage of

time and the

little moments

that matter.

Kelly Lee

Owens

Melt!

The Welsh

electronic

producer

creates a

slick piece of

environmentalist

techno that

actually samples

the sounds

of glaciers

melting. A voice

repeatedly

whispers “ice”

over a heavy

deep houseinspired

beat

that’s meant to

act as a frantic

call to action,

punctuated

with the more

pleasant sounds

of shimmering

icicles and skate

blades slicing up

a rink.

King Krule

Cellular

On the opening

track of his

latest album,

Man Alive!,

the jazzy

superproducer

gets lost in

his mind in an

interconnected

world that feels

so isolated at

the same time.

With a weary

voice and halfrapped

lyrics,

King Krule links

the divisive

headlines

he reads to

a personal

romantic fallingout,

giving in and

calling her back

in search of

connection.

Billie Eilish

No Time To Die

On paper,

someone

with the quiet

eeriness of

Eilish didn’t

seem like a

natural choice

to record

something with

the dramatic

gravitas of a

Bond theme,

but the teenage

wunderkind

steps

comfortably

into a long line

of legends. Her

aching vocals

soundtrack the

suited superspy

dealing with a

betrayal as the

classic string

patterns swirl

behind her.

PARTYNEXTDOOR

Loyal (Remix)

(Ft. Drake & Bad

Bunny)

This remix of the

latest hit from

the two Toronto

titans adds

some Spanish

flair as Bad

Bunny, the king

of Latin trap,

hops onto the

track, speeding

up the rhythms

of the laid-back

alt-R&B cut with

his extended

verses closing

out the track.

Though there’s

still not much

that can beat

Drake, firmly

in his feelings,

softly crooning

“you’re my best

friend.”

Allie X

Susie Save Your

Love (Ft. Mitski)

Two of indiepop’s

most

celebrated

female artists

finally team

up on a track

to swoop in

together and

rescue poor

Susie from an

undesirable guy;

of course, with

the implication

that she should

be involved with

someone like

them instead.

Featuring a

funky synthpop

explosion

of a chorus,

the two softspoken

sad girls

blend together

beautifully.

The Weeknd

After Hours

The Weeknd’s

fans have been

clamouring for

him to return

to the sleazy

and mysterious

figure with dark

and unsettling

lyrics that he

burst onto the

scene with, and

this six-minute

slow burner

is about as

close as we’re

going to get.

Except this time,

he’s really in

love, perfectly

blending the

rumbling bass

and vocal reverb

of his past with

his upbeat pop

present.

Big Freedia

Chasing Rainbows

(Ft. Kesha)

Two of pop

music’s most

notorious

party people

link up once

again, this time

for Freedia’s

single, on a truly

triumphant track

where they ride

away from all

the haters on

a rainbow. The

Queen of New

Orleans Bounce

mixes up the

track to better

resemble her

signature sound

with some

rapid-fire flows

and calls to the

dancefloor.

Dizzy

Sunflower

The Junowinning

indie

band returns

with a summery

and upbeat pop

track where

they remind

themselves

to snap out

of the cycle

of mundane

everyday life and

start facing the

sun. Sampling

a choir the

band overheard

rehearsing at

an Oshawa

rec centre and

containing

a delightful

synth-keyboard

solo, this one

is a feel-good

anthem to

help usher in

springtime vibes.

MARCH 2020 BEATROUTE 21


AVAILABLE

NOW

THE BRAND NEW ALBUM

FEATURING THE SINGLES UNDER THE GRAVEYARD,

STRAIGHT TO HELL AND ORDINARY MAN

OUT NOW

22 BEATROUTE MARCH 2020


Reviews

ALBUM

ELLEN EDMAR.

LITTLE DRAGON

New Me, Same Us

Ninja Tune

Little Dragon’s sixth studio album,

New Me, Same Us, revels in its dreamy

mood. The Swedish quartet has

claimed that this album is their most

collaborative yet, as if promising that

this time they’ve finally found a perfect

groove and communication between

members. Thankfully, it’s true for the

most part.

The band excels at finding a cozy

niche between pop, R&B, jazz and electronica,

gliding through what makes for

an easy listening experience. It’s never

challenging, but perhaps that’s the

point, as lead singer Yukimi Nagano’s

unique and absolutely gorgeous voice

envelops you, providing comfort and an

immediate sense of ease as opening

track, “Hold On,” rolls out.

While the album never has a bad

moment, Nagano’s voice is constantly

searching to push the album into true

excellence.

On their Ninja Tune debut, the title New

Me, Same Us rings true in many ways,

which feels like a positive step forward

for the band in terms of both their

sound and originality.

Best Track: “Every Rain”

Fraser Hamilton


MUSiC ALBUM REVIEWS

JOHAN BERGMARK

PETER BJORN

AND JOHN

Endless Dream

INGRID

Peter Bjorn and John celebrate their

20th anniversary with the release

of their ninth studio album, Endless

Dream. The trio strip things back to

their pop dreamscape roots with a

focus on bright, colourful beats and

playful folk-tinged vocals — sorry,

no whistling this time.

Every song is hooky with funky

grooves, full of new wave and

80s-pop influence, a turnaround

from their previous moody album

Darker Days. Endless Dream might

just brighten your day, leaving you

unaware of your tapping feet and

sudden positive outlook on life.

Best Track: “On The Brink”

Kayla MacInnis

MAX HIRSCHBERGER

D.O.A.

Treason

Sudden Death

NAP EYES

Snapshot of a Beginner

Jagjaguwar

THE GARDEN

Kiss My Super Bowl Ring

Epitaph

PORCHES

Ricky Music

Domino Recording Co.

Porches returns with Ricky Music,

a further refinement in Aaron

Maine’s dedication to making 80s

synth inspired indie pop on his

computer.

The album is less broken than

2018’s uneven but excellent The

House and more experimental than

2016’s pretty much perfect Pool.

Porches’ most alluring asset

continues to be Maine’s melancholy

croon, always sounding like

the saddest guy in the room.

I can’t think of anyone that

can sell a line like “do you wanna

cry? I boo hoo”, but I bought it on

“Hair.” The same song contains a

certified gem that is hard not to

relate to: “I’m kinda pretty, kinda

busted too.”

Best Track: “Do U Wanna”

John Divney

With a raging fire of political

contempt burning, Vancouver’s

original hardcore punks, D.O.A.,

ring in the decade with a manifesto

for the modern age.

Over 40 years since founding

member, Joey “Shithead” Keithley

started the band, Treason is a

tight eight-track offering that

highlights Keithley’s unique ability

to knit catchy lyrics, blazing guitar

solos, and breakneck punk rock

into one single entity that stays

perpetually fresh right up until

the very last slightly off-kilter

note. Treason lives up to D.O.A.’s

storied history, proving that as the

world continues to get weirder,

they seem to only get more

pissed off and poignant.

