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MARCH 2020

NEW

BIKE

BUYER’S

GUIDE

MARCH 2020 RSA R35.00

20003

9 772075 405004

Pic by

EXCLUSIVE SA TEST

SPEED FREAKS

The all-new BMW S1000RR has arrived in SA

and we test two very special editions.

F I R S T L O O K

DUCATI

F I R S T L O O K

SUPERLEGGERA

V4

230HP

159KG DRY

R1.6M

One of the most outrageous

production motorcycles in history.

W O R L D L A U N C H

HONDA

CBR1000RR-R

All you’ve ever wanted from a

Honda superbike and more.

MORE WORLD LAUNCH TESTS: BMW F900XR & R | 2020 KAWASAKI Z H2

W O R L D

L A U N C H

KTM 1290

SUPERDUKE R

Fast Facts about the Austrian Beast 3.0

R I D E R F E A T U R E

HOW TO GET

MOTOGP READY?

Brad Binder tells us about three ways in which

he’ll get set for the challenge…


K&N Style Filters

Available sizes 28, 35, 39, 42, 48,

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8000Ma

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Bike and ATV Covers

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H4 150% Power R290.00

EMGO Top Box

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SMART CHARGER 3.5 AMP DFC530 R899.00

SMART CHARGER 4 AMP PSA004 R999.00

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ANOTHER MOTOGP RIDER JOINS THE TEAM.

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License Disc Holders

R168.00

Bar Ends

R100.00

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50500192/L CHAIN LUBE 150ML 34.00

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WIN A

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53203200/L AIR FILTER SPRAY 55.00

BRAND NEW HJC RPHA 11 53203500/L AIR FILTER OIL 500ML 55.00

VERMO HELMET SIGNED BY 53204005/L BIO FILTER CLEANER 5l 325.00

53204400/L BIO FILTER CLEANER 400ML 47.00

BRAD BINDER 53780300/L SPARK 300ML 44.00

TO ENTER, GO LIKE OUR POWERED BY AUTOCYCLE 55000314/L TYRE FIX 200ML 45.00

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BIKING ZEEMANS ACCESSORIES MOTORCYCLES 012 011 435 342 7177 7474

FAST BIKING KTM ACCESSORIES 011 012 867 342 0092 7474

GAME FAST KTM MOTOR SERVICES 011 849 867 7000 0092

MOTO-MATE GAME MOTOR RIVONIA SERVICES 011 234 849 5275 7000

MOTO-MATE EDENVALE RIVONIA 011 234 027 5275 0545

MOTO-MATE KCR MOTORCYCLE EDENVALE FANATIX 011 975 027 5405 0545

PRIMROSE JUST BIKING MOTORCYCLES 011 016 828 421 9091 1153

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DON’T

JUST PLAY

THE GAME.

OWN IT!

The new 2020 Yamaha R1

takes double win on debut

with David McFadden at

round one of the National

Superbike Championship.

www.yamaha.co.za • +27 11 259 7600 • Facebook: Yamaha Southern Africa • Instagram: YamahaMoto_SA • YouTube: YamahaMoto_SA


ED’S NOTES: TALKING MOTOGP

Our most powerful

issue ever!

For sure we’ve had a lot of powerful

issues over the years but with all

the bikes we have featured in this

issue makes it by far one of our

most powerful yet – over 1500

horse power of pure biking pleasure

featured in this issue! Never before

have we featured so many world

launch tests and the fact that we

had one of our record months in

advertising we were able to bring

you a packed 96-page power issue!

Big thanks to all our advertisers for

sticking by us and supporting even

in these tough times. It’s times like

these we all have to stick together

and help each other grow and that’s

exactly what we are doing and we

are reaping the rewards of all the

hard work put in. So please, I have

said it before and I’ll say it again,

please take advantage and use all

the advertisers in this mag, as they

are the ones who ultimately make it

all possible.

Talking MotoGP

After my latest Talking MotoGP

podcast featuring Don Fourie I got

thinking about the whole Lorenzo

signing as the official Yamaha

test rider thing. He announced his

retirement at the final Valencia race

last year, pretty much down to all

his injuries and hating life at Repsol

Honda. It didn’t take too long for

Lorenzo to be back in the paddock

as he was announced as the official

test rider going forward for Yamaha.

I can’t help but think how Honda felt

about this? Were they upset? Were

they angry after Lorenzo cut his time

with them short by a whole year?

Here he was saying his body and

mind were over it all and then bang

here he is all of a sudden, a MotoGP

test rider for one of their biggest

rivals, potentially using whatever

data he gained whilst with them to

help develop a machine to try and

dethrone them.

As Don said in the podcast it was

a brilliant piece of business by Lin

Jarvis and Yamaha to get Lorenzo.

Not only are they getting a 5-time

champ back and one of their

favoured sons but also a rider that

now has experience with riding two

of their main oppositions machines

– Ducati and Honda. Lorenzo rolled

out in his new test rider roll at

the Sepang test and looked quick

from the work go. All of a sudden

that Honda limp and sore back

were gone, and the well-known

big Yamaha smile was back on the

Spaniard’s face. Was the retirement

all a ploy to simply get out of his

Honda deal? Or will he genuinely be

not racing and just focusing on being

a test rider? Since the test rumours

have surfaced that he will be

wildcarding at the Catalunya round

this year and there is even talks of

a Rossi/Lorenzo partnership at the

SRT Petronas Yamaha team. The

team themselves have come out and

said that would be very complicated

to pull off but they can dream… can

you just imagine, Rossi and Lorenzo

on satellite Yamaha’s… Hmmmm,

don’t know how satellite those bikes

would be if it did happen.

Good business or

bad business

So, heading up to the Sepang test

news broke that Yamaha not only

managed to re-sign Maverick

Vinales for two more years but also

snap up the rookie sensation from

2019 Mr. Fabio Quatararo, leaving

a certain Mr. Rossi out in the cold.

Well, not exactly. Rossi knows the

game all too well and in my mind

did the right thing by not getting in

Yamaha’s way wanting to sign Fabio

before they lost him to rival teams.

Rossi had/has not yet confirmed

his plans for the future but has not

ruled out the so-called move to

the SRT Petronas team. As I said

earlier we will have to wait and see

what happens with that but at the

moment the only real option for

Rossi if he does want to continue

is the satellite team, but again, as I

said, no doubt it won’t be a satellite

bike he will be on. Don makes a very

good point of this all in our recent

podcast so go check it out on the

RideFast channel if you have not

already done so.

It really was a great piece of

business by Lin Jarvis to hold onto

Maverick, who looked at one stage

certain move over to Ducati, and

then also to snatch up one of the

hottest properties in MotoGP right

now, Fabio. That’s them sorted for

the next few years at least and

can now focus on trying to build

something around them rather can

keeping Vale happy. It’s time now

for Vinales to step up to the plate

because no doubt he is going to be

their number one man but he has to

prove that he is the man, but in the

same breath they have a weapon

in Fabio that cannot be ignored so

it’s back to the good old days of

having two serious title contenders.

Of course, we are getting ahead of

ourselves just a bit as for 2020 it’s

Vinales and Rossi on the factory

bikes with Fabio also now getting

the factory treatment but still in

Petronas colours. Can Fabio be a

serious title contender this year?

Can Rossi win title number 10?

Can Vinales finally be a serious

challenger week in week out? And

can Yamaha finally get one over

Honda and Marquez? Oooooohhhh,

too much excitement!!!!

What now Ducati?

Big rumours last year were that

Ducati were ready to break the

bank to secure Vinales and Fabio

as their two main challenges for

the 2021 season. Well, that’s all

now gone out the window and both

riders have committed for now to

Yamaha. I’ve just finishing watching

a great documentary by RedBull TV

on Dovi called “Andrea Dovizioso

Undaunted”. It was an awesome

documentary going behind the

scenes in a big way showing

the struggles that not only Dovi

goes through but also the Ducati

MotoGP team. It’s very clear that

Dovi and Ducati’s main aim is to

beat Marquez, and this in my view

is their biggest handicap. It seems

they are so focused on Marquez that

they lose focus and clarity in other

areas. I love Dovi and know what a

great rider he is and Gigi also says

in the short film that Dovi is one of

the greatest riders he has ever seen

but he needs to start believing it as

well. So true, and it also shows how

Marquez has got in the mind of not

only Dovi but all the other riders with

some of the things he does and is

able to do. Marquez is seriously fast,

we know this, but so are all the other

riders but it’s not just being fast and

talented where Marc beats them it’s

more mental to me, he has them all

beat before they even go on track in

many ways. That’s something that

a lot of them, Dovi, Fabio, Vinales,

have to focus on rather than trying

to make their bikes better etc. The

Honda is by no means the best bike

out there but Marc gets the best out

of it and commits fully, something

the others don’t fully do in my mind.

Back to the problem of what now for

Ducati? Who do they turn to after the

2020 season? Do they still stick with

Dovi, who they have relied on and

has not yet delivered and I can’t see

him doing so, 2017 and 18 to me were

his best shots. Can Petrucci improve

enough over 2020 to become a

serious contender? I can’t see that

happening. So, who do they turn to?

Jack Miller for sure is the first name

that comes to mind to take one of

those factory seats. He has done

enough in my mind but just needs

to iron out one or two bad habits he

still has, but we all forget he is still

young and has time to do so. No

doubt 2020 is a big year for him. If he

can get results and be there weekin-week-out

then for sure the ride is

his, especially with the pot looking

empty now for Ducati.

There has now been talks that if

Scott Redding can bring the World

SBK title back to Bologna then he

will be considered for the factory

seat. Whether or not he will go back

to MotoGP is another question,

especially after all he has had to

say about the championship after

leaving a few years back.

Who else can they look at? Can

Bagnaia become all that has been

promised in MotoGP? Or is a certain

Mr. Brad Binder on their radar? Then

there is the likes of Jorge Martin and

Luca Marini coming from Moto2, but

surely they won’t get factory Ducati

seats straight off the bat? I know

Brad is for sure a big target for many

in the MotoGP paddock and now

that the KTM machine seems to be

getting more and more competitive

and if Brad can pull off a Rookie of

the Year season then we could very

well see him spawn the famous red

colours of the factory Ducati team.

Whatever happens MotoGP

continues to keep us on our toes

with excitement and drama a

plenty so we will have to wait and

see what happens. For now, all we

can do is sit back and enjoy what

is no doubt going to be another

epic season in MotoGP, some a bit

closer to the action than others, as

I get myself ready to board a plan

to Qatar for the season opener and

be proudly side-by-side showing

my support for our two heroes

Brad and Darryn Binder.

Yes, I know, you hate me,

but make sure you pay

careful attention to what’s

in the mag because there is

a couple of great MotoGP

offerings that need to

be looked at if you are

serious about

going over and

witnessing

the greatest

sport on

earth in

the flesh.

Look out

for MotoGP

Misano and

Mugello

packages

being offered

in this issue.

Until next time I hope

you all have a great

month and enjoy the

issue we have waiting

for you. Cheers, Rob.

EDITOR & DESIGNER:

Rob Portman

rob@ridefast.co.za

PUBLISHER:

Glenn Foley

foleyg@mweb.co.za

ADVERTISING:

Sean Hendley

bestbikemagazines

@yahoo.com

071 684 4546

OFFICE &

SUBSCRIPTIONS:

Anette

anette.acc@

mweb.co.za

011 979 5035

CONTRIBUTORS:

Sheridan Morais

Brad Binder

Darryn Binder

Gerrit Erasmus

Eugene Liebenberg

Niel Philipson

Greg Moloney

Daniella Kerby

Keith Botha

Brian Cheyne

Donovan Fourie

Shaun Portman

Mat Durrans

Copyright © RideFast Magazine: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed,

or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, articles, or other methods, without the

prior written permission of the publisher.


Please make no attempt to imitate the illustrated riding scenes, always wear protective clothing and observe the applicable provisions of the road traffic regulations!

The illustrated vehicles may vary in selected details from the production models and some illustrations feature optional equipment available at additional cost.

Photo: R. Schedl

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All the NEWS proudly brought

to you by HJC HELMETS

POWER-TO-WEIGHT

JUGGERNAUT

DUCATI’S WILD, WINGED SUPERLEGGERA V4

One horsepower per

kilogram: it’s the kind of

power-to-weight ratio you

only see in the world’s most

exclusive multi-million

dollar hypercars. But at 231

hp and 152 kg, the Ducati

Superleggera V4 absolutely

obliterates that figure,

making 1.54 hp/kg.

This, mind you, is with a fancy racing

kit and its titanium Akrapovic exhaust

fitted. Out of the box (although the

racing kit does come in the box), you’ll

have to make do with a paltry 221

fully road-legal horsepower and a

positively corpulent 159 kg. Thumbing

through the regulations for World

Superbike production-based racing, it

appears the rules require WSBK bikes

to weigh at least 168 kg. So there’s a

genuine chance this one might not

stick to the ground, and could float

you away over the treetops.

Superleggera is Italian for

“Reallylight,” and Ducati has used

this designation before for specialedition

superbikes that are tuned to

the eyeballs and shaved to the last

gram for weight savings. This new

V4 would instantly become the #1

machine kids would pin up on their

bedroom walls, if touchscreens

hadn’t been invented and kids

gave a single, solitary toss about

motorcycles any more.

The entire load-bearing structure of

the chassis is made from carbon or

composites – the frame, the subframe,

the wheels ... even the swingarm is an

elaborate carbon construction that

looks like you could pick it up with one

finger. All the bodywork is carbon, too,

much of it finished raw so you can see

the weave.

At this point, we have to discuss the

hideous wings sprouting from the side

fairings. Ducati calls them “biplane

airfoils” and proudly boasts they

give you 50 kg of downforce at 270

km/h, helping to keep the nose down

under high-speed acceleration, and

6 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


ENGINE

998CC

Desmo Stradale

90º V4, 4 valves

per cylinder, LC

POWER

224

HP @ 15,250RPM

TORQUE

116

NM @ 11,750RPM

WEIGHT

159

DRY WEIGHT

KG

squashing the front wheel down for extra

traction when you’re braking at the end of

a straight. Fine, if you’re riding this thing

on the track, keep the wings on. On the

road, they just make a beautiful bike look

profoundly silly, and they don’t even look

like you could rest your legs on them on

the highway.

The motor is the Desmosedici Stradale

V4 R – the 998cc one instead of the

1,103cc unit that graces the standard

Panigale. Why? It weighs less. It doesn’t

seem to be lacking in power, either. And

yes, that’s an open clutch cover. This

thing will rattle like a tambourine at

idle, like all Ducatis should.

You wouldn’t expect Ducati to skimp on

chassis componentry, so the combination

of top-shelf Brembo and Ohlins gear is no

surprise. Brakes are exclusive variants of

the Stylema R series, and the suspension

“The new Ducati

Superleggera V4 is one

of the most outrageous

production motorcycles

in history.”

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020 7


All the NEWS proudly brought

to you by HJC HELMETS

has been chosen for its light

weight, including a titanium

spring on the shock, GP-derived

valving and a pressurized fork.

The dash and electronics are very

track-focused, to the point where

Ducati has called in MotoGP

luminary Andrea Dovizioso to

help design the raciest dash

layout. Riding modes have gone

nuts, with new Race A and Race

B modes, as well as five custom

modes you can set and save

yourself. What’s more, you can

save up to five favorite racetracks

into the bike’s memory, so you

can look back over your lap times

and splits historically and record

new ones.

As one of the most outrageous

and desirable machines

currently in production, the

Superleggera V4 will be

extremely expensive, priced

at R1.6m and limited to 500

units worldwide. Due to the

complexity of the parts, Ducati’s

only committing to making five a

day, but it says all orders should

be fulfilled within 2020. If you

want, and why wouldn’t you, you

can get it with a special carbon

helmet and Superleggerabranded

airbag-equipped

leathers from Dainese.

The price will include a chance

to ride Ducati’s Panigale V4

R superbike at Mugello, and

there’s also 30 spots available if

you want to upgrade that to go

and ride Dovizioso or Petrucci’s

MotoGP bike. And folks, as much

as riding this Superleggera

V4 would be an unforgettable

experience, slinging a leg over

a Desmosedici GP20 is the kind

of thing that only happens in

the moistest of motorcycling

dreams. What a wonderful

world we live in, if you’ve got a

ton of money.

8 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


All the NEWS proudly brought

to you by HJC HELMETS

SMG MOTORRAD UMHLANGA

Here is a dealership that is just growing

from strength to strength. We first met

them in 2012 when they were based in

Mt. Edgecombe, they then moved into

bigger and nicer premises in Umhlanga

Ridge for a year or three or four. Most

recently, they have just had a bespoke

dealership built on the edge of Umhlanga

Ridge overlooking Umhlanga Rocks and

the Ocean on Umhlanga Rocks drive at

the corner of Ncondo Place in the all new

Umhlanga Arch.

Besides a view to linger at, the new SMG

dealership sports a very nice high end

coffee shop with really great coffee and

baked goods to give you even more reason

to linger longer at the view. As is the norm

with most Motorrad dealerships these days,

they are integrated with Auto. However, the

Motorrad side is not tucked away in the back

somewhere as an afterthought but rather

stand shoulder to shoulder with the Auto

side. And, it goes without saying they are

well stocked with all the latest and greatest

from BMW including every conceivable

accessory, gear and go faster bits. Their

workshop has a reputation for being

staffed by highly qualified, professional

and passionate technicians delivering high

quality workmanship. The guys on the sales

floor are equally well versed on all things

Motorrad and are all passionate BMW

owners and riders themselves, regularly

organising trips up to Phakisa for track days

with the crowd from Track-Daze, with whom

they have been associated with for the past

two-years now, they also often do breakfast

runs out to beautiful spots like the famous

Valley of a Thousand hills and etc.

Motorrad manager, Colin Mackrory and

the sales team always try to make it as

easy as possible to get your leg over a

new or even one of their pre-loved BMW’s.

The Big Guy looking after all your After

Sales requirements is Phil Marx, (dad to

our legendary Springbok hooker Malcolm

Marx), and he can get you really sorted with

a bevy of cool gadgets, your next service,

tyres and anything else biking related you

might need. And, as if those weren’t enough

reasons to get excited about SMG Motorrad,

they also have a second dealership with

even more stock based up on the north

coast in Richards Bay.

Give them a call on 031 502 9800,

(Umhlanga), or 035 426 0020, (North

Coast) or drop in at Umhlanga Arch, 1

Ncondo place (cnr Umhlanga Rocks drive),

Umhlanga Ridge or 2 Bauxite Bay, Alton,

Richards Bay for a chat and a cup of really

great coffee and a muffin.

A really nice place to hang out and

get an excellent cup of coffee.

Phil Marx, (yup .. that’s Malcolms dad), he

loves his vocation in life almost as much

as he loves watching his lad play rugby.

Colin Mackrory, the man at the helm.

He is very passionate about the BMW

brand as you can see below.

A stunning showroom floor with

everything BMW Motorrad.

A full range of original BMW Motorrad

riding apparel and merchandise.

Colin on his brand new BMW S 1000 RR

machine at the recent Track-Daze event

held at Phakisa.

10 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


Now available for

R77,999.00

Offer subject to stock availability.

CRF250 RALLY

Unlock new

opportunities

The CRF250 Rally covers many bases.

It can slip through congested city traffic

easily thanks to its slim proportions, but is

also tough enough to take on rough tarmac

and trails. Purchase this model, and enjoy

free rider training and roadside assist. Find

a dealer and book a test ride now!

Visit your nearest Honda Dealer for full range:

JHB: Honda Wing East Rand Mall: 011 826-4444 / Honda Wing Sandton: 011 540-3000 / Honda Wing Westrand: 011 675-3222 PTA: Honda Wing Centurion: 012 663-8718

Honda Wing Menlyn: 012 470-92000 VAAL: Honda Wing Riverside: 087 751-4023 KLERKSDORP: Honda Wing Klerksdorp: 018 468-1800

LIMPOPO: Honda Wing Thabazimbi: 014 777 1593 / Honda Wing Polokwane: 015 297-3291 PIETERMARITZSBURG: Honda Wing PMB: 033 345-628

FREE STATE: Honda Wing Central: 051 430-1237 / Honda Wing Bethlehem: 058 303-4864 NELSPRUIT: Honda Wing Nelspruit: 013 753-7324 KZN: Honda Wing Umhlanga: 031 580-7900

UPINTON: Honda Wing Upinton: 054 332-7759 RICHARDS BAY: Honda Wing Richards Bay: 035 789-6378 GEORGE: Honda Wing George: 044 874-5435

CPT: Honda Wing CPT CBD: 021 487-5000 / Honda Wing Tygerberg: 021 910-8300 / Honda Wing East Cape: 041 581-0359 / Honda Wing Worcester: 023 347-2646

NAMIBIA: Honda Wing Windhoek: 00264 613-81600 SWAZILAND: Honda Wing Mmbabane: 00268 2505 2881 BOTSWANA: Honda Wing Gaborone: 00267 395 2652

www.honda.co.za / care@hondasa.co.za / Toll Free: 0800 466 321 / Facebook - Honda SA / Twitter - Honda SA.


All the NEWS proudly brought

to you by HJC HELMETS

FIRE IT UP GET’S

NEW HOME... SOON.

Fire It Up is pleased to announce that their new store will be

opening in May of this year. Located on the corner of Main

Rd and Halifax in Bryanston, the new store, which is only

minutes away from the Fourways store, will offer all sales,

service, repairs and tuning. Both Fire It Up and Performance

Technic will now be under one roof offering a wider range of

services including Off Road, Jet Skis and ATV’s - and almost

double the amount of immaculate Pre-Owned motorcycles.

