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St Mary Redcliffe Project 450 RIBA 2 Stage End Report

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ST MARY REDCLIFFE

PROJECT 450 RIBA 2 STAGE-END REPORT

DECEMBER 2019


Dan Talkes

RIBA AABC

Old Police Station,

6 St Peters Court,

Bedminster Parade,

Bristol,

BS3 4AQ

dan.talkes@purcelluk.com

+44 (0)117 910 1060

www.purcelluk.com

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© Purcell 2019


CONTENTS

1.0 PROJECT TEAM

2.0 INTRODUCTION

3.0 PROJECT TIMELINE

4.0 DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

4.1 STRUCTURES

4.2 MECHANICAL & ELECTRICAL SERVICES AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY

4.3 LANDSCAPE

4.4 SCHEME UPDATES

4.5 CURRENT PROPOSALS

4.6 MATERIALITY

4.7 DESIGN INTENT DETAILS

4.8 AREAS OF FURTHER INVESTIGATION

5.0 CONSULTATION

6.0 COST PLAN

7.0 RISK REGISTER

8.0 PROGRAMME

9.0 NEXT STEPS

10.0 APPENDICES

10.1 ARBORICULTURAL SURVEY

10.2 ECOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT

10.3 MEP STRATEGIES


1.0 PROJECT TEAM

1.

Client

4.

Mechanical & Electrical Performance

7.

Heritage Asset Review

St Mary Redcliffe Church

Redcliffe

Bristol

BS1 6RA

Rev Dan Tyndall

0117 231 0060

dan.tyndall@stmaryredcliffe.co.uk

Qoda Consulting

1 Ram Court

Wicklesham Lodge

Faringdon

SN7 7PN

Oliver Fuller – Principal Sustainability Engineer

01367 245 960

oliver.fuller@qodaconsulting.com

8.

Rita McLean & Jane Arthur

Museums & Heritage Consultants

Outline Interpretation Strategy

Imagemakers

Exhibition Design, Heritage Planning & Installation

2.

Architect

5.

Cost Consultancy

9.

Community Consultation

Purcell

The Old Police Station

Bedminster Parade

Bristol

BS3 4AQ

Gleeds

1400 Bristol Parkway North

Newbrick Road

Bristol

BS34 8YU

10.

Vivid Regeneration

Positive change for people & place

Heritage Business Plan

Dan Talkes – Consultant

0117 910 1060

dan.talkes@purcelluk.com

Mike Jones – Associate Director

0117 317 3200

mike.jones@gleeds.co.uk

Glevum

Heritage Business Consulting

11.

Fundraising Review

3.

Structures

Integral Engineering

First Floor

Riverside South

Walcot Yard

Walcot Street

Bath

BA1 5BG

Margaret Cooke – Director

01225 859 657

mc@integral-engineering.co.uk

6.

Landscape Design

LUC

12th Floor, Colston Tower

Colston Street

Bristol

BS1 4XE

Edward Tarratt – Associate

0117 929 1997

edward.tarrett@landuse.co.uk

Eric Grounds

Charity Consultant & Campaign Director


2.0 INTRODUCTION

Funded jointly by both the Canynges Society and the Church Lands Charity, to whom we extend

our thanks, RIBA 2 has focussed on the rigorous, robust, and increasingly-detailed development

of the emerging scheme design

Now informed by specialist consultant inputs, further public and stakeholder consultation, this

work culminates in a fully-costed, coordinated and updated set of architectural proposals that

bring further certainty to both P450’s progression and the eventual realisation of its undoubted

benefits for both the Congregation and Community of St Mary Redcliffe


3.0 PROJECT TIMELINE

Emerging from RIBA 1 with a:

• Clearer definition of need

• Substantially reduced spatial brief

• Consequently, more proportionate architectural proposal

The Project Team have consciously structured the RIBA 2 activities around a considered series

of workshops, consultations, and reviews to enable iterative design, and ensure the project’s

development is coordinated, efficient, and effectively communicated

The resulting 4 months of intense exploration are summarised within the adjacent timeline and

following report

‘To serve our parish better, we

must serve our visitors better’

Rev Dan Tyndall, Vicar of St Mary Redcliffe


Project 450 Board Review

Instruction to Proceed to RIBA Stage 2

Sharing Ideas - Consultation with Bristol DAC

Design Team Meeting / Workshops

Project Board / Development Funders’ Update

Sharing Ideas - Public / Stakeholder Consultation

Design Team Meeting / Workshops

Project Board / Development Funders’ Update

PCC Update / Review

Design Team Meeting / Workshops

Project Board / Development Funders’ Update

Sharing Ideas - Consultation with Bristol DAC

Design Team Meeting / Workshops

Project Board / Development Funders’ Update

PCC Update / Review

Sharing Ideas - Stakeholder Consultation

Design Team Meeting / Workshops

Project Board / Development Funders’ Update

2019 AUG SEP OCT

NOV DEC


4.0 DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

In accordance with the RIBA Plan of Work 2013, the design development during RIBA 2 has

focussed on developing:

• The concept design, including:

• Outline proposals for structures, services, sustainability, and landscape

• Preliminary cost information, including a regularly monitored and updated cost plan

• An updated project brief and programme

Additionally, acknowledging the indisputably high significance of St Mary Redcliffe, confirmed by

its Grade I Listing, and the undoubted sensitivity of its context, extensive public and stakeholder

consultation has been undertaken (as detailed within Section 5.0) to ensure continued

engagement, project support, and minimise the risk of abortive work

Each of the coordinated co-consultant inputs is summarised within the following sub-sections and,

as noted elsewhere, has been facilitated via both regular Design Workshops and Design Team

Meetings, the latter also attended by:

Dan Tyndall - Vicar of St Mary Redcliffe

Rhys Williams - P450 Project Coordinator and Research Assistant

Richard Wallace - St Mary Redcliffe Church Warden

Marcus Chantrey - St Mary Redcliffe Inspecting Architect

Consequently, all design decisions have been subject to the welcome scrutiny of key church

officers and laypeople, and also informed by the specialist knowledge of the church’s approved

inspector

Finally, the design development has also been informed by the results of the specialist

Arboricultural and Ecological Surveys that are appended in Section 10.1 & 10.2

The RIBA Plan of Work, against which P450’s progression is

mapped, for the purposes of both project planning and reporting


4.1 STRUCTURES

Undertaken by Integral Engineering, the Structural Report documents the following civil and

structural information identified, recorded, and developed during RIBA Stage 2:

1. Ground Conditions & Site Investigation

2. Drainage

3. Site Constraints

4. Substructure

5. Superstructure

6. Design Criteria

Additionally, the report has identified and informed the structural risks and potential mitigations

that are embedded within the Project Risk Register in Section 7.0

2. Ground Conditions & Site Investigation

2. Ground Conditions & Site Investigation

The BGS geology maps show the site to be in the area of an outcrop of Redcliffe

Sandstone possibly overlain by River Terrace Deposits to the north of the site.

2. Ground 1. Ground Conditions Conditions & Site & Investigation

The BGS geology maps show the site Site to Investigation

be in the area of an outcrop of Redcliffe

Sandstone possibly overlain by River Terrace Deposits to the north of the site.

The BGS geology maps show the site to be in the area of an outcrop of Redcliffe

The BGS geology maps show the site to be in the area of an outcrop of Redcliffe Sandstone

Sandstone possibly overlain by River Terrace Deposits to the north of the site.

possibly overlain by River Terrace Deposits to the north of the site

Three historic boreholes have been identified in close proximity to the site with the closest being south of the site

to the rear of Colston Parade. The borehole was drilled to a depth of 10m in 1970 and encountered approximately

1.0m made ground over 1.2m very stiff red silty clay over red and grey sandstone

If a lightweight construction is adopted a shallow spread foundation is likely to be suitable apart from in the

location of the events space in the south courtyard which is likely to require a mini piled or screw piled foundation

due to the presence of existing tree roots

Figure 4. St Mary Redcliffe geology

An intrusive site investigation (SI) will be required to inform the design of the proposed

foundations which will need to encompass the following;

Figure 2. BGS Superficial Deposits

Figure 2. BGS Superficial Deposits

Figure 3. BGS Bedrock

Figure 3. BGS Bedrock

Figure 2. BGS Superficial Deposits

Figure 3. BGS Bedrock

Figure 4. North churchyard foundations

Figure 4. St Mary Redcliffe geology

Figure 4. St Mary Redcliffe geology

Three historic boreholes have been identified in close proximity to the site with the

breath

closest being south of the site to the rear of Colston Parade. The borehole was drilled

Three historic boreholes have been identified in close proximity to the site with the

to a depth of 10m in 1970 and encountered approximately 1.0m made ground over

closest being south of the site to the rear of Colston Parade. The borehole was drilled

1.2m very stiff red silty clay over red and grey sandstone.

to a depth of 10m in 1970 and encountered approximately 1.0m made ground over

If

1.2m

a lightweight

very stiff red

construction

silty clay

is

over

adopted

red and

a shallow

grey sandstone.

spread foundation is likely to be

suitable apart from in the location of the events space in the south courtyard which is

If a lightweight construction is adopted a shallow spread foundation is likely to be

likely to require a mini piled or screw piled foundation due to the presence of existing

suitable apart from in the location of the events space in the south courtyard which is

tree roots.

likely to require a mini piled or screw piled foundation due to the presence of existing

tree roots.

Made ground & burial ground

Choir Vestry

Made ground & burial ground

Screw piles between tree

Events space

roots, building

Screw piles between tree

Events space

suspended to allow trees to

Sandstone roots, building

Figure 5. South churchyard breath foundations

suspended to allow trees to

breath

BGS Superficial Deposits

BGS Bedrock

Three historic boreholes have been identified in close proximity to the site with the

closest being south of the site to the rear of Colston Parade. The borehole was drilled

to a depth of 10m in 1970 and encountered approximately 1.0m made ground over

1.2m very stiff red silty clay over Events red Space and grey sandstone.

If a lightweight construction is adopted a shallow spread foundation is likely to be

suitable apart from in the location of the events space in the south courtyard which is

likely to require a mini piled or screw piled foundation due to the presence of existing

tree roots.

Made ground & burial ground

Sandstone

Events space

TunnelScrew piles between tree

roots, building

suspended to allow trees to

- 2 cable percussion boreholes with gas/water standpipes installed 1 x 10-15m

borehole on the north lawn in the location of the proposed building and 1 x 15-

20m in the paved area to the south of the church in area of the proposed

education space.

- 6-8 windowless sampler holes (small boreholes) – 3 in north area for the

Screw proposed piles main located building between and basement tree roots area, 1 with under the proposed building

building immediately suspended south of the above church, ground 2 under plane the proposed event space/café

building, 3 - 4 of these with gas/water standpipes. (windowless sampler holes

Made ground and archaeologically sensitive

are small diameter boreholes drilled with a much smaller rig.)

-

ground

3-4 hand

adjacent

dug pits.

to

On

church

north side where building/basement adjoins church, and

An intrusive site investigation

rear of the retaining

(SI)

wall

will

to

be

the

required

south of the

to

church

inform

to allow

the design

the existing

of the prop

foundations which foundations will need to to be encompass viewed. the following;

An intrusive site

-

investigation

Soakaway testing

(SI)

(see

will

section

be required

3.4.)

to inform the design of the prop

foundations which - 2 machine will need dug to trial encompass pits –one on the northern following; lawn area (for near surface

- 2 cable percussion boreholes with gas/water standpipes installed 1 x 10-

foundation/ground conditions) and one on the grass behind the retaining wall

borehole south on the of the north church lawn (to expose in South the the location Churchyard rear of the of retaining the Foundations proposed wall and backfill) building and 1

- 2 cable percussion boreholes with gas/water standpipes installed 1 x 10

20m -in the Standard paved geotechnical area to the lab testing south including of the church testing for in a area piled solution, of the proposed

education

borehole contamination on

space.

the north testing lawn as appropriate in the location and targeted of the contamination proposed building testing in the and 1

20m in the area paved of the old area fuel tanks to the plus south some of Waste the Acceptance church in Criteria area of testing the for proposed

- 6-8 windowless

education

spoil

space.

disposal

sampler

characterisation

holes (small boreholes) – 3 in north area for the

proposed - gas/water main building monitoring and in standpipes, basement including area, monitoring 1 under for the volatile proposed vapours buildi –

- 6-8 windowless sampler holes (small boreholes) – 3 in north area for the

immediately minimum south of 4 of visits the church, 2 under the proposed event space/café

building,

proposed

3

main

- 4 of

building

these with

and

gas/water

basement

standpipes.

area, 1 under

(windowless

the proposed

sampler

buildi

h

immediately The site is archaeologically south of the sensitive church, so all 2 SI under works the will need

are small diameter boreholes drilled with a much

proposed to be accompanied

smaller

event

rig.)

space/café by a

written scheme of investigation and an archaeological watching brief. We would also

building, 3 - 4 of these with gas/water standpipes. (windowless sampler

- 3-4 recommend hand dug that pits. a ground On penetrating north side radar where survey building/basement (GPR) be carried out prior adjoins to church

are small diameter boreholes drilled with a much smaller rig.)

rear

commencement

of the retaining

of the intrusive

wall to

SI

the

to confirm

south

the

of

presence

the church

of underground

to allow the existing

- 3-4 obstructions. hand dug Once pits. the On results north of the side GPR where survey are building/basement available the final exploration adjoins churc

foundations to be viewed.

rear

locations

of the

can

retaining

be agreed with

wall

all

to

parties.

the south of the church to allow the existing

- Soakaway testing (see section 3.4.)

foundations to be viewed.

- 2 The machine above Made has dug been ground trial reviewed pits and –one archaeologically by a geotechnical on the northern sensitive engineer lawn who has area provided (for near a budget surface

Soakaway cost of £16,000-£20,000. testing adjacent (see Whilst to section church this is useful 3.4.) for costing purposes, we would obviously

foundation/ground conditions) and one on the grass behind the retaining

- 2 recommend machine that dug a trial specification pits –one be sent on to the a minimum northern of three lawn companies area (for to near provide surface a

south competitive of the tender. church (to expose the rear of the retaining wall and backfill)

foundation/ground conditions) and one on the grass behind the retaining

- Standard geotechnical lab testing including testing for a piled solution,

south of the church (to expose the rear of the retaining wall and backfill)

contamination testing as appropriate and targeted contamination testing

- Standard geotechnical lab testing North Churchyard including testing Foundations for a piled solution,

area of the old fuel tanks plus some Waste Acceptance Criteria testing fo

contamination testing as appropriate and targeted contamination testing

spoil disposal characterisation

area of the old fuel tanks plus some Waste Acceptance Criteria testing fo

- gas/water monitoring in standpipes, including monitoring for volatile vapo


RECOMMENDATIONS

An intrusive site investigation (SI) will be required to inform the design of the proposed

foundations and will need to encompass the following:

• 2 cable percussion boreholes with gas/water standpipes installed 1 x 10-15m borehole on the

north lawn in the location of the proposed building and 1 x 15-20m in the paved area to the

south of the church in area of the proposed education space

• 6-8 windowless sampler holes (small boreholes) – 3 in north area for the proposed main

building and basement area, 1 under the proposed building immediately south of the church,

2 under the proposed event space/café building, 3 - 4 of these with gas/water standpipes

(windowless sampler holes are small diameter boreholes drilled with a much smaller rig)

• 3-4 hand dug pits. On north side where building/basement adjoins church, and rear of the

retaining wall to the south of the church to allow the existing foundations to be viewed

• Soakaway testing (see Drainage)

• 2 machine dug trial pits –one on the northern lawn area (for near surface foundation/ground

conditions) and one on the grass behind the retaining wall south of the church (to expose the

rear of the retaining wall and backfill)

Standard geotechnical lab testing including testing for a piled solution, contamination testing as

appropriate and targeted contamination testing in the area of the old fuel tanks plus some

Waste Acceptance Criteria testing for spoil disposal characterisation

• Gas/water monitoring in standpipes, including monitoring for volatile vapours –minimum of 4

visits

The site is archaeologically sensitive so all SI works will need to be accompanied by a written

scheme of investigation and an archaeological watching brief. We would also recommend that a

3. Drainage

ground penetrating radar survey (GPR) be carried out prior to commencement of the intrusive

SI to confirm the presence of underground 3.1 obstructions. Existing Public Once Sewers the results of the GPR survey are

available the final exploration locations can be agreed with all parties

The Wessex Water asset plan shows a 1125mm diameter strategic foul sewer located

beneath the north west corner of the north church yard. This is a very large public

The above has been reviewed by a geotechnical sewer and Wessex engineer Water who have has confirmed provided that a budget it has a cost 6m of easement on either side.

£16,000-£20,000. Whilst this is useful This for costing means that purposes, no building we can would take obviously place within recommend 6m on either that side of the sewer. It is

a specification be sent to a minimum of unlikely three that companies a build over to agreement provide a competitive will be possible tender on a sewer of this size even

though it appears that the pipe extends beneath the existing Arc Café.

We await confirmation from Wessex Water on whether the exact location of the pipe

must be confirmed prior to the start of the development and similarly on whether a

condition survey is required prior to the start of the construction phase so that Wessex

Water can confirm that no damage is caused to the pipe by the construction activities.

2. Drainage

2.1 Existing Public Sewers

The Wessex Water asset plan shows a 1125mm diameter strategic foul sewer located beneath

the north west corner of the north church yard. This is a very large public sewer and Wessex

Water have confirmed that it has a 6m easement on either side. This means that no building can

take place within 6m on either side of the sewer. It is unlikely that a build over agreement will

be possible on a sewer of this size even though it appears that the easement, at-least, extends

beneath the 1940s Undercroft

We await confirmation from Wessex Water on whether the exact location of the pipe must be

confirmed prior to the start of the development and similarly on whether a condition survey is

required prior to the start of the construction phase so that Wessex Water can confirm that no

damage is caused to the pipe by the construction activities.

This type of survey given the depth of the pipe and location of the access chambers in a busy

highway can be expensive so the above should be confirmed as soon as possible. The need for a

survey may be dependent on the foundation solution adopted for the proposed buildings

A second 300mm diameter strategic foul sewer is also located along Pump Lane, whilst the

constraints on this pipe are not likely to be as onerous as the above pipe, an easement on the

pipe will likely still apply

3.2 Existing Site Drainage

Limited information is available

is identified on the existing drain

of the church. Rainwater pipes

culvert before it turns north and

drainage is unknown.

No information on foul drainage

A full CCTV survey of all site dr

condition.

This type of survey given the depth of the pipe and location of the access chambers in

a busy highway can be expensive so the above should be confirmed as soon as

possible. The need for a survey may be dependent on the foundation solution adopted

for the proposed buildings.

A second 300mm diameter strategic foul sewer is also located along Pump Lane, whilst

the constraints on this pipe are not likely to be as onerous as the above pipe, an

easement on the pipe will likely still apply.

Wessex Water Asset Plan


s

dopted

e, whilst

A full CCTV survey of all site drainage should be carried out to confirm connectivity and

condition.

to the

e

Figure 6. Wessex Water asset plan

Existing 400 diameter culvert

Figure 8. Existing site drainage

Figure 6. Wessex Water asset plan

Figure 7. Wessex Water asset plan

Wessex Water Asset Plan

No storm water drainage is visible on the public sewer maps in close proximity to the

church. The closest storm drainage appears to be located to the south of the site behind

Colston Parade, adjacent to the Ship Inn

2.2 Existing Site Drainage

Limited information is available on the site drainage. A single 400 diameter brick culvert is

identified on the existing drainage plan running in an east-west direction to the south of the

church. Rainwater pipes to the south of the church appear to connect to this culvert before

it turns north and heads off site. Its point of connection to the public drainage is unknown

No information on foul drainage is available

RECOMMENDATIONS

Establish from Wessex Water details of all surveys / investigations required under the

conditions of the strategic sewer easement, before, during and post-construction

Undertake a full CCTV survey of all site drainage to confirm connectivity and condition

Existing Site Drainage

2.3 Proposed Site Drainage

Figure 8. Existing site drainage

Existing 400 diameter culvert

Current planning requirements dictate that SuDS (Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems) must be considered for

surface water drainage on all new developments, with a connection to the existing public sewer a last resort.