Best Track: “My My, Hey Hey”

Brendan Lee

Nap Eyes have a superpower of

stretching time like playdough.

Every song on the Halifax natives’

fourth album, Snapshot of a Beginner,

should be printed in a pop-up

book of poetry. Their sound is

effortlessly low-key but especially

hi-fi, creating a polished, ambling

landscape for frontman Nigel

Chapman’s pragmatism.

Get strung out on “Real

Thoughts” before tapping into the

nuanced Puff The Magic Dragon

vibes of “Dark Link.” There is a

dichotomy here; it digs at the lazy-hustle-lazy

orbit of the zeitgeist.

The cohesiveness of Snapshot

peeks at the sixth dimension

through windows of daily banalities.

This is their magic.

Best Track: “Fool Thinking Ways”

Dayna Mahannah

The Garden conveys the idle dissatisfaction

of life in a clash of sounds

on their punchy fourth studio album,

Kiss My Super Bowl Ring.

Brothers Wyatt and Fletcher

Shears never adhere to one

narrow sound. Their DIY spirit

incorporates electronic and punk,

switching from minimalistic to

bombastic in an instant on tracks

like “Clench To Stay Awake” and

“A Struggle.” The ennui in the lyrical

content of “Sneaky Devil” and

“Hit Eject” express being fed up

with corrupt institutions and their

injustices.

The record wastes no time catapulting

listeners into its chaotic

world. Frustration and boredom

have never sounded so enlivening.

Best Track: “Sneaky Devil”

Jordan Currie

24 BEATROUTE MARCH 2020


NECK OF THE

WOODS

The Annex of Ire

Pelagic Records

PHILIP HARRIS

SHERVIN LAINEZ

The newest dispatch from thorny

Vancouver metal arbour Neck of

the Woods finds its rhythm method

in the midst of madness.

Chromatic technical prowess

gleams on “Ambivalence” while

the miopic soul-seeking of “Vision

Loser’’ levels the landscape like an

atomic blast. Jeff Radomsky’s voice

rises above the fray of “Strange

Consolation” before he finds solace

in the guitar wire spires that pierce

the celestial vault on “The Tower.”

Built on a slicker-than-wet-asphalt

foundation,the entire album

PHANTOGRAM

Ceremony

Republic Records

Phantogram has never been

known to confront things quietly.

The electronic rock duo made up

of Sarah Barthel and Josh Carter

present their fourth album, Ceremony,

with a different approach.

Following the loss of her

sister, Barthel looks deep into

the concept of death, grieving,

and moving forward. It can get

overwhelming at times, but there’s

an occasional oasis of calm, like

on the standout track, “Glowing,”

where we get to appreciate

Barthel’s impressive, controlled

hangs together with palpable cohesion

and clarity of purpose. From

the door-kick introduction provided

by the title track, it’s apparent that

Neck of the Woods aren’t giving up

any ground when it comes to the

gritty gains they’ve made.

Best Track: “The Tower”

Christine Leonard

vocals and hear the emotion

behind the lyrics.

Ceremony isn’t perfect, but its

urgency in confronting unspoken

feelings is what makes it interesting

and emotionally investing.

Best Track: “Glowing”

Fraser Hamilton

WAXAHATCHEE

Saint Cloud

Merge Records

Getting sober often involves a moment

of self-reckoning, discovering

what’s left after the hangovers

subside for good.

Waxahatchee devotes Saint

Cloud to exploring that idea, coming

to terms with herself through

her trademark moving and romantic

poetry, set against a musical

backdrop as sparse and delicate

as the wispy rural environs of her

native Alabama. Honest and unflinching,

her fifth full-length turns

inward in an attempt to connect

outward. In doing so, she emerges

with a deeper love for those around

her by learning to love herself first.

“I take it for granted/If I could love

you unconditionally/I could iron out

the edges of the darkest sky,” she

sings on album standout, “Fire.”

With Saint Cloud, it’s clear Waxahatchee

is entering a new age with

her head held high and a newfound

appreciation for the beautiful

details that surround her.

Best Track: “Fire”

CHRISTOPHER GOOD

Sebastian Buzzalino

JESSIE REYEZ

Before Love

Came To Kill Us

Island Records

Jessie Reyez is one of the most

refreshing and unlikely pop stars

working in music right now.

Dropping back the hip-hop and

R&B production of her previous

material for a new orchestral and

cinematic sound, Reyez paints

a series of beautifully tragic pictures

of unattainable or doomed

romances.

Featuring quite a few classic-sounding

doo-wop inspired

tracks, the album is packed with

twistedly morbid metaphors for

love, as if they were designed to

waltz to at a funeral.

DANA GAVANSKI

Yesterday is Gone

Flemish Eye Records

Introspection is the common

thread that cuts through Dana

Gavanski’s lo-fi breakup album,

Yesterday is Gone. Folk and pop

collide to produce hazy musings on

personal growth.

Gavanski reflects delicately on

all the pain and loss that comes

with losing a lover. Her honeyed

vocals tiptoe around whimsical

lyricism about the changing of the

seasons and the slow burn of ti me.

Sorrow transforms into a thriving

heartbreak paradise as ethereal

The album’s title refers to

a friendship that was “killed”

because he jumped in before

Reyez was ready. Adding some

heart-wrenching personal twists,

everything Reyez says here hu rts,

but it sounds so beautiful.

Best Track: “Coffin”

Ben Boddez

melodies infuse the record to highlight

the essentials: stripped-down

vocals, guitar and a pitter patter of

drums and piano.

Best Track: “Yesterday Is Gone”

Natalie Harmsen

MARCH 2020 BEATROUTE 25


Style

RUN THE

SHE’S CONQUERED

MUSIC AND NOW

BEYONCÉ IS SETTING

HER SIGHTS ON

SPORTSWEAR

26 24 BEATROUTE MARCH 2020


WORLD

By JOSEPHINE CRUZ

Photos by CHRISTINE DO

Model/Styling: DIANE J LOUIS

As soon as the news came that Beyoncé’s

IVY PARK brand was dropping a

collaboration with storied sportswear

giant adidas, one thing was absolutely

guaranteed: it was going to sell out.

Before anyone had seen a lookbook, a

product shot or even a design sketch,

the collection was destined—like so

many of Beyoncé’s other creative

endeavours—for dominance.

When it dropped on Friday, January

17, the first season of Beyoncé IVY

PARK x adidas fulfilled that destiny

with ease, much to the delight of her

faithful Beyhive who were able to nab

some of the coveted pieces, and the

chagrin of others who missed the

drop and caught (what hypebeast

culture calls) the dreaded “L.”