The telephone numbers will stay the same and a new buying,

service, and sales team are being groomed to offer the most

focused customer experience ever.

Tel: 011 467 0737. www.fireitup.co.za

20 YEARS STRONG - HONDA

WING TYGERBERG

Honda Wing Tygerberg has been in business in the northern suburbs

of Cape Town since early 2000, specialising in Honda Motorcycle

sales, parts and service/repair work. With their team they have won

several performance and service awards over the last 10 years. They

have a sales team that is very driven and experienced in all aspects

of their business including sport bikes, agricultural needs, adventure

biking and commuting. They have all the latest and greatest on offer

from Honda including the all-new Africa Twin CRF1100 in stock and

they say the order list for the highly anticipated 2020 CBR1000 RR-R

Fireblade is growing longer everyday…

Drop in at 275 Durban road, Tygervalley, Belville for a cup of coffee

and a chat or give them a call on 021 910 8300.

BIKE TYRE

WAREHOUSE NEWS

Some interesting news from the purveyors of motorcycle

tyres, brake pads, chains, sprockets and other important bits

and bobs to keep you and your bike safe:

Firstly, Eddie Leggo joins the Bike Tyre Warehouse Group

as Technical Manager at their Head Office in Midrand,

Johannesburg. Eddie has a wealth of knowledge when it

comes to motorcycle tyre products and technical expertise,

coming across from TI-Auto where he was HOD of the

motorcycle tyre division with Metzeler. You can contact Eddie

on 083 467 1349 or eddie@biketyrewarehouse.com.

Then, The BATT HP 11’s (High Performance) road range are

now available at great prices in the following size range;

120/70-17 front; 160/60-17 rear; 180/55-17 rear; 190/50-17

rear; 190/55-17 rear.

But, most importantly and prestigiously of all, BTW won the

Pirelli Dealer of the Year again - they are the largest trader in

Pirelli tyres in SA. For Sales contact 073 777 9269 | 083 467

1349 or sales@biketyrewarehouse.com.

12 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


All the NEWS proudly brought

to you by HJC HELMETS

DALY BMW MOTORRAD

KLERKSDORP TO THE RESCUE.

A couple of weeks ago we put out a

message on our Facebook page asking

if anyone had a new BMW S1000RR for

us to use in our main feature test for this

month. We had a great response but

most saying that there bikes were not yet

run in so pretty pointless.

The fine folk from Daly Motorrad, the

massive BMW store in Klerksdorp came to

our rescue and very quickly had their demo

model serviced and ready for us to test.

This was our first time visiting this

dealership and we were mightily

impressed with the layout and friendly

service. They cater for everything BMW

Motorrad - from bike sales to accessories

and service and are also the only BMW

dealership with permission to service any

make of motorcycle. They’ll even give you

a loan BMW to use while your bike is in,

T&Cs apply of course.

A big thanks to Jarques Brink and his team

for their speedy and professional service

and for coming to our rescue in a time of

need. The Demo S1000RR M Sport model

is for sale so if you are keen on anything

BMW or motorcycle related give them a

call on 018 011 1888.

All the latest BMW Motorrad

machines for you to gaze

upon. Demo models also

available for test rides.

BIKE KINGS

MASSIVE WINTER

SALE - 26-29 MARCH

The massive bike accessories chain

stores are having a big Winter Sale

starting on Thursday the 26th March

2020 and ending on the Sunday the 29th

March. Customers can expect 15% off all

brand new gear in store while there will

also be 10% off assorted tyres and up to

30% off selected helmets.

For all you dirty buggers out there Bike

Kings will have selected MX gear at less

50% - now that’s just filthy!

Bike Kings carries massive amount of

stock with a wide variety of styles and

sizes so we can guarantee that you will

find a bargain not just over this Winter

Sale but anytime you set foot into

anyone of their 3 stores.

Bike Kings PTA: 012 2710 070/1

Bike Kings Sandton: 011 234 5007

Bike Kings CPT: 084 976 1224

Our Knight in shining

armour - Mr Jarques

Brink - bike and

workshop manager.

2020 YAMAHA R1

ARRIVES IN SA.

The sharper, faster, meaner 2020 Yamaha

R1 is now available in South Africa.

Yes, at R319 950 the new R1 is not cheap

but you do actually see what you are

paying for. The build quality of the R1 is

very impressive.

The fine-tuned styling of the 2020 R1

is just bang on the money and this also

improved the overall aerodynamics of

this angry YZF. The engine has been

revised and the suspension and brakes

updated, all in the quest to take the fight

straight to the superbike class of 2020.

Expect us to bring you a full review on

the 2020 YZF R1 in the near future.

14 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


All the NEWS proudly brought

to you by HJC HELMETS

TRICKBITZ NEWS:

MORE NEW TRICKBITZ

JUST LANDED.

The all new Domino A450

grip by Tomaselli

The A450 was created with the aim of

completing the range for racing-road

use, where every rider has personal and

particular needs. For this reason Tomaselli

found it was necessary to put in place

twenty years of experience in the field

of dual compound grips, in which it is a

pioneer, and care for ergonomics that has

distinguished it for over fifty years.

Here are some features of the new grips:

• Two materials with different hardness

and colours: a harder heart to make the

grip on the handlebar stable and a softer

outer coat to promote maximum grip in all

conditions. In areas more subject to wear

and tear such as the flange, the outer edge

and an extreme portion, the harder material

emerges outside, better supporting the

hand and reducing the more localized wear

on the knob.

• New external multiconic finish, which

allows exceptional and constant grip -

even in wet conditions - with progressive

wear of the knob. This is possible thanks to

its particular shape in the world of knobs,

the result of months of studies and tests in

all conditions.

• A slightly higher grip diameter than the

A010, designed for those who prefer a

slightly larger ergonomic grip.

• Three seats for fixing with the locking

wire, of which the innermost can be

considered to adapt the socket to the

shorter accelerator tubes of the Japanese

motorcycles.

Call Trickbitz on 011 672 6599 for more info.

I.R.C. Quickshifters

With the advancements in technology

on all bikes these days it is amazing how

something as simple as the time it takes

to change gears can make. A simple up or

down shift can mean winning or losing.

The Blipper replacement the original

quickshifter sensor, allows the same

functions of the original version of most

modern superbikes. The Blipper works both

up and downshifts where it allows a more

rapid climb and greater control of engine

braking. So you no longer need to use the

clutch to downshift. The electronic gear

function Blipper is completely plug and play

with no changes to the original wiring.

Using “Load Cell Technology” they are able

to work both pushing and pulling and have

2 different Electronic modules.

• Signal powering near the strain gauge

and external board for signal treatment

• Calibrate and Calibratable at any time

• Easy preload setting done on a miniature

digital led panel, no PC

• Max Load Recording

• Current Load Display

• Failure Check warning

• Automatic temperature, vibrations and

creep adjustment

• Specific Connectors included

• Instructions for YEC, HRC and Yoshimura

ECUS

• Provided with Rod already holed and

threaded, just to be cut, available either

M6 or M8 holes

• IP 65 guaranted I.E. water and dust proof

• Reality 100% reliable: 1’000’000 cycles at

45 kg’s load passed

Call Trickbitz on 011 672 6599 for more info.

I.R.C. Tyre Warmers

A neccesaty for any track rider. The I.R.C.

tyre warmers are high quality and have

a proven track record of lasting and not

giving any hassles. There quality has

been tried and tested at the highest level

possible in both the MotoGP and WSBK

paddocks - so yes, they are good.

• Carbon resistors for greater reliability.

Virtually indestructible.

• Arrangement of spiral heating elements

for a more uniform heating of the hips too.

• Possibility to have different sizes on

request.

• Excellent side coverage for quick rim

heating.

• The temperature is set at 80 ° C as

required by the MotoGP and SBK teams.

• Heating speed developed in accordance

with the experience of the MotoGP and

SBK teams.

• Side skirts for faster heating of the rim.

• Nylon exterior and polyester interior:

FIREPROOF.

• Elastic closures for quick assembly.

• Power: 850W (size L)

Call Trickbitz on 011 672 6599 for more info.

16 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


All the NEWS proudly brought

to you by HJC HELMETS

THRUXTON MOTORCYCLES

Thruxton Motorcycles started

as a small Royal Enfield

dealer in Somerset West in

2011. It then moved to the

current site in the Tyger Valley

area, growing both in size and

brands, taking on a Suzuki

dealership in 2015.

Mike Hopkins Motorcycles

has been in existence since

1978 and is one of the most

recognised motorcycle

dealers in Cape Town. Also

being the longest Kawasaki

dealer in South Africa and

more recently the major

Triumph dealer in the

Western Cape.

The two shops combined in

2018 when the then current

owner of MHM agreed to

sell to Thruxton. The two

shops where merged under

one roof at the Tygervalley

site, achieving a more

efficient organisation; a long

established and respected

dealer, with experienced

staff and multiple brands,

Kawasaki, Suzuki, SYM, Royal

Enfield, Triumph.

Adrian Podd is the man in

charge and has been in the

motorcycle industry both

in the UK and SA for many

years. Mark Livings (Sales

Manager) is a long-standing

character in the Cape Town

motorcycle community, and

equally well-known is Gino

Perino (Service Manager).

Alongside them is a team

of experienced salespeople

and mechanics who are all

themselves enthusiastic

bikers. They understand that

motorcycling is a passion

for some, but for others just

an economical practicality

and can empathise with

all providing a friendly yet

professional service.

The showroom has brand

new bikes from all of its

franchised brands, plus a

quality selection of used

bikes, in particular Triumph.

Every used bike for sale, is

first given a comprehensive

check and test by the

workshop before being

placed on the floor for sale.

Recently introduced is the

Smart Carbon loyalty card,

enabling customers to

build up points and then

redeem them against future

purchases from either the

fully stocked accessory area

or for workshop jobs.

Supporting sales is a large

workshop, bike wash and tyre

fitment centre. The workshop

is staffed by three qualified

motorcycle mechanics with

certification in all the major

brands. Between them they

have many years’ experience

and the tools and diagnostics

to service and repair most

modern bikes. All types of

motorcycles repairs can

be undertaken including

insurance and major engine

rebuilds.

Making all this work is of

course the most important

part of the shop, the

customers. They come far and

wide to support Thruxtons

ride outs, breakfast runs,

demo days or just pop in for a

chat. The guys at Thruxtons

say that this makes running a

‘bike shop’ so enjoyable.” And

send out a Big Thank You! To

them all.

Give Thruxtons a call on

021 202 3369 or pop in for

a coffee and a chat at 112

Edward Street, Bellville,

Cape Town. 7530

RXF & RFZ

RACING-

BALANCE

BIKE WITH

ELECTRIC

MOTOR

Most of the kids out there have

had a little balance bike similar

to the one picyured here, where

they duck walked/rode it around

the garden etc.

Well, this is the next step up in

their progression to becoming

the next Brad Binder or Sheridan

Morais. Some innovative blokes

have fitted an electric motor to

a balance bike with foot boards

and from the videos we have

watched, the kiddies scoot

around obstacle courses from

about the age of 3 or 4 years old

to their early pre-teens.

The balance bikes come in two

different sizes - the RXF is 12

inch and RFZ is 16 inch - both

with lightweight aluminium alloy

frames, sturdy handle bars and

wheels and a comfy adjustable

seat. The electric motors speed

can be adjusted up or down to

suit the riders level of skill and

Mom or Dads jogging speed. The

RXF is suitable for riders from

about 3 or 4 years of age up to

about 6 or 7 years old and the

RFZ bike from about 6 or 7 years

old up to about 10 or 12 years

old, depending on the size of the

youngster. Prices range from

R4,500.00 to R5,500.00.

For more info or to orders

yours drop a mail to

freestylemarketing13@outlook.

com, delivery is via courier

countrywide and assembly is as

simple as charging and fitting

the battery, fitting the seat and

handlebars.

18 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


PADDOCK NEWS

Brought to you by

QUARTARARO JOINS VINALES

IN FACTORY YAMAHA

MOTOGP LINE-UP

MotoGP rookie sensation Fabio

Quartarsro will join Maverick Vinales in

the Monster Yamaha team for 2021-2022.

In his debut year, the 20-year old from

Nice, France, scored seven podiums with

Petronas Yamaha Sepang Racing Team,

which at the time was a brand-new

Yamaha satellite team.

He came tantalizingly close to his

first premier class win on a number of

occasions. Though it wasn’t to be, his

exceptional performances impressed

many in 2019. Ultimately, he secured fifth

place in the overall MotoGP standings,

earning him the Best Independent Team

Rider honour by 27 points, as well as the

Rookie of the Year title with a 100-point

margin to the runner-up.

“I’m delighted about what my

management has achieved in the last

few months together with YMC. It was

not simple to establish, but now I have

a clear plan for the next three years and

I’m really happy,” said Quartararo.

I will work hard, like I did last year, and

I’m extremely motivated to achieve great

performances.

“I feel like the winter period is too long –

I’m really excited to go to the Sepang test

next week to ride my new YZR-M1 and

meet and work with my crew again.

“I want to thank YMC and PETRONAS

Yamaha Sepang Racing Team, who have

given me the opportunity to enter the

MotoGP class in 2019. I will give my all to

do them proud again this year.”

Yamaha Racing managing director Lin

Jarvis added: “We are very pleased that

Fabio will be joining the Yamaha Factory

Racing MotoGP Team line-up for 2021

and 2022.

“His results in his MotoGP debut year

were sensational. His 6 pole positions

and the 7 podiums in the 2019 season

were a clear sign of his brilliance and

exceptional riding skills. Inviting him to

move up to the Yamaha Factory Racing

Team after he completes his contract

with Petronas Yamaha Sepang Racing

Team was a logical next step.

“For the upcoming season he will be

provided with a factory-spec YZR-M1 and

he will receive full support from Yamaha.

“Fabio is only 20 years old, but he is

already showing great maturity on and

off the bike, and we are excited to have

him join us in 2021.

“Fabio and Maverick will provide a big

stimulus to all of us in the Yamaha

Factory Racing MotoGP Team to continue

to develop the YZR-M1 and leave no

stone unturned in our quest for MotoGP

World Championship victories.”

Pic by GP Fever.de

ROSSI’S FUTURE

MOTOGP PLANS

PUT ON HOLD.

Valentino Rossi’s plans for his MotoGP

future have been put on hold after Yamaha

signed Fabio Quartararo to the factory team

alongside Maverick Vinales.

It is believed The Doctor has an option to

simply do a swap with Quartararo but it is

doubtful he will have the motivation to run in

a non-factory team and is more likely to go

into car racing.

“For reasons dictated by the riders’ market,

Yamaha asked me at the beginning of the

year to make a decision regarding my future.

Consistent with what I said during the last

season, I confirmed that I didn’t want to rush

any decision and needed more time,” said Rossi.

“Yamaha has acted accordingly and

concluded the ongoing negotiations. It is clear

that after the last technical changes and with

the arrival of my new crew chief, my first goal

is to be competitive this year and to continue

my career as a MotoGP rider also in 2021.

“Before doing so, I need to have some

answers that only the track and the first

few races can give me. I’m happy that,

should I decide to continue, Yamaha is ready

to support me in all respects, giving me a

factory-spec bike and a factory contract.”

20 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


PADDOCK NEWS

Brought to you by

TWO-

STROKES

TO MAKE

MOTOGP

RETURN BY

2026?

KAWASAKI AND REA LOOKING

FOR MOTOGP WILDCARD?

The news comes after Ezpeleta confirmed in

an interview with GPOne in which he confirmed

the question was raised and quickly quashed.

He said, “Kawasaki asked me for the possibility

of doing wildcard with their Superbike. I replied

no, because wildcards are reserved for those

who participate in MotoGP.”

In the interview, the Dorna CEO went on to

explain how he felt WSBK fitted into the grand

scheme of the things by saying, “I went to the

SBK paddock and said clearly that they were

second division”.

Kawasaki exited MotoGP ahead of the 2009

season citing pressures prompted by the

global financial crisis but in lieu siphoned

resources towards its WorldSBK effort which

at the time was struggling compared with its

factory-backed rivals. It proved a shrewd move

with Tom Sykes winning its first title in 20

years in 2013 before Jonathan Rea reeled off

five consecutive titles between 2015 and 2019.

Despite this success, Kawasaki has

repeatedly resisted the temptation to return

to MotoGP, describing it as ten times more

expensive than its WorldSBK effort with no

guarantees of success.

However, this revelation from Ezpeleta

suggests Kawasaki has been considering the

prospect of taking an adapted version of its

ZX-10RR all the way to MotoGP, though its

unclear how it would attempt to do this not

least because MotoGP uses Michelin tyres

compared with WorldSBK’s Pirelli rubber.

Kawasaki did have a minor presence in

MotoGP during the CRT era when its engines

were used by the Avintia team, while at the

time rival ART bikes were ultimately prototype

adaptations of the Aprilia RSV4.

Ezpeleta doesn’t say which event Kawasaki

wanted to wildcard in though a performance

at Motegi would be plausible given there is still

no Japanese event on the WorldSBK calendar.

Of the 13 events on the WorldSBK calendar,

MotoGP visited seven of them last season.

As a reference, Rea’s Superpole lap during the

Jerez round was a 1m 38.247, which would have

placed him 19th on the 24-strong grid. Fabio

Quartararo’s pole winning lap was a 1m 36.880s

Two-stroke engines or motors

running on hydrogen could be back in

MotoGP by the middle of this decade

if targets to make motorsport more

carbon neutral are to be achieved.

Stinkwheels, as the Americans

lovingly referred to them, were

canned in MotoGP at the end of the

2001 season as the emissions were

far too high and four-strokes were

brought in - some say at the behest

of Honda - to made reductions.

But with new direct injection,

pressure charging and other

technologies, two-strokes are now

more efficient than four-strokes. And

hydrogen engines only emit water

at the end of a combustion cycle but

that tech is still very expensive.

F1 chief technical boff Pat Symonds is

keen on using a two-stroke formula

in its new specification of engine unit

in 2025 and MotoGP might follow

the same ideas in order to also share

development costs.

“I’m very keen on it being a twostroke.

Much more efficient, great

sound from the exhaust and a lot

of the problems with the old twostrokes

are just not relevant any

more,” he said.

“Direct injection, pressure charging,

and new ignition systems have all

allowed new forms of two-stroke

engines to be very efficient and very

emission-friendly. I think there’s a

good future for them.”

22 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


STAB TC-2

NEW GRAPHICS AVAILABLE

PHILOSOPHER TC-1

PHILOSOPHER TC-2

PHILOSOPHER TC-5

HARMONIC TC-10

MARQUEZ POWER UP! TC-1

STAB TC-4

STAB TC-8

EQUATE TC-10

SHOREBREAK TC-2

ZORK TC-7

THE ESSENCE OF RIDING

WWW.SHOEI.COM


PADDOCK NEWS

Brought to you by

MOTOGP MISANO TOUR 2020

Calling all MotoGP fans and

more, especially fans of the

famous #46. The 2020 San

Marino MotoGP at the Italian

Misano World Circuit may

possibly be the last time the

home town hero Valentino Rossi

races at his home track.

How would you like to be there

and join #TheVoiceOfChoice in

SA Motorsport, Greg Moloney,

and watch Vale take his last ride

from his home town to the iconic

track, that has seen him on the

podium on numerous occasions,

in front of the world famous

VR46 fans?

Take a ride through the Italian

countryside from Rome to the

Adriatic Coast, as well daily

outrides.

Your 4* star hotel (upgrade

available) awaits you in the town

of Riccione, known for its nightlife

and beaches.

Experience the atmosphere of

Tavullia, Rossi’s home town,

and the MotoGP Qualifying and

then experience what it’s like to

be trackside on race day on the

grid grandstand, as we bring the

South African “gees” in true South

African style to support our very

own Brad Binder and Darryn

Binder as they line up to take on

the worlds best in MotoGP and

Moto3 respectively!

And let’s not forget that

unforgettable track invasion that

is customary at Misano... let’s be

there in the thick of it... you know

you want to.

Date: 10 – 14 September 2020

• 5 Days, 4 Nights in Riccione, Italy

• Daily planned routes

• Visit Ducati Factory & Museum

• Watch the qualifying in Tavullia -

Rossi’s home town

• Central Stand Grid View ticket –

Sunday raceday

• Arrival Lunch and Dinner,

Farewell Dinner

• Local Tour Guide

• Luggage transfers

• Economy return Flights

• Bike Hire for 5 Day with

comprehensive insurance & km

included

For more details and all pricing

per package please visit

supercarlifesyle.com.

We can’t wait to get your name

down for this incredible MotoGP

experience.

24 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


||| PRODUCTS FEATURE

RB KTM RACING TEAM

CREWNECK SWEATER

Layer up in this comfortable crewneck

sweater with a Red Bull KTM Racing

Team design on the front. Meanwhile, a

team logo on the back hem keeps your

pride on show.

Available from Planes Trains

Automobiles @ R1,599.

Bedford Centre Tel: 011 615 4995

Melrose Arch Tel: 011 684 1100

RB KTM RACING TEAM LETRA

REVERSIBLE JACKET

Like to have options? This versatile padded jacket isn’t just a cosy

layer, it’s also two styles in one. For low key days, wear the plain

side with colourful Red Bull KTM Racing Team lettering on the

sleeve, and for those days when you want extra flair, the other

side rocks a statement KTM mosaic print all over. In addition,

it’s insulated, windproof and waterproof, making it a perfect

teammate on colder days.