A betterment on the existing volume of stormwater run-off plus an allowance for climate change is normally

required and this level of betterment will need to be confirmed by the planners. There are several methods of

providing sustainable drainage:

Swales or ponds - unlikely to be practical on this site given the excavation required to create the ponds and the

limited potential for water to drain away in the clay

Soakaways - as above, soakaways are unlikely to be feasible on this site due to the extent of clay deposits

Green or blue roofs - green roofs provide attenuation within the soil layer of a planted roof. Blue roofs are similar

but provide an additional cellular zone for storage beneath the green roof finish. It is understood that the project

is currently seeking the use of landscaped roofs to both the flat sections of the Northside Building and the Events

Space. Given the additional weight of the water and soil build-ups, larger supporting structure and foundations

should be anticipated

Below ground attenuation - storage tanks wrapped in an impermeable geotextile and buried below ground level

to store storm water. A large area of excavation is normally required which may not be desirable in this case. The

attenuation tank would discharge to a manhole with a flow control device which then releases water at a preagreed

rate to the public drainage system. The position of an attenuation tank also has impact on the landscaping

strategy

Figure 7. Wessex Water asset plan


ainage

elopments. A

the existing

rmally required

here are

excavation

to drain away

this site due to

ve.

for storm

ar to green

h the green

the south

ounding trees.

dditional weight

upporting

RECOMMENDATIONS

3.3 Proposed Site Drainage

The above Current items planning should requirements be re-evaluated dictate that SuDS (Sustainable once the Urban location Drainage of the existing site drainage is

establishedSystems) 3.3 Proposed must be Site considered Drainage for surface water drainage on all new developments. A

connection to the existing public sewer is a last resort. A betterment on the existing

volume of stormwater run-off plus an allowance for climate change is normally required

Current planning requirements dictate that SuDS (Sustainable Urban Drainage

It is understood that a significant depth of relatively modern make-up exists on the north

Systems) and this level must of be betterment considered will for need surface to be water confirmed drainage by the on planners. all new developments. There are A

churchyard. connection several The methods site to the of investigations existing 3.3 providing public sustainable Proposed sewer is listed drainage; a last resort. under Site A betterment Drainage sub-section the existing 1 should be utilised to verify this and

volume of stormwater run-off plus an allowance for climate change is normally required

identify options • Swales for the or ponds- location unlikely to for be practical an attenuation this site given the tank excavation

and this level of betterment will need to be confirmed by the planners. There are

several methods required of to providing create the sustainable ponds and drainage; the limited potential for water to drain away

A confirmed drainage the clay. strategy for both surface and foul water is normally required before

• Swales Soakaways- or ponds- as above unlikely soakaways to be practical are unlikely on this to site be feasible given the on excavation this site due to

planning consent required the is clay given. indicated to create The in the the ponds suggested geotechnical and the limited information next potential provided steps for water above. should to drain away therefore be reviewed with Bristol


City Council at in Green the clay. or blue roofs- green roofs provide attenuation or storage for storm

commencement of RIBA 3

The main disadvantage of a green or blue roof system is the additional weight

to be needed prior to the submission of the planning application.

4.1 Flooding

of the water and soil • build Swales up which obviously or ponds- requires larger unlikely supporting to be practical A confirmed on drainage this strategy site for given both surface the and excavation

foul water is normally required

structure and foundations.

before planning consent is given, so the site investigation, set out in section 2, is likely

required to create the ponds and the to be limited needed prior potential to the submission for of water the planning to application. drain away

in the clay.

The site is generally in a low risk area of flooding as shown by the flood maps below.

• Soakaways- as above soakaways are unlikely to be feasible on this site

The

due

surface

to

water flooding map suggests that there may be a risk of surface water

the clay indicated in the geotechnical information provided above.

flooding to the south west of the site immediately to the south of the church. This is

Figure 11. Risk of flooding from rivers and the sea

• Green or blue roofs- green roofs provide attenuation or storage for storm

likely to be due to a localised low spot is not within the area of the proposed

Risk of Flooding from Rivers and the Sea

water within the soil layer of a planted roof, blue roofs are similar to green development.

Figure 11. Risk 10. of Below flooding from ground rivers and the attenuation sea tank

roofs but provide an additional cellular zone for storage beneath the green

roof finish. This may be an option on this project, particularly in the south

Figure 9. Blue roof

courtyard where the aim is to blend the building in with the surrounding trees. 3.4 Next Steps

• Below ground attenuation-

The

storage

main

tanks wrapped

disadvantage

in an impermeableof a green or blue roof system is the additional weight

Figure 9. geotextile Blue roof and buried below ground level to store storm water. A large area of

excavation is normally required of the which water may not be and desirable soil in this build case. The up which obviously requires larger supporting

A confirmed drainage strategy for both surface and foul water is normally required

• Below attenuation ground tank attenuation- would discharge storage to tanks a manhole wrapped with in a an flow impermeable control device

structure and foundations.

before planning consent is given, so the site investigation, set out in section 2, is likely

geotextile which then and releases buried water below at ground a pre-agreed level to rate store to storm the public water. drainage A large system. area of

excavation The position is of normally an attenuation required tank which also may has not impact be desirable on the landscaping

this case. The

to be needed prior to the submission of the planning application.

Figure 10. Below attenuation strategy. ground tank would attenuation discharge to a manhole tank with a flow control device

3.4 Next Steps

Current planning requirements dictate that SuDS (Sustainable Urban Drainage

Systems) must be considered for surface water drainage on all new developments. A

connection to the existing public sewer is a last resort. A betterment on the existing

Figure 10. Below ground attenuation tank

volume of stormwater run-off plus an allowance for climate change is normally required

and this level of betterment will need to be confirmed by the planners. There are

Figure

3.4

10.

Next

Below

Steps

ground attenuation tank

several methods of providing sustainable drainage;

4. Site Constraints

• Soakaways- water within the as above soil layer soakaways of a planted are roof, unlikely blue to roofs be feasible are similar on this to green site due to

the roofs clay but indicated provide an in the additional geotechnical cellular information zone storage provided beneath above. the green

• Green roof finish. or blue This roofs- may green be an option roofs provide on this attenuation project, particularly or storage in the for storm south

water courtyard within where the soil the layer aim is of to a blend planted the roof, building blue in roofs with are the similar surrounding to green trees.

roofs The main but provide disadvantage an additional of a green cellular or blue zone roof for system storage is beneath the additional the green weight

roof of the finish. water This and may soil be build an up option which on obviously this project, requires particularly larger supporting the south

courtyard structure and where foundations. the aim is to blend the building in with the surrounding trees.

which then releases water at a pre-agreed rate to the public drainage system.

The above The items position can be of an considered attenuation following tank also confirmation has impact of on the the location landscaping of the existing

site drainage. strategy.

The above items can be considered following confirmation of the location of the existing

site drainage.

A confirmed drainage strategy for both surface and foul water is normally required

before 3.4 planning Next Steps consent is given, so the site investigation, set out in section 2, is likely

A confirmed drainage strategy for both surface and foul water is normally required

before planning consent is given, so the site investigation, set out in section 2, is likely

to be needed prior to the submission of the planning application.

3. Site Constraints

4. Site Constraints

4.1 3.1 Flooding

4. Site Constraints

The site is generally in a low risk area of flooding as shown by the flood maps below.

The 4.1 surface Flooding site water is generally flooding map suggests in a low that there risk may area be a risk of surface flooding water as shown by the flood maps below. The surface

flooding to the south west of the site immediately to the south of the church. This is

The likely water site to be is generally flooding due to a localised a low map risk low area spot suggests of and flooding is not within that as shown the there area by of flood the may proposed maps be below. a risk of surface water flooding to the south west

The development.

of

surface

the site

water

immediately

flooding map suggests

to

that there

south

may be a

of

risk

the

of surface

church.

water

This is likely to be due to a localised low spot

flooding to the south west of the site immediately to the south of the church. This is

likely and to is be not due to within a localised the low spot area and is of not the within proposed the area of the proposed development

development.

Figure 12. Risk of flooding from reservoirs

Figure 12. Risk of flooding from reservoirs

Risk of Flooding from Reservoirs

4. Site

4.1 F

The site

The surfa

flooding t

likely to b

developm

Figure 11

Above: A Typical Below-Ground

Attenuation Tank

Right: An Illustrative Blue-Roof

Build-Up

Figure 9. Blue roof

Figure 11. Risk of flooding from rivers and the sea

Figure 13. Risk of flooding from surface water

Risk of Flooding from Surface Water

4.2 Trees Figure 14. South courtyard trees


3.2 Existing Trees

There are a large number of trees within the south churchyard in proximity to the proposed

Events Space. As noted within the Arboricultural Survey (appended within Section 10.2) root

zone protection requires consideration and, inevitably, influences the foundation solution of the

proposed building. Mini piles, which are in the region of 150mm-200mm diameter, may be most

appropriate as they will require only a very small amount of excavation for each support

The ground floor structure will also be suspended to prevent damage to the structure due to

seasonal shrink swell of the ground in the zone of the tree roots. This will generally be in the

form of a lightweight steel and timber structure suspended off steel piles to ensure both air

circulation and the penetration of groundwater to the tree roots below

3.3 Railway Tunnel

An existing C19 railway tunnel runs beneath the south east corner of the churchyard in the location of the

proposed Events Space, as indicated on the plan below

Reinforced concrete ground beams will be used to bridge over the tunnel, supported on piled foundations to

either side. Given the large span of the tunnel, these beams are likely to be in the region of 1.0m deep and, at

the commencement of RIBA 3, it is recommended that the detail of this proposal is further evaluated by the

Arboricultural Consultant to ensure that sufficient founding zone can be achieved

Due to the proximity of the foundations to the tunnel, a Party Wall Agreement may be required. It is understood

that the owner of the tunnel is aware of the proposed development but confirmation from a Party Wall Surveyor

should be sought, prior to the preparation of the Consents applications

Figure 13. Risk of flooding from surface water

Footprint of proposed Events Space

4.2 Figure Trees 13. Risk of flooding from surface water

There 4.2 are a Trees large number of trees located in the south churchyard in the location of the

proposed events space. We await the results of the arboricultural survey, but it is likely

that the There root are zones a large of at number least some of trees of located these trees in the will south need churchyard to be protected. in the location This will of the

influence proposed the foundation events space. solution We await of the the proposed results of building. the arboricultural Mini piles which survey, are but in it the is likely

region that of the 150mm-200mm root zones of diameter at least some may of be these most trees appropriate will need as to they be protected. will require This only will a

very influence small amount the foundation of excavation solution for each of the support. proposed building. Mini piles which are in the

region of 150mm-200mm diameter may be most appropriate as they will require only a

The ground very small floor amount structure of excavation will be suspended for each to support. prevent damage to the structure due to

seasonal shrink swell of the ground in the zone of the tree roots. This may be in the

form The of a ground lightweight floor steel structure and timber will suspended structure suspended to prevent off damage steel piles to the or structure a reinforced due to

concrete seasonal suspended shrink swell ground of floor the ground slab laid in the on a zone Cordek of the Cellcore tree roots. compressible This may be void in the

former form to prevent of a lightweight damage steel due and to ground timber heave. structure If there suspended are tree off roots steel beneath piles or a the reinforced

building concrete then there suspended may be ground a requirement floor slab to laid maintain on a Cordek air circulation Cellcore over compressible them. void

former to prevent damage due to ground heave. If there are tree roots beneath the

building then there may be a requirement to maintain air circulation over them.

Figure 14. South courtyard trees

If the Figure arboriculture 14. South report courtyard shows trees that any of the trees are particularly sensitive root

radar, a technique which used ground penetrating radar (GPR) to locate large tree

roots, If the may arboriculture be used to report ensure shows that that our foundations any of the trees are are located particularly in the most sensitive appropriate root

places. radar, a technique which used ground penetrating radar (GPR) to locate large tree

roots, may be used to ensure that our foundations are located in the most appropriate

4.3 places. Railway Tunnel

An 4.3 existing Railway historic Tunnel railway tunnel runs beneath the south east corner of the churchyard

in the location of the proposed events space as shown on the plan below

An existing historic railway tunnel runs beneath the south east corner of the churchyard

Reinforced the location concrete of the ground proposed beams events will space be used as to shown bridge on over the the plan tunnel below on to piled

foundations on either side. Given the large span of the tunnel these beams are likely to

be Reinforced the region concrete of 1.0m ground deep. beams Discussion will be with used the to arboriculture bridge over the consultant tunnel on will to be piled

required foundations to confirm either that side. this solution Given the will large not adversely span of the affect tunnel the these trees beams in this are area. likely to

be in the region of 1.0m deep. Discussion with the arboriculture consultant will be

A party required wall to award confirm may that also this be solution required will due not to adversely the proximity affect of the the trees foundations in this area. to the

tunnel. This should be confirmed as soon as possible.

A party wall award may also be required due to the proximity of the foundations to the

tunnel. This should be confirmed as soon as possible.

Figure 15. Tunnel location in south courtyard

Figure 15. Tunnel location in south courtyard

Tunnel

Tunnel

Events space

Events space

Outline of railway tunnel below

A Diagram Illustrating the Position of the Railway Tunnel

Below the South Churchyard

The Interior of the Railway Tunnel Below the

South Churchyard

Figure 16. Existing railway tunnel


4. Substructure

4.1 Foundations

Any foundation solution will be dependent on the ground conditions and no design can be carried

out in this area prior to completion of the site investigation

Given the ecclesiastical nature of the project and the historic nature of the site, obstructions

and burials in the ground are likely. A raft foundation or piled raft foundation could be the most

suitable solution as it will allow flexible support locations whilst avoiding the need for deep

excavations. See diagram in sub-section 1

4.2 Ground Floor Construction

As noted above, the results of the intrusive site investigation will be required before the ground

floor construction can be confirmed. If a raft slab foundation solution is adopted this will also

form the ground floor structure

A suspended slab will be required to the Events Space in the South Churchyard due to the

presence of trees. This could take the form of a lightweight steel and timber structure with a void

below. See diagram in sub-section 1

4.3 Basement

5. Superstructure

5.1 Conceptual Design

Crucial to the architectural concept is the differentiation between a rooted, heavy-weight base,

with visually-lighter linings and upper components. This is reflected in the proposed approach to

superstructure

5.2 Northside Building

An in-situ concrete frame will achieve the following key benefits:

• Common form of construction, familiar to most contractors

• Inherent fire protection

• Flat soffits, avoiding disruption to service runs and permitting a free-flow of ventilation air

• Simplified detailing of partition heads

• Thermal mass to minimise cooling and diurnal swings

Quality fair-faced concrete can be produced with careful forethought and thorough specification,

provided that the concrete contractor is appropriately skilled and experienced

An additional cost allowance should be made for a high-quality, exposed, board-marked finish

Two new basement structures are proposed to the north of the site. The first provides WCs

adjacent to the existing C20 Undercroft, the second provides a service corridor, kitchen areas

and further WCs adjacent to the chancel aisle / ambulatory

Both basements sit immediately adjacent to the existing church, in areas of apparent previous

excavation. so trial pitting will be required to confirm both the existing foundation details to avoid

undermining

The level of the groundwater is also currently unknown but, as noted, existing structures already

exist at these levels. Nevertheless, it is assumed that two layers of waterproofing will be required,

most likely in the form of waterproof concrete and a drained internal cavity

The suggested site investigations will confirm the nature of the ground for basement excavation,

but it is likely that there is a large depth of fill on site which will require temporary support during

construction. As noted above, the level of groundwater is currently unknown but temporary dewatering

should be allowed for at this stage

Finally, whilst the new basements occupy areas that appear to have been disturbed previously,

they remain within the historic church boundary and so burials are a risk. If burials are

encountered during the intrusive site investigations, this aspect of the spatial strategy may need

to be reconsidered, as the implications of exhumation may prove prohibitive

An Example of a Board-Marked Concrete Finish


Stability can be provided by reinforced concrete shear walls in both directions

The contrasting lightweight structure of roofs, lanterns, and upper volumes could then be

constructed from cross laminated timber (CLT). These are prefabricated timber panels of solid

timber spanning in two directions. The CLT would be supported by glulam / CLT beams and

spanning onto the reinforced concrete frame or glulam / CLT columns, as appropriate. Both CLT

and glulam are manufactured to precise dimensions in a factory and delivered to site flat packed.

They offer the following advantages:

• Sustainable material

• Low carbon footprint

• Rapid erection on site

• Can facilitate early watertightness of envelope

• Simplified airtightness detailing

• Attractive, warm internal finish

5.3 Circulation Cores

The circulation cores are currently shown as lightweight and transparent structural interventions,

incorporating large areas of glazing. Subject to costs, structural glazing may be an option but, as

an alternative, a very lightweight steel frame could achieve a similar level of transparency

A decision on the preferred approach should be made as early as possible during RIBA 3 to

enable coordination with the interface details required for the Planning / Faculty applications

5.4 South Churchyard Buildings

Conceived as lightweight elements, particularly due to their relationship with the ground plane,

the Education and Events Space will be constructed from CLT panels with glulam / CLT beams

and columns. Coordinating with the upper level components of the Northside Building, they will

utilise carefully-detailed, rigid connections between the beams and columns to resist shear loads

5.5 Connections to Existing Building

Links to the existing building will be lightweight to minimise load transfer. Opening up work is

required as soon as possible to establish the existing construction, as detailed design cannot be

progressed until this investigation work is complete

The connection to the existing vaults of the C20 Undercroft poses a particular challenge, as

vaulted structures exert a horizontal thrust that must be resisted if the vaults are cut. In the

location of the proposed cafe, significant temporary works will therefore be required to ensure

that deflection of the existing structure is kept to a minimum. The new structure will need to be

designed to resist the load in the long term

6. Design Criteria

6.1 Floor Loadings

To provide future flexibility, the following floor loads have been calculated, based on Eurocode 1:

Classrooms & Offices

Cafes

Kitchens

Circulation

Exhibition Space

Plant

Partitions

Roofs - Maintenance Access Only

3.0kN/m2

2.0kN/m2

3.0kN/m2

4.0kN/m2

4.0kN/m2

7.5kN/m2

1.2kN/m2 (i)

0.6kN/m2

(i) Based on lightweight

movable partitions of load

per metre length no greater

than 3.0kN/m - to be

reviewed during RIBA 3

6.2 Stability & Movement Joints

A CLT Interior

In all cases, movement joints will be provided between the new interventions and the existing

church. The new interventions will provide their own stability


4.2 MECHANICAL & ELECTRICAL SERVICES AND SUSTAINABILITY

1 Introduction and Project Brief

1.1 Project Design Risks

The Parochial Church Council of St Mary Redcliffe have appointed a design team to develop a proposal for planning for

new visitor welcome and events spaces for the church comprising of a mixture of refurbished and new-build spaces.

This will include a new-build events space, kitchen, café space, gallery and exhibition spaces and supporting back of

house areas.

The primary objective of this report is to present the Mechanical and Electrical Engineering options that have been

discussed and agreed throughout stage 2. It will also ensure that the Client and all members of the project team are fully

aware of the nature and implications of the building engineering design proposals prior to commencing the production

of further design documentation.