Because this is Beyoncé we’re

talking about, Mrs. Knowles-Carter

didn’t release her collection like

everyone else. In the days leading up

to the launch, she seeded pieces to

her A-list friends like Reese Witherspoon,

Zendaya, Cardi B, Laverne

Cox, Janelle Monáe and Hailey Bieber,

all packaged up in luxurious PR boxes

shaped like orange rolling racks.

And if that wasn’t enough, for her

biggest marketing tactic, Beyoncé

used a trick she herself perfected

back in December 2013 when she

unleashed her acclaimed self-titled

album on the world by complete

surprise. The IVY PARK x adidas

collection released a full day earlier

than originally planned, setting social

media—and hopeful buyers—into a

frenzy as everyone tried to get their

hands on the pieces.

The capsule collection was

completely gender neutral and was

comprised of apparel, accessories

and four sneaker styles. The collection

featured a stunning orange and

maroon colour palette and borrowed

from Beyoncé’s signature bold style

with asymmetric dresses and jackets,

shrugs, cargo skirts, and jumpsuits

alongside elevated staples such

as hoodies, biker shorts, tees, and

sports bras. While this season may

have sold out, this isn’t the end of the

partnership between Ivy Park and

adidas, so keep your eyes peeled for

future releases.

MARCH 2020 BEATROUTE 25 27


Style

Love on top

Four pillars of the adidas x IVY PARK Collab

1 .ORANGE

adidas x IVY PARK

Halter Bra, Solar

Orange, $45 USD

2. UNISEX CUTS

adidas x IVY

PARK Mock Neck

Sweatshirt, Ecrtin/

Maroon, $90 USD

3. ELEVATED BASICS

adidas x IVY PARK

Cargo Sweatpants,

Maroon/Solar

Orange, $85 USD

4. STATEMENT SHOES

adidas x IVY

PARK Nite Jogger,

Maroon/Solar

Orange, $160 USD

28 26 BEATROUTE MARCH 2020



TRAVEL

BOISE, IDAHO:

TREEFORT MUSIC

FESTIVAL

SPUDS, BUDS AND

DESTINATIONLESS

EXPLORATION IN THE

CITY OF TREES

By MELISSA VINCENT

ALDEN SKEIE

In 2019, Forbes named Boise, Idaho the

fastest-growing American city, and last

year, The City of Trees took the top spot

for overall livability when it was ranked the

best place to live for millennials. But looking

beyond the weight of impressive accolades,

a casual visit to Boise quickly reveals a city

whose spirit tells its own narrative.

With the easy-going charm of Canada’s west coast, and the “come as

you are" tolerance of the Mountain states, all jammed into the ever-evolving

bustle of a budding metropolis attempting to carve out a new identity, there’s

something familiar, compelling, and, if you give in, undeniably irresistible

about Boise. Because below a sprawling mountain backdrop, and adjacent to

Boise State University’s famously blue football field, the city’s wide sidewalks,

bike-friendly streets, and noticeable street culture invites destinationless

exploration.

Due to this, it’s difficult to imagine a festival like Treefort Festival — the

city’s exceptional multi-genre, multidisciplinary music festival, now in its ninth

year—serving as a better representation of the very best of the city come

to life. And because of its ability to capture the life-sized humility of a small

town with world class musicians, internationally renowned artists and writers,

and a remarkably curious approach to programing rooted in inclusion and

representation; it’s similarly difficult to imagine Treefort happening in another

American city.

With past headliners including Vince Staples, Toro Y Moi, and Parliament

Funkadelic, 2020 welcomes silken-pop revisionist Omar Apollo, electroniceverything

innovators Chromatics, sun-baked desert rockers Calexico, and,

as always, local boys Built to Spill, a clear example that the festival continues

to offer a slice of something for everyone.

30 BEATROUTE MARCH 2020

Treefort Festival

Mar. 25 - Mar. 29, 2020

treefortmusicfest.com

Tix: $125-$210

DESTINATIONS

Idaho State Museum

610 Julia Davis Dr

Originally built in 1950, the Idaho State Museum

celebrated its grand reopening two years ago

with an ambition to accurately tell the story

of the state, through the story of its people.

During Treefort festival, the museum morphs

into the landing site of a diverse range of talks

on subjects like exploring the human diaspora,

and understanding the benchmarks of activism,

alongside more eclectic talks like a deep dive

(pun intended) into the the state’s river systems.

Rhodes Skatepark (4)

1555 W Front St.

Stretching across 1.2 acres under Interstate 184,

Rhodes skatepark is impressive due to its sheer

size. Since its construction, the world-class

skatepark has served as a crucial community

hub and support for at-risk youth, but those

with a flair for adventure might come looking for

something more. For the last three years, the

park has hosted the X Games Qualifier, offering

the opportunity to see pros at the top of their

game.

EATS & DRINKS

Petite 4

4 N. Latah St.

Sarah Kelly cut her teeth as a self-taught chef

at both grocery stores and fine dining restaurants

before opening the beloved Bleubird

sandwich shop, which she shuttered with

partner David to open Petite 4. Serving a wide

range of French bistro-inspired dishes, expect

staff in pinstriped aprons, a rotating dessert

menu, or if you’re in luck, a Friday night oyster

cart announced 24 hours in advance via Instagram.

Madre

1034 S La Pointe St.

It’s very likely that even the most devoted taco

aficionados have never had a taco quite like

Madre’s non-traditional upscale tacos. James

Beard House is devoted to using sustainably-sourced

ingredients. Ever had an Idaho

spud and chorizo taco? Or a vegetarian pineapple

al pastor taco? Now’s your chance.


1 3

ALLIE SMITH

2

CHRISTINA BIRKINBINE

4 5

AARON RODRIGUEZ

AMY RUSSELL

Mai Thai (2)

750 W Idaho St.

For Chef Josh Maciolek, pretty good doesn’t

cut it. The Thai restaurant sets its sights on

the cosmos with an approach to Southeast

Asian fusion that blends both classic and contemporary

styles of regional cuisine through

an always innovative menu. A beloved local

favourite, if they’re pad thai doesn’t convince

you, their 12 year streak of being voted the

city’s best Thai restaurant will.

Guru Donuts (1)

928 W Main St.

Stationed in the historic Idanha Building,

Guru Donuts does away with artifice to

create a uniquely crafted donut experience

made fresh daily, from scratch, and with local

ingredients. This month for Treefort Fest,

the storefront wears a new coat. While you

munch on a “Hipster Berry,” “Funfetti,” or

“Girl Scout,” you can also take in a writing

workshop or panel discussion.