Available from KTM Centurion. Tel: 012 643 1110

RB KTM RACING

TEAM SOCKS

Created in a comfortable cotton mix,

these sporty socks feature a knitted

Red Bull KTM Racing Team logo to

put your pride on show and they rock

a two colour KTM mosaic design to

complement the rest of the collection.

Available from Planes Trains

Automobiles. Call for pricing.

Bedford Centre Tel: 011 615 4995

Melrose Arch Tel: 011 684 1100

RB KTM RACING

TEAM SHIRTS

Show your love for racing on two

wheels with this statement T-Shirt

featuring a big Red Bull KTM Racing

Team logo on the front in colour,

together with a classic crew neck

and short sleeves to keep you fresh.

Available from KTM Centurion.

Tel: 012 643 1110

RB KTM RACING TEAM CAPS

Show your support for MotoGP riders Brad Binder and

Pol Espargaro with the Red Bull KTM Racing Official

Teamline. Keep a cool head with the Red Bull KTM 9FIFTY

cap by New Era. Creative, vibrant and stylish, and for

authenticity it features a Red Bull KTM Racing logo on the

front together with “racing team” embroidery.

Available from RAD Moto KTM. Tel: 011 234 5007

26 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


||| PRODUCTS FEATURE

VR46 MINICHAMPS 1:10 SCALE

AGV HELMET COLLECTION

If you are a Valentino Rossi fan then pay careful

attention to this. Planes Trains Automobiles have just

got stock of the all-new Minichamps 1:10 scale Rossi

helmet collection. Some of the most famous helmet

designs from the Doctor over the years - from Mugello

and Misano replica’s to his more current race replica’s.

These are a must for any Rossi fans and MotoGP

collectors.

Available from Planes Trains Automobiles @ R249 each.

Bedford Centre Tel: 011 615 4995

Melrose Arch Tel: 011 684 1100

OGIO NO DRAG MACH 5

BACKPACK

The OGIO Mach 5 Back Pack is OGIO’s topof-the-line

aerodynamic backpack. Full of

features such as a pocket for shoes, helmet

carry strap and a fleece-lined electronics

pocket, this backpack is made from a

streamlined shape that resists buffeting at

speed. The OGIO No Drag Mach 5 Backpack

easily expands by means of a U-shaped

zippered gusset.

Available from Bike Kings PTA @ R2800.

Tel 012 2710 070/1

SHOEI NXR HELMET

The new NXR is a value-for-money helmet

aimed at a wide variety of riders - from every day

commuters to track day warriors - the NXR offers

all one could want when it comes to a quality,

safe, reliable helmet at a price that won’t leave

your head feeling sore.

SHOEI’s state-of-the-art wind tunnel at their

Ibaraki Factory was the key to the NXR Helmet

Design Process. Thanks to the time spent in the

wind tunnel the NXR sport; a more compact

and aerodynamic shell than the XR-1100 and is

the lightest Snell Certified Helmet in the Shoei

Line as of its introduction.Using the Shoei Wind

Tunnel the optimal balance of ventilation and

noise was identified.

Using this knowledge Shoei Engineers equipped

the NXR with a large, three position lower vent

shutter for ease of use with gloves, three upper

vents for optimal air intake, and four upper

exhaust vents too take full advantage of negative

pressure suction. The end result is dramatically

improved cool air intake and hot air expulsion.

CWR-1 shield provides a vast field of vision that

rivals helmet less peripheral. In addition to

protecting against 99% of the sun’s damaging

UV rays, the CWR-1 shield offers a distortionfree

view throughout the entire range thanks to

SHOEI’s 3D injection-moulding process.

The NXR all-new QR-E base plate system

facilitates quicker shield changes than ever

before.

The NXR features the SHOEI Multi-Ply Matrix

AIM+ Shell construction. Combining fibreglass

with organic fibres, the NXR proprietary

AIM+ Shell is not only strong, it is extremely

lightweight, and comes in an industry-leading

four shell sizes to ensure a custom fit for heads

between the sizes of XS-XXL.

Dual-Layer, Multi-Density EPS liner not only

provides an enhanced impact absorption by

utilizing varying densities of foam in key areas

around the riders head, it is also designed to

allow cooling air to travel unrestricted through

tunnels created in the EPS, further enhancing the

NXR superior ventilation.

Fully removable, washable, adjustable, and

replaceable 3D Max-Dry System II interior.

SHOEI equipped the NXR Helmet with its

exclusive Emergency Quick Release System

(technology borrowed from The Shoei X-Twelve

Helmet) that allows emergency medical

personnel to easily remove the cheek pads

from an injured rider’s helmet. When the cheek

pads have been removed, the helmet can be

safely lifted from a rider’s head without creating

unnecessary strain in the neck area.

The new range of NXR colours and designs are

now available in SA. Featured here is the STAB

TC-8 (Orange) and STAB TC-2 (white and blue).

Available from Linex Lifestyle Centre

Randburg @ R9,700 each.

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020 2 7


Cool

Urban

Cruiser

Cruising the streets on the ultra cool

and seriously good value-for-money

new Big Boy Superlight 200cc.

Words: Shado Alston | Pics: Sean Hendley

My first impression of the

Superlight was that it appears

to be a small commuter akin

to the Suzuki GN250, with

similar styling, appearance and

ergonomics. Wide flat seat, with

raised handlebars makes it a

comfortable ride with zero effort

in keeping the arms up and hands

on the bar ends.

The CG-derived 200cc motor

is common to the STX 200 I

reviewed not too long ago and

has proven itself to be a robust

performer with ample guts to

get you rolling. Although the rev

counter indicates a maximum

useable range of 10000rpm, a

more realistic figure is around

the 8000rpm mark, the extra

2,000rpm is there if you need it

though. The counterbalanced

crankshaft delivers a smooth

useable rev range and has ample

torque down in the low RPM

range. The manufacturer states a

fuel consumption figure of around

2.5l per 100km, which if ridden

correctly should see you get

around 500-600km on a tank!

The only issue I picked up, and

this is really just splitting hairs,

is on the fuelling on the motor,

it has a small flat spot when

accelerating hard off the line, but

you must remember that most, if

not all carburetted machines are

jetted for sea level and a bit of re

– jetting at the first service should

sort most of that out. Also, it is

always better to run the engine a

bit rich when running in the motor.

The machine is fitted with Yuan

Xing rubber, which has quite a soft

compound and tread pattern that

will handle the rain and grip nicely

on dry roads. 18 inch alloy rim on

the rear a 19 inch up front let the

machine feel planted and handle

the corners of Fort Klapperkop like

a dream!

Brakes employed up front are

a big single-piston calliper and

disc and drum on the rear. The

wet weight is around 130kg and

with the 200cc 5-speed motor

option will see you through to

around 110km/h! (Not that one

should be doing those speeds on

urban roads…)

Adjustable preload on the

rear shock allow for adjustment

to accommodate a payload of

around 150kg. I found the machine

to have great manners on the

road and the little bit of rocky

terrain I climbed to get a photo

at the cell tower was handled

with ease! The Superlight also

has a rear carrier rack and pillion

setup to make it versatile and

an option in the commute and

commercial markets too! I’d say

it’s a great beginner machine that

will keep on going if serviced and

maintained as and when it should!

Personally, I think the machine

is great value for money, looks

really good and I expect to see a

good few on the road in the near

future!

Check out www.

samotorcycles.co.za for your

nearest dealer.

28 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


NOW HERE: BIG BOY’S

ALL-NEW SUPERLIGHT

125 & 200cc.

SuperLight 125- R17,499.00

SuperLight 200- R17,999.00

* Prices include VAT, excludes On-The-Road costs & Govt. Levy.

Due to popular demand, SA Motorcycles is proud to

announce the re-introduction of the Big Boy Superlight.

This new addition to the Big Boy range will come

in both 125 and 200cc. The upright riding position

and comfortable ergonomics make

it ideal for commuting in daily traffic

or running company deliveries at a

highly affordable price tag compared

to similar models in the market.

The pair of Superlights feature superior

build quality, both sporting counter-balanced 4-stroke

motors, 5-speed gearboxes, LCD displays, LED lights,

electric starts, front disc brakes and

other key features.

The first shipment

will be available in

Orange & Silver

and Black & Silver

colour schemes, both

equipped with 12-spoke

satin black sports wheels.

If you’d like a super-light feel in the traffic with

super-light fuel consumption, the Big Boy SuperLight is

the ride for you. Visit one of our 80+ authorised dealers

today for a closer look.

For the full scooter, motorcycle, ATV and commercial range visit: www.samotorcycles.co.za

IMPORTED AND DISTRIBUTED BY

Join Big Boy on

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2020/02/10 2:05 PM

SA’S ADVENTURE

BIKE MAGAZINE

IN STORES NOW!

Available at all leading

retailers nationwide.


THE APRILIA

MPUMALANGA

BLAST

Two Aprilias, two days and two idiots blasting to

motorcycling paradise. What could be better?

Words: Donovan Fourie | Pics: Hapless Donovan and his iPhone

Mat never mixes his

words: “Don, let’s go

shoot two bikes in

Sabie this week.”

My professionalism fails,

and I answer like a school kid

unwrapping a new Scalextrics set.

“Yes, please!”

“Good. We are riding up with

all our camera gear in backpacks.

And you’re riding an RSV4. And

you have to wear leathers.”

At this point, you notice that

the box is from China and the

spelling has two K’s.

“Oh…”

I love the RSV4, just like I

love all Aprilias, but the idea of

300km of N4 highway cramped

on a superbike while my black

leathers absorb the stifling heat

tends to dull the shine slightly.

Normally, I’d load the trailer,

turn the aircon in my bakkie

up and blare Led Zeppelin the

entire way there, but Mat had

this genius plan of doing a

travelogue film about the trip

there. He’d sit in the comfort

of a Tuono while I, the butt of

the joke, cramp my way to heat

exhaustion. Bastard!

The sun rose on a

Wednesday, which we are all

thankful for, and two bursting

backpacks travelled through

the morning gridlock on the

back of two idiots growling their

V4 ways along the morning

suffering. I’m on the RSV4RR, the

cheaper of the two superbike

options, that is joyfully still

adorned with the full set of

Aprilia electrickery, including

cruise control. The traffic clears

as we leave civilisation, and

we want to get this highway

torture over and done with. The

fastest way to so that is to lock

the speed at 166 km/h; fast

enough to haul and yet not fast

enough for handcuffs. Along

the journey, we encountered a

police representative once, who

pointed its little radar gun at us,

saw the speed, shrugged and

then waved at us. Isn’t that nice?

I expected to be weeping

with cramps before middistance,

more so in leathers.

Truthfully, the cramped position

of a superbike is never great in

riding jeans and a jacket, but

the leathers had a surprisingly

opposite effect. They were a

new pair I had received from

Mass Sports who were good

enough to stick a tape measure

into my unmentionables

and tailor me a custom set,

something a gentleman of my

“generous” proportions requires.

By some miracle, they fitted

magnificently, more so than

jeans and jackets, and I was

oddly comfortable. Helping

further is that the Italians are not

the smallest race and their bikes

are usually deliciously roomy.

By Milly’s Services, I felt

drained but not fatigued.

Happy as a daisy, we set off for

the last stretch and rolled into

The Woodsman less than an

hour later.

The plan was to begin filming

my road test of the RSV4 that

afternoon, but the weather

gods had become jealous and

offloaded a mini monsoon

upon us, so there was no more

riding until morning. With that,

I can heartily recommend The

Woodman’s bar…

The 22 is a stretch of road

running from Sabie towards

Hazyview and is the best race

track in the world. You may have

gazed in wonder at aerial photos

of European passes zig-zagging

down the mighty Alps and cast

some doubt on this claim. While

they are magnificent to behold,

they are less magnificent to

Two absolute beauties! You can see them in

the background behind Mat and Don.

ride. Essentially, they are like a

prolonged lap of a go-cart track

– short straight, hairpin, short

straight, hairpin, short straight,

hairpin, etc. The 22 does not

surmount any might peaks but,

instead, follows the Sabie River’s

meanders making for a 22

km-long stretch of fast, flowing,

predictable corners. The best in

the world.

Pornography for petrolheads,

And the RSV4RR is quite

possibly the best bike in the

world for this stretch. It’s even

better than the RSV4 Factory for

one simple reason – it’s cheaper.

There’s a good reason for the

Factory commanding a dearer

price and one that is much

appreciated around the closed

race circuits of the world, but

the 22 isn’t a closed race circuit.

30 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


The Ohlins suspension on the

Factory is far better than the

Sachs on the RR for braking hard

into hairpin bends, but there are

no hairpin bends on the 22. The

extra 16hp stomped out by the

bigger 1100cc motor is excellent

for punching out of curves onto

long straights, but the 22 is

mostly a series of connected

corners where subtlety is

rewarded far more than a punch.

The extra Moola for the Factory

is not needed, so why pay more?

Beyond that, the V-four

motor offers power throughout

the rev range while broadcasting

that soulful soundtrack. The

frames on Aprilias are legendary

for providing a miraculous mix

of both stability and agility in

a rarely found combination of

both, making switches between

corners as easy as holding a

line while in them. The Brembo

brakes are excellent, the Sachs

suspension works admirably,

the looks turn the heads of every

Arrival at the famous

Woodsman in Sabie.

pedestrian, and the electronics

are magnificent – especially the

two-way quickshifter.

The RSV4RR is quite probably

the perfect bike for the 22, but it

was not the best bike on our trip;

that prize went to the Tuono.

Through the 22, it was

outclassed by the RSV4 but

a long way from the point of

embarrassment. Everywhere

else, it was a better motorcycle.

Through traffic, it is easier to

jiggle between cars, down the

freeway the upright position

is breezier but less taxing, and

it was all joy everywhere else.

We’ve said it before, and we will

say it again – the Tuono is the

best bike Aprilia makes.

If you want to conquer the 22,

get an RSV4RR. If you want to

conquer everywhere else, get a

Tuono.

The new range of Aprilia’s

are set to land in SA any second

now so call Aprilia SA on 010 443

4596 now for more info.

After spending the day “working” on the 22, it

helps to carbo-load.

“The frames on Aprilias are legendary

for providing a miraculous mix of both

stability and agility in a rarely found

combination of both, making switches

between corners as easy as holding a

line while in them.”

The perfect bike for the perfect road.

Standing triumphantly at the Aprilia (and

Maserati) shop after a two-day blast.

Taking a break beside the 22

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020 31


EXCLUSIVE LOCAL TEST: 2020 BMW S1000RR

LETHAL

WEAPON 1&2

BMW S1000RR: STANDARD VS RACE TRIM

32 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


In this issue of RideFast, Robert Portman had the

opportunity to ride Lance Isaac’s National-spec BMW

S1000RR race bike kitted with everything our minds can

imagine, and things much brighter minds can imagine also.

Before we turn the pages to peruse the written form of

his eyes popping out of his head, Donovan Fourie spent a

day at Red Star Raceway with both a “standard” version

of BMW’s latest superbike incarnation, plus a more

“reasonably” kitted-out one from the fellows at World Of

Carbon. Effectively, we move from good, to better, to best.

Let’s start with the good – herewith from Donovan:

Words: Donovan Fourie | Pics: Beam Productions

“Standard”

BMW S1000RR

Well, we say “standard”

because it is road-legal and

left the factory in this trim.

But manufacturers have

cottoned on to the idea that

people don’t want what

is technically “standard”

and find that their minds

are more at ease when

said factory bolts on all

their batsh*t crazy go-fast

bits. Thus we should make

a distinction between

“standard” and “base”. This is

standard, but it has an entire

catalogue of BMW’s newlyadopted

M-parts vomited

over it and therefore is

galaxies away from “base”.

If you don’t believe us,

observe:

It has the optional M

Package complete with

carbon wheels, the lighter

M battery, the M seat with

harder padding and a nonslip

cover, an M tail and a

“WSBK” M swing-arm with

a different pivot. And this

is the outward glance –

inwardly, there is a host of

added electronic trickery

with three Race Pro riding

modes, a launch control, a

pitlane limiter, engine brake

control, hill-start control

pro, dynamic brake control

and slide control.

After all that, if you feel

as though your overheating

brain has exceeded melting

point, take a moment to

sympathise with Rob and

me, standing disconsolately

in the pits of Red Star as

we flipped through the

seemingly infinite onslaught

of options on the TFT dash.

After various phone calls

and committee meetings,

we eventually reached an

electronic compromise that

will suit our simple track

needs and set forth down

pitlane. Obviously, this is

without the pitlane limiter

working on account of it

not being included in the

understanding settlement.

We are sure it works

terrifically, though.

At the beginning of last

year sometime, RideFast

attended the tedious world

launch of this model in

some scummy country at

the bottom of Europe on

some lousy race track – the

adjectives contained in the

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020 33


previous sentence were not

affected in any way by the fact

the Rob went to that launch,

and I did not. An age seems to

have passed since then with

various little tweaks and local

legislative bureaucracy causing

various delays, but it is good to

finally sit on one in the flesh and

feel it rumbling its way onto a

track we call our own.

The full report was offered

after the launch but herewith

a highlights package – the

motor now shoves out 207 hp

at 13,500 rpm, two figures that

have since been out-claimed

by the Italians. However,

these are German figures that

tend to be portrayed via an

efficiently-produced clipboard,

whereas the Italians convey

theirs through the medium

of arm waving and crotchgrabbing.

The S1000RR has

also been munching the diet

pills. Previously, it sat at a

somewhat rotund 208kg, a

figure BMW dismissed as not

a problem due to their clever

use of mass-centralisation.

Sadly, for them, the opposition

also used mass-centralisation,

except with less mass. The

current bike, with the lightened

M Package, weighs a daintily

athletic 193 kg ready to ride.

Where the previous model

was a pillar of stability, it had a

wayward manner deep within

the corner, preferring to go

straight when you would rather

it would turn. There are no

issues now, and immediately

it feels light on its feet with

far better tipping and less

negotiation mid-turn. The

strange throttle setup helps this

further; at all stages of opening,

the bike feels bogged down as

though it’s in the wrong gear.

This might not run up and give

you the kick you were expecting,

but it does make controlling

speed through the turns a little

less traumatic.

When all hope appeared

lost, you open up onto the

straight with the anticipation

it will merely struggle through

the revs, but the moment the

throttle goes full, suddenly the

engine comes to life with the

kick of 207 ponies. The struggle

here is that you had just begun

to relax your kidneys when

suddenly they are shot out your

backside. The theory behind

this phenomenon is part down

to the ride-by-wire throttle

setup and a good chunk down

to the ShiftCam motor. It also

goes some way to help curb

the shortfall of the inline-four,

screamer motor, a format

that traditionally offers huge

punch down the straights but is

clumsy within the turns.

Where some manufacturers

seem to base their superbike

ergonomics on the dimensions

of smurfs, BMW has hired

Hans, who moonlights as a

heavyweight kickboxer, to

model theirs. There’s enough

room to conduct a gymnastics

tournament.

The electronics were never

noticed, meaning that they’re

either working exceptionally

well or are not working at all

and will be sorely missed when

they are suddenly needed. The

quickshifter is one of the best

available anywhere – further

begging the question of why the

system on BMW’s boxer motors

is so awful – and the TFT dash

is magnificent, especially in

track display mode.

On the race track, some

little flaws do sneak their way

through the net. The brake

callipers used are from some

company you have never

heard of and have the letters

“BMW” emblazoned on them.

There are stories that Brembo

34 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


Big thanks to Daly Motorrad

Klerksdorp for loaning us their

Demo M Sport model to test.

The bike is available for sale so

contact them as it is a gem!

World of Carbon

BMW S1000RR

couldn’t supply them with

their latest goods because of

some contract with Ducati, so

BMW went elsewhere. While

suspicious to begin with, they

do stop the motorcycle faster

than hitting a concrete wall

and will serve it well during an

emergency. The problem is that

braking on a racetrack is less

about grinding to a halt and

more about control.

The rider squeezes the brake

hard in a straight line and then

slowly releases the brake as

the bike leans more and more

into the turn. There’s a lot of

feel required, a problem when

the brakes feel more like a light

switch than a dulling knob.

The electronic suspension

will cater for various roads

and tarmac but tend to get

somewhat overwhelmed when

braking hard into a bumpy turn,

especially when the brakes let

go a little too suddenly.

These matters of concern

manifest strictly when ridden

hard on the race track, whereas

the public road should be

nothing but bunnies and

rainbows. However, we are

not on the public road, so let’s

move on to something a little

more fitting.

Here we have the race bike of

Bert Jonker, the man behind

World of Carbon, who nervously

let Rob and I lap Red Star at

speed mere days before the

start of his racing season. No

pressure.

From a technical point of

view, this bike remains mostly

standard with no performance

mods to the motor, the frame,

the brakes and the electronics

beyond what is “standard”

in the M Package. What it

does have is an addition that

improves the handling, the

brakes, the acceleration and the

lap times more than anything

else: an aftermarket fairing.

The improved performance

is partially down to the lighter

weight of the thinner panels

and the removal of lights

and flickers, but it is mostly

down to how much less the

racing kit costs. Have you ever

priced a standard road kit on

“Where some

manufacturers seem

to base their superbike

ergonomics on the

dimensions of smurfs,

BMW has hired Hans,

who moonlights as a

heavyweight kickboxer,

to model theirs. There’s

enough room to

conduct a gymnastics

tournament.”