The deliverable for this stage of the site’s development is the production of this stage 2 report and accompanying

sketches.

The following have been identified as design risks at stage 2 that need to be resolved or confirmed at the beginning of

stage 3:

1. External plant space is not fully identified and coordinated at this stage.

2. Options have been proposed for the heating, ventilation and air conditioning of the events space. These are to

be agreed in stage 3.

3. Natural ventilation solutions are proposed for a number of locations. Modelling is required at stage 3 to assess

the usage limitations imposed by this as a servicing strategy. Mechanical solutions have been investigated but

not taken forward due to the impact on the architecture.

4. Current architectural proposals require the existing plant room height to be reduced. It may be possible to have

this raised in local areas or it may require services diversions to accommodate and will need to be further

surveyed.

The report summarises QODA’s strategy options that have been formulated based on the initial meetings held to develop

and clarify the brief.

Figure 1 – Proposed model – Option 1

1563.R1 – Stage 2 report Page 4 of 29


1563.R1 – Stage 2 report Page 5 of 29

2 Key Design Drivers

Environmental Requirements:

Overheating

Building Regulations:

As the building is an extension it will fall under approved document Part L2B. CO2

calculations maybe required for the new build areas if the size of the extension is

greater than 25% of the existing floor area. The extension and the provision of

additional building services will also trigger consequential improvements and

Acoustics

Draughts

Daylighting

Air quality

Occupancy hours

and numbers

Practical and easy to Maintain

Expected energy

demands

therefore 10% of the primary works costs will need to be allocated to improving the

existing building.

Planning Requirements:

The project falls under Bristol City Council and will need to meet there planning

requirements. As part of the stage 3 works an energy statement will be produced

which will show how we aim to meet the 20% renewable energy target as well as a

feasibility into connection into the proposed district heating network.

Passive design

opportunities

Capacity of existing

utilities and site

limitations

Site Layout &

Infrastructure

Environmental

Requirements

Functional

Requirements

Architectural

Design

Massing / layout /

fenestration /

orientation

Thermal performance /

thermal mass / air

permeability

Energy/Client low carbon targets:

Capital cost

The question regarding client specific energy and carbon targets has been raised

during this design phase. It was suggested that a workshop takes place to talk

through the aspirations in more detail. QODA will arrange and this should be a key

priority before we start stage 3 design work.

Running cost

Maintenance

cost

Costs

Building Services

Design

Controls

Centralised vs

local

Certifications e.g. BREEAM

Performance

Targets

Legal

requirements

Building

regulations

Energy / Client low

carbon targets?

Planning targets /

constraints

Heating Hot Water Ventilation Cooling Lighting Power


3 Design Criteria

The design criteria will be in accordance with the recommendations of the following:

Back of house

circulation

13 to 20°C ± 2°C 21 to 25°C ± 2°C 10 l/s/person

• This RIBA stage 2 report

• CIBSE Guides

Statutory undertakings

• Health and Safety Executive (HSE) Guidance and all relevant legislation

• CDM regulations

• Pressure system safety regulations

• Relevant British Standards

External design conditions

External design conditions for thermal load calculations and plant sizing will in general have been determined in

accordance with CIBSE Guide, Section A2, Weather and Solar Data and the design criteria identified by and discussed with

the users.

Winter: -5°C

Summer: 30°C db, 21°C wb

Chillers: 35°C Summer & -10°C

Internal Design Conditions

Location Winter Summer Ventilation Requirements

Exhibition space /

event space

19 to 21°C ± 2°C 21 to 25°C ± 2°C 10 l/s/person

Hogarth gallery 19 to 21°C ± 2°C 21 to 25°C ± 2°C

10 l/s/person – Humidity control

required to this space and any

adjacent connected galleries.

Café 19 to 21°C ± 2°C 21 to 25°C ± 2°C 10 l/s/person

Main kitchen 17 to 19°C ± 2°C 21 to 25°C ± 2°C 40 ACH

Choir Room 19 to 21°C ± 2°C 21 to 25°C ± 2°C 10 l/s/person

Comms room 19 to 21°C ± 2°C 12 to 25°C ± 2°C 10 l/s/person

Plant rooms

Uncontrolled with Frost

Protection

Uncontrolled

Occupation density

Occupation densities are generally based on furniture layouts shown on architectural layouts.

To achieve the design criteria with natural ventilation servicing strategies, limits will be defined for the occupancy at the

next stage of design.

Noise Criteria

Gallery Spaces

NR30-35

Café

NR40-45

Events Space

NR40-45

Circulation Spaces NR45

Plantrooms

NR75

Site Boundary

Noise levels to be confirmed by Environmental Health Officer or acoustic consultant.

Design Internal Heat Gains

People Sensible – 90W per person Latent – 50W per person

Lighting 8 W/m²

Equipment Schedules to be provided by the users

Infiltration Rate

The external air infiltration rate will be taken as 0.5 air change per hour in winter and 0.5 air changes per hour in summer.

This is the air infiltration to be utilised in heat loss/ heat gain calculations and will account for both occupied spaces and

the ceiling/ floor voids. As the design progresses, the specified airtightness of the building will be applied to improve the

accuracy of the heat gain and heat loss calculations.

Drainage

The above ground drainage and sanitation systems will be designed generally to comply with the following standards and

regulations:

BS8301 Building Drainage

BS 5572 Sanitary Pipework

CP 305 Sanitary Appliances

Building Regulation and Water Regulations

Office 21 to 23°C ± 1°C 22 to 25°C ± 2°C 10 l/s/person

Toilets 19 to 21°C ± 1°C 21 to 25°C ± 1°C >5 ACH

1563.R1 – Stage 2 report Page 6 of 29


LEGEND

40-60 W/m 2 HEAT GAINS - NATURAL VENTILATION

- GAS HEATING - NO COOLING

40-50 W/m 2 HEAT GAINS -FULL MECHANICAL

VENTILATION WITH VRF HEATING AND COOLING

70-80W/m 2 HEAT GAINS - MECHANICAL

VENTILATION WITH VRF HEATING AND COOLING

110-120W/m 2 CHEAT GAINS - FULL MECHANICAL

VENTILATION WITH VRF HEATING AND COOLING

NOTE:

COOLING LOADS ABOVE EXCLUDE SOLAR GAIN AND ARE TO

INDICATE THE FEASIBILITY OF A NATURAL VENTILATION

SOLUTION.

EXISTING ELECTRICAL AND MAINS COLD WATER CAPACITY TO

BE ASSESSED AND PLANT ROOM REQUIREMENTS ADVISED

ACCORDINGLY.

LOW LEVEL

KITCHEN EXHAUST

PROPOSED - AS

CURRENTLY

INSTALLED

ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTION BOARD

MEP STRATEGY DRAWINGS

The following drawings highlight the intended MEP strategic approach. In accordance with the

outcomes of RIBA 2, they provide a robust basis for further development at RIBA 3

This is particularly critical, as a key element of the design approach is the requirement for:

ROUTE REQUIRED

FOR KITCHEN

EXHAUST

DUCTWORK

EXISTING BOILER

PLANT TO REMAIN.

NEW AREAS

HEATED BY AIR

SOURCE HEAT

PUMP.

• Natural and passive environmental strategies wherever possible

• A ‘fabric-first’ approach to sustainability

• The maximum concealment of services to maintain the purity of the spaces themselves

PROJECT:

ST MARY REDCLIFFE

SKETCH TITLE:

BASEMENT M&E COMMENTS_rev 4

DATE: 29/08/2019

ENGR: JD


EXTERNAL COMPOUND

LEGEND

FOR EXTERNAL HEATING

PLANT SERVING NEW

AREAS: 5m x 4m

LEGEND

ACCESS

40-60 W/m 2 HEAT GAINS - NATURAL VENTILATION

- GAS HEATING - NO COOLING

40-60 W/m 2 HEAT GAINS - NATURAL VENTILATION

- GAS HEATING - NO COOLING

40-50 W/m 2 HEAT GAINS -FULL MECHANICAL

VENTILATION WITH VRF HEATING AND COOLING

70-80W/m 2 HEAT GAINS - MECHANICAL

VENTILATION WITH VRF HEATING AND COOLING

110-120W/m 2 CHEAT GAINS - FULL MECHANICAL

VENTILATION WITH VRF HEATING AND COOLING

NOTE:

COOLING LOADS ABOVE EXCLUDE SOLAR GAIN AND ARE TO

INDICATE THE FEASIBILITY OF A NATURAL VENTILATION

SOLUTION.

EXISTING ELECTRICAL AND MAINS COLD WATER CAPACITY TO

BE ASSESSED AND PLANT ROOM REQUIREMENTS ADVISED

ACCORDINGLY.

SEPARATION CANNOT BE

ACHIEVED SO SAME

VENTILATION STRATEGY AND

CONDITIONS WILL BE

PROVIDED TO BOTH SPACES.

REDUCED THE OCCUPANCY TO

~35 WOULD ALLOW NATURAL

VENTILATION.

M MET

1m TO BE GRP

ENCLOSURE FOR PUMPS

AND PRESSURISATION

UTILITY METER, CUT-OUT,

EARTH BAR AND DISTRIBUTION

BOARD. 2.5M IN LENGHT IN

TOTAL CLEAR FRONT ACCESS

REQUIRED.

40-50 W/m 2 HEAT GAINS -FULL MECHANICAL

VENTILATION WITH VRF HEATING AND COOLING

70-80W/m 2 HEAT GAINS - MECHANICAL

VENTILATION WITH VRF HEATING AND COOLING

110-120W/m 2 CHEAT GAINS - FULL MECHANICAL

VENTILATION WITH VRF HEATING AND COOLING

NOTE:

COOLING LOADS ABOVE EXCLUDE SOLAR GAIN AND ARE TO

INDICATE THE FEASIBILITY OF A NATURAL VENTILATION

SOLUTION.

EXISTING ELECTRICAL AND MAINS COLD WATER CAPACITY TO

BE ASSESSED AND PLANT ROOM REQUIREMENTS ADVISED

ACCORDINGLY.

ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTION BOARD

CONNECTIVITY OF

SPACE TO

ATMOSPHERE

NEEDS TO BE

DEVELOPED TO

ENSURE NATURAL

VENTILATION IS

POSSIBLE

AS GALLERY AND

EXHIBITION SPACES ARE

NOT SEPARATED, THE

SAME VENTILATION

STRATEGY AND

CONDITIONS WILL BE

PROVIDED TO BOTH

SPACES. LOCAL HEATING

AND COOLING MAY BE

REQUIRED TO THESE

SPACES TO CONTROL

HUMIDITY.

ACCESS

600mm VOID REQUIRED

FOR MVHR UNIT.

PACKAGED AHU SERVING

HOGARTH GALLERY - 6mL

x 1mW x 2mH

INCREASE UNIT TO 1.5mW

AND 2.6H TO COVER

ADJACENT EXHIBITION

SPACE

NOTE- EQUAL ACCESS

WIDTH REQUIRED

ALL SECURITY

EQUIPMENT CCTV

MONITORS,

INTRUDER ALARM

AND PATCH

CABINET TO BE

RELOCATED TO

HERE

NATURAL

VENTILATION

SOLUTION

REQUIRES GOOD

OPENINGS TO

OUTSIDE AND

CONTROL OVER

SOLAR GAINS.

ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTION

BOARD

PROJECT:

ST MARY REDCLIFFE

SKETCH TITLE:

UNDERCROFT M&E COMMENTS_rev 4

DATE: 29/08/2019

ENGR: JD

PROJECT:

ST MARY REDCLIFFE

SKETCH TITLE:

NAVE LEVEL M&E COMMENTS

DATE: 29/08/2019

ENGR: JD


LEGEND

40-60 W/m 2 HEAT GAINS - NATURAL VENTILATION

- GAS HEATING - NO COOLING

40-50 W/m 2 HEAT GAINS -FULL MECHANICAL

VENTILATION WITH VRF HEATING AND COOLING

70-80W/m 2 HEAT GAINS - MECHANICAL

VENTILATION WITH VRF HEATING AND COOLING

110-120W/m 2 CHEAT GAINS - FULL MECHANICAL

VENTILATION WITH VRF HEATING AND COOLING

NOTE:

COOLING LOADS ABOVE EXCLUDE SOLAR GAIN AND ARE TO

INDICATE THE FEASIBILITY OF A NATURAL VENTILATION

SOLUTION.

EXISTING ELECTRICAL AND MAINS COLD WATER CAPACITY TO

BE ASSESSED AND PLANT ROOM REQUIREMENTS ADVISED

ACCORDINGLY.

250KVA

SUBSTATION

REQUIRED WITH

24HRS VEHICULAR

ACCESS

AS PER EXISTING

AND DUE TO SIZE

OF KITCHEN

SHOWN, COOKING

IS EXPECTED TO

BE MINIMAL -

EXTRACT

VENTILATION

PLANT THEREFORE

PROPOSED TO

EXHAUST AT LOW

LEVEL WITH PLANT

LOCATED AT HIGH

LEVEL WITHIN

BASEMENT

KITCHEN.

UNDERGROUND

LOW VOLTAGE

CONNECTION

ALTERNATIVE

LOCATION FOR

UTILITY METER,

CUTOUT AND

EARTH BAR

M

MET

ACCCESS

ACCCESS

OPTION A

SIDE BY SIDE AHU

3m x 10m x 1.8mH -

INCLUDES

ALLOWANCE FOR

DUCTWORK AND

ATTENUATION -

1.5m ACCESS

WIDTH REQUIRED

ON EACH SIDE -

SLIGHT OVERLAP

WITH GREEN ROOF

OPTIONS FOR AIR DISTRIBUTION

TO EVENTS SPACE

LOW LEVEL VERTICAL LOUVRES

BEHIND JOINERY:

HIGH LEVEL HIGH PRESSURE

SLOT IN BULKHEAD:

ACCCESS

LOW PROFILE

SUPPLY AND

EXTRACT

DUCTWORK

DISTRIBUTED

ABOVE ROOF.

OPTION B

DOUBLE DECKER

AHU 1.5m x 10m x

3.2mH - INCLUDES

ALLOWANCE FOR

DUCTWORK AND

ATTENUATION

M

MET

UTILITY METER,

CUT-OUT, EARTH

BAR AND

DISTRIBUTION

BOARD. 2.5M IN

LENGHT IN TOTAL

CLEAR FRONT

ACCESS

REQUIRED.

PROJECT:

ST MARY REDCLIFFE

SKETCH TITLE:

SOUTH COURTYARD M&E

COMMENTS_rev 4

DATE: 29/08/2019

ENGR: JD

A Slatted Timber Interior Utilised to Integrate Lighting, Provide

Concealed Ventilation and Passive Acoustic Attenuation


LIGHTING STRATEGY

In common with the overall MEP strategy, the lighting strategy favours discreet integration and

will be premised, wherever possible, on concealed-source lighting to accentuate the spatial quality

of the existing and proposed volumes, with occasional accents for dramatic effect

FOR FURTHER DETAILS OF THE MEP STRATEGY, PLEASE REFER TO APPENDIX 3


4.3 LANDSCAPE

Introduction

The purpose of this Stage 2 report is to capture the essence of the

emerging response to site and the landscape concept. Sketch proposals

are explored along with ‘look and feel’ images. The report culminates with

an Illustrative Landscape Masterplan and the identication of potential

risks associated with the landscape going forward.

Firstly a brief synopsis of the historical context and broad site analysis of

the site is provided, this is largely to inform and inuence the developing

concept. It is the intention that the proposals reference key points, lines

and intersections from the existing site and historical storyline whilst

looking to avoid overtly obvious references on site.

REPORT CONTENTS

Historical Context

Site Analysis

Landscape Concept

Response to Site

Sketch Plan/ Ideas: North Churchyard

South Churchyard

Illustrative Landscape Masterplan

Identied Risks

Annex 1: Tree Survey/ Constraints Plan

Annex 2: Ecology Report (rst draft)


Historical Context

The combined J Lyons 1717 drawing of the church with John Rocques’

1742 map of Bristol shows the proximity of Redcliff e to the current west

boundary of the churchyard and the extent to which buildings abutted the

north wall of the church.

The combined Wild’s 1812 plan of the church for Britton’s ‘Account

of Redcliff e Church’ with Ashmead’s Plan of 1828. The plan provides

additional detail of the tenements on the Mansion House site and

remodelling of the steps up to the North Porch.

The Ordnance Survey Map of 1885 shows the demolition of the Mansion

House tenements to the front of the Church, allowing for open views and

a new foreground to the church. The change in setting allowed for a

major shift in the orientation and alignment of the North Porch entrance

steps.

The 1949 plan shows the newly formed Redcliff e Way and Undercroft,

completed in 1941, these changes allowed the northern churchyard to be

further extended.

Lyon’s 1717 plan of the church combined with Rocque’s 1742 map of Bristol

Wild’s 1812 plan of the church combined with Ashmeads 1828 map of Bristol

Plans adjacent and overleaf extracted from

B2 Architects access study 2013

1880 OS combined with Oatley’s site survey 1949 map of Bristol from ‘Know Your Place’


Historical Context

The southern churchyard boundaries remain relatively unaltered from that

shown in John Rocque’s 1742 plan of Bristol to present day. However,

the northern boundary has moved a number of times, responding to the

developing urban context. The plan adjacent illustrates these boundary

changes.

Key Points:

- Chronology of historic landscape layouts

- Often densely built-up north frontage, intimacy & enclosure

- Seen obliquely, church was not conceived to be a formal isolated object

- South churchyard qualities remains largely intact historically

Northern churchyard boundary development

Rocque’s 1742 Bristol plan showing the southern churchyard


Site Analysis

Views

?

The Church’s setting and signi cance have been eroded by post war

development most notably the surrounding highway engineering and

roads. Ground levels have been signi cantly raised to the north of the

church by approximately 2m.

The post war developments have created a context that is at odds with its

more intimate historic setting, the current open views and front lawn sets

the church up as a ‘monument’.

Sewer

The busy surrounding roads physically disconnect the church from its

parish and the city, reinforcing the feeling of isolation.

Northern Boundary

Traffic movements, noise, pollution and expansive views of a car park to

the northern elevation provide an unattractive and hostile setting. As such

the northern churchyard is un-animated and infrequently used.

Wall

There are little landscape features of note as most of the area is laid

down as amenity lawn, the most signi cant constraints in this area being

archaeological and a modern sewer line.

Southern Boundary

The southern churchyard by contrast provides a small, tranquil green

oasis with a collection of mature and semi mature trees. The southern

churchyard’s boundary remains broadly as per the 1717 Church Plan,

internally it has been remodelled and re-levelled over the last 200 years,

however, it provides an appropriate setting and is well used by the local

community.

The existing trees are the key landscape features of note and great care

will be required to retain the mature boundary trees along the eastern

boundary.

Trees

Existing Site Plan - Analysis


Landscape Concept

The diagram adjacent illustrates the landscape concept for St Mary

Redcliffe and sets out the two contrasting characters for the northern and

southern churchyards, which are based on its historic setting.

North - Vibrant urban space

• Urban setting, predominantly hard

• Celebration of the red cliff and level change

• Animated space

• Permeable, enhanced access

• Intimate spaces, glimpsed and partial views

NORTH

Vibrant Urban Space

South - Light touch tranquillity

• Green, informal setting

• Respect, retain and enhance the tranquillity

• Enhanced urban biodiversity

• Light touch, reversible interventions

• Predominantly soft landscaped

Above all, the following key characteristics will be required for a successful

landscape scheme: SIMPLE DESIGN, HIGH QUALITY, & FINE DETAILING.

SOUTH

Light Touch Tranquillity

Proposed Site Plan - Concept


Response to Site

The following series’ of diagrams explore the use of different references to

inform the initial framework for the landscape.