NIGHTLIFE

Neurolux

111 N. 11th St.

Think of Neurolox as a glorious combination

of the best parts of your local dive, the likely

spot where a wildly buzzed-about out of

town band will probably play, or the place

you might catch a set of eyes from across

the hall, and make an unsuspected new

friend. The best part? The giant luminescent

clam in the background, acting as a mascot,

chaperone, and cheerleader to a raucous

night.

The Balcony

150N 8th St.

From the moment you take the outdoor elevator

up to the the top floor of The Balcony

and turn the corner, you know what kind of

night you’re in for. Spectacularly sprawling,

you’re just as likely to sink into the crowd (or

decide to take centre stage). Think of this as

the city’s go-to destination for both a sweaty

night of dancing, or the crowning site where

the city’s next best drag queens perform.

The Funky Taco (5)

801 W Bannock St.

Imagine a beautiful place where life’s two

delicacies of live music and tacos meet.

Welcome to The Funky Taco. An even blend

of Asian, Indian, Mexican, and Americana

cuisine? Check. An unreal balcony performance

space with sightlines around the

restaurant? Check. A robust live music and

DJ schedule? Check. A pivot from “farm to

table” towards “farm to funk.” You’re sold.

The Olympic Hotel

1009 Main St.

Perched above Mulligans Pub & Eatery,

Boise’s newest venue in the heart of the city

hosts a wide range of programming most

nights of the week, including rising local

bands and international acts on a stage with

a delightful wraparound balcony. During

Treefort, the venue morphs into an important

landing site, running full steam nearly all

night long.

SHOPPING

The Record Exchange (3)

1105 West Idaho St.

To call The Record Exchange an institution

would be an understatement. For the last 40

years Idaho’s largest independent record

store has sold vinyl, books, candy bars, collectibles,

and everything in between. Keep

an ear out for their always free, all-ages,

in-store events which might include a meet

and greet, album signing, or concert.

Maven

928 W. Main St.

Maven opened in the basement of the

Idanha Building after the closure of the Garden

City Projects pilot program that created

a dynamic multi-use DIY space that cradled

art shows, live performances, and poetry

readings. Now in its new home, a recent

testimonial describes the space best: “A

cool collective / mini art museum / gift go-to

place. The best Boise has to offer in funky

little wares crafted by local creatives. Prints,

jewelry, vintage clothes, crafted candles and

so much more."

STAR

MARCH 2020 BEATROUTE 31



VIVIAN MAIER, MAY 16, 1957 © ESTATE OF VIVIAN MAIER, COURTESY OF MALOOF COLLECTION AND HOWARD GREENBERG GALLERY, NY.

YYC

LA SANTA CECILIA

MULTICULTURAL COLLECTIVE THRIVES

ON STREET CORNER SPONTANEITY

By BRAD SIMM

F

ar from the world where pop music is fabricated

in sophisticated studios full of digitized precision

and sonic mutations, La Santa Cecilia reins in a

warm, rich Latino vibrance straight off the streets of

Los Angeles.

Before they were a band, they busked and blended

punk with the blues, the bossa-nova and jazz with

upbeat rumbas bearing their collective souls that

stem from Mexico, Venezuela and Nicaragua.

For their sixth album, Amar Y Vivir (2017), it’s fitting

that they recorded live, direct to tape, and sung in

Spanish at various outdoor locations in Mexico City.

La Santa Cecelia, named after the patron saint of

musicians, thrive on street corner spontaneity.

At the same time, they’re not afraid to embrace the

vast cross-section of scenes that they grew up with

in LA. Their last album recorded entirely in English (a

first for the band), reveals their nightclub love and fullon

joy for melting pot grooves.

“We were always a bi-cultural band that sung in

English and Spanish,” says percussionist Miguel

“Oso” Rameriz. “We always mixed genres and mixed

traditional Latin American music with rock, with

blues, jazz and funk. That’s been the DNA of the

band, to follow the lineage of bands like the Doors,

Chili Peppers and Los Lobos mixing cultures and

expressing all that is Los Angeles.”

A large part of La Santa Cecilia’s chemistry also

lies with the colourful dynamics of La Marisoul. A

compelling focal point, she roams from sad to sassy

to sultry and spiritual projecting a voice laced with

strength and conviction.

Living under the tyranny of Trump, Rameriz says the

band and community they belong to find themselves

in an extremely tough time and place.

“The particular view of the United States and

Americans who think we’re not corrupt and we’re

the face of justice, it’s very difficult to admit we have

some serious problems. It’s crazy man. As a band we

have to utilize the positives in a platform and shed

some light and truth on the situation.”

La Santa Cecilia perform Thursday, April 2 at Arts Commons

(Calgary)

CALGARY’S ESSENTIAL

MARCH HAPPENINGS

03.20

MARCH 2020 BEATROUTE 33


34 BEATROUTE MARCH 2020


03.20YYCAGENDA

Heartful Of Hockey

Men Express Their

Feelings explores the

game’s complex emotions

In hockey, the blade cuts two ways.

It’s a fast-paced sport that requires a

tremendous amount of skill, speed, and

finesse where the dance on skates,

stickhandling, playmaking and putting the

puck in the net is an art and science. It’s

also primitive and destructive; when the

gloves come off, the goon squad comes

out and the sucker punch gets thrown.

Playwright Sunny Drake comes from

Down Under — Brisbane, Australia. He

played and coached field hockey for 10

years, and was raised in a household

full of rough and ready rugby players. All

too familiar with the rigors of sport, he

wanted to investigate what makes a man

tick once the puck is dropped.

“I picked the most uber-masculine

sport,” says Drake. “Hockey can be

fantastic. It’s exciting and filled with

comradery and strategy. But can also

be brutal, toxic, and crushing. There’s a

full range of complexity. But when it’s so

devastating, I think men are counting the

costs and finding different ways how to

be masculine.”

Noting the extremities of emotion,

Drake says, “It’s not out of the question

for a player to shed a quiet tear if they

lost the game or express a wider array

of feelings in the game’s heat of the

moment. When you see fans hug in the

stands or players get intimate on the

ice, that is closest to a man hug that is

acceptable. All these ironies are really

fertile ground to explore in a play.”

Men Express Their Feelings starts

with a fist fight between two dads who,

along with their sons, are ordered by the

league president to the dressing room

and participate in a sharing circle to sort

out their differences. From there they

touch on a whole range of things – close

contact, locker room culture, racism and

the difficulty their wives have with their

hockey heads. But with all the weighty

issues being tossed around, Drake

stresses, “It’s still a comedy.”