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020 3 5


a superbike? Especially

a BMW? You’ll need to

harvest at least four

healthy kidneys to pay

for it. This has a profound

effect on the psyche of a

rider causing less braking,

turning, accelerating and

lap times.

More so than a mere

fairing, World of Carbon

has also splashed it

through their product

catalogue. The goods are

quality and therefore not

cheap, but cost is merely a

matter of context: there’s

a carbon-fibre frame

cover that costs a good

deal but much less than

a new frame, there’s a

carbon-fibre swing-arm

cover that costs much

less than a swing-arm, a

carbon-fibre tank cover

that costs less than a tank,

a carbon-fibre hugger

that costs less than the

original, a carbon-fibre

mudguard that also costs

less than the original and

a brake lever protector

that costs a kak-load less

than flipping over the

handlebars.

The rider peace of

mind doesn’t stop there,

because Mr Jonker

has also fitted M-rear

sets, GB Racing engine

covers, a lighter Lightek

fuel cap and a slip-on

exhaust from his very

own Bertech Racing

brand. Then, as an added

measure, there’s a full

set of Ohlins Racing

suspension, both forks

and shock.

The full tally of extras

on this machine is a calm,

cool R200,000.

Immediately, the race

seat is higher than the

standard one leaving the

rider more tippy-toed in

the pits. Start the motor

and the Bertech exhaust

blisters your eardrums as

it barks into life.

“Immediately, the race seat is higher

than the standard one leaving the rider

more tippy-toed in the pits. Start the

motor and the Bertech exhaust blisters

your eardrums as it barks into life.”

36 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


SMG Motorrad Umhlanga

Umhlanga Arch, 1 Ncondo Place, 4319 Umhlanga Rocks, KwaZulu-Natal

Tel: 031 502 9800. Email: colin.mackrory@smg.co.za

G 310 GS, 2020

Delivery mileage.

R72 900

R nine T Racer, 2020

Delivery mileage.

R140 900

R nine T Pure, 2020

Delivery mileage.

R139 000

C 400 X, 2019

800km.

R109 900

F 750 GS, 2020

Delivery mileage.

R163 450

F 850 GS, 2019

5 800km.

R169 900

R 1200 GS, 2018

7 800km, Headlight/radiator guards, Spots.

R185 000

R 1200 GS, 2017

14 800km, Full crash bars, Adv bash plate.

R175 000

R 1200 GS, 2017

58 500km, Full crash bars, Frame guards.

R129 000

R 1250 GS Exclusive, 2020

350km.

R259 900

R 1250 GS Exclusive, 2019

3000km, Crash bars, Spots.

R249 900

R 1250 GS Adventure, 2020

Delivery mileage, HP model.

R295 300

S 1000 RR, 2018

17 000km, – Full Akrapovic exhaust.

R210 000

R nine T Scrambler, 2019

1 000km.

R150 000

K 1600 GTL, 2014

49 000km.

R155 900

SMG Motorrad North Coast

2 Bauxite Bay, Alton, Richards Bay, 3900. Tel: 035 426 0020. Email: colin.mackrory@smg.co.za


Freed from the constraints

of bankruptcy in the event of

a crash, a new lease on life

emerges as the bike tosses into

corners with increased vigour,

spurred on by a rider with an

unburdened mind. Apart from

psychological freedom and a

mildly lighter ride, the biggie

bolt-on bits are the Ohlins

shock and forks that transform

this machine into a race bike in

a fundamental way. Where the

standard suspension buckles

under the strain of hard braking

while turning in, the Ohlins laps

it up, letting the front wheel

burrow into the tar seemingly

impervious to bumps. Roll on

the gentle throttle and the rear

settles the bike into a calm,

collective curve before the hell

that is full-throttle is unleashed.

We have ridden heavilykitted

race bikes before and

marvelled at their seemingly

endless competence, but what

is more remarkable is the

level standard road bikes find

themselves. A good rider on

a standard bike can push into

the mid-pack of a race field,

causing emotional strain for

those behind him on bolstered

race machines. As unbelievable

as modern machines are, they

will not grace the podium

steps. For that, you need a little

bit of suspension and a lot of

psychology.

In more extreme cases,

like a National Superbike

Championship, you might also

need the bike Rob is about to

ride…

38 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


ROB SAYS

It’s felt like an eternity since I first got to test the all-new BMW

S1000RR at last years world launch in Portugal. I was blown

away by it then and I was blown away but it now again!

BMW have done an amazing job with the new bike. The previous

gen was well loved by many, especially here in SA. I never really

got to grip with it. Yes it was back to the future fast, but it was very

stubborn in many ways and that’s what got my back up.

The new machine is faster, stronger, just better in every aspect

and not just by a little bit. Its back to the future 2 and 3 fast and all

that stubbornness that the previous bike had is all gone. It now

wants to help you go faster and enjoy your ride more, rather than

wanting to just scare the living hell out of you. The electronics

package on the new machine is phenomenal assisting and

embracing the ride rather than taking over and spoiling it.

Apart from more power and better electronics it’s in the

handling department where the new Beemer really impresses me.

The M Sport model we tested here comes standard with those

carbon wheels and along with the overall load shedding and

shorter wheelbase the Germans have now created a machine that

enjoys going into corners. It now also like staying there, something

the previous gen struggled with. Holding a line and putting the bike

where YOU want it rather than where IT wants to go is the biggest

highlight for me. After all, what’s all that power if you can’t control

it - and that was my biggest gripe with the older models - I never

really felt in control, whereas now with the new machine I feel in

full control and like a superstar rider!

So, can it get any better? Well, of course it can. Just shed even

more weight, add a few more ponies, a race fairing kit and some of

the finest carbon fibre parts your eyes will ever see...

The World of Carbon race bike masterpiece you have just had

the honour of gazing your eyes upon over the past few pages is just

that - a masterpiece. Everything just looks better when dressed

in carbon fibre, especially when it’s as good as World of Carbon’s

products. Just imagine Pamela Anderson dressed in a carbon fibre

swimsuit in Baywatch - even more mouth watering for sure!

The look and sound of the Burtech pipe just adds to the bikes

overall flair. The rumble from start up just sends happiness all

through your body and this is amplified while out and track and

hearing it in full flight.

Gone is the standard M Sport electronic suspension and

replaced with Ohlins cartridge forks and even though no setup

had been done the bike felt on point and hit every marker and apex

with no hesitation. It’s crazy to think that this bike was literally just

slapped together and no setup has been done with electronics or

suspension. I have been told that I can test the bike again later this

year when more has been done so now my nights will be spent

dreaming of that day.

My only real complaint on both the stock and racebike, and it’s

the same complaint I had on the world launch test, comes in the

braking department. Don’t get me wrong, the brakes work really

well I just don’t like the feel from the lever. It just lacks that initial

bite. They seem to get better the harder you pull the lever and that

for me is a tad bit off putting.

A big thanks once again to Daly Motorrad in Klerksdorp for

assisting us with their S1000RR M Sport model for this test and

to Roberto Jonker from World of Carbon for letting us test his

beautiful creation.

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020 3 9


EXCLUSIVE LOCAL TEST: 2020 SUPABETS BMW S1000RR RACER

Words: Donovan Fourie | Pics: Beam Productions

LETHAL

WEAPON 3

After 15million messages and 10million calls we finally got the chance

to test the Supabets BMW S1000RR. The new one that is, the 2020 M

sport version. But on arrival at the track top tech Dean Ferreira rolled

out both Lance Issacs 2019 and 2020 machines for Rob to test back-toback

to feel first hand the big difference between the two.

I had tested the 2018 version of the

Supabets race machine and was

keen to see the progression made

by Dean and Lance on the 2019

machine, and now with the new

2020 bike. It’s been a frustrating

time for Lance as he has had the

2020 bike for sometime now but

has not been able to unleash it

due to all the drama with the stock

bikes and all the recalls. So finally

Lance was given the go ahead to

use the new M Sport bike literally a

week before the first SA SBK Series

race of the season at Zwartkops.

Lance rolled out the new 2020,

which had not had 1 lap of testing

prior, but also had the good old

faithful waiting in the wings if

needed. The 2019 bike was properly

sorted and helped Lance to 2nd

overall in the 2019 championship,

missing out by only a few points at

the final round.

For 2020, Lance is determined

to go one better and with the new

machine is confidant of doing so,

even at the tender age of 238...

just kidding, think he’s around 42

but no one actually knows for sure

as it seems he has been around

for decades.

Lance was one of the first

people to call me after the world

launch of the new bike last year,

asking if it truly was this amazing

machine Zie Germans made it out

to be. I sung nothing but praise to

him about the new beast and he

was eager to get his hands on it.

But alas, he has had to wait a full

year to finally race the new bike,

but is now more ready than ever

to take the fight to Clint Seller and

the rest of the SA SBK boys.

40 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020 41


Good old faithful

I started the day off on the 2019

machine, which is fully kitted out

with all the latest and greatest

race parts. You don’t finish 2nd in

a National championship without

being something special and

heading out of pit lane I could

feel the power and potential

beneath me. With the bike still

fitted with the Metzeler Racetec

tyres used in 2019 I was quickly

able to get up to a fast pace. The

bike is perfectly dialed in and

was effortless to get around the

normally tough and demanding

RSR track. Everything worked

perfectly in sync - from the

throttle control to the electronics

system. I was confidant enough

from the word go just to hammer

the throttle and know I would be

assisted in the best way possible

by the well setup system done by

Dean himself.

The bike was crazy fast but

easy to handle - a testament to

Dean and Lances’ hard work. For

sure one of the best previous

Gen S1000RR models I have ever

tested, a big step up from the

2018 version I rode back then.

It all felt amazing until I

swung my leg over the new

bike, which made the 2019 spec

seem like an absolute dinosaur.

The ultimate

track weapon

It’s been a long time coming but

it was well worth the wait. The

delay with the bike allowed Dean

to get as much info on the new

machine as possible and even

42 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


though they are still in the early

days of development this thing

is already a real weapon. If you

look at their results first time out

at Zwartkops, a 2nd in race one

and 3rd in race two, with littleto-no

time on the bike shows

what a good package the new

S1000RR M Sport is.

Gone is the bulky,

unnecessary road kit and in a

fibreglass fairing kit by local

man Michael Niemand from

East London. Very impressive

kit. Alpha Racing parts have

been splashed all over the

place and man is that stuff

quality. Dean is the imported

of the Alpha Racing products,

which are perfectly suited to

all BMW machines and used

by just about every race team

worldwide. A full Akro pipe

replaces the not-so-nice-onthe-eyes

stock pipe and cat,

and as expected looks and

sounds amazing. The dash has

been setup in race mode so

everything displayed from TC

setting to lap times and even

sector times.

The seating position is spot

on. Until now, only Italian

machines felt perfectly suited to

my style but this new BMW is,

dare I say it, even more so. I fit

snug into the bike and the bars

“I knew it was going

to be great but I

didn’t expect it to be

as good as it was.

Everything was

20-30% better than

the 2019 model. It

was faster, handled

sharper and with

more intent and the

electronics package

was better than

any I have ever

witnessed before.”

are set right where I like them

and the pegs are spot on. This

set me up for what I knew was

going to be a great ride.

I knew it was going to be

great, but I didn’t expect it to be

as good as it was. Everything

was 30-40% better than the

2019 model. It was faster,

handled sharper and with

more intent and the electronics

package was better than any

I have ever witnessed before.

Throttle response was instantly

smooth and responsive and

so easy to control. This bike

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020 43


At one stage I thought “why is Dean playing Tetris?”

I then discovered he was actually diving into the BMW

race ECU and playing around with setup. Carzy!

was stupid fast, an overall

masterpiece I think I called it

when I returned to the pits and

this was only after 1 session

and 7 laps.

On arrival back into the pits,

Dean then informed me that for

the second session he would

be putting it in full power mode.

Excuse me boet? Full power...

what was it on? Intermediate,

he replied. I replied something

along the lines of him going

and playing with himself, just a

lot more vulgar than that. You

mean there’s more power? Yes,

lots more, but also loads more

ways to help control it and use

it to its full potential, said Dean.

Ok then, let’s give it a bash.

So, with full power mode

activated, I headed out on track

for my 2nd session. Just before

leaving Lance told me that

the bike would sound and feel

as if it were about to break at

low rpm, and that I shouldn’t

worry, that’s just how it runs.

So what basically happens is

proper World SBK stuff, and

Shez called it when I asked him

how the racing was going at the

National and he replied “Lance

is f@$kin fast, and that thing

sounds like a proper World SBK

bike firing on 2 cylinders coming

out of the turns”. And that’s

exactly what happened. At first I

did think it was falling to pieces,

but I soon got used to it and

started appreciating it more

and more. After 2 laps I found

myself literally getting into a

corner and going from 30%

throttle to full throttle straight

away. No old school feeding it

on, just zero to hero and let the

bikes electronics and the way

Dean had set it up do the rest.

It truly is an amazing feeling

and so confidence inspiring. I

felt like a true racer once again

and in the zone, as if I could

do anything with the bike and

get away with it. And this was

all done on worn Bridgestone

R11 tyres, which made it all the

more impressive.

Handling is superb in every

way - into corners, mid turn

and out, it’s just on rails and

loves being thrashed around.

Gone are the standard M Sport

carbon wheels and replaced by

BST carbon wheels, and just like

the stock M Sport and World of

Carbon bike before this overall

steering and flex is brilliant. No

stubbornness what so ever!!!

The rest of the session I

spent just enjoying what is

truly an amazing piece of kit.

Dean has done and incredible

job at working with what he

has at his disposal. There is

still plenty to play with on the

settings of the BMW race ECU

and Dean has barely touched

the surface but has already

got it so right, so all I can say

to the opposition is beware,

Lance, Dean and the Supabets

S1000RR M Sport are coming.

44 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


RENT A

RACER

Dream of being a track racer? Or just

want to tick riding on track off your

bucket list? Well, now you can do either

without forking out a fortune on your

own track machine.

Words: Rob Portman | Pics: Beam Productions

Now, I’m sure most of you read

that headline and your mind took

you straight to that time you

rented a car and, well, raced it.

But here I am not talking about

renting a car but rather actually

renting well prepped trackbikes.

Trust me when I say that there

is nothing quite like riding a

motorcycle around a track.

Those who have experienced it

will tell you that it’s an thrill that

is hard to match. Forget about

paying to go on a roller coaster

at GoldReef City where you

merely just sit as a passenger,

here you get to rent the roller

coaster ride and actually pilot it

yourself.

MotoRentals is a company

started by Jason Wessels, a

very well known and respected

name in the SA motorcycle

community, especially the

racing scene. MotoRentals gives

customers the chance to rent a

well-prepped track/racebike to

go and tick off the one thing that

should be on everyone’s bucket

list - trackday riding.

On a recent visit to Redstar

Raceway I bumped into Jason

who was just rolling out his

freshly stickered rentals

machines. Ridgeway Racebar

has come on board as a

sponsor to MotoRentals and

helped spruce up the 10 Honda

CBR600RR trackbikes that Jason

has available. A very pretty sight

indeed seeing all 10 machines

lined up on the front straight.

Jason then offered me the

chance to ride one of the bike

to see and feel the quality

of machine customers can

potentially ride. I must say the

bikes are well prepped and very

neat in many aspects. Yes there

one-or-two little flaws but

nothing serious, and nothing

that will put the rider in danger.

The brakes work really well,

that’s the first thing you need

working properly, while the rest

of the bike was a good deal of

fun out on track. Decent track

tyres are fitted along with basic

suspension setup done by Jason

himself. There is no modern

day quickshifter and autoblip

fitted, but then again the newby

customer who this is really aimed

at is not going to care about that.

The bike I tested was proper

fun and had enough zest to put a

smile on this very spoilt journo’s

face, so there is no doubt it will

put an even bigger smile, and

most likely a bit of brown in

the undies of many customers

experiencing track riding for the

first time.

So if you would like to give

track riding a go but are too

afraid to use your own machine

for various reasons I suggest

you get a hold of Jason and

organise yourself a day on one

of his bikes. Rental rates are

really good and while Redstar is

the main hub they do also offer

the bike for Track-Daze events

down at Phakisa and Kyalami.

They also now have Honda

CBR125, 150 and 250cc machines

available, which can also be

used at the new Formula K short

circuit in Benoni. Don’t have track

riding gear? No problem, they

have full gear available for you

to use at no extra charge.

For more info email Jason@

moto-rentals.co.za.

46 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020


REDBULL KTM RC16

BRAD BINDER


2020 WORLD SBK

CALENDAR


Contact 011-566-0333 for your nearest stockist


WORLD LAUNCH TEST: 2020 KTM 1290 SUPERDUKE R

MANAGED

ANGER

The 2020 KTM 1290 Super Duke R has kicked off the year right with an

extensive revision. KTM’s sportbike flagship comes out swinging with a

completely new stiffened chassis, revised geometry, updated electronics,

weight savings, and engine updates that tease out a few more ponies.

Words: ultimatemotorcycling.com | Pics: Simpson (Świat Motocykli)

Dubbed The Beast 3.0 by

KTM, the 2020 Super Duke R

marks the third iteration of

the Austrian brand’s beloved

V-twin powered wheelie

ambassador. Importantly, all

the updates aim at making

it an even sportier, trackcapable

weapon, without

compromising its street

readiness.

I packed my bags and

headed off to the curvy

backroads of the Algarve

region in Portugal—plus

a visit to the dynamic and

demanding circuit that is

Autódromo Internacional do

Algarve, otherwise known as

Portimão—to see what the

2020 KTM 1290 Super Duke R

had in store. Without further

ado, here are the Fast Facts.

1. The Beast’s 1301cc LC8

75-degree V-twin heart

is stronger than ever,

producing three additional

ponies on the trot. If you

enjoy gigantic, quick-revving,

torque-rich V-twins, look no

further—your chariot has

arrived. The Super Duke R

has always delivered those

qualities in spades, and

now promises a dyno-chart

stomping 180 horsepower

at 9500 rpm and 140Nm of

torque at 8000 rpm, with

roughly 86-percent of that

torque accessible at 4,500

rpm. It’s buttery-smooth,

linear, and comically

powerful, yet maintains a

civilized personality when

cruising about town without

the excessive lumpiness

that twins of this size

52 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


ENGINE

1301

2-CYLINDER

V 75º

POWER

177

HP @

9,500RPM

TORQUE

140

NM @

8,000RPM

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020 5 3


“The Duke’s massive lowend

grunt quickly blends into

equally brilliant mid-range

power. Here’s the real kick in the

saddle—it doesn’t stop raging

until you’re shaking hands with

the rev limiter.”

can develop. The monstrous

V-twin wicks up without any

hesitation, even when slogging

along at city speeds, sending

the rpm gauge flying as-youplease.

The Duke’s massive

low-end grunt quickly blends

into equally brilliant mid-range

power. Here’s the real kick in the

saddle—it doesn’t stop raging

until you’re shaking hands with

the rev limiter.

2. Those performance

gains didn’t come out of thin

air—they are a product of

being able to bring it in more

efficiently, among other

updates. If you want to create

more power, you’ll need to draw

in more air and fuel, then expel

exhaust gasses more effectively,

so that’s just what KTM did. To

that end, a wholly revised air

intake through the center of the

headlight has been introduced,

coupled with a redesigned

airbox that creates a ram-air

effect at high rpm. Also, top-feed

fuel injectors and more powerful

coils have allowed engineers

finer control with fueling,

creating much better response

at the throttle. Meanwhile, larger

54mm and 60mm headers

increase The Beast’s ability to

eject gasses, while also making

use of a dual catalyst solution.

The main catalytic converter

is under the motor, and a

secondary unit is in the new

muffler to beat emissions.

54 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


front. ABS is permanently on

in front to comply with Euro

5. Also, Motor Slip Regulation,

an electronic supplement to

the mechanical slipper clutch,

returns as an option.

3. Several tweaks save

weight and prepare the 2020

KTM 1290 Super Duke R for

Euro 5 emissions standards.

Internally, the Super Duke R’s

architecture returns—piston,

crank, titanium valves, DLC

coated finger-follower cams,

as well as the bore and stroke,

are identical. However, KTM

engineers worked hard to meet

Euro 5 without compromising

performance goals. They also

took the opportunity to shave

nearly two pounds from the

overall weight of the engine

by slimming the engine cases

and optimizing oil routing,

reducing internal friction. Also,

a lighter-weight water pump

is new. Tighter machining

tolerances for the cylinder,

piston, and piston rings have

been introduced, in the name of

meeting and respecting Euro 5

standards for consistency.

4. The six-speed gearbox

and slipper clutch received a

serious update. New for 2020

is the Pankl-built gearbox that

now features a shorter shifting

stroke and improved actuation.

A new machined splined shaft,

as well as new bronze and

copper coatings on the shift

forks, are responsible for the

noticeable improvements over

the earlier version. The new

KTM 1290 Super Duke R shifts

with precision and less effort

than before. Better yet, the shift

lever itself can be placed in a

short or long-throw position,

allowing owners a bit of finetuning.

Feel at the clutch lever

is light, and it isn’t nearly as

grabby at lower rpm thanks to

redesigned clutch plates that

help with disengagement.

5. KTM’s Quickshifter + is

an option, but I’d consider

it mandatory. The updated

gearbox deserves a round of

applause, though the encore is

reserved for the new up/down

quickshifter featuring improved

kill times and superior shifting

across the entyre rev range.

Previously, the Super Duke R’s

up/down quickshifter could

induce lurching at lower rpm

and wasn’t anywhere as refined.