The LINEAR framework shown below references the rhythm of the church

buttresses (which are in turn picked up in the proposed building grid).

Formal grid - Building Buttress

Access/ Enclosure

Landscape Framework

LINEAR

NORTH


Response to Site

The ANGULAR framework shown below references the historical

tenement lines of the 1800’s to create a set of axes to inform the

positioning of proposed landscape elements.

Angular - Historic Tenements

Access/ Enclosure

Landscape Framework

ANGULAR

NORTH


Response to Site

Finally the HYBRID framework shown below references both the vertical

LINEAR rhythm of the church buttresses with the horizontal ANGULAR

historical axes.

The combination of both these grids appears to provide the most effective

and dynamic landscape framework option.

Formal grid - Building Buttress

Access/ Enclosure

Landscape Framework

HYBRID

NORTH


Sketch Plan: North Churchyard

3

The adjacent plan illustrates the development of the hybrid framework to show

potential hard and soft landscape treatments for the key spaces within the

Northern Churchyard.

2

1

12

4

8

9

7

5

6

9

11

10

13

12

1

2

3

4

5

6

Podium

high quality natural stone, some seating elements

Water feature

re ective pool (referencing medieval water conduit)

Banding in paving

referencing church buttress grid

Raised elements

permeable enclosure/ seating (referencing historical lines)

Proposed trees

large, clear stem (their alignment references historical lines)

Vertical planting elements

potential green planting in ll on columns/ elevations

7

Spill-out seating

feature multi-stem tree, semi-private enclosure

8

Terrace planting

eye-level shade planting atop medieval upstand wall

14

9

10

Raised Terrace

simple loose gravel nish to foot of church

Bleachers/ planted terraces

localised extrusions, planting to soften window views

11

Drop-off

for coaches & disabled visitors, diverted footpath

12

Plant beds

to provide enclosure, softening & colour

13

Green roof

extensive green roof covering

14

Disabled parking/ servicing area

2no. parking spaces

NORTH

Proposed Site Plan - Concept


linear/ raised elements

- benches, foils etc

Trees taking reference

from historic lines,

bands referencing church

architecture

Sketch Ideas

water

feature

planting

integrated into

bleachers

‘green’ views

out from

windows

Reflective

surface

seating

courtyard

living walls/

column infill

tree centred

on window

shade

planting

Water feature referencing medieval conduit

Planting to the

windowpane

Simple elegant seating

Paving bands

referencing church

buttresses to line

through with trees

Outside/ inside

semi-private space


Sketch Ideas

Red cliff

- continuation into Landscape

Planted bleachers?

Permeable ‘foils’

provide enclosure

from busy road to

the north

Spire Views

Banding

- surface, furniture, trees

Enclosure

‘living wall’ panels appear

as green colonised fissures

in the ‘red cliff’ building

elevation

Opportunities for pickingup

church iconography/

historical references in

landscape structures/

furniture and floorscape

‘living wall’ insert panels

within columns

Permeability of

structures


NORTH CHURCHYARD

Green ‘living wall’ panels within building elevation recesses

Integrated design of furniture and paving

Use of cut-outs to play with light and shadow

Furniture and landscape elements that provide enclosure whilst maintaining a permeability

Water feature - clean re ective surface Use of light to project images/ words out from structures (Chatterton verse etc) Gaps in walls/ structures to allow for views through


NORTH CHURCHYARD

Simple high-quality materials used in creative ways

Landscape plaza - simple paired back design Informal loose furniture arranged below a canopy of trees Nature to the windowpane

Punched metalwork in the ground plane Use of engraved text/ motifs in paving/ walls Fine detailing - revealed at close inspection Enhancement of urban biodiversity


Sketch Plan: South Churchyard

The adjacent plan illustrates potential hard and soft landscape treatments

for the key spaces within the Southern Churchyard.

1

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Existing ‘George Oatley’ paving

retained/ restored as required

Existing grass

maintained with potential additional tree/ shrub planting

Wildower meadow

to create soft informal setting for building

Trees

light scatter to create woodland setting for building

Green roof

wild ower meadow - continuation of ground-level meadow

Existing trees

retained, managed and celebrated

Entrance

new forecourt paving referencing north side materials

Service area

elegantly screened so as not to detract from building

3

4

6

2

5

8

7

NORTH


SOUTH CHURCHYARD

Mown paths/ margins through wildower meadow

Extensive green roofs - providing opportunities for wildlife

Maintaining and enhancing the peace and tranquility of the space

Retention/ restoration of historic stone paving

Seamless transition between outside and inside. Nature/ planting to the windowpane

Cool verdant planting - enhancing calmness


C O L S T O N P A R A D E

Illustrative Landscape Masterplan

R E D C L I F F E W A Y

coach/ DDA drop-off

The adjacent site-wide Illustrative Landscape Masterplan is intended to

capture the concepts and ideas idened in this Stage 2 report and provide

the staging point for developing detailed design proposals as part of Stage 3.

seating/ foils

planting/ bleachers

IDENTIFIED RISKS

water

feature

paved plaza

Entrance Podium

cafe spill-out

green

roof

The following key risks/ uncertainties have been identied, these will need to

be examined in detail as a priority going forward on to Stage 3:

• Tree Removals: in order to construct the building in the south courtyard,

a number of trees will need to be removed. Whilst the majority of these

are considered low-value, it does include a mature lime tree (T5)

which could possibly be contentious as it is a prominant tree in the

streetscape. The same tree has also been identied as having bat roost

potential (BRP) and will likely require further ecological investigation.

The proposed design for the use of screw piles (or similar) will need to

be developed in order to provide assurances that the mature existing

trees can be retained in such close proximity to the new building.

R E D C L I F F H I L L

cross

exg. paving

retained

St Mary Redcliffe Church

meadow &

scattered trees

green

roof

DDA

parking

PUMP LANE

exg. trees

retained

• Existing Sewer: the implications of building/ planting on top of the

existing sewer that runs east-west across the North courtyard will need

to be assessed in more detail. It may be that there are restrictions on

tree planting within the sewer easement which could necessitate use of

raised planters etc as an alternative.

• Coach/ DDA drop-off/ parking: a transport study is required to

assess the feasibility of positioning a new coach/ DDA drop-off layby

on Redcliffe Way. The proposed design reduces the quantum of

disabled/ staff parking and will look to prevent ad-hoc parking in the

south churchyard. The implications of this with regards to staff and

congregation etc will need careful consideration.

• Service yard/ deliveries: the site provides limited opportunity for ‘back

of house’/ servicing areas to allow for deliveries/ refuse pick-up etc.

Detailed consideration is required to understand whether these items

can be accommodated in the current design.

• Substation: It looks likely that a substation will be required to provide

the necessary power for the new buildings. The siting of this structure

will need sensitive consideration.

Stakeholder Buy-in: As yet, details of the proposed landscape have

been very limited, and as such have not been reviewed by stakeholders.

South Churchyard

• Redcliff Way Masterplan: Unknown future context - Bristol City

Councils proposals for Redcliffe Way and Redcliff Hill are currently

under development. Therefore the treatment of the northern boundary

(within the Churches ownership) needs to mitigate the current situation,

as best it can.

yard

entrance

forecourt

NORTH


4.4 SCHEME UPDATES

ARCHITECTURAL PROPOSALS

Retaining the strategic benefits of the RIBA 1 scheme, the RIBA 2 proposals remain:

• Primarily single-storey

• Exclusively at Undercroft level on the north-side to exploit the site’s section, remain entirely

below the level of the existing and much-celebrated tracery windows, and create a new base

for the church, itself expressive of the ‘red cliff’ on which the church is founded

• Composed of three inter-linked buildings to achieve the conceptual objective of creating a

stitch between the socio-economically divided communities of North and South Redcliffe,

and provide an Education / Learning Space and an Events Space within the South Churchyard

The design changes are therefore relatively modest and can be summarised by level, as follows:

UNDERCROFT

Based on this research, and with specific reference to the context of St Mary Redcliffe, the design team has

concluded that both the stair and its enclosing envelope are of Medium - Low Significance

It is therefore proposed to:

• Retain this stair in-situ, but:

• Create a new, fully-compliant stair external to the existing Vestry, within the Northside building

• Link this stair, via a new lightweight ‘bridge’ and a newly formed opening in the external fabric of the Vestry,

its exact position determined to impact only on replacement or substantially-re-tooled masonry

• Provide bearing for the new ‘bridge’ on the penultimate tread of the existing stair to create a level threshold

and enable the continued use of the existing C20 doorway into the Vestry, itself

Illustrated within the adjacent plan, these proposals are further explored within Section 4.6, and achieve the

following additional benefits:

• A Volunteer Room

• Increased Storage for silver safes, etc

• An enlarged Clergy Vestry and Vestry Back-Office

New Stair from Choir Vestry / Nave Level

• During the initial briefing process, the design team had been made aware of the Choir’s

preference to retain the existing ambulatory / processional route to the Chancel, and hence

to Nave level, via the current Vestry

• This was interpreted by the design team as dictating the continued use of the existing stair

from Canynges Kitchen and so, whilst the Choir Vestry itself is proposed to be relocated to a

new purpose-built facility, access via this stair was retained

• Ultimately, however, via both the Public Consultation and PCC Review during Sept 19,

members of the Choir reported that this stair is unsatisfactorily narrow, steep, and

particularly difficult to circulate safely when in robes

• On this basis, the design team consulted the documentary record to evaluate the significance

of this stair. As can be seen from the adjacent drawings, the stair:

Is not present in the C19 survey of the church

Is not indicated in the contemporary watercolour of the Vestry doorway, in the background

to which is, instead, a substantial fireplace, supporting both anecdotal reports that the stair,

itself, was inserted into the chimney breast and flue, and the hypothesis that the stair is C20,

presumably associated with Oatley’s 1930s restoration and, quite likely, a replacement for the

still extant mediaeval stair from the North Transept Undercroft to the North Aisle

Furthermore, whilst Jerry Sampson’s ‘North Wall - Archaeological Survey’ (2014) concludes

that the Vestry appears to be C15 in origin, with reference to the C19 restoration, it also

notes that, ‘In the eastern undercroft there appear(s) to be extensive renewal’


4

1 2 3

1 Volunteer Space

2 Vestry Back-Office

3 Clergy Vestry

4 Store

Left: The External Facade of the Chimney


FFL

12.00

FFL

10.36

FFL

10.36

FFL

10.36

FFL

11.79

FFL

10.36

FFL

11.25

FFL

11.79

FFL

11.79

FFL

12.39

FFL

10.19

FFL

11.79

FFL

12.39

FFL

12.96

FFL

13.00

FFL

14.22

PROS

Achieves Choir Vestry of target area

Potentially simplifies Choir processional route from Vestry to Chancel

Provides increased Vestry Storage, and Vestry / Clergy Vestry at Nave level

Provides additional Vestry Storage at Undercroft level but relies on existing stair within

Canynges Kitchen for access

CONS

To achieve Choir Vestry target area dictates that Choir Vestry and Events Space

become conjoined, producing a large singular volume, potentially problematic in terms

of both consents and acoustic separation

Arguably, fails to make best use of potential Education / Sunday School space, relying on

an acoustic screen for sub-division - although further re-planning is possible

Locates Sunday School at Undercroft level, potentially isolating from main service

Enables increased Education / Sunday School facilities

NAVE / SOUTH CHURCHYARD LEVEL

Locates Education Space alongside Exhibition / Interpretation

At the conclusion of RIBA 1, it was noted that the Education / Learning Space remained below the

target area. Indeed, the requirements of this space are quite complex, since it must provide:

• Either one or two spaces capable of housing a class-size (nom 30 children), with the question of

one or two spaces arising from the possibility that the Lady Chapel could continue to serve

this function, due to its relative self-containment

Education

Officer

• A space capable of housing a Sunday School of circa 120 children. This figure is critical, as the

current Sunday School demand exceeds capacity and, of course, its members are crucial to

the growth and longevity of St Mary Redcliffe’s congregation

Education / Learning

Space

80sqm

Store

Seminar

Room

In consultation with the church’s Education Officer and Sunday School volunteers, it was

discussed that, whilst the current Sunday School takes place in a single space (the Undercroft),

this is certainly not essential, and potentially not desirable, as separating into two groups could

enable more age-specific religious education and worship

circa 45 - 60 children,

based on DfE ADS

Existing Undercroft circa

90sqm useable

Store

Store

Entrance /

Lobby

With this in mind, following the PCC Review in Sept 19, it was agreed that the design team

should:

• Develop the two-storey Education Space initially proposed within the conclusion of the RIBA 1

Report

• Explore alternative locations for the Education Space to enable the achievement of the target

area

Conducted alongside the development of the Undercroft / Choir access cited in the previous

section, the resulting options are indicated in the following drawings, together with a list of

relative Pros and Cons

SMR - South Churchyard Option 1 - Choir Vestry - Undercroft Level

1:200 @ A1

21.10.19


FFL

15.85

FFL

13.24

FFL

15.83

FFL

16.08

FFL

16.08

FFL

18.05

FFL

13.24

FFL

15.83

FFL

19.13

FFL

17.00

PROS

PROS

Achieves Choir Vestry of target area

Achieves Choir Vestry of target area

Potentially simplifies Choir processional route from Vestry to Chancel

Potentially simplifies Choir processional route from Vestry to

Chancel

Provides increased Vestry Storage, and Vestry / Clergy Vestry at Nave level

Provides additional Vestry Storage at Undercroft level but relies on existing stair within

Canynges Kitchen for access

Provides increased Vestry Storage, and Vestry / Clergy Vestry at

Nave Level

Enables increased Education / Sunday School facilities

Locates Education Space alongside Exhibition / Interpretation

Provides additional Vestry Storage at Undercroft level but relies on

existing stair within Canynges Kitchen for access

Enables increased Education / Sunday School facilities

Locates Education Space alongside Exhibition / Interpretation

CONS

To achieve Choir Vestry target area dictates that Choir Vestry and Events Space

become conjoined, producing a large singular volume, potentially problematic in terms

of both consents and acoustic separation

Arguably, fails to make best use of potential Education / Sunday School space, relying on

an acoustic screen for sub-division - although further re-planning is possible

Locates Sunday School at Undercroft level, potentially isolating from main service

PROS

CONS

To achieve Choir Vestry target area dictates that Choir Vestry and

Events Space become conjoined, producing a large singular volume,

potentially problematic in terms of both consents and acoustic

separation

Achieves Choir Vestry of target area

Potentially simplifies Choir processional route from Vestry to Chancel

Provides increased Vestry Storage, and Vestry / Clergy Vestry at Nave level

Provides additional Vestry Storage at Undercroft level but relies on existing stair within

Canynges Kitchen for access

Enables increased Education / Sunday School facilities

Locates Education Space alongside Exhibition / Interpretation

CONS

To achieve Choir Vestry target area dictates that Choir Vestry and Events Space

become conjoined, producing a large singular volume, potentially problematic in terms

of both consents and acoustic separation

Arguably, fails to make best use of potential Education / Sunday School space, relying on

an acoustic screen for sub-division - although further re-planning is possible

Locates Sunday School at Undercroft level, potentially isolating from main service

Arguably, fails to make best use of potential Education / Sunday

School space, relying on an acoustic screen for sub-division -

although further re-planning is possible

Locates Sunday School at Undercroft level, potentially isolating

from main service

Choir Vestry

Clergy

Vestry

Meeting

Space

Store

Vestry

Dashed line indicates outline of Choir Vestry over

Steps to Choir Vestry alternative entrance

Choir

Master's

Office

Robing

Robing

Practice Space

SMR - South Churchyard Option 1 - Choir Vestry - Nave Level

1:200 @ A1

21.10.19

SMR - South Churchyard Option 1 - Choir Vestry - South Churchyard Level

1:200 @ A1

21.10.19


FFL

12.00

FFL

10.36

FFL

10.36

FFL

10.36

FFL

11.79

FFL

10.36

FFL

11.25

FFL

11.79

FFL

11.79

FFL

12.39

FFL

10.19

FFL

11.79

FFL

11.79

FFL

13.00

FFL

12.96

FFL

13.00

FFL

14.22

PROS

Maintains Choir Vestry of target area

Provides alternative route from Vestry to Chancel, via new stair

Provides increased Vestry Storage, Vestry / Clergy Vestry, and Volunteer Space at

Undercroft level

CONS

To achieve 2no teaching spaces dictates that Education / Learning Building must be

two-storey

Alternative route from Choir Vestry to Nave level requires alterations to external fabric

of Canynges Kitchen. However, affected stair is known to be more recent - and, subject

to further investigation, most likely late C19 / C20

Enables increased Education / Sunday School facilities, including 2no teaching spaces of

sufficient size to accommodate an average class of at-least 30 children

Following review by both the client and Peter Floyd (Architectural Advisor to the Project Board),

it was concluded that the two-storey South Churchyard option is preferred, but:

• Its three-dimensional design requires further exploration, particularly in terms of the

relationship to the windows of the Chancel Aisle

Locates Education Space at Nave level to enable increased experiential engagement with

main service

• The self-containment of the Education / Learning Space is welcomed and essential, but the

associated route from Nave Level to the Events Space requires further review

• Whilst dedicated WCs are proposed, their remoteness from the upper level Education /

Learning Space is a concern

Practice Space

Choir

Break-out

Storage remains critical and the current provision appears inadequate

Robing

Choir Vestry

80sqm

These issues have been considered further throughout RIBA 2 but, as indicated in Section 4.7, it is

concluded that the optimum solution has not yet been realised, and that the Education / Learning

Space should be a key focus for further investigation at the commencement of RIBA 3

St

Store

Store

Entrance /

Lobby

Volunteers'

Room

Vestry

Clergy Vestry

An Concept Sketch for the Two-Storey

Education / Learning Space

SMR - South Churchyard Option 2 - Education / Learning - Undercroft Level

1:200 @ A1

21.10.19


FFL

15.85

FFL

13.24

FFL

15.83

FFL

16.08

FFL

16.08

FFL

18.05

FFL

13.24

FFL

15.83

FFL

19.13

FFL

17.00

PROS

PROS

Maintains Choir Vestry of target area

Maintains Choir Vestry of target area

Provides alternative route from Vestry to Chancel, via new stair

Provides alternative route from Vestry to Chancel, via new stair

Provides increased Vestry Storage, Vestry / Clergy Vestry, and Volunteer Space at

Undercroft level

Provides increased Vestry Storage, Vestry / Clergy Vestry, and

Volunteer Space at Undercroft level

Enables increased Education / Sunday School facilities, including 2no teaching spaces of

sufficient size to accommodate an average class of at-least 30 children

Locates Education Space at Nave level to enable increased experiential engagement with

main service

Enables increased Education / Sunday School Facilities, including

2no teaching spaces of sufficient size to accommodate an average

class of at-least 30 children

CONS

To achieve 2no teaching spaces dictates that Education / Learning Building must be

two-storey

Alternative route from Choir Vestry to Nave level requires alterations to external fabric

of Canynges Kitchen. However, affected stair is known to be more recent - and, subject

to further investigation, most likely late C19 / C20

Locates Education Space at Nave level to enable increased

experiential engagement with main service

PROS

CONS

To achieve 2no teaching spaces dictates that Education / Learning

Space must be two-storey

Maintains Choir Vestry of target area

Provides alternative route from Vestry to Chancel, via new stair

Provides increased Vestry Storage, Vestry / Clergy Vestry, and Volunteer Space at