Men Express Their Feeling runs March

6 to 15 at the Big Secret Theatre, Arts

Commons

By Brad Simm

Irish Whiskey:

A Word From The Wise

Stuart Patrick Connor, the Oak Tree Tavern’s full measure Irish owner, knows how

to stock his shelves and is particularly mindful when It comes to his selection of

whiskeys. While most of us have experienced the infamous shot glass straight-downthe-pipe

ritual, Connor is pleased to offer a much more glorious path to the rewards of

enlightened whisky drinking.

JAMESON

For a traditional Irish whisky, original

Jameson can do the trick but comes

with a harder taste and some scratching

at the back of the throat. This is the

entry-level whisky pleasing to those

craving for a midnight liquid bump.

Jameson is “good to shoot if you're an

18-year-old,” says Connor.

PADDY

Dubbed the “old man drink” in Ireland,

Paddy is a light, affordable, everyday

whisky. “Cheap and good,” notes

Connor. “Just right for coffee, sporting

games or brown paper bags.”

HELL-CAT MAGGIE

Hell-Cat Maggie or “the fighting whisky”

offers a nice middle-ground — golden

brown, a bit a sweeter that leaves

behind an oaky flavour without a strong

after-burn. “Shot of choice,” says Connor,

“if I’m just toasting with friends.”

REDBREAST

The Redbreast 12 Year Old is on the

higher end of the scale and one of the

smoothest according to Connor. “Where

some whiskeys have that really awful

burn, this one doesn't really give you the

yuck face. It’s sweet, smooth and delicious.”

Made to sip, not to shoot, while

sitting in a leather chair by the fireside.

GREEN SPOT

If you’re feeling saucy and want to treat

yourself, Green Spot is the way to go.

Known as the “water of whisky,” because

it’s almost transparent in colour,

the sipping quality is undisputed with no

aftertaste and zero burn. Connor claims,

“It’s a gift to someone that you're either

trying to impress or don't want to kill

you. Smooth, dangerous, the ultimate.”

By Christian Kindrachuk

MARCH 2020 BEATROUTE 35


03.20YYCAGENDA

THE SLOCAN RAMBLERS

Canadian bluegrass bandits

keep it fresh and physical

reviews, noting that while the band

dips into the backwoods of traditional

bluegrass they also dive into new

directions.

Gross, who loves jazz, Miles Davis,

Phish and the Grateful Dead as much

as he loves Stevie Ray Vaugh and Led

Zeppelin, explains, “You have do your

homework and learn about whatever style

or genre you’re playing comes from and

be true to that tradition, really loving it.

Then be comfortable to do your own thing

and explore.”

What then do the Ramblers think they

add to tradition?

“All four of us write, we all compose

and keep ourselves interested. When

playing live, we keep it dynamic,

interactive, and we surprise each other

on stage, try out little whacky things

and keep it fresh. If we keep ourselves

interested, we know the audience is

feeling the same way.”

In recent years, bluegrass shows

in Toronto hit their stride where band

members took turns showcasing their

talent, sharing a single mic hoisted up on

centre stage. While the acoustic element

proved to be a refreshing break from

overdriven amps and pounding bass bins,

the energy levels to unleash a flurry of

Appalachian fire and skill held steadfast.

Praised for their vigorous, breakneck

deliveries live and on record, the

Slocan Ramblers have emerged as one

of Canada’s top-seeded, aggressive

bluegrass acts.

“When I hear musicians,” says Adrian

Gross, the Ramblers’ mandolin man,

“I like to hear a real physical presence

of themselves. To hear them play hard

enough so that their instruments talk

and I can hear them sing, so they have a

personal stamp on it. To put your physical

self into it, that’s where I think you kind of

get the uniqueness. To play with intent, so

you communicate something.”

Their third album, Queen City

Jubilee, which pays homage to Toronto’s

cfmfpresents-beatroute-march-ad.pdf bluegrass scene, has received glowing

1 2020-02-27 1:49 PM

The Slocan Rambler play The Arden

Theatre (St. Albert) on March 13, the Irish

Cultural Centre (Calgary) on March 20,

and the Horizon Stage (Spruce Grove) on

March 22.

By Brad Simm

JEN SQUIRES

Pink

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

Martini

12 musicians

25 languages

1 Pink Martini

APRIL 16, 2020

Arts Commons, Jack Singer Concert Hall

Doors 6:30pm

/ Concert 7:30pm

GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY!

artscommons.ca/martini

Public Sector Support

Official Suppliers

36 BEATROUTE MARCH 2020


LOCAL ARTIST SPOTLIGHT

JUSTINE VANDERGRIFT

YOUNG NEIGHBOURS

Finding motivation in

unfulfilling relationships

and heartbreak

Growing up in rural Alberta, country

music permeates just about every facet

of daily life. The traditional music genre

has long gone hand-in-hand with prairie

living and its various permutations, such

as Americana, folk or roots, all sharing a

common theme of direct storytelling that

reflects the values of its community.

Justine Vandergrift is no stranger to

this life, having grown up in Lacombe, AB,

and regularly splitting her time between

there and Calgary. As a kid, country music

was everywhere, even if “in my circles, it

wasn't necessarily cool to identify with

it, though, I think I always did,” as she

says. Indeed, the music left an indelible

mark on her life as she works on her own

additions to the country canon, releasing

her latest full-length, Stay, on March 7. As

she wrote “melodies and lyrics that are

more true to [her] roots, it felt good to

embrace country sounds [she’s] always

secretly loved.”

“Prior to recording the tracks I had

a series of ‘complicated’ and unfulfilling

relationships,” she says. “I guess I finally

realized I was the one to blame for the

decisions I kept making and wanted to

change some of my patterns. This album

is a story of choosing to move forward

from a place of overall dissatisfaction. I

wanted to share my thoughts and hopes

with my listeners, specifically my sisters

(both biological and spiritual).”

Stay is a homegrown album through

and through. With a local cast of players

backing her on the album (which was

recorded at OCL Studios in Chestermere,

AB), Vandergrift comes to terms with

herself and her relationship to country

music, all the while pushing herself

creatively towards the bright edges of the

envelope.

Justine Vandergrift will release Stay on

March 7 at the Ironwood (Calgary).

By Sebastian Buzzalino

Indie rock outfit finds

deep friendships in

long-term songwriting

Some albums feel like a burst of fresh

flavour, raw and rich in their immediacy as

they come together in a flash of creativity.

Others take longer to mature, simmering

away and developing deep and nuanced

complexities that seem to emerge the

more time passes. It’s in this latter

category that Young Neighbours’ newest

full-length, Famous, fits.

The Calgary indie rock outfit has

undergone its own fair share of changes

since they debuted in 2015. Led by Eric

Pauls, the contemplative singer-songwriter

at the helm of it all, Young Neighbours

seems to have finally found its footing

as a stable group with the addition of

Sarah Houston, Noah Michael, Cameron

Clowe, and Evan Freeman, all of whom

came together to push Famous forward,

creatively and emotionally.