If you’re buying the new Super

Duke R, make sure you get it.

6. The 2020 KTM Super

Duke R supports a full suite of

electronic rider aids and brand

new six-axis IMU. One of the

significant electronic updates

for 2020 is the inclusion of a

six-axis IMU (previously a fiveaxis)

that improves how ABS or

traction control engages while

factoring slide control into the

revised TC algorithm. The Super

Duke R features cornering Road

ABS, nine-level lean-angledetecting

traction control,

cruise control, and heated grips.

Launch control and Supermoto

ABS are accessed through the

optional track mode. Supermoto

disables rear-wheel ABS, and

removes pitch detection and

cornering detection from the

7. Three ride modes are

available on the 2020 Super

Duke R. Rain, Street, and Sport

are standard on your Super

Duke R from the showroom

floor. Each preset riding mode

modifies the throttle map,

wheelie control and traction

control intervention. Rain offers

the most subdued throttle

response and heaviest rider

aide interventions – perfect for

damp pea-soup fog conditions

we met during the start of our

street ride. Street kicks things

up a notch with noticeably

snappier throttle response

and suitable settings. Sport is

crisp and athletic, with lower

TC settings and a WC level

that will let you loft the front

end – not too high or it will cut

power, but enough to extend

your tentacles with your fellow

cephalopods while in the

canyons. The track throttle map

is the most direct connection—

it’s as aggressive as it gets.

8. The optional R7K plus

Tech Pack includes the Track

Pack, Quickshifter +, MSR,

and adaptive brake light. This

is the way the Super Duke R is

meant to be experienced. The

Track Pack unlocks Track and

Performance modes, allowing

riders to disable wheelie control

and adjust TC on the fly with

the new paddle clickers on the

left-hand controls. Additionally,

riders can change from Road

ABS—which is used across

all preset riding modes—to

Supermoto ABS. Note that

the Motor Slip Regulation is

disabled in Track mode, or when

Supermoto ABS is engaged.

The two riding modes differ

in that Performance mode

will still display the KTM My

Ride navigation, and cruise

control can be used. If you

don’t purchase the Track Pack,

you’ll be stuck with the preset

throttle, WC, and ABS settings.

Depending on your comfort and

skill level, it could be a necessity

when hitting the track.

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020 55


9. Enough homework—tell

me how the electronics work

already! Road ABS works

well, but can be conservative

at times, especially for a bike

with this type of performance.

I would like to see a more

aggressive ABS mode that

retains cornering support,

acting as a middle ground

between Road and the

racetrack-ready Supermoto

setting. Supermoto mode

performed superbly, letting you

trail brake deep without a hint

of intervention on track. The TC

is quite linear, allowing more

wheelspin and slip as you bump

down from level 9 to 1. I found

level 5 most comfortable on

track; it subtly reigned in power

when I needed it, and gave

me some rope when I wanted

it while riding the undulating

circuit that is Portimão. Levels

1-3 are recommended with slick

tyres, and I’d agree with that, as

it lets the leash out.

“The Super Duke R is

seemingly designed to do

wheelies, as all that torque

will quickly point the front

wheel to the sky.”

10. To wheelie control or

not wheelie control, that is

the question. The Super Duke

R is seemingly designed to do

wheelies, as all that torque will

quickly point the front wheel to

the sky. On the street, I kept WC

on, and Sport mode will let you

loft over rises for a laugh. On

the track, WC will restrict power

and help keep the front end

planted when cresting over the

many massive hills throughout

Portimão, as it’s intended

to do. Although my wheelie

game needs work, I was able

to manage the Super Duke R’s

gentle skyward rise between

the throttle and rear brake. With

WC off, I found my exits to be

much stronger. Interestingly,

the 1290’s WC lacks multiple

settings like many of KTM’s

competitors; it’s either on or off.

The WC setting asks riders a

pretty simple question: Do you

want to wheelie or not?

11. An all-new, stiffer

chassis has imbued the Super

Duke R with greater track

chops, without sacrificing

street prowess. KTM engineers

wanted more front-end feel,

greater chassis rigidity, and

improved handling—they got

it all. Visually, the all-new

steel trellis frame is a stark

contrast to its predecessor,

with additional bracing points

towards the front of the engine,

while also being 4.4 pounds

lighter. Three millimeters of

offset was added to the newly

designed triple clamps, too. To

improve anti-squat properties

when on the gas, the swingarm

was raised 5mm, in addition

to being 15 percent stiffer.

The shock also gets new

linkage. The longest-in-class

wheelbase grows 0.6 inches

to 58.9 inches. Meanwhile,

the rake has increased by 0.7

degrees to 25.2 degrees. Finally,

the engine is 38mm higher,

raising the center of gravity,

giving the rider greater leverage

to overcoming those sizeable

geometry dimensions.

12. Those chassis changes

have a considerable impact.

From the moment we hit the

street, it was apparent how

much easier the Super Duke

R steers and initiates a turn,

even at low speeds. The stiffer

chassis has traded some

comfort in the name of stability,

but that’s a compromise I’ll

gladly make. When met with

compression bumps and other

inconsistencies, the Super

Duke R is solid, gobbling them

up and pressing on. All of that

translates to the track, where

the higher center of gravity

makes it more agile, quickly

getting on and off the edge

of the tyre. At the same time,

the new swingarm improves

mechanical grip dramatically

and helps cornering when hard

on the gas. The front-end feel

is superior, letting you put your

faith in it as you barrel into

turn 1 from, slowing from 160

mph. In short, this chassis is

fantastic.

56 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


class. For taller riders, it offers a

tremendous amount of legroom.

New for this year are adjustable

rearsets that allow riders to

raise or push the footpegs back.

You can also switch to GP-shift

by moving one bolt, and choose

from a long or short stroke

on the shift lever. I never once

found myself dragging toes, as

I did on the previous bike. The

4.2-gallon tank is redesigned

and offers more support when

braking, which genuinely helps

reduce fatigue.

13. Fresh suspension is

aboard the Beast 3.0. A newly

designed, fully adjustable

43mm WP Apex fork can

be tailored to your needs,

and for the first time on a

Super Duke R, it features

adjustable spring-preload.

On the street, the damping is

controlled and supple enough

to hide most of the rough

stuff. On the track, it’s more

than up to some hard-braking

zones, while also keeping

front end confidence high. A

physically larger cartridge sits

in those fork tubes, while a

new machined recess in the

fork caps prevents the springs

from jostling around, improving

the actuation. The all-new

fully adjustable WP shock has

separate damping reservoirs

and circuits to ensure consist

behavior as the shock heats

up. It also comes with a remote

spring-preload adjuster. In

practice, the shock performed

admirably, helping keep the

Super Duke R nice and tidy on

and off the circuit.

14. The Beast hits the

gym and cuts the fat. KTM

engineers made it a goal to

shave weight where they

could. It wasn’t achieved by

dropping weight from one part

in particular; a few grams here

and there all add up. It’s done

in some smart ways, with the

bodywork being thicker at

stress points and thinner in less

critical areas. Borrowing a page

from the 790 Duke playbook,

the Super Duke R’s subframe

is now one lightweight unit

of aluminum and composite

materials, as opposed to the

streel trellis subframe. The

fuel tank also lost a half-gallon

of capacity, further reducing

the curb weight. Virtually all

components from the frame,

engine, suspension, wheels,

have dropped a few grams. The

result is a curb weight of 462

pounds, about 10 pounds lighter

than last year.

15. Brembo delivers the

goods once again. Up front,

we have the coveted Brembo

Stylema four-piston monoblock

calipers clamping onto dual

320mm floating rotors. In the

rear, a dual-piston caliper

seizes upon a 240mm rotor. In

practice, the feel at the Brembo

lever is impressive and offers

more than enough stopping

power to halt The Beast in its

tracks. The rear, which you’ll use

on this bike, has great feel and

can be used to tighten up lines

or as wheel control.

16. The 2020 KTM 1290 Super

Duke R gets some fresh kicks—

it’s all-new wheels and tyres for

the orange machine. Redesigned

alloy wheels are lighter and

stronger, and have 120/70 and

200/55 Bridgestone Battlax

Hypersport S22 tyres mounted.

While they are Bridgestone

S22s, Bridgestone developed

the OEM rear tyre specifically for

this model, utilizing the same

carcass construction from its

race rubber to improve grip and

feel. As far as street tyres go, they

communicate the information

well and performed admirably on

the track, session after session.

17. The Beast is still one

of the comfiest in the class.

In 2020, the sub-33-inch

seat height returns, with the

handlebar lowered and pushed

forward slightly to put even

more weight over the front

wheel. The handlebar can be

adjusted forward nearly an

inch. Even with those changes,

it’s still easily one of the most

comfortable machines in its

18. A fresh five-inch TFT

display and new hand controls

await. The last Super Duke R’s

TFT display certainly wasn’t

bad, but this is clearer and

displays information more

thoughtfully. Importantly,

new hand controls are much

easier to use while riding, and

KTM wisely included paddle

buttons to adjust TC settings

while in track mode. When

in standard modes, those

paddle buttons control your

cruise control speed. There is

Bluetooth connectivity and,

when coupled with the KTM

My Ride navigation app, riders

will be able to see turn-by-turn

navigation displayed, as well as

answer phone calls, should they

be utilizing an in-helmet audio

system from Sena or Cardo.

19. The 2020 KTM 1290 Super

Duke R is a serious evolutionary

step, and a welcome one at

that. KTM engineers should

pop the sekt, because the 2020

Super Duke R is now equally

at home on the street or track.

Previously, I lamented about the

Super Duke’s softer chassis when

pushed on the circuit and now,

you won’t hear me say such a

thing. It feels sportier, fiercer, and

far more pointed than previous

generations while retaining the

streetable mannerisms that

make it suitable for a weekend

getaway, quick canyon rip, or

track day. Beyond that, the

updated TC is stellar. Do you like

insane amounts of torque and

power wheelies? Get yourself in

the saddle of a 2020 KTM 1290

Super Duke R as soon as possible.

For more info regarding price

and availability contact your

nearest KTM dealer.

58 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


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WWW.WP-SUSPENSION.COM


WORLD LAUNCH TEST: 2020 KAWASAKI Z H2

SUPERCHARGED

NAKED

From the moment the Kawasaki H2 was released,

motorcycle enthusiasts have been clamoring for a naked

version with all of its supercharged madness. Well, wait

no more because the 2020 Kawasaki Z H2 has arrived,

and it fills the capstone within the all-important, sporty

yet street-friendly, Z-family lineup as its flagship model.

Words & pics: ultimatemotorcycling.com

Featuring an all-new

chassis, comfortable

ergonomics, and an updated

electronics package, the

rip-roaring Z H2 utilizes the

same 998cc supercharged

powerplant as the H2 SX

line, with a few notable

changes to fit this naked

bike application.

We packed our bags and

headed off to Las Vegas

Motor Speedway for two

days of riding on the road

course, the oval track, and

the surrounding roads to

feel the full spectrum of the

Kawasaki Z H2.

Despite the teethchattering

40-degree

weather, the Z H2 was able

to prove that it has a whole

lot more going for it than

outlandish power, with

versatility being a strong suit.

Now, let’s roll the dice and

get on with the Fast Facts.

1. The 998cc

supercharged inline-four

engine is astounding, and

not just because of all

that raw power. The Z H2’s

supercharged powerplant is

amazingly smooth. It does

not lug. It does not rattle. It

is the definition of refined.

Due to those qualities, I’d

go as far as describing its

197 horsepower at 10,500

rpm and 137Nm of torque

at 9500 rpm as friendly.

Power on this motorcycle is

omnipresent, and it builds in

a predictable, linear fashion.

But, make no mistake, the

stunning acceleration will

make you feel like you’re

60 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


ENGINE POWER

TORQUE WEIGHT

998 197 137 239

CC

4-Cylinder, DOHC,

4-Valve, LC,

Supercharged

HP @ 13,500RPM

NM @ 8,500RPM

WET WEIGHT

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020 6 1


Chuck Yeager breaking the

sound barrier when you hold

the throttle wide-open. The Z

H2 is as happy plodding along

on city streets as it is running at

full-chat around the oval track,

where I reached speeds of 168

mph and, yes, it still had much

more in it. I, however, did not.

2. While the Z H2’s engine

is essentially the same as

what’s powering the H2 SX

lineup, though there have

been crucial changes to give

it more low-end and midrange

oomph. To that end,

Kawasaki engineers developed

new model-specific fuel maps,

and an entyrely new exhaust

system with longer header

pipes, that prioritizes low-end

and mid-range power while

meeting Euro 5 emissions

standards. The final piece of

the puzzle is shorter final-drive

gearing. In comparison to the

H2 SX, the Z H2 has far more

snap and responsiveness at

low rpm, which I noticed while

tip-toeing around the chilled

road course and on the street.

My, oh my, is it easy to pick up

the front while exiting corners,

giving you a taste of that naked

bike hooligan goodness.

3. Supercharging ain’t easy,

and the Z H2 has some tricks

up its sleeve. The prominent

asymmetric ram air duct

helps this beast gulp down

air, and does so with the

most direct path

into the engine, maximizing

performance and efficiency.

The 69mm supercharger

impellor, which is specific to the

H2 SX and Z H2, is machined

with a five-axis CNC mill to

create the six full-length

blades at the tip, down to the

dozen shorter blades at the

base. This allows a broader

spread of power. The impellor

is also responsible for the

chirping sound you hear when

decelerating. Commonly,

superchargers require

intercoolers, but they add

weight. Kawasaki engineers

managed to sidestep the

issue by utilizing

an efficient

design

that

doesn’t raise the compressed

air temperature excessively.

Direct oil-jet cooling also

gives critical components

a refreshing spritz of oil to

ensure proper lubrication and

operating temperatures. Lastly,

cast pistons are used as they

are essential in such highperformance

applications.

4. The slick six-speed

dog-ring transmission comes

equipped with an up/down

quickshifter and an assistand-slipper

clutch. The gearbox

on the Z H2 is a peach, with

its precise, easy shifting. As

if that weren’t enough, you’ll

never need to fiddle with the

relatively light clutch unless

you’re coming to a stop, thanks

to the quickshifter that works

well in either direction. Kawasaki

does state that you should

only utilize it when the engine

is spinning above 2500 rpm;

on this motorcycle, that’s easy

to comply with. The slipper

function helps sort out any

hamfisted downshifts you might

make, alleviating wheel-hop and

keeping you out of the dirt.

5. Ride-by-wire throttle

paves the way for three

preset and one customizable

ride mode. Once behind the

handlebar of the Z H2, riders will

have the choice of Sport, Road,

Rain, and Rider modes. As you

might have guessed, the modes

adjust the levels of traction

control, throttle response,

62 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


and all other electronic aids.

Interestingly, Sport and Road

share a throttle map, which is a

sporty pairing well suited with

the H2’s personality. At higher

rpm, a bit of abruptness can be

felt when initially closing the

throttle, though it doesn’t upset

the chassis. TC is bumped down

to the lowest setting in Sport,

giving you plenty of leeway;

Road reigns it in a bit. Rain cuts

power and softens the throttle

considerably, while also jacking

up TC to its maximum settings.

Rider mode allows the owner to

customize the Z to taste.

6. A full suite of IMUsupported

electronics is

standard on the 2020 Z H2. As

linear and easy to control as the

supercharged engine is, it’s still

good to have state of the art

technology watching over your

shoulder. Standard features

assisted by the six-axis

Bosch IMU include cornering

ABS, three-level lean-angledetecting

traction control,

wheelie control, slide control,

cruise control, and launch

control. Also, three power

modes are available—Full (full

power), Middle (75 percent

power), and Low (50 percent)

let you tailor the maximum

output to your needs.

7. Let’s crunch the numbers

and dive into the electronics.

Kawasaki approaches the Z H2

with a mind for simplicity and,

while that strategy restricts

certain types of adjustment, it

isn’t something I’d be critical

of as this isn’t a track-focused

motorcycle. Still, the Z H2 is a

street bike, so I want things to

be as easy as possible. ABS is

paired with the selected ride

mode and works quite well.

I tested this in a chicane set

up on the oval track, slowing

from 160+ mph, down to a slow

2nd gear corner. ABS engages

under extreme braking, but it

won’t make the lever go numb,

“Overall, it has a more compliant chassis feel to

it. It isn’t as stiff as a ZX-10R or as soft as the H2

SX SE sport tourer...”

preventing you from slowing

properly. The three-level TC

also integrates WC; they are

not adjustable separately.

TC levels 1 and 2 let you loft

the front under a power

wheelie for quite a while, and

intervention is progressive

throughout each setting.

8. An all-new steel trellis

and swingarm are unique

to the 2020 Kawasaki Z H2.

One of the most significant

challenges facing Kawasaki

engineers was the steel trellis

frame. They needed it to be

strong enough to handle

the power and weight of the

platform, without making it

too stiff or uncompromising

for the road. To solve that

issue, an all-new trellis frame

was developed, along with a

stronger, yet lighter doublesided

swingarm. In practice, the

Z H2 communicates everything

to the rider nicely, and is a

neutral handling machine with

updated geometry figures,

when compared to its cousins.

The Z H2 boasts a tighter, more

sporting 57.3-inch wheelbase

than the H2 SX platform, but

a slightly relaxed 24.9-degree

rake for improved stability.

9. Fully adjustable Showa

suspension takes care of the

rough stuff. There is a 43mm

SFF-BP fork with a linkageassisted

shock. Together,

they do well to soak up most

of the bumps and bruises of

the road, featuring an initial

setup that leans towards the

comfortable side. Cranking the

spring-preload and damping up

will have you feeling too much

of the road for my taste. While

that’s good for high-speed or

heavy braking, I opted for a more

casual setup off-track. It doesn’t

make the Z H2 as pointed as I

experienced on the road course

and oval while going flat out, but

is far more pleasurable on the

mean streets.

10. The Z H2 is downright

gentlemanly when it comes

to handling. Overall, it has

a more compliant chassis

feel to it. It isn’t as stiff as a

ZX-10R or as soft as the H2

SX SE sport tourer, striking a

solid middle ground between

them. It comfortably leans

onto the edge of the tyre and

transitions well, with no real

effort being exerted on the

bike. The Z H2 doesn’t steer too

quick or too slow. It has just the

right amount of sportiness for

a spirited pace, and is surefooted

on the edge of the tyre.

There is some suppleness to

the chassis, and I attribute that

to its hefty 527-pound curb

weight. Regardless, it never

gets out of shape when hitting

big compression bumps.

11. Brembo M4.32 calipers

keep the shiny side up.

Kawasaki opted for dual

Brembo 4-piston M4.32

calipers to clamp onto the

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020 6 3


14. A stellar full-color

TFT display delivers all the

information you need, and

more. Once at the grips of the

Z H2, you’ll be eyeing down the

attractive TFT display that’s

shared across several Kawasaki

models. It works and looks the

business, relaying everything

you’d ever need to know at a

glance, in or out of direct light.

There are also two display modes

available. My favorite feature

is the dash’s retention of my

maximum attained lean angle.

“The 2020 Kawasaki Z H2 is a worthy

addition to the Z family, and all gearheads

owe it to themselves to experience it.”

320mm floating rotors. Now,

before you scoff at the lack

of M50s or Stylemas, know

that these have immense

stopping power and great feel

at the Nissin master cylinder.

I enjoyed these binders over

some motorcycles that are

equipped with pricier Brembo

kit. The one critique I do have is

the inclusion of rubber hoses

as opposed to steel-braided

brake lines, especially on a

high-performance motorcycle

that stresses braking systems.

I didn’t feel any worrying brake

fade, but it was also extremely

cold, and it might be a different

story in the summer. Adjustable

levers are also in the mix. In the

rear, a dual-piston caliper grabs

onto a 250mm rotor and has an

equally good feel.

12. Pirelli Diablo Rosso

III tyres are OEM fitment.

Featuring a single compound

front tyre and dual compound,

the Diablo Rosso III tyres are

an excellent option for those

who will ride primarily on the

street—wanting to do a bit of

sporty riding, while also getting

considerable mileage out of

them. 120/70 front and 190/55

sizes are common, so if owners

want to go with something else,

they’ll have plenty of options.

Off the showroom floor, the

Pirellis are a great fit for the

2020 Kawasaki Z H2.

13. All-day ergonomics is

a crucial component of the

Z family. The Z H2’s upright

ergonomics make riding around

town, hitting the canyons,

or even the track, a relaxed

affair. The riser handlebar is

noticeably taller than the H2 SX

platform, creating a sporty, yet

neutral riding position. Its 32.7-

inch seat height is accessible

for my 32-inch inseam, and

I’m able to get my boots on

the ground. That’s most likely

because Kawasaki made the

subframe relatively narrow

where the seat meets the tank.

The five-gallon fuel tank makes

for an excellent anchor when

leaned over or braking and

gives you considerable range.

Once at pace, you’ll be pleased

to learn that wind protection

is much better than you might

assume, and you can still tuck in

for better aerodynamics. When

riding casually, the Sugomistyled

machine does a decent

job of protecting the rider from

windblast.

15. Track rides, collect data,

and take calls with Bluetooth

connectivity through the

Kawasaki Rideology app. Should

you choose, you’ll be able to pair

your mobile device with your Z

H2 and track virtually every single

aspect of your ride. Info such as

speed, rpm, gear position, throttle

position, front brake pressure,

acceleration/deceleration,

current mileage, and coolant

temperature are all recorded

once you’ve saved your ride.