Undercroft level

Enables increased Education / Sunday School facilities, including 2no teaching spaces of

sufficient size to accommodate an average class of at-least 30 children

Locates Education Space at Nave level to enable increased experiential engagement with

main service

CONS

To achieve 2no teaching spaces dictates that Education / Learning Building must be

two-storey

Alternative route from Choir Vestry to Nave level requires alterations to external fabric

of Canynges Kitchen. However, affected stair is known to be more recent - and, subject

to further investigation, most likely late C19 / C20

Alternative route from Choir Vestry to Nave level requires

alterations to external fabric of Canynges Kitchen. However,

affected stair is known to be late C19 / C20

Education / Learning Space

88sqm

circa 48 - 64 children

based on

DfE ADS

Education / Learning Space

60sqm

circa 32 - 44 children

based on

DfE ADS

Dashed line indicates outline of Education / Learning Space over

Steps to Education / Learning Space alternative entrance

Courtyard

SMR - South Churchyard Option 2 - Education / Learning - Nave Level

1:200 @ A1

21.10.19

SMR - South Churchyard Option 2 - Education / Learning - South Churchyard Level

1:200 @ A1

21.10.19


4.5 CURRENT PROPOSALS

11

13

3

9 10

14

24

26

25

22

23

21

4

2

1

5

6

8

7

12

20

19

17

18

15

16

BASEMENT & UNDERCROFT LEVEL

1 Welcome

2 Shop

3 Shop Store

4 WCs

5 Cafe

6 Servery

7 External Courtyard

8 Exhibition Space

9 Temporary Exhibition Space

10 Hogarth Gallery

11 Curator’s Office

12 Choir Vestry

13 Choir Master’s Office

14 Choir Break-Out

15 Choir Robing

16 Choir WCs

17 Vestry Storage

18 Clergy Vestry

19 Vestry Back Office

20 Volunteer Space

21 Mess Room

22 Kitchen

23 Food Store

24 Warming Kitchen

25 Blower Room

26 Plant Room


Consistent with the previously shared ideas, the current

single-storey buildings, extending from the South Church

to create a ‘stitch’ between the communities of North a

The buildings may be summarised as follows:

Northside Visitor Reception

• Encapsulating and retaining the existing 1940s Underc

• Providing enhance visitor and congregation facilities, incl

Space, fully-accessible WCs, and a new Cafe

• Linking to the North Aisle, via a new lift and stair to

to Nave level

• Providing a new, dedicated Choir Vestry with enha

carefully-attuned acoustic, to enable the existing C14

to its apparent historic function of Church Treasury,

Exhibition Space

• Placing alongside the Choir Vestry a series of ecclesia

including a Clergy Vestry, Vestry, and Robing Spaces

• Exploiting the 5m level change between Redcliffe Wa

locate entirely at Undercroft level, below the tracery

new base that, expressed in red sandstone, conscious

cliff’ to reconnect the church to its history and contex

South Churchyard Education Space

• Utilising the existing Priest’s Door to locate a new

Learning Space between the South Transept and Chan

child protection issues and ensure an experiential conn

• Acknowledging the C18 precedent for a walled g

Churchyard, presents as a ‘hidden’ space, behind a plan

South Churchyard Events Space

• Locates with the trees at the Churchyard’s eastern bou

the ground to minimise root disturbance

NORTH ELEVATION

• Is deliberately flexible and self-contained to facilitate

wedding receptions, etc


27

29

28

A Concept Image for the New Armoire

27 Lift from Undercroft

28 Tower Tours

29 Stair from Exhibition

30 Education Space

30

NAVE LEVEL


SOUTH ELEVATION

EVENTS SPACE


31

32

The Chancel South Aisle & Priest’s Door

31 Education Space

32 Courtyard

33 Events Space

34 Accessible WCs

35 Servery

36 Warming Kitchen

37 Bin Store

38 Service Yard

33

35

34

36

37

38

SOUTH CHURCHYARD LEVEL


LONG SECTION FACING EAST


4.6 MATERIALITY

The design team have continued to explore the materiality of the scheme and, as noted within

Section 4.1, the conceptual desire for a duality between a heavy, rooted base, and lighter, more

luminous upper volumes has translated into an emerging structural system with an elegant

tectonic

Key aspects of the scheme’s material expression include the:

• Use of red sandstone to provide a new base to the church and a conceptual reference to the

‘red-cliff’ on which it is founded. Conceived as an experiential narrative strand, the red

sandstone will define the new points of entrance and reinforce the primary visitor route

• Use of Pennant stone, the secondary materiality of the existing building, generally used

for paving and retaining walls, for all other masonry elements to ensure a subtle

contextualisation, modesty and conscious subservience

• Potential to articulate the proposed Choir Vestry’s elevations with:

• A series of fissures, in the form of both discreet openings and climbing plants to reflect the

conceptual erosion and naturalisation of the geological plinth

• Shallow relief to capture within the masonry facades the key narratives of St Mary Redcliffe and

provide a subtle introduction to the interpretation within

• Representation of the South Churchyard buildings as lightweight, refined pieces of joinery,

divorced from the ground and visually extruded from the Northside Building’s materially and

tectonically identical lanterns

• Use of carefully modulated rhythms to represent the translation from the controlled verticality

of the Perpendicular to the arboricultural patterns of the South Churchyard

• Use of bronze connectors to celebrate both the craft of construction and, particularly, the

carefully judged interaction of new and old

The emerging materiality of P450 is therefore highly specific, with all of the proposed materials

already present in the site; the red sandstone representing the underlying geology, and the

Pennant, timber, and bronze respecting the existing building’s secondary and tertiary materiality

to ensure a harmonic modesty of expression

To inform the evol

particularly those

historic fabric, such

These emerging de

of intervention and

• Modesty

Deliberate subserv

secondary material

subtly distinguish th

of the church, itself


4.7 DESIGN INTENT DETAILS

Focussed on key interfaces with the existing

building, the following Design Intent Details

have been utilised specifically to de-risk the

future Consents applications by enabling

early consultation with key stakeholders,

including the DAC, Historic England, et al,

on such critical matters as the:

• Assessment of fabric significance

• Proportionality of change

• Potential justification

• Emerging design language, and:

• Underlying conservation philosophy

All stakeholders consulted to-date have

welcomed this approach and expressed a

willingness to continue the current dialogue

through RIBA 3 to enable the project’s

iterative and collaborative development

Whilst the current details are therefore

necessarily outline in nature, they embody

the aspiration to evolve a project-specific

language, founded on:

INTERNAL ELEVATION

00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

a-t--+---------- FRAMELESS GLASS FINS BOLTED TO REVEALS TO FORM

STRUCTURAL SUPPORT

.-+--+--+---------- EXISTING MEDIAEVAL DOORS RETAINED UNALTERED WITH

FLOOR SOCKETS TO HOLD-OPEN IN USE TO ENABLE VIEW

ALONG AXIS OF NAVE FROM REDCLIFF HILL

7

Modesty

ROCHESTER CATHEDRAL

Legibility

Reversibility

Minimal Intervention

PLAN

PROPOSED INTERNAL PORCH TO WEST DOOR


PROPOSED OPENING TO NORTH AISLE


PROPOSED CANOPY TO THE EXISTING PRIEST’S DOOR AND LINK TO EDUCATION SPACE


Former Opening to South Porch Stair Former Opening to Lady Chapel

With reference to the proposed Vestry

and North Aisle Openings, these two

photographs record the existing condition

of locations where, from the documentary

record, we know that historic openings

have been infilled, demonstrating that,

with sufficient care and craftsmanship, true

reversibility can be achieved

PROPOSED OPENING TO VESTRY


Castelvecchio Museum - Carlo Scarpa Hamar Museum - Sverre Fehn

The two precedents above, both obviously

seminal works of new and old in their own

right, also symbolise the design team’s

aspiration to achieve an indivisibility of

architecture and interpretation, utilising

artefacts from the church’s collection to

animate the new spaces and influence

visitor flow

PROPOSED OPENING TO VESTRY


4.8 AREAS OF FURTHER INVESTIGATION

In accordance with the expectations of RIBA 2, this document represents the development of an

increasingly comprehensive concept design

However, it is recognised that design evolution with continue during RIBA 3 - and thereafter - as

more detailed considerations inform, resolve, and enhance subsequent iterations

In relation to this, the following aspects are proposed as areas of further investigation at the

commencement of RIBA 3

EDUCATION SPACE

As noted within Section 4.4, a number of alternative options have been explored during RIBA 2.

Above all else, these have served to demonstrate the implications of achieving the target area and,

as noted, in review with both the client and Project Board, it is concluded that:

• The South Churchyard is the favoured location for the Education Space, due to its proximity to

safe, external space, and its effective physical and experiential links to Nave level

EVENTS SPACE

At RIBA 1+, the Events Space was evolved to meet the revised brief for circa 250 covers (banquet

style). Following further review by the Project Board, it is concluded that the link to South

Redcliffe requires further consideration as, currently, the:

• Position of the servery dictates that, when the Events Space is in use, the covered route

through the South Churchyard must be closed, presenting a locked door to the South

Redcliffe Community

• Service Yard and WCs create a potentially unwelcoming blank elevation to both Ship Lane and

Pump Lane

In order to consider these options further, and avoid the risk of potentially abortive work during

RIBA 3, it is therefore recommended that the current proposals for the Events Space should be

revisited at the commencement of RIBA 3

• Of the options presented, the two-storey version is preferred. Yet it is acknowledged that

its three-dimensional form and, particularly, its relationship with the Chancel South Aisle

requires further investigation

In order to consider these options further, and avoid the risk of potentially abortive work at RIBA

3, it is therefore recommended that the current proposals for the Education Space should be

revisited at the commencement of RIBA 3. Noting the interim conclusions of the Project Board,

these further options should be focussed on the South Churchyard and retain access via the

Priest’s Door but, within these constraints, explore the alternative opportunities of this location

and seek to:

• Have a reduced impact on the Chancel South Aisle

• Further consider the route to the Processional Way

• Maximise the potential for increased self-containment, additional storage, and the

accommodation of dedicated WCs at the same level as the teaching / learning spaces

Initial Concept Sketches for an Alternative South Churchyard Arrangement


NORTHSIDE PHYSICAL SERVICING STRATEGY

One of the great challenges of St Mary Redcliffe is that it has no ‘back’. The entire site perimeter

is public and, whilst this offers an extraordinary opportunity in terms of public engagement, it

unavoidably complicates the requirement for discreet and efficient physical servicing

Currently, this is proposed to occur within the south-east corner of the Northside building.

Considerable advancements in this strategy have occurred in the creation of a Contractor’s Mess

Room, Service Lift and Stair, but the issue of street-level bins, deliveries, and vehicular movement

remains challenging, particularly in terms of the potential interaction with the Processional Way

In consultation with the Project Board, it has been concluded that this remains the only viable

location for physical servicing, but the strategy must be revisited during RIBA 3, with the aim of

making servicing more discreet and, ideally, fully-concealed from the public realm

Initial Concept Sketches for an Alternative Northside Servicing Strategy

An Historic (presumed C19) Image of St Mary Redcliffe with an Apparent Structure in the South-East Corner of the North Churchyard


5.0 CONSULTATION

In order to ensure continued project support, develop ownership and, ultimately, de-risk

the eventual Consents applications, further public and stakeholder consultation has occurred

throughout RIBA 2, including:

A BRISTOL DAC UPDATE ON 28 AUG 2019

Held in the Parish Office and attended by:

Dan Tyndall - Vicar of St Mary Redcliffe

Rhys Williams - P450 Project Coordinator and Research Assistant

Simon Pugh-Jones - Chair of Bristol DAC

Dan Talkes - Project Architect

This session provided an open and informal update on P450’s developed and focussed specifically

on the question of how the design team could best engage with the DAC and its processes

A PUBLIC CONSULTATION EVENT ON 19 SEPT 2019

In summary, the feedback concluded:

• The RIBA 2 proposals represent considerable progress since the last round of consultations

(Sept 2018)

• The scheme remains considerably more comfortable and proportionate than any of the

competition proposals

• In principle, the proposals breach no ‘red-lines’ and none of the consultees anticipates the need

to be ‘obstructive’ to the project’s progression

• The emerging details offer considerable reassurance, and indicate a respect commensurate with

the existing building’s significance

• Given the complexity of levels, a walk-through model / visualisation, indicating the sequence of

arrival and circulation, will be critical for the Consents applications

Held in the church, and open to all, this session was attended by over 80 members of the

congregation and community of St Mary Redcliffe

Following short project updates, by both Dan Tyndall and the Project Architect, refreshments

were offered, and an informal questions and answers session conducted in the South Transept,

around a series of explanatory presentation boards and the physical model

Attendees were invited to both ‘ask the architect’ and record their feedback on speciallyprepared

questionnaires

A STAKEHOLDER EVENT ON 19 NOV 2019

Held in St John’s Chapel, and attended by:

Bristol DAC

The Church Buildings Council

Historic England

Bristol Civic Society

The Canynges Society

With invitations also extended to:

The Victorian Society, and:

The Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings

This session consisted of detailed project updates from both Dan Tyndall and the Project

Architect, followed by an opportunity to inspect a series of presentation boards and the physical

model

As one might expect, given the calibre of the attendees, the critique was astute, robust, and

reasoned

‘The northside building is now very modest - given the

constraints, it’s incredible - miraculous even - that you’ve

managed to accommodate so many functions so successfully’

An example of feedback received during the Stakeholder Event


FORMAL PRE-APPLICATION ENQUIRY

It is a condition of both development funders that, in order to avoid the risk of potentially

abortive work during RIBA 3, a formal pre-application enquiry (pre-app) is conducted with Bristol

City Council (BCC), prior to the preparation of the Consents documentation

BCC’s pre-app procedure requires an online submission. In consultation with BCC, the design

team has been advised that, once submitted, a pre-app is:

• Allocated randomly to the next available officer

• Issued to the Conservation Advisory Panel (CAP), if the officer deems it necessary, for

consideration at the next CAP meeting, with no opportunity for representation from the

client / design team

In this context, it should be noted that, to-date, P450 has consulted the following representatives of

Bristol City Council:

Marvin Rees

Colin Molton

Nuala Gallagher

Vicky Smith

Richard Goldthorpe

Vicky Welchman

Cllr Helen Holland

Cllr Paul Smith

Cllr Kye Dudd

Mayor

Executive Director of Growth & Regeneration

Director of City Growth, Investment & Infrastructure

City Design Manager

City Design Group

City Design Group

Cabinet Member for Place

Cabinet Member for Homes & Communities

Central, Clifton & Harbourside Neighbourhood Committee

Based on the above, the Project Board has concluded that:

• This standard procedure provides very limited opportunity for the contextualisation,

explanation and justification for a project of P450’s complexity

• There is no guarantee that the officer to whom the project is randomly allocated will have the

prior knowledge of St Mary Redcliffe, or relevant experience of similar projects, to provide

the necessary advice

AN ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL STUDY

OF THE MANSION HOUSE AT ST MARY REDCLIFFE

BRISTOL

• In combination, these factors generate considerable risk that, whether through

misunderstanding or otherwise, unhelpful, unsupportive, or potentially prejudicial advice

could be added to the planning record without the opportunity for consultation, explanation

or rationalisation

• On this basis, a bespoke approach should be adopted to more successfully introduce P450 and

its context, prior to a request for formal pre-app advice

To this end, St Mary Redcliffe have made contact with Dr Roger Leech, Member of Bristol &

Gloucestershire Archaeological Society, Bristol Conservation Advisory Panel, and author of ‘An

Archaeological and Historical Study of the Mansion House of St Mary Redcliffe’ that records the

previous uses of the northside site, and was commissioned by the church in 2014

Dr Leech therefore has highly-relevant prior knowledge of St Mary Redcliffe and, through this

contact, it is proposed that, at the commencement of RIBA 3, the project team will:

• Engage the Conservation Advisory Panel

• Invite its members, recommended officers and councillors to an event within the church to

provide the necessary project context

• Only then seek the formal pre-application feedback required by the project development

funders

CLIENT: PARISH OF ST MARY REDCLIFFE

AGENT: benjamin+beauchamp architects ltd

CULTURAL HERITAGE SERVICES REPORT 2014/2015/224

Cover Image of Dr Roger Leech’s Report


6.0 COST PLAN

Throughout RIBA Stage 2, construction costs have been managed on an iterative basis

to mitigate risk, ensure compliance with the client’s budget, and inform design decisions.

The following summary, extracted from the RIBA 2 Cost Plan, summarises the current

position

2 Project 450 - St Mary Redcliffe Church

2 Project 450 - St Mary Redcliffe Church

3 Project 450 - St Mary Redcliffe Church

3 Project 450 - St Mary Redcliffe Church

Project 450 - St Mary

Redcliffe Church

Draft Cost Plan Report No. 1

RIBA Stage 2

Purcell UK

Gleeds Cost Management

BLCM0399

The Cost Plan Report has been based on the following information and assumptions:

Exclusions

Exclusions

The Cost Plan Report has been based on the following information and assumptions:

A. General

The Cost Plan Report does not include monetary allowances for the following: -

The Cost Plan Report does not include monetary allowances for the following: -

A. General

1. The estimated costs at this early stage are high level and for initial guidance only to provide an

indication of potential construction costs. Costs will vary significantly subject to design, specification, A. Planning

1. The estimated costs at this early stage are high level and for initial guidance only to provide an

A. Planning

and phasing and prevailing market conditions. These factors should be regularly reviewed and more

indication of detailed potentialcosting construction exercises costs. undertaken Costs will as vary thesignificantly design andsubject the programme to design, isspecification,

developed.

1. Section 106 / 278 Contributions/ Highway works

and phasing and prevailing market conditions. These factors should be regularly reviewed and more

1. Section

2. Any

106

exceptional

/ 278 Contributions/

requirements

Highway

from

works

the Local Planning Officer

detailed costing 2. Theexercises costs areundertaken issued subject as the to confirmation design and the or amendment programme following is developed. revisions to the information 2. Any

3.

exceptional

Community

requirements

Infrastructure

from

Levy

the

(CIL)

Local Planning Officer

stated and detailed discussion with the Client and the design team at which time the estimated costs 3. Community

2. The costs are issued subject to confirmation or amendment following revisions to the information

4. Public

Infrastructure

Art contribution

Levy (CIL)

will be reviewed and re-issued.

4. Public

stated and detailed discussion with the Client and the design team at which time the estimated costs

5.

Art

Commuted

contribution

sums

5. Commuted sums

will be reviewed 3. Theand costs re-issued. only addresses the estimated cost of the capital works. No consideration or allowances

have been made in connection with future maintenance, operation or replacement costs (i.e. whole life

3. The costs only costs). addresses the estimated cost of the capital works. No consideration or allowances

have been made in connection with future maintenance, operation or replacement costs (i.e. whole life

B. Employer

B. Employer

costs). 4. The measurements and rates contained in this cost plan are indicative pending issue of dimensioned

drawings and schedule of accommodation.

1. Church's own contingency sum

4. The measurements and rates contained in this cost plan are indicative pending issue of dimensioned

1. Church's

2. Loose

own contingency

FF&E

sum

drawings and schedule of accommodation.

2. Loose

3.

FF&E

Conservation works to existing building – e.g. cleaning of north elevation

3. Conservation works to existing building – e.g. cleaning of north elevation

B. Description of the Project

4. Subsequent phasing of construction works (phasing to be agreed)

4. Subsequent

5. Collections

phasing

Management

of construction

and

works

conservation

(phasing

of

to

artefacts

be agreed)

B. Description of the Project

5. Collections

6. Exhibition

Management

and interpretation

and conservation

design

of

and

artefacts

installation

The Project is to develop various areas of St Mary Redcliff Church, encompassing alteration works to 6. Exhibition

7. No

and

other

interpretation

works inside

design

St Mary

and

Redcliffe

installation

beyond those necessary to achieve scope above

the Undercroft, development of a new café/exhibition area, Hogarth gallery, choir vestry, education 7. No other works inside St Mary Redcliffe beyond those necessary to achieve scope above

The Project is to develop various areas of St Mary Redcliff Church, encompassing alteration works to

8. Specific project insurances required to carry out these works

building and events building.