“Creatively, I don't know if I pushed

myself as much as the band pushed me

and challenged every idea I had with

some very healthy creative tension,” says

Pauls. Used to a perhaps more individual

approach to songwriting, Famous pushed

him out of his comfort zone as themes

“around the idea of holding my beliefs

loosely and being willing to let go of things

that used to define me,” emerged as

overarching narratives.

But with the passage of time — three

years since Pauls first started working

on Famous — Young Neighbours have

gained a new appreciation for the craft

of releasing an album. To wit, Pauls had

a moment during the filming of the video

for “Peace During Wartime” that, in many

ways, has come to define this chapter of

the band: “As I stood there pretending to

play and sing with streamers flying around

me, my friends all playing their parts, I had

a moment where it felt like all the dreams I

had of playing music and being an artist as

a kid had come true.”

Young Neighbours will release Famous on

March 21 at the King Eddy.

By Sebastian Buzzalino

SEBASTIAN BUZZALINO

INGRID VARGAS

MARCH 2020 BEATROUTE 37



LEVI MANCHAK

03.20YEGAGENDA

Essential Edmonton

MARLAENA MOORE

CONFRONTS HER

IMPOSTER SYNDROME

HEAD-ON

Imposter syndrome isn’t just a

buzzword for being uncomfortable in

a particular job or role, or even your

own skin. Edmonton-based singer-songwriter,

Marlaena Moore, has

recently contended with that slippery

intellectual slope and talks about

her struggles to embracing personal

confidence despite having numerous

accolades and two solid LPs,

Beginner (2014) and Gaze (2016), to

her credit.

“The past year has been marvelous.

Everything got completely

flipped upside-down in my life for the

best possible outcome. After Gaze

was released, and after I toured that

record, I fell into a little bit of a slump

creatively and life-wise, as well. I felt a

little stuck,” says Moore. ”Eventually,

I realized I was having some mental

health issues. After getting diagnosed

with BPD, dealing with it and confronting

myself a little bit, I realized I

needed to start writing again.”

Setting aside time in the early

morning hours to practice her craft,

Moore connected with her creative

spirit and rekindled her passion for

weaving poetic pop-rock tales that

leave an indelible impression on all

who encounter them. It wasn’t long

before the potent emotions she had

been fermenting were ready to distill

for public consumption and Moore

approached trusted collaborators

grant-writer/manager Jesse Northey

and musician/engineer Chris Dadge

for guidance in making her vision a

reality.

“I said, ‘This might sound kinda

wild, but I’d really like Chad Van-

Gaalen to produce the record.’ It took

a little bit of convincing but we managed

to get him into the studio and he

was very generous with his space and

his time. He was really involved as a

producer, so I felt really lucky to get

to borrow his brain for my songs!”

As Moore puts it, the resulting

album, Pay Attention, Be Amazed,

“flourished,” displaying her ever-evolving

style as a guitar-wielding

romance novelist and autobiographical

graffiti artist rolled into one. It’s

hard to imagine there’s any deception

or shortcomings to be had among

the immaculate melodies, swooning

vocals and deeply cut love letters she

inhabits in the nine painterly tracks

that stretch from “I Miss You” to

“Tiger Water.”

“If you listen to the whole record

you’ll hear the voice of someone

who feels they’re really lacking in a

relationship, like they are the ones

not pulling their weight. The song,

‘Imposter,’ is about feeling as if

people don’t really know the true

you is the dark version and that’s the

only version that is real. That song

is an imposter itself: it has jangly

guitars and an upbeat tempo, and

it’s really fun and has this bright L.A.

pop-groove sound, but it’s about a

relationship completely falling apart,”

Moore says.

“The thing that kept coming up

with Pay Attention, Be Amazed is

that, something could be coming and

it might not look like you expect it

to. Be present and pay attention to

what’s going on around you. In those

moments, you can feel this clear, lucid

high where you see everything for

what it is. It’s beautiful and interesting

and you can start pulling things

apart and looking underneath. Look

close enough to see the signs. Maybe

everything is not as it seems when

you’re going through darker times.”

Marlaena Moore will release Pay Attention,

Be Amazed on March 21 at the

Palomino Smokehouse (Calgary) and

on March 27 at 9910 (Edmonton).

by Christine Leonard

TOP 5 SHOWS OF

THE MONTH

Brought to you by High Horse Coffee Co.

HUMANS

Friday, Mar. 6 at 99ten

Vancouver’s electro-pop duo, HUMANS, have driven

crowds crazy with infectious dance floor hooks

since 2009. They will do it one last time then the

party’s over as this is their farewell tour.

RALPH

Saturday, Mar. 13 at Starlite Room

Graced with a sultry synth-pop style that bounces

to the 80s and back, Ralph is sweeping the country

with “Superbloom,” her breezy new single that

glistens like Californian rays of golden sun.

BROKEN YOLKS

Thursday, Mar. 19 at The Buckingham

Bust out the beer, high-energy skate-punks, Broken

Yolks, are going to ride that melodic wave like it’s

1999.

BLACK BELT EAGLE SCOUT

Friday, Mar. 27 at The Rec Room South Edmonton

A product of the Pacific Northwest’s rich indie

landscape, Black Belt Eagle Scout’s sophomore

offering, At The Party With My Brown Friends,

continues to travel down a lush, but fearless foray

into the modern world.

HOTEL MIRA

Sunday. Mar. 29 at the Starlite Room

Garage-dance beauties, Hotel Mira, turn up the heat

with a new release, Perfectionism, full of pumped-up,

chaotic, heartthrob pleasures that eagerly embrace all

things frantic and romantic.

LOCAL ORGANIC BADASS

FREE DELIVERY IN THE EDMONTON AREA - ORDER ONLINE

HIGHHORSE.CA


Venus Forecast

By AERIN FOGEL

Pisces season

Notable Pisces

Millie

Bobby

Brown

02.19

WELCOME TO PISCES

SEASON! According to

astrologers, it’s the end of the

year, because the astrological

wheel resets when we enter

Aries season and the first

day of spring. So if it feels like

things are ending, perhaps

unraveling and drifting away,

there’s nothing to worry about

– you’re right in line with the

season.

Pisces is ultimately about

recognizing what connects

us all. Going through our day

to day lives can be intense,

personal, and even isolating.

But this sign speaks to the

intangible and powerful reality

that we are part of a vast

collective. As a result, we learn

how to be more sensitive to

what we (and others around

us are feeling). Life is tough

sometimes, and through our

own struggles we become

more empathetic. Pisces

teaches us how to act more

compassionately as a result.