That’s how I discovered that I hit

168 mph on the Las Vegas Motor

Speedway oval track. The app

also retains basic information

about your motorcycle, such as

mileage and fuel levels, allowing

you to check that information

even when the key is out, and its

nowhere near you.

16. The 2020 Kawasaki Z H2

is a worthy addition to the Z

family, and all gearheads owe it

to themselves to experience it.

Kawasaki’s line of supercharged

models is like nothing else on

the market. Nothing makes

that nearly 200 horsepower in

such an approachable, smooth,

and friendly manner. The trick

to the Z H2 is that the rider

chooses how friendly it will be.

You can plod around town at a

turtle’s pace, or experience the

face-melting acceleration on

tap—it’s up to you, and it does

both excellently. A comfortable

chassis and commendable

electronics package harnesses

the enormous power, while

enjoyable ergonomics help

highlight how versatile the Z H2

is. The 2020 Kawasaki Z H2 might

be built for speed, but it’s far from

being a one-trick-pony.

The new Z H2 is set to arrive in

SA end of March with a price tag

of around R350k. Call Fire it Up

Kawasaki now for more info.

64 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


WORLD LAUNCH TEST: 2020 HONDA CBR1000RR-R & SP

Words & pics: Simpson (Świat Motocykli)

CUTTING

EDGE

For nearly 30 years, Honda has faithfully defended the idea of “balanced power”

in sports motorcycles. Fireblade has always had less horsepower than the

competition and, with perfect handling, proved that more is not needed. However,

we have entered electronic times, and in them the term “power beyond control”

ceases to exist. So Honda banded a unique team that built a unique motorcycle.

66 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


ENGINE POWER

TORQUE WEIGHT

999 217 113 201

CC

Liquid cooled

4-stroke 16valve

DOHC, Inline 4

HP @ 14,500RPM

NM @ 12,500RPM

WET WEIGHT

KG

“Yes, it’s more powerful than

before and yes, it is more physically

demanding on track but it’s not a

handful to ride and yes it still feels

every inch like a Fireblade.”

If you’re a regular

sportbike nutter, you’ve

already caught “Theory

R”. It has long been known

that the more the letter “R”

appears in the name, the

faster the motorcycle is.

While S generally evokes

emotions , R means having

fun and going fast.

We all know that the

“RR” in Kawasaki meant

homologation versions

for racing motorcycles

and BMW once dominated

the Superbike class with

the S1000RR model, and

Suzuki’s GSX-RR is the

prototype machine from

MotoGP racing.

Honda had previously

marked the top Fireblade

model the CBR 1000RR,

so they had no choice but

to go a step further with

this revolution. Dear Sir or

Madam, before you is the

motorcycle with the most

R’s: The Honda CBR 1000

RR-R Fireblade!

THIS IS a revolution

The new Fireblade has

been booming for the past

5 years. Honda fans were

causing the commotion,

not the producer himself.

The hunger for the rival

CBR was so huge that the

fantasies of the media

and motorcyclists went

really far. Most fantasies

revolved around changing

the arrangement of

cylinders from four-row

to V-4. Finally, the fourcylinder

engine in the V

system is dormant in the

RC-V racing model, which

over the past 9 years

brought 8 championship

titles in the constructors

category. So when Honda

presented the new “Fajer”

a lament appeared that

the engine still has an

in-line system. It’s time

to reconcile themselves

with the fact that the CBR

will always be that kind of

engine. Maybe someday we

will see the successor to

the legendary RVF model,

but writing about such a

possibility, we sail back

into the depths of fantasy.

Welcome to Earth again,

I would like to inform you

that the motorcycle you

are reading about is a

revolution. The biggest

change did not manifest

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020 67


itself as a unique frame or

an innovative engine, but in

the Japanese approach. The

toned-down manufacturer

has made a turn. The board

decided that if people look at

sport bikes through the prism of

performance on the track and

necessarily need the maximum

power value with two in front,

then they will get what they

want. This is the first Fireblade,

which is a race motorcycle

with road approval , not a road

machine capable of driving fast

on the track. Trust me that this

small change in theory makes a

huge difference.

Some technology

The engine is a completely new

unit, in which the sum of small

changes gives an impressive

effect. By measuring the

power on the shaft, 217HP was

achieved. That’s exactly what

it needed for the Fireblade to

leave many behind instead of

standing on a straight line. A

recipe for such power from a

capacity of 1000cc? Turnover!

Lots of turnover! Maximum

power is obtained at 14,500

rpm, and the ignition is cut off

after exceeding 15,000rpm on

the tachometer. Until recently,

only 600cc class shafts were

turning at such speeds!

Shifting the ignition cut-off

moment and tossing air with

gasoline into the cylinders is

not as much of a challenge as

making such an engine work

for years. I had the opportunity

to spend the whole evening

with an engineer named

Kensuke Mori, who was

responsible for the engine.

Interestingly, now that the

project Fireblade has finished

he will be moving to HRC

(Honda Racing Corporation)

and will be building another

engine for the MotoGP teams.

When asked about the life

of the motor, he replied that

it is standard for Honda

motorcycles and mileages of

100,000 km and more will not

be a problem. At this point, he

began to bore me with info

about a new lubrication system

for the piston bottoms and a

separate coolant circuit that

bypasses the radiator, which

has a higher temperature

and better balances the

temperature of the cylinders.

So I quickly beat the topic of

power generation and said

that they used their proven

technology “tightening” it to

the limits. When asked about

the Shift-Cam system (patent

from BMW) he said that they

have similar technology but in

a racing motorcycle it does not

apply, because it is supposed

to work at high speed, not

low. It would unnecessarily

complicate the construction.

Apparently they are working

on a racing camshaft timing

system, but for now they focus

on some solutions.

“At the heart of the bike is an all-new 1000cc inline

four-cylinder engine, designed from the ground

up with the primary aim being to produce more

power than any other Fireblade unit to date.”

In the pursuit of revolutions,

the diameter of the piston

was increased and its stroke

was shortened. MotoGP fans

appreciate that these are the

same values as in the RC213V

(MotoGP machine). Further

examples are cranks that no

longer have nuts, and threads

and intermediate mode for

timing chain drives. Thanks

to this, the chain is shorter

and can work faster. The new

Camshaft is key for the entire

project. Glasses were replaced

with pushers - So the spring

and the valve work up and

Techy Dash

Crowning the cockpit of the

2020 Fireblade is a very trick

and well laid out TFT dash. I

could go through the full remit

of options and designs you can

select but it’d run to the length

of this piece already. What I

can say is that it’s easy to read

even with the massive amount

of information that’s contained

within it.

Beneath the sheen of the TFT

is an all-new box of tricks and

parameters that monitor the

bike’s behaviour. The biggest

change that I could feel on

track was the updated Honda

Selectable Torque Control

(HSTC). It’s a fancy on-brand

name for traction control and

for 2020 it’s had a new load of

algorithms poured into the ECU.

The new pile of zeros and ones

means that the bike no longer

detects a slip of the rear wheel,

diving in and cutting all the

engine power in the process.

The update now measures the

speed that the tyre is slipping,

meaning it will only intervene by

a specific and measured amount

to achieve the desired result.

68 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


down, which means lower

inertia and the ability to work

faster. Of course, we find a

lot of elements covered with

a DLC (Diamond Like Carbon)

coating that reduces friction.

It requires a lot of air for the

engine to work at such high

revs generating huge power.

An impressive air intake at

the front of the machine is

responsible for delivering it. In

order to provide uninterrupted

inflow, the traditional ignition

was abandoned in favour

of a proximity key. Also

the steering damper was

removed from the upper

shelf area (traditional place

for Fireblade). The electronic

cupid wondered off to the

front of the bottom shelf.

The airbox intake manifold is

almost straight, which forced

the use of a special shape of

valves that force the mix to

spin. Certainly there are many

more interesting nuances in

the engine, but the dinner with

Mori-San is over, and we are

more interested in how the

new stove works in full flight.

“The fastest 600 I’ve

ever ridden”

This statement by a British

journalist says it all. Pay

attention to the chart from

the dynamometer (pictured

far right), which clearly shows

that in the low and medium

rev range the previous

Fireblade is even slightly

stronger than the 2020 model.

However, if the motorcycle

is to be racing, no one is

interested in average revs but

more the low down, just like in

600cc class.

Finally, I turn on the display

mode, in which the indications

appear only from 5000 rpm

and I start playing high engine

spin. After exceeding 7,000

rpm, a strong thrust appears,

and after 11,000 rpm I got

what we’ve all been waiting

for all these years! The new

Fireblade goes crazy!

After the first session, I

got off the bike and among

my fellow editors I could see

approving nods. Impressions

are phenomenal! It’s a really

furious Japanese machine! I

shoot it, the exhaust system is

screaming heavily, and I shift

through the next gears with

an incredibly fast quickshifter!

To play with gears I have to go

“Honda engineers used the RC213V-S MotoGP inspired road-going

machine as the performance benchmark for the development of

the new Fireblade, which also draws on the RC213V-S for most of

its new technology.”

really fast. I pull first gear to 170

km/h, second to 220 km/ h, and

I catch fourth on 299 km/ h!

It’s a pity that the motorcycle is

limited to the aforementioned

299 km/h. Certainly, someone

will unlock it and check the

maximum speed.

The power comes linearly,

and the electronic throttle

is very precise, but with

so much HP on board you

need to be a pro to handle

it without electronics. Most

users, including myself, will

enjoy traction control. The

new Fireblade, in addition to

using the six-plane Bosch IMU

sensor, takes into account

the speed of rear wheel slip.

This means that the bike

can now drive in controlled

slides and sense when the

loss of traction is in safety

or not. Ultimately, I had the

choice of either turning off

the traction control and

opening the throttle with a

big handful at each exit, or set

low levels of interference (1 or

2) and try to find the optimal

traction alone. I had to be

careful then, because at full

lean I felt the rear wanting to

break traction. I control the

throttle and the HSTC system

guided me helping hone in

my exuberance. On the Losail

Above shows the dyno chart

between old and new versions.

Old being green and new being

red. The way the new bike

delivers the power is smoother

and ultimately loads more.

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020 69


track there was a place where

we could go full throttle to

speeds over 260 km/h. At this

speed and angle of folding, I

could give the computer full

control and feel the system

working and assisting. The

system kicked in, but the power

regulation was not perfectly

smooth, as in racing systems.

This caused minimal pumping

of the rear shock, which

was handled by electronic

suspension settings (we’ll get to

that soon). I drew the attention

of engineers, to which one of

the testers showed me a rear

tyre worn only after three

sessions. It turned out that the

Pirelli slicks could not cope with

the rough asphalt track in Qatar.

As assumed on my CBR’s new

gum, the effect was smaller. So

I can with a clear conscience say

that the traction control is finally

as it should be. Much better

from the previous generation.

I did not have any comments

for the operation of the Wheelie

Control system. The lifting

effect can be adjusted and at

the lowest interference the

front went surprisingly high and

then gently fell. Unfortunately,

to turn it off completely one

also needs to deactivate

traction control. Fortunately,

the three modes of the

motorcycle can be personalized

and one can switch between

them quickly while riding.

I would personally give up

the Rain mode and replace it

with another Sport or Track

(we can have three different

Track modes with settings for

different tracks) with traction

control turned off to show off

from time to time. Despite the

fact that around 7000 rpm

there is a clear boost, “Fire” can

be controlled on the rear wheel

with great ease.

Fireblade as we know it

Control is the key word for

every CBR motorcycle. In this

case it is no different. I just

complained about pumping

and instability at 260 km/h.

Know that it’s a complaint to

look for any disadvantages.

The truth is that competing

motorcycles, in particular the

Ducati Panigale and the new

BMW S1000RR, are much

less stable than the Honda.

The thing is that in the age of

electronics, manufacturers

can afford flexible frames that

improve the speed of direction

change and grip in the corners,

but on the other hand make it

difficult to sense the traction on

their own. In simplified terms,

they are created for close

co-operation with electronic

systems, which is not bad, if

we know how to use them. It is

possible that Honda has found

a golden mean. The frame has

no stiffener at the back (shock

absorber bolted to the engine

block), and in some places the

walls of the structure are only

2mm thick. It is more flexible

than the previous “Blade” but

still gives great confidence

while riding fast. Looking for a

reference to the competition,

I complained about the speed

of moving the motorcycle from

side-to-side when accelerating,

which gave me a proposal to

play with suspension settings.

Throughout the session, Freddie

Spencer (it couldn’t be better!)

and a specialist from Ohlins

worked with me.

In the CBR SP model sits a

semi-active suspension that

adjusts the damping force

depending on whether we are

braking, accelerating or being

folded. We can also separately

set the overall damping

characteristics of the fork and

rear shock. All parameters are

adjusted in the range of + 5 /

-5, i.e. simplifying the work we

stiffen (slow down) or soften

(accelerate). We sharpened

the machine’s geometry with

a few clicks on the handle.

We set the motorcycle so that

it dives harder, but it gave

more support at the rear.

Effect? I started to feel like

on my racing motorcycle! To

clearly determine the speed

of direction change compared

to Ducati and BMW, we need

a comparative test, but at the

time I didn’t care about any

other motorcycle! The new

Fireblade has become the

motorcycle of my dreams ...

Seriously. If I only got rid of the

ABS fuse, I would only have got

off it once I had run out of fuel,

used up all tyres available or

died of exhaustion...

It’s really a pity the ABS

cannot be switched off as it

did somewhat spoil what was

almost the perfect ride. It did

not intervene until the rear

broke away from the asphalt

under hard braking . A simple

change and it would be brilliant

but, no! The Japanese are

the guardians of the rules ...

Nevertheless, after this test I

can happilly say that I would like

to have one. I know that I often

say that about motorcycles,

but probably everyone wants

to have a full garage. The new

Fireblade proves that “Theory R”

is well founded. This is a radical

version of a motorcycle that

many loved for years. Thanks to

the power of the new CBR it is

fast on in a straight line, thanks

to electronics we can use this

power in corners, and thanks to

the brilliant chassis and brakes

we can be really fast on the

track. Now, I would like to put

the CBR 1000 RR-R on the street,

because I want to feel the full

power and break all national

speed limits in the first gear...

The new Fireblade is set

to arrive in SA around July in

limited numbers at first so

make sure you get to Honda

East Rand Mall and book yours

now. Tel Shaun on 011 826 4444

for more info.

Does the front

end aero on the

Fireblade do

anything?

The big talking point of this bike is

the inclusion of the front fairing and

its aerodynamic winglets, which

Honda claim provides the same

amount of downforce as the 2018

RC213V MotoGP machine.

Could I ‘feel’ the downforce on the

track? I couldn’t put my finger on

exactly where it was helping but

the front end does feel extremely

planted and very stable under

heavy braking and at the point

of turning in. It’s probably a

combination of the electronic

suspension, the added stability

the downforce provides and also

the super-sticky Pirelli Diablo

Superbike slicks the bikes were

shod with. Nevertheless, it’s a

seriously impressive feeling, giving

you the confidence to push on the

brakes later and the throttle earlier.

70 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


WORLD LAUNCH TEST: 2020 BMW F900R & F900XR

THE NEW

TWINS

By now, you must all be familiar with BMW’s

new 850cc Parallel twin engine that took

over from the venerable F800 GS? Well – as

inevitably happens, BMW saw more potential

for that engine, bumped up the power a bit and

fitted it into two exciting new road bikes in the

guise of the F900R and the F900XR…

Our Glenn Foley went over to the world launch

to test both new twins.

72 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


We were invited along to

Almeria in Spain to sample

the new bikes along with

what seemed like the rest of

the worlds press – and after

3 flights we touched down in

this historic holiday town for

lots of riding.

Sadly, at an event you

don’t get to spend much time

sightseeing and getting to

know a place – but we’ll tell

you this: We need to get back

for a longer visit. The hotel

where we were stationed

is bang on the edge of the

Mediterranean Sea. The city is

not super large but it appears

to be neat, clean and friendly.

Take a short ride out of the

city and you find yourself

in the mountains and for a

motorcyclist – that’s where

the fun starts. Kilometre upon

kilometre of perfect, twisty

roads that carve their way all

over the place.

Motorcycle Nirvana?

No question. If we’d had more

time, we would have stopped

here and there to take it all in.

You ride through tiny villages

that dot the mountains. There

are hundreds of viewpoints

all along the route with info

boards that explain more

about where you are… an

awesome place – even a

scooter would be awesome.

And – people agree with us

because we saw bikes of all

shapes and sizes enjoying the

twisties. A Yamaha Banshee

quad screamed past in the

opposite direction and we

saw a couple of utility quads

trundling along. Three wheel

scooters are very popular and

we saw a few heavily laden

couples enjoying the crisp

winter air.

Upon our arrival we were

hustled along to meet the

teams responsible for the

bikes. It was fascinating to

listen to what actually goes

into building bikes like these

and they had the specialists

– from the guy who designed

the LED lighting system, to

the guy who designed the

TFT display and all of the

connectivity features to share

information and answer any

questions. Also on hand were

the horsepower, brake and

suspension experts – so BMW

really gave us a great idea

about what makes these bikes

tick. We were even graced

with the Big Boss of Motorrad

Dr Markus Schramm who

shared some insights into the

success story that is BMW.

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020 73


Globally, BMW is a real force

to be reckoned with, they sell

motorcycles all day long, all

over the world – and with the

addition of these two new

models… they hope to sell even

more. And we reckon that if the

price is right, they should sell

quite a few here.

Two days of riding convinced

us that BMW really has

something quite lekker.

Day 1 - Bright and breezy – we

woke up to overcast skies and

cold gusts of wind billowing

down from the snowy mountain

peaks. In my mad rush to get

ready, I had packed a very light

Tankwa summer jacket and a

Unit fleece thinking that they

would do the trick. Sadly, the

fleece belongs to my eight year

old son and it really did not fit…

not ideal for a slightly more

mature belly. So I managed to

squeeze into that – but there

was no chance of zipping it up!

The jacket is airflow fabric,

so that did little against the

elements. It was going to be a

fun day.

Damn was I grateful for the

screen on the XR – small, but

effective. Easy to adjust up and

that really helped to deflect the

blizzard trying to bore holes

into my chest. Thankfully, as

the day wore on it warmed up

somewhat – so all was not

lost and it turned into a really

brilliant ride.

BMW worked out some

simply spectacular routes

with the mandatory coffee

stop halfway and judging by

the grins all round in several

languages and accents, the bike

was a hit with everyone.

The route led all the way back

to the hotel, where the team

had to wrestle the electronic

dongles (keyless keys) from our

sweaty palms.

Day 2 – The sun was shining

and we suddenly realized that

we were at the seaside. It was

an absolutely perfect day to ride

“BMW worked out some simply

spectacular routes with the

mandatory coffee stop halfway

and judging by the grins all round in

several languages and accents, the

bike was a hit with everyone.”

a motorcycle – and we did the

previous days route in reverse

– which was like a whole new

ride. Too flippen cool! Guys

and gals, you need to go riding

in this place to understand.

It would seem as though the

Spaniards are unable to build a

road that goes in a straight line

for any length of time.

A second day in paradise. So

much fun.

What makes the bikes tick?

At the heart of these bikes – and

I’m not going to bore you with

too many technical details – is

the new 900 engine.

New? Well… yes! These bikes

take over from the R800’s.

As much as BMW’s new-ish

850 is a good motor, this one

is – well, better. More torque,

more revs, more top-end more

everything. And it’s very smooth

to boot. This is all thanks to

a slight rebore and some

electronic upgrades.

Bottom end torque is perfect

for everything you’d like to do,

the midrange rushes up to meet

you – and while we did not run

her at the top, BMW claims a top

end at around the 220 KPH mark.

On those roads we saw 180 odd

quite comfortably on the “R” –

one of the mad Russians says

that he got to 210.

The R and the XR share

the same engine, electronics,

gearing, wheels, brakes and

chassis. The difference is in the

ergonomics, and suspension.

The R is a real Naked, raw and

aggressive with shorter travel

74 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


electronic suspension. The XR

boasts a beautifully crafted

mini-fairing and screen, with

longer travel suspension and a

more upright, less aggressive

seating position.

The bikes share an

insane amount of electronic

innovations from rider and

suspension modes to that

brilliant TFT screen that even

measures your angle of lean.

ABS, cruise control, quick

shifter, Traction control… you

name it and you can look it all

up or chat to your dealer.

Beefy Brembo brakes

(thankfully) worked flawlessly,

despite this riders lack of any

kind of talent around the tight

corners. Naturally, the tilt meter

worked hard throughout with

riders seeing who could get the

greatest angle of lean. This guy

did not win…

the gridlock. That power is just

perfect for getting away from

the urban hustle and bustle.

Pop your goose on the back

and take off for the weekend

in absolute comfort. This bike

eats up the kilometres and the

relaxed seating position and

decent sized fuel tank will give

you plenty of distance between

refuels. They reckon you’ll use

4.2 litres per 100. The plastic

moulded tanks (15.5-litres vs

13-litres on the F 900 R) that’s

more than 300kms between

top-ups.

At the launch we did not go

far enough to run out a full tank.

Hats off to the BMW

designers - the new

F 900 XR is a proper

looker from every angle.

The F 900 XR

In true BMW XR fashion, the

900 is built for fast, comfortable

cruising. For sure a perfect bike

to use to work and back every

day, neat, nippy, nimble (How’s

that for the 3N’s?), with lots of

power when you need to escape

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020 75


The F 900 R

This is the grin stretcher of

the two. They tell us that

everything is shared in terms

of performance but there

is just something that is so

much fun when you ride this

bike. It’s pokey, compact and

quite aggressive. The very

nature of the bike is like that

naughty oake on your shoulder

whispering to go faster or hoik

the wheel up into the air.