8. Specific project insurances required to carry out these works

the Undercroft, development of a new café/exhibition area, Hogarth gallery, choir vestry, education

9. Alternative facilities/accommodation whilst works are carried out

9. Alternative facilities/accommodation whilst works are carried out

building and events building.

10. Specialist Fit Out, Interpretation & Display Works

10. Specialist

11. Provision

Fit Out,

of

Interpretation

district heating

& Display

system

Works

and connections into the development provided by Bristol City

C. Estimate Base Date

11. Provision

Council

of district

outside

heating

this contract

system and connections into the development provided by Bristol City

Council outside this contract

C. Estimate Base Date

12. Sustainability Initiatives beyond that identified separately

12. Sustainability Initiatives beyond that identified separately

The ‘Estimate Base Date’ is 1Q 2020

13. Sprinklers

13. Sprinklers

14. Underfloor heating allowed

The ‘Estimate Base Date’ is 1Q 2020

14. Underfloor heating allowed

No allowance has been included for tender inflation (i.e. inflation from the estimate base date to the

date of tender return) and construction inflation (i.e. inflation from the date of tender return to the

No allowancecontract has been completion includeddate). for tender Thisinflation will be reviewed (i.e. inflation oncefrom a construction the estimate programme base date and to the procurement C. Inflation

date of tender return) and construction inflation (i.e. inflation from the date of tender return to the

C. Inflation

strategy is agreed and issued.

contract completion date). This will be reviewed once a construction programme and procurement

1. No allowance has been made for Tender or Construction inflation

strategy is agreed and issued.

1. No allowance has been made for Tender or Construction inflation

Version: 01

Date: 30/01/20

D. Allowances

D. Surveys / Existing

D. Surveys / Existing

D. Allowances 1. Costs are reconciled against the Client budget of £10,000,000.

1. Any Party Wall Awards, Right of light issues and associated work

2. An allowance of 12% overall has been included for Design Development & Construction risks. 1. Any

2.

Party

Crane

Wall

over

Awards,

sailing

Right

licenses

of light issues and associated work

1. Costs are reconciled Notwithstanding against the thisClient allowance, budget noof costs £10,000,000. have yet been ascertained for any specific risk. This is an2. Crane

3.

over

Dealing

sailing

with

licenses

underground contamination materials

2. An allowance initial of risk 12% allowance, overall has which been willincluded need to for be reassessed Design Development in conjunction & Construction with the Client risks. and the design3. Dealing

4. Abnormal

with underground

ground conditions

contamination

& foundations

materials

& underpinning

Notwithstanding teamthis as the allowance, design develops no costs and havemitigation yet beenaction ascertained is takenfor toany reduce specific the risk risk. exposure This is an

4. Abnormal

5. Unknown

ground

contamination

conditions & foundations

including removal

& underpinning

of asbestos (ACM’s)

initial risk3. allowance, VAT is included which will at the need standard to be reassessed rate of 20%. inVAT conjunction in relation with to buildings the Client isand a complex the design area. Therefore, 5. Unknown

6. Works

contamination

arising from

including

site investigation

removal of

and

asbestos

surveys

(ACM’s)

team as the design it is recommended develops andthat mitigation specialist action advice is taken be sought to reduce to ensure the risk that exposure the correct rates are applied to the6. Works

7.

arising

Service

from

diversions

site investigation

/ upgrades

and surveys

3. VAT is included various at the aspects standard of the ratescheme.

of 20%. VAT in relation to buildings is a complex area. Therefore,

7. Service

8. Works

diversions

& delays

/ upgrades

arising from archaeological investigation works

it is recommended that specialist advice be sought to ensure that the correct rates are applied to the

8. Works

9.

&

Diversion

delays arising

of 1125mm

from archaeological

dia Wessex Water

investigation

foul water

works

sewers

various aspects of the scheme.

9. Diversion

10. Accommodating

of 1125mm dia

existing

Wessex

Medieval

Water foul

wall

water

into

sewers

scheme

10. Accommodating existing Medieval wall into scheme

E. Information Used

11. South Church Yard – burials

11. South Church Yard – burials

E. Information Used The information on which this Cost Plan report is based Purcells RIBA 2 Stage End Report December

2019.

The information on which this Cost Plan report is based Purcells RIBA 2 Stage End Report December

2019.

Project number: BLCM0399 / Version: 01 / Issue date: 27/08/19

Project number: BLCM0399 / Version: 01 / Issue date: 27/08/19


Project 450 - St Mary Redcliffe Church, Bristol

RIBA Stage 2 Report

Overall Outline Cost Plan Summary No 1 20/01/2020

Ref

A

Scope of Works Description

Church Yard North

Approx.

GIFA (m2)

Current Costs Previous Costs Movement Comments

£ £ £

SUMMARY

RIBA 2 Total Construction Cost

RIBA 1 Total Construction Cost

£8,345,961 (ex VAT)

1 New facilities comprising new café & kitchen, gallery & exhibition space 1,098 £3,579,054 £2,939,000 £640,054

B

Church Yard South

1 Education/Learning Building including new access lift/steps 212 £861,844 £562,200 £299,644

2 Events Building including hard & soft landscaping 381 £1,183,259 £1,010,300 £172,959

C

Consequential Improvements to satisfy Building Regulations

1 Allowance Excl Excl £0 To be confirmed

D

Other Works

1 Proposals for storage and office at Nave Level & Volunteer room £0 £140,500 -£140,500 Works now included in A1 above

2 Proposed Internal Porch to West Door £30,000 £0 £30,000 Additional Works added

3 Allowance to provide new internal exhibition space £50,000 £0 £50,000 Allowance pending scope agreement

4 New Armoire £50,000 £0 £50,000 Part included in D1 previously

£5,754,157 £4,652,000 £1,102,157

D Main Contractor's Preliminaries 16% £923,000 £930,400 -£7,400 Assumes South Church Yard projects share site management facilities

£6,677,157 £5,582,400 £1,094,757

E Main Contractor's Overheads & Profit 7.5% £491,037 £418,680 £72,357

£7,168,194 £6,001,080 £1,167,114

F Professional, Legal, Planning & Building Regulation Fees 16% £1,177,767 £1,086,946 £90,821 18% included for South Church Yard projects & 16% for Undercroft & Hogarth

G

H

Design Development & Construction Risks

Inflation

SUB TOTAL: Facilitating and Building Works

Sub-total

TOTAL: Building Works Estimate

Base Cost Estimate

£8,345,961 £7,088,026 £1,257,935

0.1 Design Development Risks 12% £991,006 £900,162 £90,844

0.2 Construction Risks 0% £0 £0 £0 Included in Design Development Risk above

0.3 Employer Change Risks 5% £0 £345,062 -£345,062 Allocated to building works above

Total Risk Allowance Estimate

Cost Estimate (excluding inflation)

£991,006 £1,245,224 -£254,218

£9,336,968 £8,333,250 £1,003,718

0.1 Tender Inflation 0% Excl Excl £0

0.2 Construction Inflation 0% Excl Excl £0

Cost Estimate (including inflation)

£9,336,968 £8,333,250 £1,003,718

I VAT 20% £1,867,394 £1,666,650 £200,744

TOTALS (incl VAT & Fees) @ Base Date 1Q20

£11,204,000 £10,000,000 £1,204,000

Base Scheme

£7,088,026 (ex VAT)

Enhanced Scheme £8,236,500 (ex VAT) *

including increased:

i) Events Space

ii) Education Space

iii) Nave Level ‘Armoire’

Given that the RIBA 2 scheme includes the above increased

provision, the most accurate comparator is the RIBA 1 Enhanced

Scheme and, on this basis, project costs can be seen to have

remained relatively consistent through the RIBA 2 design

development

However, the impact of both VAT and Quantified Risk Allowance is

such that the forecast Total Project Cost now exceeds the agreed

£10m budget by £1,024,000

In relation to this, and to more adequately define the scope for

RIBA 3, it is recommended that SMR:

1. Seeks an update on the funding position from the Fundraising

Consultant and, particularly, clarity on whether the anticipated

£10m maximum relates to total construction or total project

cost

2. Seeks clarity from its Financial Advisors on the project’s VAT

status

3. Ensures the separate fundability of the excluded items, such as

FF&E

4. Considers the early undertaking of the suggested further

surveys and investigations to manage the Quantified Risk

Allowance

5. Utilises the suggested review of the South Churchyard Buildings

to achieve efficiencies wherever possible

* As reported in RIBA 1 Report, July 2019

T:\BLCM\123\MJQ\St Mary Redcliffe Church\2019\December 2019\RIBA Stage 2 Report\Cost Plan Jan 20\Draft V1.xlsx


7.0 RISK REGISTER

To ensure the effective and timely management of risk, the Project Risk Register is subject to

continual iterative review, with formal assessment of ongoing risks and potential mitigation during

monthly Design Team Meetings

SMR - PROJECT 450 - RISK REGISTER

RISK NO DESCRIPTION IMPACT CURRENT MITIGATION FURTHER MITIGATION RISK OWNER COMMENTS

PROJECT ADMINISTRATION /

GOVERNANCE

R.01 Consents not achieved Project doesn't progress. Existing

development phase abortive

R.02 Insufficient support from public /

congregation

Objections, impacting on Consents /

Funding

Pre-app consultations with DAC and key

stakeholders undertaken at RIBA 1 and 2.

'No red-lines'

Public consultations undertaken at RIBA 1

& 2

Proposals put in place for bespoke formal

pre-app, prior to development of

Consents documentation

Monthly / bi-monthly 'Wider Redcliffe'

consultations to continue throughout

RIBA 3

Purcell / DTy

Purcell / RW

Meeting to be arranged with Dr

Roger Leech 01/20

Monthly updates, via Parish Newsletter

R.03 Insufficient PCC support Project doesn't progress. Existing

development phase abortive

Project Governance requires monthly

updates to Project Board that reports and

makes recommendations to PCC

PCC updates to continue throughout

RIBA 3

Purcell / DTy

PCC updates provided by Purcell / DTy at

stage-ends and other key intervals

R.04 Insufficient engagement with funders of

development phase

Loss of trust

Canynges Society & Church Lands Charity

invited to attend all consultation events

and monthly Project Board

Purcell to provide monthly update via

Design Team minutes / Risk Register

Purcell / RW

R.05 Development funding shortfall Project doesn't progress. Existing

development phase abortive

R.06 Capital funding shortfall Project doesn't progress. Existing

development phase abortive

Purcell and sub-consultant design team

appointed on basis of lump sum fee to

RIBA 3

Current capital works budget informed by

Fundraising Feasibility, undertaken by Eric

Grounds

Fundraising Appeal Board to be formed to

facilitate funding of subsequent workstages

Cost plan iterative with formal reporting

at Design Team Meetings and via stage-end

reports

Fundraising Appeal Board to be formed

DTy

Purcell / DTy


SMR - PROJECT 450 - RISK REGISTER

RISK NO DESCRIPTION IMPACT CURRENT MITIGATION FURTHER MITIGATION RISK OWNER COMMENTS

DESIGN RISKS

R.07 Design proposals exceed budget Project doesn't progress. Existing

development phase abortive

Design subject to iterative cost review by

independent cost consultant

Formal cost review at stage-ends to be

aligned with fundraising update

Purcell / DTy

R.08 Below-ground archaeology Project doesn't progress, or design

changes required to consented

scheme

Change control proceedures in place to

ensure that any change requests with

anticipated cost implications are quantified

prior to proceeding

Scheme design assumes phased delivery.

Both Cost Plan and Business Plan aligned

with phases to balance capital /

establishment costs against revenue /

operating surplus

Proposals informed by client-supplied

archaeological reports / working

knowledge of Marcus Chantrey, Inspecting

Architect, and record drawings held within

church archives

Stage 2 Report includes recommendations

for scope / timing of additional surveys /

investigations to de-risk

Potential funding of invasive surveys /

ground investigations to be reviewed at

commencement of RIBA 3

Purcell / DTy

Any invasive works likely to be

under at-least an Archaeological

Watching Brief and WSI

R.09 Below-ground utilities Project doesn't progress, or design

changes required to consented

scheme

Utilities companies insist on

locational / condition survey of

assets by SMR, as 'developer', with

consequent impact to project costs

Proposals informed by BCC / clientsupplied

utilities surveys

On-going consultation with utilities

companies

Continued consultation with utilities

companies

Potential costs built into project

contingency

Purcell / DTy

Engagement with Redcliffe Way JDB to

explore whether costs / responsibilities

could be shared with / borne by

commercial developers of adjacent land


SMR - PROJECT 450 - RISK REGISTER

RISK NO DESCRIPTION IMPACT CURRENT MITIGATION FURTHER MITIGATION RISK OWNER COMMENTS

R.10 Ecology Project doesn't progress, or design

changes required to consented

scheme

Ecological Survey undertaken Aug 19

Affected tree proposed to be retained. If

Bats are found, works will therefore be

subject to bat licence

Purcell

1no tree in south churchyard identified as

having 'high bat roost potential' -

endoscopic survey instructed to assess

R.11 Arboriculture Project doesn't progress, or design

changes required to consented

scheme

Arboricultural Survey undertaken Oct 19

Purcell

Report confirms that South Churchyard

Events Space dictates removal of least

significant trees and construction in close

proximity to others

Scheme design locates around canopies

and hence root zones and assumes a

'floating' slab on micropiles to minimise

ground disturbance and maintain hydration

of root zones

BCC tree replacement policy potentially as

onerous as 8 new trees / removal

Following conclusion of survey, Design

Team to engage with BCC's Tree Officer

at commencement of RIBA 3 to negotiate

requirements prior to application for

consents

R.12 Rainwater Attenuation Project doesn't progress, or design

changes required to consented

scheme

Integral scoping potential investigations

and liasing with Wessex Water / BCC

Planning over requirement

Northside archaeological report to be

investigated to understand potential for

below-ground attenuation tanks

Purcell


SMR - PROJECT 450 - RISK REGISTER

RISK NO DESCRIPTION IMPACT CURRENT MITIGATION FURTHER MITIGATION RISK OWNER COMMENTS

R.13 Constraints on incoming electrical mains Limited spare capacity dictating

either alternative energy source or

a substation on site, with

consequent spatial and financial

impacts

Potential for micro-generation in the form

of concealed PV array on chancel south

roof under review

Phasing strategy suggests that existing

capacity will suffice for south churchyard

buildings. Therefore, monitor sequencing /

programme for Redcliffe Way

development, as this will inevitably require

substation and thereby provide an

alternative source of additional capacity

Purcell

Consultation with utilities companies

ongoing over potential spare capacity

elsewhere

Requirement for cooling to be reviewed

with details / frequencies of peak internal

temperatures calculated for client review

R.14 Contaminated ground - particularly

associated with former oil tanks

Restrictions on construction

methodologies

R.15 Design proposals fail to meet client brief Project doesn't progress, or design

changes required to consented

scheme

R.16 Unknown condition/position of existing site

drainage

R.17 Construction / Party Wall restrictions

related to existing railway tunnel below

South Churchyard

De-contamination costs Investigations to be scoped Purcell

Design changes to consented

scheme, including need for more

complex foundation / slab design, if

drainage found to be within

proposed building footprints

Delays / additional costs, associated

with Party Wall / more complex

foundation / slab design

Client brief defined by 'reverse brief'

appended to Purcell agreement

Regular consultation with client, via client

meetings, design team meetings, and

project board meetings

Proposals based on client supply survey,

but noted that this is limited in scope /

detail and assumed incomplete

Owner of railway tunnel has been

contacted and is aware of proposals

CCTV Survey to be conducted to establish

location of all storm and foul drainage

within site. Integral to scope and obtain

costs for client review

Specialist Party Wall advice to be obtained

during RIBA 3 to enable requirements to

be factored in to Consents documentation

Purcell / DTy

Purcell

Purcell

R.18 Condition and location of existing

structure / foundations at interface with

new construction

Delays / additional costs. More

complex foundation / slab design

and complexities in setting-out

Proposals informed by working knowledge

of Marcus Chantrey, Inspecting Architect,

and record drawings held within church

archives

Potential opening-up works to be scoped

by Integral at commencement of RIBA 3

Funding for surveys to be reviewed

Purcell / DTy

Any invasive works likely to be

under at-least an Archaeological

Watching Brief and WSI


8.0 PROGRAMME

The below-listed programme represents a projection from the current position, based on

anticipated timescales for design development, documentation, and ongoing consultation

It records an overall prolongation of 4 months from the initial programme and, as such, is subject

to client review and approval

Rev B - 16.12.19

ID

Task Task Name Duration Start Finish

Mode

1 RIBA 1+ 15 days? Mon 01/07/19 Fri 19/07/19

2 Start‐Up Meeting 1 day Mon 01/07/19 Mon 01/07/19

5 Masterplan Review 14 days Tue 02/07/19 Fri 19/07/19

3 Project Board 1 day? Mon 08/07/19 Mon 08/07/19

4 Cost Review 5 days? Mon 15/07/19 Fri 19/07/19

6 RIBA 2 115 days? Mon 22/07/19 Fri 20/12/19

7 On site Review of Proposals 5 days Mon 22/07/19 Fri 26/07/19

8 Scheme Update 15 days Mon 29/07/19 Fri 16/08/19

9 Client Presentation 1 day? Mon 12/08/19 Mon 12/08/19

10 Project Board 1 day? Mon 12/08/19 Mon 12/08/19

14 Wider SMR Update 5 days? Tue 13/08/19 Sun 18/08/19

15 Cost Review 6 days Tue 13/08/19 Mon 19/08/19

11 Intervention Details Survey 3 days Mon 19/08/19 Wed 21/08/19

13 Outline Intervention Details 66 days Thu 22/08/19 Mon 18/11/19

12 DAC Pre‐App Meeting 1 day? Wed 28/08/19 Wed 28/08/19

16 Client Presentation 1 day Mon 11/11/19 Mon 11/11/19

17 Project Board 1 day? Mon 11/11/19 Mon 11/11/19

18 Engagement with DAC 1 day Mon 11/11/19 Mon 11/11/19

19 Scheme Update 17 days Mon 25/11/19 Mon 16/12/19

20 RIBA 3 113 days? Mon 13/01/20 Wed 17/06/20

37 Wider SMR Update 1 day? Mon 10/02/20 Mon 10/02/20

30 Planning / Faculty Scheme

Drawings

25 days Mon 13/01/20 Fri 14/02/20

31 First Draft Visuals 15 days Mon 20/01/20 Fri 07/02/20

33 Client Presentation 1 day? Mon 10/02/20 Mon 10/02/20

38 Project Board 1 day? Mon 10/02/20 Mon 10/02/20

32 Wider SMR Update 1 day? Mon 10/02/20 Mon 10/02/20

29 Planning / Faculty Details 15 days Mon 17/02/20 Fri 06/03/20

21 Meeting of PCC 1 day? Mon 24/02/20 Mon 24/02/20

22 Project Board 1 day? Mon 09/03/20 Mon 09/03/20

28 First Draft of Drawings Issued 1 day? Mon 09/03/20 Mon 09/03/20

2020

Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3

34 Client Review of First Draft 4 days Tue 10/03/20 Fri 13/03/20

35 1:20s / New Details 25 days Mon 16/03/20 Fri 17/04/20

36 Project Board 1 day? Mon 13/04/20 Mon 13/04/20

26 DAS / HIA 30 days? Mon 20/04/20 Fri 29/05/20

27 Project Board 1 day? Mon 11/05/20 Mon 11/05/20

25 Final Draft of Documentation

Issued

1 day? Mon 01/06/20 Mon 01/06/20

24 Client Review of Final Draft 5 days Tue 02/06/20 Mon 08/06/20

23 Finalising Documentation 4 days Tue 09/06/20 Fri 12/06/20

39 Planning / Faculty Submissions 1 day? Mon 15/06/20 Mon 15/06/20

Task

Project Summary

Manual Task

Start-only

Deadline

Project: SMR

Date: Mon 16/12/19

Split

Milestone

Inactive Task

Inactive Milestone

Duration-only

Manual Summary Rollup

Finish-only

External Tasks

Progress

Manual Progress

Summary

Inactive Summary

Manual Summary

External Milestone

Page 1


9.0 NEXT STEPS

Recording the development of a considered and coordinated concept design, this report and

its findings will be presented to the P450 Project Board on 10 Feb 2020. Subject to approval,

it is proposed to then progress to RIBA 3 to undertake the detailed design development and

preparation of the comprehensive documentation necessary for the Consents applications