Aerin Fogel is a spiritual

counsellor and the creator of

Venus Fest, a future oriented

Toronto music festival.

Important dates:

March 9

Mercury stations direct.

Yes that’s right, we’re in the middle

of a Mercury Retrograde. Mercury

traveling backwards through

sensitive Pisces gives us reason to

pause, go inwards, spend time alone

dreaming and wondering and feeling

it all. When Mercury goes direct

again it’s time to move forward on

decisions you’ve been putting off,

and revisit some hard conversations,

this time speaking from the heart.

March 9

Full Moon in Virgo.

The Full Moon helps us see

where we need to pick up the

pieces from Mercury Retrograde

– we may need to

reorganize our drawers, our

commitments, or our social

priorities. How are we doing on

the goals we set during “back to

school” season? Some can be

redefined now, as we take time

to integrate the last few weeks.

March 24

New Moon in Aries

The first New Moon of the astrological

year is the most powerful

moon to set an intention. This

is an opportunity to start a new

endeavor, new relationship,

new approach to something

already existing, and infuse

it with fresh energy. Think of

where in your life you want

something to begin or emerge

more fully. Now is the time.

Rihanna

02.20

Erykah

Badu

02.26

Kesha

03.01

Tyler,

The

Creator

03.06

Steph

Curry

03.14

Albert

Einstein!

03.14

Visit us online at beatroute.ca to check out our Pisces mood songs playlist!

40 BEATROUTE MARCH 2020 MARCH 2020 BEATROUTE 37


03.20YYCMUSIC

The Cheat Sheet BR PICKS THE 5 ESSENTIAL LIVE MUSIC SHOWS

1

LAB COAST,

FLORIDA BC, NITE TWIN

Friday, Mar. 6 at the Palomino

Calgary’s beloved indie jangle-pop

band rocks out with Clinton St.

John’s Florida BC and the van

Kampen brothers’ NITE TWIN.

2

YOUNG NEIGHBOURS

ALBUM RELEASE W/

KRILL WILLIAMS

Saturday, Mar. 21 at the King Eddy

Indie rockers Young Neighbours

have been maturing their upcoming

album, Famous, for three years and

are finally ready to show the world.

3

MARLANEA MOORE

ALBUM RELEASE,

W/ SAMANTHA SAVAGE

SMITH, GHOST WOMAN

Saturday, Mar. 21 at the Palomino

Edmonton’s enigmatic indie songwriter

unleashes her much-anticipated

album, Pay Attention,

Be Amazed!, produced by Chad

VanGaalen.

4

BLACK BELT

EAGLE SCOUT

Thursday, Mar. 26 at the Palomino

Their 2018 debut album burst onto

the scene with high-flung appraise

and their follow-up, At the Party

with My Brown Friends, is on an

upward trajectory.

5

HOTEL MIRA,

NORTHERN COAST,

SHUFFALO, FOX OPERA

Friday, Mar. 27 at SAIT’s The Gateway

Vancouver indie alt-pop/rock trio

tours in support of their brand

new album, Perfectionism, and are

joined by a slew of local greats.

1

DEAD PIXEL

Friday, Mar. 6 at Broken City

Energetic punks draw from Eastern

Swing, bluegrass and ragtime

to celebrate an album release with

The Pits Planet Earth, The Ringwalds,

and Orbit the Fox.

2

LESS MISERABLE

Wed, Mar. 11 at the Ship & Anchor

The self-deprecating, post-emo pop

punks are set to release their latest

album, Insufficient Funds, at a free

show.

3

CHRON GOBLIN

Saturday, Mar. 14 at the Palomino

The stoner/doom metal giants

have been rippin’ bongs and riffs

for a decade so join their massive,

two-floor party as they enter their

rebellious teens.

4

THE BRAINS

Saturday, Mar. 21 at Dickens Pub

Montreal's psychobilly monsters

are back in town with support from

Gallows Bound and The Devil's

Sons.

5

INSOMNIUM, OMNIUM

GATHERING, SEVEN

SPIRES

Friday, Mar. 27 at Dickens Pub

Finnish metal masters balance

sorrow and dreariness with the

bright hope of summer’s first sun

rays on their sixth album, Shadows

of the Dying Sun.

1

RAE SPOON, KIM

BARLOW, MOHAMMAD

SAHRAEI, KATE STEVENS

Sun, Mar. 15 at the Ironwood (all ages)

A rolodex of industry non-conformers

converge on stage for an

afternoon of expansive, imaginative

music that spans folk, pop,

electronic and traditional.

2

JOHN WORT HANNAM,

EMILY TRIGGS

Thursday, Mar. 19 at the King Eddy

The Lethbridge-based folk

musician has built a career on

the strength of his all-Canadian

narrative, moving lyricism.

3

AYLA BROOK & THE

SOUND MEN

Friday, Mar. 27 at the King Eddy

Ayla Brook encompasses the

breadth of the prairies with raw,

unflinching rock on his new album,

Desolation Sounds.

4

THE CAROLINES

Sun, Mar. 29 at the Ironwood

Three-part country harmonies and

melodies take centre stage with

the Albertan sweethearts’ two-set

performance.

5

THE BROS. LANDRETH

Wed, Apr. 1 at Festival Hall

Winnipeg’s rock brothers are back in

a big way with their new album, ‘87,

a tip of the hat to their own roots.

1

THE SPONGES,

BURCHILL,

WE ARE ROBOTS

Thursday, Mar. 5 at The Hifi Club

Groovy funk, heavy bass, nostalgic

sample chops, and four on the

floor rhythm make for a hell of a

dance party.

2 HUMANS

FAREWELL TOUR

Saturday, Mar. 7 at The Hifi Club

Western Canada’s beloved electro

duo is hanging up their dancing

shoes once and for all—don’t miss

out on one last chance to see

them live.

3 RALPH

Friday, Mar. 13 at Commonwealth

Synth-pop, disco, and smooth-soul

converge in the Toronto pop artist’s

engaging and oh-so danceable

discography.

4

ALIX PEREZ, TSURUDA

Friday, Mar. 13 at The Hifi Club

A double-headliner bill that blends

elements of experimental hip-hop

with avant-garde electronics and

soul music.

5

JAY ELECTRONICA

Sun, Mar. 29 at Commonwealth

New Orleans hip hop artist, Jay

Electronica, brings his Kingdom Music

vibes to Calgary for a bumping

Sunday set.

1

SANDER VAN DOORN

Fri, Mar. 13 at the Palace Theatre

The Dutch electronic producer

constantly redefines the limits of

dance music and will do nothing

less this Friday the 13th.