It is very sporty, but it is by

no means uncomfortable. Just

more aggressive and tight. It

feels more explosive in the

greatest possible way.

Instead of undertaking a

guided tour like we did on the

XR, the R kind of turned things

into a dice. And that was just

so brilliant!

There is not much else to

say. I was along on the launch

with the very experienced Dave

Cilliers and we looked at each

other and both agreed that it’s

really difficult to find anything

that we do not like. Fact.

Beemer has done an excellent

job with these two – and we

both reckon that both models

should sell really, really well.

Quality feel and finish.

Comfortable, nimble, sporty,

exciting… go and ride one when

they arrive, you’ll see exactly

what we mean…

www.bmw-motorrad.co.za

for your closest BMW dealer.

AT A GLANCE: THE TWO BIKES

THAT WE RODE WERE FULL

HOUSE WITH ALL EXTRAS.

1. Powering the F 900’s is the

same engine as the F 850 GS,

but it grows from 853cc to 895cc.

The parallel-twin now produces

105 horsepower at 8750 rpm and

92Nm of torque at 6500 rpm.

BMW says more than 83Nm of

torque is available from 4500 to

8500 rpm. The engine also uses

two opposed counterbalance

shafts to increase smoothness

across the rev range.

2. The base model is made

standard with minimal

electronics – two riding modes

(Road and Rain), ABS, and

traction control, which is

disengageable).

3. In typical BMW fashion, riders

can update the base models with

Riding Modes Pro and get all the

latest in savvy BMW electronics.

This adds two additional riding

modes (Dynamic and Dynamic

Pro), “dynamic” traction control

that provides other parameters

for measuring loss of traction,

and cornering ABS. New for 2020

is the addition of what BMW calls

“MSR”, an “engine drag torque

control” that prevents the rear

wheel from slipping as a result of

abrupt throttling or downshifting.

4. The chassis consists of a steel

frame that uses the engine as

a load-bearing element and

positions the fuel tank in the

standard place (not under the

passenger seat as on the F

GS series of yesteryears). The

fuel tank is made from welded

plastic – a first in this motorcycle

brands history.

5. The bolt-on steel rear frame

has also been newly developed

for the F 900 range. BMW says

this helps created a visually short

and slim rear.

6. Suspension duties are

handled by an upside-down

43mm telescopic fork and a fully

adjustable shock attached to a

double-sided swingarm.

7. BMW offers its electronic

suspension as an option. This

suspension, called “Dynamic

ESA (electronic suspension

adjustment), will control the

riding experience through

electronic damping of the rear

strut’s spring. The bikes we rode

all had ESA.

8. The bikes we rode all had

cornering lights, keyless ignition,

up/down quickshifter, and an

emergency call system.

9. The F 900’s boast a 6.5-

inch full-color TFT screen

that can connect to the

rider’s smartphone. From

there the options are literally

mindboggling. Go and look it up

for yourself.

10. Higher and lower seats are

available. We used the standard

ones and found them to be

really comfy.

76 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


OLD VS NEW: APRILIA RSV4 FACTORY’S

FACTORY

BATTLE

“Rob, do you mind taking our Aprilia bikes for a test and

let us know what you think...?” Now, you don’t have to be a

genius to know what Rob’s answer to that question was.

So here you go, a quick test on a 2016 Aprilia RSV4 Factory

and a 2019 RSV4 1100 Factory around Redstar.

Words: Rob Portman | Pics: Beam Productions

While at Redstar Raceway

recently to test Lance Isaac’s

beast of a BMW race machine I

bumped into Mr. Sean Powell

from Aprilia SA who was at

the track on the gorgeous

new Aprilia RSV4 1100 Factory

machine. After gazing at the

bike and not listening to a word

Sean was saying for around

5-minutes, I came around and

started paying attention. A

few minutes later the lucky

customer who was going to

test ride the new machine

rocked up, a rider whom I had

met a few years back who also

owns a RSV4 Factory machine

but the 2016 1000cc model. He

was looking to upgrade and

was given the chance to test

ride the new machine by Aprilia

SA. This got us thinking. “Rob,

why not take my bike out and

do a quick test against the new

bike?”, asked the customer.

“That sounds like a great idea”,

naturally was my answer - I

never pass up the opportunity

to ride gorgeous Italian

supermodels… one’s with two

wheels that is… dirty minds you

all have!

So, I jumped onboard the

customers well tricked out 2016

model first. I’ve always enjoyed

the riding position RSV models

have offered over the years and

felt right at home on this one

again. Nice wide bars and deep

set seating, but the footpegs

did feel a bit higher than normal

for me, but nothing I could not

get around. Immediately I could

feel that this bike has had some

work done as the customary

flat spot at bottom rpm was not

there. Instead I was greeted by

pure performance and power a

plenty from bottom to top. The

quickshifter and autoblip were

divine while braking was as

sharp as ever – it always is on

Italian machines!

78 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


It takes but a few mere laps

to know that this was a properly

setup machine and I enjoyed

the bike out on track with no

complaints to report. That was

until I jumped on the new 1100

factory machine.

Power delivery and braking

was not where I would feel a big

difference, but rather more-so

in the handling department.

Donovan Fourie and myself

tested the new RSV machines

for the first time at the end

of 2019 at Kyalami and were

blown away by how quickly

the front-end steers on the

1100 factory machine and that

feeling was once again felt here

around the RSR track. It turns on

a dime and holds its line better

than any “off the showroom

floor” machine I have ever

tested. It honestly feels like a

proper setup GP or Supersport

600cc bike, just with plenty

more stink once the throttle is

opened. The dog bone section

of the RSR track is a very tricky

section and one where some

people suffer from sea sickness

as you are forced to go from

left-to-right and back again

in a matter of seconds. On the

RSV4 1100 Factory this was a

very simple and pleasurable

exercise. No struggle, no

hesitation, no convincing

necessary - just point, SQUIRT

and SMILE. Ok, that CAME out

a bit wrong… that too, but you

know what I mean.

Needless to say, after

the test both myself and

the customer were left well

satisfied after riding the new

bike, and yes, it looks like the

deal has been done and my

mate is now the owner of the

only 1100 Factory machine in

the country so far. That is set

to chance very soon, probably

even as you read this with

Aprilia SA set to receive their

fresh new shipment of 2020

models any second now.

So, they say that third time’s

a charm but I can tell you not

on a new Aprilia. My first time

was, and my second even

more so. It does not take long

to fall in love with the charm

that exudes from an Aprilia

machine, especially one like

the new 1100 Factory with all

that carbon fibre splashed all

over and those gorgeous wings,

which take you on a joyful

flight of pure enjoyment and

excitement.

If you are keen on sampling

a new Aprilia machine I suggest

you get hold of Sean at Aprilia

SA and book a test ride on the

new 2020 range, which as I said

are arriving any day now. Tel

010 443 4596.

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020 79


Words: KTM Blog & Adam Wheeler | Pics: KTM Images

HOW DO YOU GET

READY FOR A

MOTOGP

BIKE?

In a matter of a few weeks, Brad Binder will be able to

answer the question that many race fans regularly have:

what does it feel like to pin a MotoGP factory bike?! The

South African chats about three ways in which he’ll get

set for the challenge…

Red Bull KTM MotoGP teams will

field two rookies in 2020: Brad Binder

and Iker Lecuona with the combined

age of 43 years. Binder comes into

the factory squad with a Moto3 world

championship and fifteen Grand Prix

victories in two categories to his name

including five wins in Moto2 last year.

The South African has earned his

MotoGP shot thanks to his results,

attitude and attacking riding style;

something that paddock insiders seem

to think will suit him well on the RC16

and a motorcycle that Pol Espargaró

aggressively throttled to 100 world

championship points in 2019.

Binder first threw his leg over the

KTM Grand Prix bike at the summer

test in the Czech Republic. The laps

he made at the Brno circuit were like

a preview for what he might have in

store for 2020. At the Valencia and

Jerez MotoGP tests in November

the new #33 was able to deepen his

appreciation for the 350kmph missile.

Already an eight season ‘veteran’ of

FIM world championship competition,

Binder, who works between bases in

Dubai and Spain, identified three areas

in which he’s been focussing on to

face the increase of speed, power and

the best racers in the world.

A PHYSICAL PRESENCE

“I had my first taste of MotoGP

at Brno last summer and I realized

straight away that it is a lot harder on

the forearms and also your heart rate

goes a bit harder than in Moto2. I think

generally it is something that will be a

lot more physical but also something

you get used to.”

“I’d like to try and pick up a bit more

muscle, and a bit more power for

the new season can only help. Body

weight is obviously an important

factor in Moto3 and Moto2 but I can

honestly say that I struggle to gain

weight. I think it has a lot to do with

80 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020 81


“I’ve worked with a

few different trainers

and lately I’ve been

using the same guy

that trained other

MotoGP riders and

have learned a good

few pointers.”

the amount of cardio I do but also how much I

eat. Normally my heaviest point comes when

I start riding in February: I want to start the

season like that because when races go on I

start to lose it.”

“I don’t worry about training that much

because it is something I take very seriously,

and I do it very hard. I love cycling. I don’t do

some of the insane mileage like the other

riders, but I enjoy getting out on the bicycle and

will mix it up between road and the enduro

bicycle. You can do downhill loops and still

peddle back to the top. I’m doing just as much

if not more than anyone else and I know

physically I’m very lucky because I’ve always

felt just as strong at the end of the races, more

than my competitors from what I see on the

track. For sure this year will be a different story!

There you are with the elite guys I suppose.”

I’ve worked with a few different trainers and

lately I’ve been using the same guy that trained

other MotoGP riders and have learned a good

few pointers. I want to learn as much as I can

from everybody and make a program that

suits me. I’m sure there is room to improve. I’ve

spoken to Pit [Beirer, KTM Motorsport Director]

about working with Aldon Baker [famed South

African Supercross/motocross trainer] and I

think we’ll get around to it at some point. I did

go to the Red Bull diagnostic training center

recently with the other guys [riders] and that

was an eye-opener. It is impressive how they

can tailor special plans to the smallest detail.”

82 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


A CHANGE OF TECHNIQUE

“I just need to ride the thing a bit more!”

“Brno was very much a ‘get your feet wet’ situation. I

have a lot to learn but I don’t want to think about it too

much. I always believe that if you over-think things or

have expectations that end up not existing then it’s

only negative. Better to try and then work out what

you need to do and to change.”

“MotoGP will mean keeping an open mind. Taking it

one day at a time. You can almost try and ‘jump-start’

situations but then you can also go a bit mad. In 2019

I made big improvements and my riding was much

better. Moto2 was hard at the beginning and that was

mainly because of my arm; it was buggered for six

months basically. Once it started to feel normal again

then I started to find my way.”

“I’m sure electronics will be a big factor and getting

my head around all that stuff. Learning to find set-up

and how to save the tyre; that’s not something you

have to worry about too much in Moto2. It is allguns-blazing

from lap one until the end. We had more

electronic options in Moto2 last year but, to be honest,

I don’t know too much about them: I turned them off!”

MINDFUL OF THE MINDSET

“First of all, I don’t want to repeat what I did in the

past: trying to make everything happen at once. That’s

how I ended up hurting myself, by pushing for too

much too soon. We are working through everything in

testing and I need to take advantage of it.”

“I know I’ll be starting nearer the back of the grid,

especially compared to what I achieved in Moto2,

but that’s definitely not where I am going to end up.

I believe that if you work at something hard enough

“MotoGP will mean keeping an open

mind. Taking it one day at a time. You can

almost try and ‘jump-start’ situations

but then you can also go a bit mad.”

84 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


then there is every chance you will improve and

that is how I have been throughout my career.

I’ve never started by being the fastest guy in the

beginning…but I got there in the end.”

“I wouldn’t say I’m a patient guy – by any

means – but I do believe that you have to aim at

progression. If you are just looking at results then

it can send you mad, but if you just try and tick

off little things every single day then you’ll end

up getting there. In a way it is quite simple: ride

the bike and tell them what I think and I guess the

team does the rest. For sure it will be a hundred

times more technical…but I just want to try and

keep it simple to do my job.”

“I’m excited about being on track with

those riders we all know about. I think it will be

awesome. I remember shouting at the TV for Rossi

when I was a little kid, way before I knew what

MotoGP was just because my Dad cheering him

on…so to line-up against legends of the sport will

be an incredible feeling.”

“I’m quite an easy-going guy so I don’t think the

extra duties of being a factory rider will bother me

too much. I know there will be extra attention and

back home is pretty insane. When I travel back to

South Africa I always have a solid week of media

work every day but it has to be done suppose!”

“I’m excited about being on track with

those riders we all know about. I think it

will be awesome. I remember shouting at

the TV for Rossi when I was a little kid...”

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020 85


FUN UNDER THE SUN!

Words: Rob Portman

Pics: Beam Productions & Eugene Liebenberg

MONOCLE SERIES ROUND 1: REDSTAR RACEWAY

Finally, it was back on track as

round 1 of the 2020 Monocle

Series kicked off at Redstar

Raceway with over 180 riders

lining up on the various grids.

Riders of every shape, size,

age and gender was present

with riders as young as 12

years right up to 75 taking part

in the 9 classes available in

the series.

The days racing action

started off with the frantic

300 Supersport class which

saw talented youngster Chris

Wright pick up both wins on

the day and the full 50 points

on offer on his Yamaha R3.

Chris was pushed hard in both

races by the fastest mother in

the world Nicole Van Aswegen

in her Kawasaki Ninja 400.

Clinton Fourie continued his

development with a 3rd place

overall for the day.

The ever expanding

Streetbike class was on

track next and for 2020

the grid has been split into

two categories - Streetbike

Elite and Streetbike, now

catering for the slightly faster

newcomers to track racing and

the complete newbies.

It was 2019 champ and SA

cage fighter Colin Hume who

picked up both wins in the Elite

class ahead of Marlo Ferreria,

both on BMW S1000RR

rockets, while up and coming

youngster Tiaan Fouche ended

up and impressive 3rd on his

Yamaha R6.

Ewoud Pienaar picked the

overall win in the Streetbike

class ahead of Henk Kruger

and Donovan Moolman.

The most illustrious and

greatest class to ever grace

the circuits in SA was up next.

The BOTTS, which is now a

combination of V Twin and V4

machines thunderous sound

exploded the RSR track and

Delmas town. It was our own

Shaun Portman on our Ducati

SA/World of Motorcycles

V4 racer who took both wins

on the day just holding off

the challenge from Brian

Bontekoning in race one who

pushed him all the way to the

line. Race two was a bit easier

for Shaun with the absence of

Brian who crashed out of the

lead in the Masters Class and

was forced out for the rest

of the day. That left current

champ Alan Hulscher in 2nd

overall with former multiple

champ Thomas Brown in 3rd.

In the Masters class, it was

Johnny Krieger on his World

of Carbon BMW S1000RR

who took both wins ahead of

Suzuki GSXR1000 mounted

The very talented

Chris Wright

Young Hunter Dreyer

first time out in the

300cc class


Louwrens Bardenhorst and the

ever-improving Michael Barth on

his Kawasaki ZX10R.

The Dunlop SA TT Classic riders

were up next and in the F1 class it

was Dunlop D213 shod AJ Venter

who picked up the win ahead of

2019 champ Paul Jacobs and James

Barson. The F2 class saw Fergal

McAdmas take 1st overall ahead

of British based SA rider Philip

Atkinson and Mike McSkimming.

Onto the most exciting and

action-packed classes of the day

where over 25 1000cc Superbike

and 600cc Supersport machines

lined up to do battle with some of

SA’s finest going head-to-head. AJ

Venter on his Lekka Racing Suzuki

GSXR1000 machine was pushed

hard in both heats by Morne

Geldenhuys on his Yamaha R1. Too

National rider Garrick Flok was

also in the mix along with Dylan

Barnard and Damion Purificati.

It was AJ in the end who took

both wins in the SBK class with

Geldenhuys settling for 2nd and

Purificati in 3rd. Our editor Rob

Portman ended up 4th overall in

the Ducati SA V4 racer. More on

that in the following pages.

The Supersport 600cc battle

was in true style spectacular with

top youngsters Jared Schultz and

Riccardo Otto. Cape Town star and

Spanish Supersport bound Schultz

took the overall win ahead of Otto

with the very impressive 2019

Supersport 300 champion, Ryno

Pretorius in 3rd in his first outing in

the 600cc class.

It was a spectacular days racing

with plenty of smiles throughout.

Round 2 heads down to the Aldo

Scribante track in PE on the 7th of

March with round 3 taking place

at Phakisa on the 9th of May.

For more information check out

the Monocle Motorcycle Series

Facebook page or website www.

motorcycleracingseries.co.za.

Exciting

Announcement!!!

Pirelli and Monocle

have partnered for the

remainder of the 2020

race season.

Pirelli is proud to be partnered

with the well supported and

professional series, and look

forward to the rest of 2020 season;

there are a couple things that you

Taric van der

Merwe

need to know going forward:

• Pirelli will be the only tyre that is

allowed to be sold at the events

themselves from Friday to Saturday

for race meetings.

• Lekka Racing is the official race

tyre fitment service for the race

weekends, and part of the Pirelli

service will be the free fitment of all

Pirelli tyres, and will have Pirelli’s

for sale on the day.

• Other tyre vendors selling Pirelli

are welcome to join, however they

cannot offer fitment on the day, but

Lekka racing will fit for free.

• Special pricing for Monocle racers

only will be offered. Deals will be

released shortly on the Monocle

Facebook page.

The battle at the front of the

SBK 1000cc class.

Ducati boss man

Jos Matthysen

Ewoud Pienaar in the

Streetbike class

Chris-Marie

Schlebusch


SO GOOD IT FEELS LIKE YOU’RE CHEATING

DUNLOP TYRES – PROUDLY BROUGHT TO YOU BY HENDERSON RACING PRODUCTS

DUCATI V4 RACER

OUR FIRST OFFICIAL RACEDAY ON THE PANIGALE V4 RACER.

The day had finally come for

us to race our new Ducati SA/

World of Motorcycles V4 racer.

As you can see by the pics, it

was not dolled up in its normal

flash red Ducati colours, but

rather a plain white kit. This

was due to a slight oopsy daisy

we had a few weeks prior with

the bike, which needed a lot of

attention and time from master

tech Zoki to be made race ready.

He managed to pull it off

and rolling it out on the Friday

practice for the first time

we noticed one or two small

gremlins that were quickly

sorted out by Zoki. The rest

of Friday practice went really

well with both myself and my

bro setting really good times

and finding a setup we were

both comfortable with. For

the 2020 season we would

once again be racing the same

bike on the same tyres so we

needed tyres that could last

but more importantly gave us

enough grip to be competitive.

Dunlop SA came on board and

supported us with their D213

Pro4 compound, the perfect

solution for both grip and

longevity. We found out on the

Friday practice that they were

perfect as both grip and wear

were perfect.

Come Saturday race day

myself, my brother, and

our Ducati V4 1100 race

machine were ready. Shaun

will be racing in the BOTTS

championship for the season

looking to wrap up his first big

bike title while I will be taking

on the ultra-competitive SBK

1000cc class. Why not take

on the BOTTS and make my

younger brother deal with the

SBK racers? Simple really, I

don’t have the stomach or liver

to handle the alcohol abuse

I would get from the BOTTS

guys. I have done a BOTTS race

before and let’s just say my

liver is still not talking to me.

So, I decided to throw my

brother into the fun, exciting,

party hard BOTTS class and

what an introduction it turned

out to be for him and our new

Ducati racer. With a big belly

full of nerves, Shaun managed

to put the bike on pole position

for both races. He then had

probably the worst start I

have ever seen from any

racer in race one and found

himself back in about 1990.

He managed to fight his way

through the field and onto the

back end of early race leader

Brian Bontekoning. The twobattled

hard for a few laps and

Shaun made the perfect move

heading into the final lap. Brian

pushed him all the way to the

final turn where Shaun just

managed to squeeze him out,

taking the win by a mere 0.198.

Both riders set their fastest

laps of the race on the last lap,

Brian on a 1,58.426 just slightly

quicker than Shaun’s 1,58.524.

Race two was a bit easier

for Shaun with the absence of

Brian after his big crash in the

Masters race. Again, Shaun got

a terrible start but this time only

found himself back in 1995. He

again fought through the field

and once he got to the front

consolidated his lead on what

was a slightly underperforming

Ducati. The gear position

sensor had failed meaning the

electronics were a bit out of

sync, which did make the bike

a bit harder to ride but Shaun

managed to hold onto the win

and picked up all 50 points on

offer for the day and now takes a

solid lead into round two in PE, a

track he has only ridden on once

a very long time ago so it’s not

going to be easy down there.

As for me, it was a very

busy weekend as not only was

I racing but was also handling

commentary for the track

and the live to Facebook feed

courtesy of Raceday TV. The

coverage was amazing and big

thanks to Keith Botha and the

rest of the team from Raceday

TV for the amazing coverage

and to all the sponsors who

came on board. Go check out

the coverage on the Raceday

TV FB page or on their YouTube

channel.

I managed to set a good

qualifying time of 1,57.9, which

saw me down in 10th place

on the combined 600cc and

1000cc grid. The start of the

first heat was frantic with

handlebar bashing a plenty

heading into a cement dust

filled turn one. In the race

before us, one of the Classsic

bikes put some oil down so

track conditions were not

ideal for us hard charging

testosterone filled maniacs.