To de-risk this process, and with due regard to the feedback received from stakeholders, the

following next steps are proposed:

5. FURTHER INVESTIGATIONS

Finally, prior to all of the above, to provide an opportunity to consult on the outcomes, and avoid

potentially abortive work during RIBA 3, the design team will, as a first priority, undertake the

options studies cited in Section 4.8

1. FORMAL PRE-APPLICATION ENQUIRY

Subject to the approval of both the Canynges Society and the Church Lands Charity, utilise the

existing contact with Dr Roger Leech to initiate a bespoke, formal pre-app process to engage

both BCC’s planning department and the Conservation Advisory Group and invite written

feedback on the current proposals, areas of further development, and any factors affecting

Consents / Approval

Dan Talkes

Consultant Project Architect

RIBA AABC

2. PUBLIC & STAKEHOLDER CONSULTATION

Alongside item 1, continue the pattern of regular, open engagement to ensure continued project

support and an increased sense of ownership within P450’s stakeholders, community and

congregation

3. ADDITIONAL SURVEYS / INVESTIGATIONS

As noted within section 7.0, throughout RIBA 2, the design team has conducted a review of the

available survey information. Given the current level of scheme design, targeted investigations

of key areas of unresolved risk are now possible, and it is therefore recommended that, at the

commencement of RIBA 3, the design team scopes and competitively tenders these surveys to

obtain accurate costs for client consideration

4. EXPERIENTIAL WALK-THROUGH

The current proposals are undoubtedly complex and many consultees, both stakeholder and

public, have expressed difficulty in visualising particularly the proposed internal spaces. For this

reason, the design team intend to produce a three-dimensional, digital walk-through model that

can be presented either as a video or, ideally, as a self-directed ‘virtual’ experience

The existing architectural fee includes an allocation for visualisations, so Purcell will seek specialist

advice on what might be achieved for this sum


10.0 APPENDICES

Endnotes

1 Sampson, J (1994) ‘St Mary Redcliffe, The North Wall - Archaeological Survey, pp 4


10.1 ARBORICULTURAL SURVEY

BS 5837: TREE CATEGORY GUIDE

Category U: Unsuitable for retention, trees with less than 10 years life expectancy.

Category A: high quality trees, able to make a substantial contribution for at least 40 years,

normally retained unless there is an over-riding reason for removal and appropriate mitigation.

Category B: moderate quality trees, able to make a significant contribution for at least 20 years,

normally retained.

Category B/C: an intermediate category between categories B and C (not specifically described in

BS5837). Trees, which should be retained wherever possible, providing retention does not

significantly constrain the layout.

Category C: low quality, in adequate condition to remain for at least 10 years, or young trees


St Mary Redcliffe

Appendix B

BS 5837: 2012 Tree Schedule

Tree/

Group

No.

Species

Height

(m)

Stem

Diam. at

1.5m

(mm)

Branch Spread (m)

N S E W

Canopy

Cleara

-nce

(m)

T1 Lime 18 580 7 3 6 6.5 2

Age

Class

Early

mature

T2 Horse chestnut 19 1230 6 8 12 7 1.6 Mature

T3 Lime 11 290 1 2 5 6 2.3

T4 Lime 16.5 430 4 4 5 5 2.0

Early

mature

Early

mature

T5 Lime 13.5 870 5 6 6 6 1.9 Mature

G6 Yew hedge 2-3 100-200 0.4

T7 Lime 11 470 6 1.5 1 3 1.2

Early

mature

Observations

Asymmetric canopy. Extensive basal growth. Showing

good vigour.

Four stems from 1.8m, with a "bowl" between - no

signs of significant decay. Small dead branches within

canopy, but showing good vigour, despite Leaf miner

infestation.

Suppressed. Could consider removal to give T2 and

T4 more space to develop.

Management

Recommendations

Estimated

Remaining

Contribution

(years)

BS 5837

Category

Grading

Protect

-ion

Distnce

(m)

Root

Protect.

Area

(m2)

Remove basal growth. >40 A2 7.0 152

Remove dead branches.

At same time carry out a

climbing inspection and

highlight structural

weaknesses.

>40 A2 14.8 684

15-30 B-C2 3.5 38

Good form structure and vigour. >40 A2 5.2 84

Twin stems which have fused, with western stem

bifurcating at 2m. Pollarded to 3.5m approximately 10

years ago- risk of decay where pollarded, weakening

attachment points.

A line of multi stem trees growing at approximately

0.7m spacing. Trees at southern end engulfed by

creepers and elder growth. Remainder, with fresh

growth but patchy. Some gaps. Low amenity value.

20-40 B2 10.4 342

Remove. 15-30 C2 2.4 18

Low vigour. Poor structure. Remove. 10-20 C2 5.6 100

G8 Berberis 3 25-50 0 Mature 10-20 C2 0.6 1

G9 Roses 1.8-2.2 25-50 0.5 Mature 10-20 C2 0.6 1

T10 Laburnum 3.2 200 4 0 2 3 1.7

T11 Holly 3.6 140 1 1 1 1 1.7

Early

mature

Early

mature

T12 Dogwood 3.8 200 0.5 3 0.5 3 1.6 Mature

T13 Cherry 5.5 270 3.5 3.5 3 3.5 1.8

T14 Cherry 8 140 2 2 1 2.5 2

T15 Amelanchier 8.5 160 2 2 0.5 3 3.5

Early

mature

Semimature

Semimature

Semimature

Three stems- 100,120,120mm- all leaning to north.

Good vigour and will provide attractive flowering, but

short lived.

Six stems from base- average 55mm. Variegated

variety. Low amenity value.

Three stems at 1.5m- 100,120,130mm. Poor structure.

Attractive flowering, but short lived.

Five stems from 1.3m. Ornamental variety. Good

crown shape and vigour.

10-20 B-C2 2.4 18

10-20 C2 1.7 9

10-20 B-C2 2.4 18

20-40 B2 3.2 33

Good form and vigour. >40 C2 1.7 9

Completely engulfed in ivy. Low branches dead. Remove. 5-15 C2 1.9 12

SJ Stephens Associates 14-10-2019 1 of 2


Tree/

Group

No.

St Mary Redcliffe

Species

Height

(m)

Stem

Diam. at

1.5m

(mm)

Branch Spread (m)

N S E W

Canopy

Cleara

-nce

(m)

T16 Holly 5.5 120 1 1 0.5 1.5 1.3

T17 Holly 6 80 0.5 1 0.5 1 1.7

T18 Ash 7.5 160 1 2 1 2.5 3.5

T19 Holly 3.5 110 0.5 1 0 2 1.5

Age

Class

Semimature

Semimature

Semimature

Semimature

G20 Shrubs 1-2.5 50-75 0 Mature

Observations

Management

Recommendations

Appendix B

BS 5837: 2012 Tree Schedule

Estimated

Remaining

Contribution

(years)

BS 5837

Category

Grading

Protect

-ion

Distnce

(m)

Low branches removed. Good vigour. 20-40 C2 1.4 7

Twin stem from base- 30 and 70mm. Good vigour, but

low amenity value.

Root

Protect.

Area

(m2)

10-20 C2 1.0 3

Four stems from base- 60,60,60,120mm- tight forks. 20-40 C2 1.9 12

Leaning to west. Poor form. 10-20 C2 1.3 5

A mixture of mostly over mature and poorly managed

shrubs including elder and elaeagnus.

Remove 10-20 C2 0.9 3

G21 12no. lime 13 270 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 1.6

Semimature

Lift crown to provide 3m

Showing good vigour, creating an impressive avenue. ground clearance over

path and 1.8m over grass.

>40 A1 3.2 33

T22 Lime 13 260 5 4 4.5 4.5 1.6

Semimature

Part of avenue, extensive bark wounds to main stem,

but callusing.

Lift crown to provide 3m

ground clearance over

path and 1.8m over grass.

>40 A-B2 3.1 31

T23 Lime 300 5 5 5 4 1.6

Semimature

Lift crown to provide 3m

ground clearance over

path and 1.8m over grass.

>40 A1 3.6 41

T24 Lime 13.5 330 6 6 6 6 1.6

Early

mature

Good form and structure. Some damage to surface

roots.

>40 A1 4.0 49

SJ Stephens Associates 14-10-2019 2 of 2


10.2 ECOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT

Contents

1 Introduction 5

Site description 5

Project Description 5

Purpose 5

Policy and Legal Considerations 6

Ecological Assessment for St. Mary’s Church,

Redcliffe

Prepared by LUC

October 2019

2 Method 7

Desk Study 7

Extended Phase 1 Habitat Survey 7

Bats 8

Limitations 10

3 Results 11

Desk Study 11

Extended Phase 1 Habitat Survey 16

Bats 16

Birds 17

Badgers 17

Other Notable Species 17

4 Discussion 18

Statutory Designated Sites and Non-Statutory Designated Sites 18

Habitats 18

Bats 18

Birds 19

Enhancements 20

5 Conclusion 21

Appendix 1 22

Site Plan 22

Appendix 2 22

Policy & Legal Considerations 23

Appendix 3 26

Phase 1 Habitat Survey Results 26

Appendix 4 27

Phase 1 Habitat Survey Target Notes 27

Appendix 5 28

BRP Features on T5 28

Tables

Table 2.1: Guidelines for assessing the suitability of structures and trees for bats to roost within 9

Table 3.1 Desk Study Findings – Site Search 11

Table 3.2 Desk Study Findings – Species Search 13


1 Introduction

Policy and Legal Considerations

1.1 LUC was appointed by Purcell UK on behalf of St. Mary’s Church to provide ecological support and

input into development plans to redesign and re-landscape aspects of St. Mary’s Church,

Redcliffe. This report sets out an Ecological Assessment to establish whether work undertaken on

St. Mary’s Church (referred to from here on out as ‘the Site’), would have any effect on the

ecology of the Site and the surrounding area.

Site description

1.2 Site consists of amenity grassland lawns in front of the church, intersected with hardstanding

walkways. In the rear garden on each side of the perimeter are two rows of mature trees. The

east is joined by an adjacent area of shrub and immature trees.

1.8 This report has been prepared in accordance with the relevant legislation and planning policy.

Further details are given in Appendix 2, the following documents are of relevance:

• The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (as amended);

• The Countryside and Rights of Way Act (CRoW Act), 2000 (as amended);

• The Natural Environment and Rural Communities Act (NERC Act), 2006;

• The Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2017 (as amended);

• The Protection of Badgers Act 1992 (as amended);

• Bristol Central Area Plan (2015); and

• Bristol Biodiversity Action Plan (BAP) (2018)

1.3 The Site sits near the centre of Bristol, on a popular east-west axis for public transport, cycling

and walking; connecting Temple Meads to the city centre and the Harbourside (central grid

reference ST 591723). Being a gothic parish church used from the 12 th century and listed by

Historic England as a Grade 1 listed building, it serves a popular destination for people transiting

through the city. Due to its centrally geographic, urban, location the Site is considered relatively

ecologically isolated and as an area of potential importance for wildlife living in the city of Bristol.

Project Description

1.4 A planning application will be submitted in the near future for proposed works, designed to

expand the area within the church grounds that can be utilised by visitors. This involves the

northern formal lawns being removed, replaced on the north-eastern boundary with large

oversized stone steps and new areas of planting. Between the steps and the original church

building a newly constructed structure will be built to house an exhibition space, gallery area, gift

shop, café and toilet facilities. This will extend one storey up from ground level, but will also

include a below ground level.

1.5 In the south-east corner, a single storey, raised, lightweight building will run in parallel with Pump

Lane. An area of scrub will have to be removed for construction to take place. The building will be

raised by being built on wooden support structures that will elevate it off the floor, the space will

be used as an educational facility and studio space. The design will be largely glazed to allow for

the garden setting to be viewed from within the building.

Purpose

1.6 This report is designed to provide an ecological assessment of the Site, assessing the impacts of

the proposals and outlining mitigation where needed.

1.7 This report will contain the ecological information needed to help the local planning authority

make a decision regarding the development plans to the Site.

Ecological Impact Assessment for St.Marys Church, Redcliffe 5 September 2019

Ecological Impact Assessment for St.Marys Church, Redcliffe 6 September 2019


2 Method

2.8 A list of other species considered during the Extended Phase 1 Habitat Survey are listed below:

• Badger

• Dormice

• Great Crested Newt (GCN)

2.1 The methods adopted in the survey throughout the assessment are outlined below. They accord

with the good practice guidance documents for ecological survey and assessment produced by the

Chartered Institute of Ecology and Environmental Management 1 and the British Standards

Institute 2 .

Desk Study

2.2 To provide additional background information to the report, and to highlight any potential habitat

and/or species that may be influenced over the proposed changes to the Site, an evaluation of

pre-existing biological records was undertaken. A data search for statutory designated sites within

a 5km of the Site was undertaken as well as a data search for non-statutory designated sites, bat

records and other notable species groups within 2km of the Site.

2.3 Data was both requested and collated from the following sources:

• Bristol Regional Environmental Records Centre (BRERC); and

• Multi-Agency Geographical Information for the Countryside (MAGIC).

2.4 Absence of species records within the desk study from the biological records does not equate to

absence in reality. Species distributions were interpreted with caution as they may reflect surveyreporting

effort rather than actual distributions.

Extended Phase 1 Habitat Survey

2.5 A Phase 1 Habitat Survey was undertaken. This survey is a rapid, standardised approach to

categorising different habitat types within any given terrestrial site, and was carried out within the

Site boundary.

2.6 A DAFOR scale was applied to the species listed within each habitat type. A DAFOR scale assigns a

letter to a species based on how prominent they are within that particular habitat, it is at the

discretion of the surveyor to decide what label to assign to a particular species. DAFOR translates

as:

• D – Dominant

• A – Abundant

• F – Frequent

• O – Occasional

• R – Rare

2.7 The survey was ‘extended’ by considering the suitability of the Site for notable or protected fauna

and flora. Species considered included those identified within the desk study, or those considered

appropriate by the surveyor whilst on Site. The survey was conducted by Greg Nightingale BSc,

ACIEEM and Isaac Hogan BSc, MSc, QCIEEM on 12 th August 2019. Weather conditions were sunny

and dry.

• Nesting Birds

• Reptiles

Bats

2.9 Several different bat surveys were carried out as to assess the Site’s suitability to support bat

roosts. The following surveys were undertaken: Preliminary Roost Assessment, Preliminary

Hibernation Assessment, Ground Level Assessment (GLA) and Endoscope Surveys.

2.10 All features were examined using a torch (CB2-L1) Clubman Deluxe Li-Ion 12V 8.8 AH and

binoculars (Pentax Papilio ll 5x21)). The search took place on the 12 th August 2019, conducted by

Greg Nightingale (Class 2 Bat Licence holder) and Isaac Hogan. The survey methods used is in

accordance with Bat Conservation Trust (BCT) guidelines 3 .

2.11 Only the areas of the Site to be affected by the proposals were assessed (i.e. a complete survey

of the church was not carried out as the church would largely be unaffected by the proposals).

Information gathered was then used to evaluate the Bat Roost Potential (BRP, for designation see

Table 2.1) of each feature.

Preliminary Roost Assessment (PRA)

2.12 A PRA of the exterior of the church was undertaken to determine if the building had the potential

to support bat roosts. The PRA on Site included inspecting the north-east and south-east church

walls up to one storey high from the courtyard area only, as these were the areas to be affected

by the proposals. In addition, and external and internal survey of a small outbuilding, located to

the south-east of the church, was undertaken. This is the first step towards establishing whether

there are roosts present in, or access points available on structures or buildings. Features

searched for included: gaps in brickwork/stonework, lifting damaged rendering on walls and lifted,

or under tiles and slates. A thorough search for actual and potential signs, including bats,

droppings, urine splashes ect, were searched for.

Preliminary Hibernation Survey Assessment

2.13 Proposals include below ground work, as a result preliminary hibernation surveys were conducted

in underground spaces beneath the church and northern lawn, including the cellar; the vault; and

a third underground space, to evaluate the suitability for use by bats over winter. A thorough

search for actual and potential signs, including bats, droppings, urine splashes ect, were searched

looked for as well as potential access points into the underground area. including all vents, ducts,

and surfaces.

Ground Level Assessment (GLA)

2.14 All trees within the Site underwent a GLA. This included all trees found within the southern lawn.

The assessment involved a detailed inspection of a tree from ground level to identify any Potential

Roost Features (PRFs) that could be used by bats to roost. PRF searched for included: woodpecker

holes, loose bark, hollow trunks, cavities, splits and cracks along branches, and dense ivy lattices.

Endoscope Survey

2.15 PRFs found during the GLA, which were within close proximity to the proposed works was subject

to an endoscope survey (Video Borescope N85NH). This enabled a detailed review of the potential

for the PRF to support a bat roost. Evidence such as: droppings, grease marks and staining,

1 Survey guidance is available at http://www.cieem.net/sources-of-survey-methods-sosm- and appraisal guidance is available at

http://www.cieem.net/guidance-on-preliminary-ecological-appraisal-gpea-

3 Collins, J. (ed.) (2016) Bat Surveys for Professional Ecologists: Good Practice Guidelines (3rd ed). The Bat Conservation Trust,

London.

2 British Standards Institute (2013). BS42020:2013 Biodiversity – Code of Practice for Planning and Development. BSI, London.

Ecological Impact Assessment for St.Marys Church, Redcliffe 8 September 2019

Ecological Impact Assessment for St.Marys Church, Redcliffe 7 September 2019


feeding remains and bats were searched for. The survey was carried out on the 26 th September

2019 by Greg Nightingale (Class 2 Bat Licence holder) and Isaac Hogan. The weather conditions

for this survey were dry and cloudy, although there was a short burst of rain on route to the

survey.

Table 2.1: Guidelines for assessing the suitability of structures and trees for bats to

roost within

BRP

Category

Negligible

Low

Roosting Habitat Features

Negligible habitat features likely to support

roosting, commuting or foraging bats

Structures in this category offer one or more

potential roost sites for individual,

opportunistically roosting bats. These sites do not

offer the space, shelter or appropriate conditions

to support large numbers of bats or maternity

roosts.

Survey Requirement

No surveys required

1 dusk or dawn survey

required for structures.

No surveys required for

trees.

Limitations

2.16 It is important to note that ecological surveys provide information regarding the ecological

baseline of a site for only a ‘snapshot’ of time. Therefore, if significant time lapses between the

surveys; if further development or implementation of proposals have been updated; or if there

has been significant changes to habitat present on Site then ecological surveys may be required

to identify any change in the baseline, such as natural succession of habitats, or local extinction

or colonisation of species. Therefore, if a year lapses between the progressions of development

proposals, it is recommended that ecological advice is sought regarding the applicability of the

survey findings 4 .