2 QUIX

Sat, Mar. 14 at the Palace Theatre

Prolific Kiwi trap artist Quix spins

experimental bass music for the

forward thinkers at the rave. Free

before 10:30 pm with RSVP.

3

ODD MOB

Sat, Mar. 21 at the Hifi Club

The Aussie EDM producer made

waves on the global scene with his

2014 hit “Is It A Banger?” Come find

out for yourself.

4 JACQUEES

Sat, Mar. 21 at the Palace Theatre

21st century R&B meets old-school

grooves are a signature of the

Atlanta-based songwriter who is in

line to end up among the greats.

5

DASH BERLIN

Sat, Mar. 28 at the Palace Theatre

The Hague-based electronic dance

trio megaliths bring their fiery, upbeat

bangers to Canadian soil.

MARCH 2020 BEATROUTE 41


SAVAGELOVE BY DAN SAVAGE

The Girls

My boyfriend and I were having

relationship issues until we

tried something new: pegging.

He wanted to try it, but he was

afraid and sometimes said

the idea disgusted him. Then

we tried it, and it was better

than normal vanilla or even

kinky bondage sex. It was the

most emotionally connected

sex we’ve ever had. I actually

pegged him three times in 24

hours. He says now he wants to

be “the girl” in our relationship.

He doesn’t want to transition

to become a girl, but to be

more “the girl” sexually and

emotionally. I see this as sexy

and loving. I’ve always taken

care of him in a nurturing way,

but this adds so much more.

I feel bad about sending this

long story just to ask a simple

question, but… how do I be

more “the guy” for my boyfriend

who wants to be more “the

girl”? Not just sexually, but in

everyday life?

– The Boyfriend Experience

“It’s amazing these two found

each other,” said Key Barrett,

a trained anthropologist. “They

communicate and obviously

create spaces to be vulnerable

together and explore.”

Barrett has studied female-led

relationships (FLR) and written

books—fiction and nonfiction—

about them, TBE, and his first

concern was your boyfriend

succumbing to “sub-frenzy,”

or a burning desire to realize

all his fantasies at once. You

guys aren’t new to kink—you

mention bondage—but you’ve

found something that taps into

some deep-seated desires, and

you don’t want to move too fast.

“Pegging opened up a huge

box of shiny new emotions and

feelings,” said Barrett. “That’s

great, but they should take it

slow, especially if they want this

dynamic to be a part of the dayto-day

relationship.”

You also need to bear in mind

that pegging, while wonderful,

won’t solve your underlying

(and unspecified) “relationship

issues.” Unless, of course, the

issue was your boyfriend feeling

anxious about asking you to

peg him. If he was worried

about walking back his previous

comments, or worried you would

judge, shame, or dump him over

this, that could have been the

cause of your conflict, and the

pegging—by some miracle—was

the solution.

But, hey, you didn’t ask about

those other issues—you didn’t

even name them—so let’s

focus on your actual question:

you being “the guy” and your

boyfriend being “the girl.”

“The boyfriend wants TBE to

be ‘the guy’ in the relationship

to reinforce his desire to be

‘the girl,’” said Barrett, “and she

seems okay with this, although

she does acknowledge that

this would require more than

the nurturing and caretaking

she’s already showed toward

him. That’s a valid concern. His

desire to take the kink out of the

bedroom and merge it with the

day-to-day risks turning her into

a kink dispenser. There’s also the

aspect of the boyfriend’s gender

stereotyping. Being dominant

isn’t unique to men, and being

submissive isn’t a ‘feminine’ trait.

There are a lot of alpha men

in FLRs who shine in support

roles for the women they trust.

Female-led relationships don’t

rely on stereotypes. Indeed, they

often flout them by relying not on

stereotypical behaviors but on

what is a natural dynamic for the

couple. In that sense, each FLR

is unique.”

While it’s possible that “I want

to be the girl” are the only words

your boyfriend has to describe

the dynamic that turns him on,

for some men, sacrificing their

“male” power and privilege is an

intrinsic part of the eroticism of

submitting to a dominant woman.

And that’s okay, too.

“If he legitimately wants to

take on a role of supporting

her and being her adoring

submissive partner while thinking

of that role as ‘feminine,’ it could

work for them,” said Barrett. “He

might really enjoy supporting

her decisions and being more of

a domestic partner. She might

enjoy the support and validation

that comes from having a partner

who revels in her successes and

strength. This could fulfill the

‘caring for him as if I were the

boyfriend’ portion (what a loving

a statement!) while still feeling

natural for TBE.”

So how can you get started as

“the guy” in this relationship?

“They should, again, start

small,” said Barrett. “Maybe

delegate a few tasks that were

‘hers’ to him, and she can tell

him how she wants them done,”

whatever it is (dishes? laundry?

cocksucking?), “as this will help

ensure the outcome they both

want. I would also recommend

they both read about what

FLRs are and aren’t. FLRs are

often kink-friendly, but kink is

not required. And they need

to remember the key word in

‘female-led relationship’ is

‘relationship.’”

Follow Key Barrett on Twitter

@KeyBarrettMSc

I’m a woman, and I was

contacted on an app by

someone claiming to be a

“guydyke.” Based on their

profile pictures, I was basically

looking at a white, cis, mascpresenting

man who’s said

he is queer but only attracted

to women. And by mascpresenting,

I mean I could

not pick him out of a lineup of

the most average of averagelooking

straight dudes: drab

clothes, a week’s stubble,

bad haircut. Granted, nobody

is obliged to announce their

gender identity through clothing

or grooming choices, but how is

this guy not straight?

– Perplexed

“I happen to be one of those

‘old-school’ lesbians, despite

not actually being what most

consider to be old,” said Arielle

Scarcella, a popular lesbian

YouTuber (youtube.com/

Arielle) with more than 600,000

subscribers. “Back when I was

coming out in 2005, if a male

person who lived as a man—a

male who lived in such a way

that he was always perceived

to be a man—claimed he was

a lesbian or a dyke, we’d shut

them down. But in 2020, it’s

only acceptable to accept

everyone for what they say they

are. I disagree. Part of being a

lesbian, being a woman, is also

cultural and societal. It’s not

simply an identity. Living in the

world as a woman matters. A

biological male who presents

as a man and has sex only with

women will never know what it’s

like to be treated as a woman

or a lesbian. He can identify

however he likes, of course,

but he will be perceived as a

straight man who’s fetishizing

queer women.”

42 BEATROUTE MARCH 2020


UNIQUE

50LES

FOR

UNIQUE

50ULS

JOHNFLUEVOGCALGARYTHAVESW··

JOHNFLUEVOGEDMONTONAVENW··

FLUEVOGCOM


More magazines by this user
Similar magazines