I managed to sneak in with

the leading group out front

and was feeling very racy

on our then spot on feeling

Ducati machine with Dunlop

D213 tyres fitted. My feeling

would quickly be interrupted

as the race was stopped due

to a big crash from Tyrone

Piper heading into the tight

90 degree left hander. The

decision was then made to

move the first heat to after the

Supersport 300 race two as to

try and help clean up the track.

My race one re-start was

shocking as I was not present

in the meeting where it was

decided to use a flag start due

to load shedding. So, there I

was on the line waiting for

the lights to go on-and-off

88 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


meanwhile it was a flag start.

So, just like Shaun I found

myself back in 1990. I had to

battle through and did so on

the first couple of laps before

I started feeling the bike give

trouble. On lap 4 the quickshifter

and autoblip stopped working,

and all kinds of things started

flashing up on the gorgeous

V4’s dash. I knew it was nothing

motor related, so decided to

push on and finish the race. I did

so in 5th place, losing out on 4th

to Luca Bertolini on the last lap.

Race two and the decision

was made to use Ducati boss

man Jos’ V4S machine, with

number plate and all. I would

only get 1 warm-up lap before

having to go gung-ho on a

machine I had no time on.

My start was ok and credit to

the V4S as after only a few

corners I felt right at home and

comfortable. This allowed me

to push a bit harder every lap

and I soon found myself in good

company dicing it out for 5th

place once again after having to

start at the back of the grid for

changing bikes between races.

After the demise of a couple of

riders ahead I managed to hold

onto a hard fought 4th place

on the stock V4S machine, a

testament to just how good it is,

electronic suspension and all.

I’ve never been a huge admirer

of ES but must say this race did

convince me a bit.

So, in the end I had to settle

for 4th overall for the day in the

1000cc class just off the podium,

while Shaun went up proudly

to top spot to receive his shiny

new trophy. Yes, he won and I

finished 4th but the first rule of

racing is to beat your teammate,

and even more so if your

team-mate is your brother. I

managed to do this by setting a

faster time than him on the day

so once again I am the faster

brother, just saying.

Sadly, I will not be present for

round 2 as I will be at the Qatar

MotoGP race supporting our

boys Brad and Darryn Binder.

Shaun will be down in PE flying

the flag for our team so look

out on FB for how it goes or

just read next month’s issue

where we will bring the full race

report. We might even be on a

more “R”acier machine from PE

onwards. Let’s see….

We will also be showing off

some new sponsors who have

come on board for the rest of

the season. Big thanks to Rich

Racing, Cre8works, Ridgeway

Racebar, Wink Promotions,

Africa United Sports

Construction and Smashton

Industries for supporting us

going forward. We look forward

to representing your brands.

MO MAHOPE SHINES

AGAIN ON HER DUCATI

Lady rider Mo Mahope

continued her progression

on her Ducati SA/World

of Motorcycles Ducati V4

machine with some more

solid performances at

round 1 of the Monocle

Series and Bridgestone

Challenge races.

Her first race of the

season took place on

Saturday the 1st Feb at RSR

where she again showed

her class by finishing in

10th place in race one of

the BOTTS class and a

stunning 8th in race two.

The very next day

she and her Ducati V4

machine headed to

Zwartkops to take part in

the Bridgestone Challenge

races. She managed 9th

place in race one and found

extra pace in race two

finishing 6th. That gave her

4th overall for the day.

Mo has now traded in

her V4 Panigale for the new

V2 959cc V-Twin version,

which she will no doubt go

even better on and we look

forward to showcasing her

progression over the rest

of the season.

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020 8 9


SA SBK SERIES ROUND 1 ZWARTKOPS

Words & pics: Paul Bedford

Double delight for

David McFadden and

the 2020 Yamaha R1.

MCFLASH IS BACK!

Last year Zwartkops

Raceway wasn’t kind to

David McFadden, with a

sixth-place the best he

could manage in all of the

rounds he competed in.

He didn’t let that worry

him at the opening round

of the 2020 SA Superbike

Championship held at

Zwartkops Raceway on

Sunday, 2 February. The

Cape Town-based rider

piloted his 2020 RPM

Center/Stunt SA Yamaha R1

to two wins on its debut. In

the SuperSport 600 class,

Dino Iozzo (King Price

Xtreme Yamaha R6) wasn’t

threatened on his way to

two comfortable victories.

It was defending champion

Clint Seller (King Price Xtreme

Yamaha R1) who was quickest in

the morning qualifying session,

albeit just 0.012” ahead of Lance

Isaacs who was out for the

first time on his new Superbets

BMW Motorrad S1000RR.

McFadden, who was just over a

tenth further back, completed

the front row. Garrick Vlok

(Yamaha R1) headed the second

row of the grid with the Hi-Tech

Racing Kawasakis of Sheridan

Morias and Byron Bester

alongside him.

Jared Schultz, who will also

be competing in Spain this year,

put his ASAP/FFC Yamaha R6 on

pole, also just 0.012” ahead of

his closest rival, Iozzo. Ricardo

Otto (Otto Racing Yamaha R6)

and newcomer Brett Roberts

(Lights by Linea/RPM Center

Yamaha R6) filled third and

fourth places.

A slow start to the first race

by Isaacs, which dropped him

down to fifth place, allowed

Seller and McFadden to pull

away at the front of the pack

with Seller pushing hard to try

to open up a gap. Unfortunately

for him, he pushed a bit too

hard and the Bridgestone tyre

on the front of his Yamaha cried

enough, leaving the defending

champion in the gravel on

the outside of turn 5. This left

McFadden with a lead of just

more than a second over Vlok,

but it was Isaacs who was the

Champ Clint Seller’s

got his work cut out

this year.

90 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020


Great seeing Shez

Morais back in SA.

Plenty more

to come from

Isaacs and the

new BMW.

Dino Iozzo in

fine form.

man on the move. By the end

of the third lap, he was up to

second, and just a couple of

laps later was on McFadden’s

back wheel. The pair then diced

to the finish, with Isaacs trying

everything he could to get to

the front, but McFadden was

able to hang on to take a hardfought

win. Isaacs had to settle

for second, comfortable ahead

of Vlok with Morias and Bester

in fourth and fifth.

Iozzo grabbed the

SuperSport 600 lead from the

start leaving Schultz and Otto to

fight over the remaining podium

positions after Roberts suffered

front brake failure. While Iozzo

slowly extended his lead at the

front, Otto led Schultz with the

pair never more than a couple

of bike lengths apart until about

two-thirds race distance. A

small error by Schultz allowed

Otto to open the gap and

Schultz decided to settle for

third on his ill-handling Yamaha.

In the early stages, Race 2

was a repeat of the first at the

front of the 1000cc class, with

Seller leading the way from

McFadden, although a better

start by Isaacs saw him just

behind the leading duo. Seller’s

bike was doing its best to throw

him off as the tyres battled

for grip on the extremely hot

track surface which allowed

McFadden to move into the lead

a third of the way through the

heat. He went on to another

win while Seller, despite the

handling problems with his

bike, was able to keep Isaacs

behind him until the flag. Vlok

had a huge crash while running

in fourth, which allowed Morias

and Bester to end in fourth and

fifth as they did in the first race.

While Iozzo’s winning margin

wasn’t quite as big in the second

heat, he was still comfortably

ahead of the second-place man

after leading from the start.

Schultz was much happier with

the handling of his Yamaha

after some hard work by his

pit crew between races and,

while he couldn’t hang on to

Iozzo, was comfortably ahead

of the battle for the final podium

position. Roberts led that battle

at the start of the final lap, but

experience told as Otto made his

move in the final corner to take

the final podium position by less

than a quarter of a second.

The next round of the

Bridgestone supported SA

Superbike series takes place on

Saturday, 14 March 2020, again

at Zwartkops Raceway.

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020 9 1


BUYER’S GUIDE

SELLING

YOUR BIKE?

MODEL PRICE MODEL PRICE MODEL

PRICE

RSV4 RR 1000 R297,500 Monster 797

R138,300

RSV4 RR 1100 Factory R398,500 Monster 821

R173,100

Tuono V4 1100

Tuono V4 1100 Factory

RSV4 1100 FACTORY

G 310 R

G 310 GS

C 400 X Scooter

C 400 GT Scooter

F 750 GS

F 850 GS

F 850 GS Adventure

R 1250 GS

R 1250 GS Adventure

R 1250 R

R 1250 RS

R 1250 RT

R NineT Pure

R NineT

R NineT Scrambler

R NineT Urban GS

R NineT Racer

K 1600 GT

K 1600 GTL

K 1600 B

S 1000 R

S 1000 RR Red

S 1000 RR M Sport

HP4 Race

APRILIA

DUCATI

BMW

R258,000 Monster 821 Stealth R184,700

R288,000 Monster 1200

R209,900

Monster 1200 S

R245,600

Monster 1200 R

Monster 1200 Black

R257,900

R248,600

Hypermotard 950

R194,100

Hypermotard 950 SP R230,900

Supersport

Supersport S

R192,200

R216,200

Multistrada 950

R207,900

R69,300 Multistrada 950 S

R253,200

R80,400

Multistrada 1260

R232,000

R125,000 Multistrada 1260 S R284,700

R136,000 Multistrada 1260 Enduro R283,400

R190,500 Multistrada Pikes Peak R345,300

R202,500 Multistrada Grand Tour R312,900

R223,300

Diavel 1260

R279,900

R269,300

R288,900

Diavel 1260 S

X Diavel

R313,900

R295,900

R212,000

X Diavel S

R339,900

R227,000

959 Panigale

R229,900

R252,400

R175,300

959 Panigale Corse

Panigale V2

R264,900

R255,900

R196,700

Panigale V4 base

R334,800

R204,000

Panigale V4 S

R399,900

R180,350 Panigale V4 Speciale R669,900

R180,200 Panigale V4 R (2019) R669,900

R288,700 Panigale V4 25° 916 R720,000

R311,900 Panigale Superleggera R1,690m

R348,100 1299 Panigale R FE R669,900

R213,600 Streetfighter V4

R292,900

R311,400 Streetfighter V4 S

R342,900

R352,400

R1,3m

STREETFIGHTER V4

Sixty 2 Scrambler

Icon Scrambler

R119,500

R144,900

Full Throttle Scrambler R172,900

Classic Scrambler

R164,900

Desert Sled Scrambler R187,900

Cafe Racer

R187,900

1100 Scrambler

R199,900

1100 Scrambler Special R216,900

1100 Scrambler Sport R230,900

HARLEY-DAVIDSON

Street 750

Street Rod

R109,000

R120,000

Iron 1200

R153,000

Superlow

R147,500

Iron 833

1200 Custom

R151,500

R163,900

Superlow 1200T

R169,000

FortyEight Special

R163,000

FortyEight

Roadster

R163,000

R171,500

StreetBob

R191,000

LowRider

R218,500

Deluxe

Sport Glide

R276,900

R234,500

Fat Bob

R229,500

Fat Bob 114

R263,000

Soft Tail Slim

R249,900

Fat Boy

R280,500

Fat Boy 114

R316,500

Brak Out 114

R316,000

Break Out

Heritage Classic 114

R281,000

R319,500

Heritage Classic

R286,900

Ultra Limited Low

R385,000

Road King

R323,500

Road King Classic

R281,000

Road King Classic

R323,500

Road King Special

R344,500

Street Glide

R354,000

92 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020

Prices may change so please contact local dealer.


FIRE IT UP IS THE MOST TRUSTED PURCHASER IN SA!

WE PAY INSTANTLY, WE COLLECT, WE COME TO YOU!

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MODEL PRICE MODEL

PRICE MODEL

PRICE

Street Glide Special

Road Glide Special

Road Glide

Road Glide Ultra

Ultra Limited

CVO Street Glide

CVO Limited

Free Wheeler

TRI Glide Ultra

FXDR114

HONDA

ACE 125

Elite 125 Scooter

NC750X

NC750X DCT

Africa Twin 1100 Manual

Africa Twin 1100 DCT

Africa Twin 1100 AS Man

Africa Twin 1100 AS ES

XR190

XR150L

XR125L

CRF250L

CRF250 Rally

CBR 1000 RR 2019

CBR 1000 RR-R 2020

CBR 1000 RR-R SP 2020

GL1800 Goldwing M

GL 1800 Goldwinh DCT

HUSQVARNA

R371,000

R375,000

R355,000

R379,000

R385,000

R510,000

R544,000

R407,000

R514,000

R299,900

R24,300

R23,399

R114,480

R123,120

R210,000

R222,499

R236,000

R269,000

R49,620

R32,960

R30,000

R74,999

R85,000

R209,999

TBA

TBA

R367,000

R432,200

FS 450

R122,699

701 Enduro

R141,699

701 Supermotard

R141,699

Vitpilen 401

R89,699

Svartpilen 401

R89,699

Vitpilen 701

R129,699

Svartpilen 701

R149,699

FTR 1200

FTR 1200 Race Replica

Scout Sixty

Scout 1133

Scout Bobber

Chief Dark Horse

Chief Classic

Chief Vintage

Springfield

Springfield Darkhorse

Chieftan Dark Horse

Chieftan

Roadmaster

Z300

Z400 ABS

Ninja 400 ABS

Z650

Z900 ABS

Z900 RS

Z900 Cafe Racer

Z1000R

Z1000SX

Ninja 650

Versys X300

Versys 650

Versys 1000

ZX10R WSB 2018

ZX10R WSB 2019

H2 SX SE

ZZR1400 Ohlins

NINJA H2 SX SE

INDIAN

KAWASAKI

R209,900 125 DUKE

R58,999

R269,900 RC125

R59,999

R169,900 390 DUKE

R76,999

R199,900 RC390

R74,999

R199,900

R299,900

R419,900

R379,900

R389,900

R369,900

R399,900

R399,900

R449,900

R61,995

R79,995

R86,995

R110,995

R145,995

R175,995

R168,995

R179,995

R179,995

R122,995

R85,995

R115,995

R159,995

R229,995

R259,995

R310,995

390 Adventure

790 DUKE

790 Adventure

790 Adventure R

690 Enduro R

890 DUKE

1090 Adventure R

1290 Super ADV S

1290 Super ADV R

1290 SuperDuke R (2019)

1290 SuperDuke R (2020)

1290 SUPER DUKE R

Agility RS 125

Like 125l ABS

G-Dink 300l

Xciting 400l

AK550

KTM

KYMCO

MOTO GUZZI

TBA

R149,999

R179,999

R185,999

R152,999

TBA

R198,999

R234,999

R239,999

R229,999

TBA

R19,950

R34,950

R54,950

R99,950

R154,950

R249,995 V85 TT

R209,000

California 1400 Touring R405,000

MGX 21 Flying Fortress R489,000

V7 Stone lll ABS

R171,150

V7 Rough

R175,875

V7 Milano

R191,625

V7 Carbon lll

R201,950

V7 lll Racer

R208,950

Prices may change so please contact local dealer.

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020 93


SELLING YOUR BIKE? FIRE IT UP IS THE MOST TRUSTED PURCHASER IN SA!

WE PAY INSTANTLY, WE COLLECT, WE COME TO YOU!

www.fireitup.co.za

MODEL PRICE MODEL PRICE MODEL

PRICE

Dragster Pirelli LE

Dragster 800RR

Dragster 800 RC Limited

Super Veloce 800RR

Brutale 1000RR 208HP

RUSH 1000RR 212hp

MV AGUSTA

Turismo Veloce 800 160HP

R329,900

R299,900

R359,900

R379,900

R479,900

R549,900

R299,900

GTS 300l EV

Max Sym 600l ABS

Crox 125

Fiddle ll 150

Jet14 200

Orbit ii 125

Symphony 150

X-Pro 125

R63,995

R98,995

R17,995

R17,495

R23,995

R14,995

R19,995

R18,995

FJR1300

XMax 300 Scooter

YZF R3

YZF R6

YZF R1 2020

YZF R1M 2020

Niken 3-wheeler

NIKEN 3-WHEELER

R229,950

R89,950

R78,950

R209,950

R319,950

R399,950

R275,000

SUPERVELOCE 800

TRIUMPH

Street Triple RS

R170,000

Speed Triple RS

R219,000

Street Twin

R144,000

Bonneville T100

R145,000

Bonneville T120

R169,000

Bonneville Bobber

R169,000

Bonneville Bobber Black

R184,000

UR110

UB125

GS150

GSX150F

DL650XA L9

DL1000XA L9

SV650A

SUZUKI

R17,950

R19,950

R27,800

R32,900

R124,900

R172,900

R99,500

Bonneville Speed Master

Street Scrambler

Thruxton 1200 R

Tiger 800 XCX

Tiger 800 XCA

Tiger 1200 XCX

Tiger 1200 XCA

Tiger 900

Tiger 900 Rally Pro

Rocket R

R179,000

R169,000

R192,000

R186,000

R205,000

R226,000

R260,000

R192,000

R215,000

R299,000

ZT250 R

ZT310R

ZT310X

ZT310T

ZONTES

R44,900

R63,900

R68,900

R74,900

DEALERS CONTACTS WHO

ADVERTISE WITH US

GSXR750 L9

GSXR1000 L9

GSXS1000 R L9

GSXS1000 L9

Katana

VZR1800

Hyabusa 1300

XS125 K Delivery

NH125

XS200 Blaze

XS200 Trail Blaze

Citycom 300l

SYM

R161,950

R271,900

R327,500

R162,500

R187,500

R194,900

R211,900

R16,495

R25,995

R18,495

R19,995

R54,995

Rocket GT

XTZ125

YBR125G

TW200

XT250

XT1200Z

XT1200ZE

MT07 ABS

MT09 ABS

MT07 Tracer

MT09 Tracer

MT09 Tracer GT

YAMAHA

R315,000

R35,950

R28,950

R59,950

R69,950

R194,950

R228,950

R124,950

R152,950

R144,950

R159,950

R189,950

Aprilia SA (IMI) Tel: 010 443 4596

BMW West Rand Tel: 011 761 3500

SMG Motorrad Umhlanga Tel: 031 502 9800

SMG Motorrad Noth Coast Tel: 035 426 0020

Daly Motorrad Klerksdorp Tel: 018 011 1888

Ducati SA Tel: 012 765 0600

Honda East Tel: 011 826 4444

Holeshot Husqvarna Tel: 011 823 5830

Indian Motorcycles SA Tel: 010 020 6195

TRD Kawasaki Tel: 011 051 9104

Fire it Up Kawasaki Tel: 011 467 0737

RAD KTM Tel: 011 234 5007

TRAX KTM Tel: 012 111 0190

KTM Centurion Tel: 012 643 1110

Moto Guzzi SA (IMI) Tel: 010 443 4596

Fire it Up MV Agusta Tel: 011 467 0737

KCR Suzuki Tel: 011 975 5545

SYM TRD Motorcycles Tel: 011 051 9104

Zontes SA Tel: 012 565 6730

94 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2020

Prices may change so please contact local dealer.


PUSHING BRAKES TO THE LIMIT!

Brake pads are fundamental elements in any brake system because they are directly responsible for transmitting the power of the

caliper to the brake disc so that it can overpower the brake pads without strain. Galfer has developed specifics compounds for each

use and motorcycle model looking to offer the top performances in all type of riding and for all the profiles and needs of users.

FEATURES: • Powerful, progressive & modular brake • Low wear rate and minimum noise • Maximum resistance to the fade effect

• Efficiency in wet conditions • No wear on brake disc

G1054

Semi metal compound

• Great feel and modulation for OEM

brake pad replacement.

• Long lasting brake pad and very little

rotor wear.

• Good in wet and/or dry conditions.

• Overall a very versatile brake pad

compound for almost every need.

RANDY

KRUMMENACHER

2019 WORLD

SUPERSPORT CHAMPION

G1370

Sinter compound

• For moderately aggressive every day and

sport street riding.

• Advanced ceramic composites ready

to withstand higher temperatures than

regular semi-metallic carbon brake pads.

• HH friction rated compounds deliver

excellent feel and modulation.

G1375

Sinter Sport compound

• For moderately aggressive every day and sport street/

track riding with ceramic coated backing plate to assist

with temperature management and dissipate heat.

• Advanced ceramic composites ready to withstand

higher temperatures than regular semi-metallic

carbon brake pads.

• HH friction rated compounds deliver excellent feel

and modulation.

• Brake pads do not fade.

G1300

Full GP Spec. Competition only

Carbon Ceramic hybrid pad intended for race use only. Same

pads as our race teams use, designed to withstand extreme

racing temperatures without losing feel. Race team tested

and proven! Precision made in our Galfer factory in Spain.

Trade Enquiries: (011) 672-6599

Email: info@trickbitz.co.za

Enquire at your local dealer

Office Hours Mon-Fri 8am-5pm

www.trickbitz.co.za


DUNLOP

DOMINATES!

SA TT CLASSIC & MONOCLE SERIES

SBK 1000 BOTTS

CLASSICS

STREET BIKES

CHOOSE THE WINNING FORMULA

YOU + DUNLOP D213 PRO 4

“This tyre outplays and outlasts them all”

AJ Venter - SBK & Classic class winner

Available through LEKKA Racing.

Contact LEKKA Racing now on to get your hands on the class winning tyre.

Tel: 011 238 7666 or email ajventer@lekka-racing.co.za

S594/A

DUNLOPTYRESSA

Get a Grip on 2020! Email Nicole Swanepoel at

nicole.swanepoel@srigroup.co.za or contact our call centre on 011 418 3088.

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