Tree in this category include those of sufficient

size and age to support suitable roosting features,

but none are visible from the ground

Moderate

Structures and trees in this category offer one or

more roost site that, due to their space, shelter or

conditions, offer roosting potential for a range of

species. Roosts may be more permanent, rather

than opportunistic. Small maternity roosts of

common species may form in one of these roost

sites.

1 dusk and 1 dawn survey

required for both structures

and trees.

Tree-climbing may be an

appropriate alternative to

dusk and dawn surveys.

High

Structures and trees in this category have one or

more potential roost sites that are suitable for

large number of bats. Roosts are likely to be

permanent and include maternity roosts.

Potential roost sites exist for a wide range of

species or species of particular conservation

interest.

3 surveys, including both

dusk and dawn elements.

Tree-climbing may be an

appropriate alternative to

dusk and dawn surveys.

4 CIEEM (2019). Advice Note: On the Lifespan of Ecological Reports and Surveys. Chartered Institute for Ecology and Environmental

Management, Winchester. Available from:https://cieem.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Advice-Note.pdf

Ecological Impact Assessment for St.Marys Church, Redcliffe 9 September 2019

Ecological Impact Assessment for St.Marys Church, Redcliffe 10 September 2019


3 Results

with some parts ancient woodland. The canopy

contains oak, both pedunculate and sessile, Quercus

robur, Q. petraea, ash, small-leaved lime Tilia

cordata, birch Betula spp., whitebeams Sorbus spp.,

beech and hornbeam Carpinus betulus. An

exceptional diversity of whitebeams including two

Desk Study

which are unique to Avon Gorge Sorbus bristoliensis

and Sorbus wilmottiana.

3.1 The findings of the desk study are presented below. A description of all statutory designated sites

within a 5km buffer radius, and non-statutory sites within a 2km buffer are listed in Table 3.1.

Statutory designated sites include:

• Special Protection Areas (SPAs), Special Areas of Conservation (SACs) and Ramsar Sites which

are of European importance;

Leigh Woods

NNR

Found on the western slope of Avon gorge, a very

similar assemblage to Avon Gorge, including also

wild cherry Prunus avium, Spanish chestnut

Castanea sativa, and occasional lime hybrids Tilia

spp. Shrub layer is discontinuous, frequented with

hazel Corylus avellana and field maple Acer

2,600m North-west

• Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) and National Nature Reserves (NNR) which are of

National importance; and

• Local Nature Reserves (LNR), which are of Local importance.

campestre, privet Ligustrum vulgare, hawthorn

Crataegus monogyna, spindle Eunymus europeaus,

dogwood Cornus sanguinea, and yew Taxus

baccatta.

3.2 Non-Statutory designated sites include:

• Site of Nature Conservation Interest (SNCI), which are of County importance; and

Quarry Steps Durdham

Down

A key site designated for its reptilian history. Two

species of saurischian dinosaur were found in fissure

3,000m North-west

• Avon Wildlife Trust Reserves (AWTR).

SSSI

fillings from the old quarry site.

Table 3.1 Desk Study Findings – Site Search

Royate Hill

LNR

Bordered by a railway embankment, creates a varied

topography. Mosaic of habitats, including calcareous

3,630m North-east

Site Name and

Description

Distance to Site

grasslands, secondary woodland and scrub.

Designation

Statutory Sites

Troopers Hill

LNR

Old quarry and mining site that has created unusual

acidic soils for the area, containing as a result a

3,780m East

Ashton Court

SSSI

Important for its saproxylic coleoptera and other

invertebrate fauna, many species of which are

2,780m West

unique invertebrate assemblage. Endangered mining

bee Monada guttualata is present.

nationally scarce. Has a complex underlying geology.

Above ground ancient trees, including: ash Fraxinus

excelsior, wych elm Ulmus glabra, and beech Fagus

sylvatica, although most of the ancient trees are oak

Quercus robur. These ancient oak pollards are

Avon Valley Woodland

LNR

Noted for its underlying geology, specifically the

Carboniferous Downend Group strata. Woodland is

predominantly oak, containing willow, Salix spp.

Scrub, pasture and grassland.

3,580m East

important for saproxylic invertebrates. Species such

as Ctesias serra beetle, false darkling beetle

Phloiotrya vaudouer, darkling beetle Eledona

agricola, all with very adapted to extremely specific

conditions found on this site.

Stockwood Open Space

LNR

Majority of area is old grassland and unploughed

meadows, housing numerous species of butterflies.

An old woodland, with many thick hedgerows and

several farm ponds. Nesting whitethroats Sylvia

communis are found here.

4,360m South-east

Avon gorge

SSSI

The Gorge has natural cliffs and quarry exposures of

Carboniferous limestone, which are of great

3,380m North-west

Non-statutory Sites

SAC

geological interest and, together with the screes,

scrub, pockets of grassland and adjacent woodland,

support an exceptional number of nationally rare and

scarce plant species. Rare plants are found in species

rich neutral grassland, such as such as: Bristol rockcress

Arabis stricta, compact brome Bromus

Brandon Hill

AWTR and SNCI

Site located close to the centre of Bristol. Mosaic

habitat, consisting largely of parkland, areas of

wildflower meadows, with scattered trees, areas of

scrub, and presence of ponds. Small areas of

woodland to the north-west of the site.

1,200m North-west

madritensis, nit-grass Gastridium ventricosum, and

honewort Trinia glauca. Scarce plants include: dwarf

mouse-ear Cerastium pumilum and spring cinquefoil

Potentilla tabernaemontani. Woodland is present,

mainly semi-natural broadleaf woodland, but

includes areas of mixed and broadleaf plantation,

Arno’s Vale Cemetery

SNCI

Large, 22.85ha, overgrown Victorian Cemetery with

adjacent area of broadleaf woodland, grasslands

present supporting invertebrate assemblage.

1,600m South-east

Ecological Impact Assessment for St.Marys Church, Redcliffe 11 September 2019

Ecological Impact Assessment for St.Marys Church, Redcliffe 12 September 2019


Clifton Wood

SNCI

Woodland area forms part of the larger grounds of

Goldney Gardens in Clifton, Bristol. Mainly broadleaf

woodland noted for feeding bats.

1,700m West

Fieldfare

Turdus pilaris

Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Schedule 1)

IUCN Red List - Red

1,600m South-east

Easton-Staple Hill

Disused Railway

SNCI

It is a linear site that runs through dense housing

and industrial areas. The variety of habitats include

grassland, scrub, secondary woodland, tall ruderal

vegetation, planted trees and flower beds.

1,920m North-east

Firecrest

Regulus ignicapilla

Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Schedule 1)

NERC Act Section 41

United Kingdom Biodiversity Action Plan - Priority

Species

1,260m West

Feeder Side

SCNI

Glyn Vale

SCNI

Novers Common

SNCI

Wedmore Vale

SNCI

An artificial canal-like water channel connected to

the River Avon at both ends, banked with semiimproved

neutral grassland, with patches of scrub

and small areas of wet crack willow Salix fragilis.

Consisting mainly of neutral grassland, with

occasional patches of calcareous patches, areas of

scrub and planted trees, both native and exotic,

within the 9.17ha site.

Site found to the South of Bristol City Centre.

Predominantly semi-improved neutral grassland with

pockets of semi-improved calcareous grassland.

Areas of woodland present.

Range of habitats including grassland, amenity

grassland, scrub woodland and streams. Small,

scattered patches on semi-improved calcareous

grassland.

990m East

1,820m South

2,000m South-west

1,710m South

House Sparrow

Parsus domesticus

Kingfisher

Alcedo atthis

Lapwing

Vanellus vanellus

Redwing

Turdus iliacus

Red Kite

Milvus milvus

NERC Act Section 41

Bristol Biodiversity Action Plan – Priority Species

Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Schedule 1)

NERC Act Section 41

United Kingdom Biodiversity Action Plan - Priority

Species

Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Schedule 1)

NERC Act Section 41

IUCN Red List - Red

The Bonn Convention (Appendix 2)

Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Schedule 1)

United Kingdom Biodiversity Action Plan - Priority

Species

IUCN Red List - Red

Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Schedule 1)

NERC Act Section 41

520m West

600m West

1,770m West

1,600m South-east

1,400m North-west

3.3 Table 3.2 list all protected and notable species found also within a 2km buffer around the Site.

Table 3.2 Desk Study Findings – Species Search

Species Name Designation Approx. distance of

record to Site (m)

Scaup

Aythya marila

Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Schedule 1)

NERC Act Section 41

United Kingdom Biodiversity Action Plan - Priority

Species

The Bonn Convention (Appendix 2)

600m West

Amphibians

Whimbrel

Numenius phaeopus

Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Schedule 1)

IUCN Red List - Red

600m West

Common Toad

Bufo bufo

Great Crested Newt

Triturus cristatus

NERC Act Section 41

United Kingdom Biodiversity Action Plan - Priority

Species

Habitats Directive Annex 2

Habitats Directive Annex 4

Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Schedule 5) Sec

9.4b

NERC Act Section 41

Local Biodiversity Action Plan - Priority Species

United Kingdom Biodiversity Action Plan - Priority

Species

The Bern Convention (Appendix 2)

1,100m South

1,300m North-west

Woodlark

Lullula arborea

Wryneck

Jynx torquilla

Mammals (non-bats)

Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Schedule 1)

NERC Act Section 41

United Kingdom Biodiversity Action Plan - Priority

Species

Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Schedule 1)

NERC Act Section 41

United Kingdom Biodiversity Action Plan - Priority

Species

IUCN Red List - Red

The Bonn Convention (Appendix 2)

1,600m South-east

1,320m West

Birds One list of birds and mention NBN Atlas with 2km buffer

Roe Deer

Capreolus capreolus

The Deer Act 1991

1,950m South-east

Brambling

Fringilla montifringilla

Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Schedule 1)

IUCN Red List - Red

1,320m West

European Otter

Lutra lutra

Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Schedule 9 & 11)

Bristol Biodiversity Action Plan – Priority Species

1,400m East

Ecological Impact Assessment for St.Marys Church, Redcliffe 13 September 2019

Ecological Impact Assessment for St.Marys Church, Redcliffe 14 September 2019


Eurasian Badger

Meles meles

Mammals (bats)

The Protection of badgers Act 1984

1,620m West

Extended Phase 1 Habitat Survey

3.4 A visual representation of the results from the Phase 1 Habitat Survey with colour coded habitat

labels can be found in Appendix 3, target notes are given in Appendix 4

Serotine

Eptesicus serotinus

Habitats Directive Annex 4

Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Schedule 5)

Section 9.4b

NERC Act Section 41

United Kingdom Biodiversity Action Plan - Priority

Species

1,200m West

3.5 The habitats within the Site include: approximately 185m 2 amenity grassland is present in the

north and south; three rows of trees; ornamental planting with a mixture of native and non-native

species; and hardstanding surrounding the church and forming various paths.

3.6 Amenity grassland consisted of perennial rye-grass Lolium perenne (D), white clover Trifolium

repens (D), daisy Bellis perennis (F), ribwort plantain Plantago lanceolate (O), creeping buttercup

Ranunculus repens (O).

Bechstein’s bat

Myotis bechsteinii

Habitats Directive Annex 4

Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 Schedule 5)

Section 9.4b

910m South

3.7 Three rows of trees, delineated as: treeline 1 comprising 9 trees of small-leaved lime Tilia cordata

with a single silver birch Betula pendula; treeline 2 comprising 13 trees of small-leaved lime; and

treeline 3 comprising 5 trees small-leaved lime with a single horse chestnut Aesculus

hippocastanum at the eastern boundary. All trees were semi-mature or mature with large crowns.

Daubenton’s bat

Myotis daubentonii

Habitats Directive Annex 4

Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Schedule 5)

Section 9.4b

1,600m South-east

3.8 An area of ornamental planting, consisting of mainly native, non-mature specimens was present

along the south-west boundary. Species included: elder Sambucus nigra (O), yew Taxus baccata

(O), wild cherry Prunus avium (R), bramble Rubus fruticosus (R), buckthorn Rhamnus cathartica

(R), ash Fraxinus excelsior (R), small-leaved lime (A) and ivy Hedera helix (A).

Leisler’s bat

Nyctalus leisleri

Noctule

Nyctalus noctula

Habitats Directive Annex 4

Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Schedule 5)

Section 9.4b

NERC Act Section 41

United Kingdom Biodiversity Action Plan - Priority

Species

Habitats Directive Annex 4

Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Schedule 5)

Section 9.4b

NERC Act Section 41

United Kingdom Biodiversity Action Plan - Priority

Species

1,520m West

1,730m South-West

Bats

Preliminary Roost Assessment (PRA)

3.9 A search took place of the exterior of the church (areas within proximity of the proposals) as well

as a small, brick walled, outbuilding with a corrugated roof, located on the eastern boundary of

the Site next to Pump Lane. No evidence of bats was observed on the exterior of the buildings or

the interior of the outbuilding and no features with the potential to support bat roosts were

observed on either building. The stonework of the church in good repair with no cracks or cavities

present and limited other features or materials were present. The exterior of the church was

assessed as having negligible suitability to support bat roosts. The outbuilding was assessed as

having negligible suitability to support a bat roost.

Common Pipistrelle

Pipistrellus pipistrellus

Soprano Pipistrelle

Pipestrellus pygmaeus

Reptiles

Grass Snake

Natrix Helvetica

Adder

Vipera berus

Slow worm

Anguis fragilis

Habitats Directive Annex 4

Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Schedule 5)

Section 9.4b

Habitats Directive Annex 4

Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Schedule 5)

Section 9.4b

NERC Act Section 41

United Kingdom Biodiversity Action Plan - Priority

Species

Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Schedule 5)

Section 9.1 & 9.5

NERC Act Section 41

Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Schedule 5)

Section 9.1 & 9.5

NERC Act Section 41

Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Schedule 5)

Section 9.1 & 9.5

1,780m South-West

1,600m South-east

1,400m North-west

1,520m West

1,020m South-west

Preliminary Hibernation Survey

3.10 All underground areas: the cellar, the vault and third underground space, were searched. No

evidence of bats was found in any of the areas. All the vents were sealed with shutters and no

other potential access points for bats to enter the underground areas were observed. The

underground areas were assessed as having negligible potential to support bat roosts.

Preliminary Ground Level Roost Assessment (GLA)

3.11 All trees within the Site were assessed for their potential to support bat roosts. One tree was

assessed as having the potential to support bat roosts. The remaining trees did not support PRFs,

with the majority of the trees being of a smaller size and in good health. Two PRFs were found on

the mature small-leaved lime (T5). The PRFS were vertical splits with cavities extending up into

the trunk. The first was at a height of one metre from the ground, the second at two metres from

the ground. Both were facing north-east and exhibited good space for flight from the tree and

sufficient shelter from weather and light as a result of the large tree crown. Images of both

features can be found in Appendix 5. These two PRFs were assessed as having high suitability to

support a bat roost.

Endoscope Survey

3.12 Both PRFs were examined. The first feature opened immediately into a wide cavity that extended

approximately 12cm back into the trunk, average diameter 8cm. The cavity then extended

upwards 120cm with a slight right inclination tightening towards the top. The interior of the

feature was smooth, with no debris or detritus found as the camera moved through the cavity.

Ecological Impact Assessment for St.Marys Church, Redcliffe 15 September 2019

Ecological Impact Assessment for St.Marys Church, Redcliffe 16 September 2019


Approximately 90% of the cavity was searched with no signs of bats found. The second feature,

found at 2m from the ground, travelled straight up for approximately 100cm, exhibiting a

cylindrical spire extending back 5cm at the opening with an average diameter of 4cm. Smooth

textures recorded, no debris or detritus. Unlike the first, the top of the cavity was reached and

there was no evidence to suggest presence of bats.

4 Discussion

Birds

3.13 All areas were assessed for their suitability to foraging and nesting birds. The trees and shrubs

have the potential to support nesting birds during the nesting bird season. Within the area of

shrub on the eastern side of the southern lawn there are a number of existing bird boxes present

on the row of trees. Therefore, the Site is likely to support nesting and foraging of low numbers of

common and widespread birds.

Badgers

3.14 No evidence of badgers was observed within the Site. The desk study returned results of badgers,

but at a distance of 1,620m to the west of the Site, and no latrines, setts or other evidence of

badgers was found. The Site is located in a highly urban area and therefore it is highly unlikely

that badgers are present within the local landscape surrounding the Site. Badgers will not be

discussed any further within this report.

Other Notable Species

3.15 Other species searched for during the extended Phase 1 Habitat Survey were dormice, GCN and

reptiles. No evidence or suitable habitat was found within the Site to consider these species

relevant to the development proposals. In relation to GCN and reptiles, lawns were kept tidy

through regular mowing regimes, free from refuge piles, and other suitable terrestrial habitat for

these species. Furthermore, the closest records of GCN and reptiles species were recorded over

1,000m away and no records of dormice were present. As a result, there will be no further

mention of dormice, GCN, or reptiles throughout the remainder of the report.

4.1 Relevant legislation afforded to protected species, habitats and designated sites is detailed in

Appendix 2.

Statutory Designated Sites and Non-Statutory Designated Sites

4.2 A number of statutory and non-statutory designated sites are located within the wider landscape.

These include three SSSIs: Ashton Court, Avon Gorge, and Quarry Steps Durdham Downs; one

NNR; four LNRs and seven SNCI were also located nearby Site. The nearest designated site is

located over 900m from the Site boundary. Habitats within the designated sites include: seminatural

broadleaf woodland, including patches of ancient woodland, ancient pollards, species-rich

neutral grassland and patches of calcareous grassland.

4.3 It is not considered that the proposals will result in any impacts on the statutory designated sites

and non-statutory designated sites within the wider area as: the Site is spatially separated from

the designated sites, the proposals are small in scale; and any impacts as a result of the proposal

will be contained to within and adjacent to the Site. In addition, the proposals do not relate to

residential development and therefore will not result in increased recreational pressure on the

designated sites within the wider area.

Habitats

4.4 The proposals will result in the loss of all the amenity grassland in the north of the Site and

approximately 45m 2 of amenity grassland in the south of the Site. The ornamental planting and

shrubs, and one mature tree along the tree line (T5 - the tree identified to have two BRP features)

will be removed. The habitats to be removed are of negligible – low ecological value. The value of

the tree in relation to bats is discussed below.

4.5 As compensation for the loss of amenity grassland, a green roof and an area of terrace planting

has been proposed in the northern area of the Site and a wildflower meadow and wildflower green

roof have been proposed in the southern area of the Site. To replace the value of the loss of

mature trees within the Site, a formal line of trees will be planted along the northern perimeter of

the Site. Overall, these habitats will provide a significant increase in the ecological value of the

Site.

Bats

4.6 The buildings within the Site have negligible suitability to support roosting bats.

4.7 One tree within the Site has the potential to support a bat roost (T5, small-leaved lime). The tree

has been subject to a single endoscope survey which confirmed that bats were not present during

the survey and that the PRFs can be suitably surveyed using an endoscope as opposed to

requiring emergence surveys.

4.8 Tree T5 will be removed as a result of the proposals. Therefore, further surveys are required to

determine if this tree supports a bat roost. The further surveys can either be emergence/re-entry

surveys or endoscope surveys. The surveys should be undertaken during the bat survey season

(May - September, with September being sub-optimal).

4.9 All bats and their roosts are subject to the highest level of protection afforded to species in the UK

as European Protected Species (EPS), regardless of the number or species of bats affected. A bat

Ecological Impact Assessment for St.Marys Church, Redcliffe 17 September 2019

Ecological Impact Assessment for St.Marys Church, Redcliffe 18 September 2019


oost is defined as any structure or place which is used for shelter or protection, irrespective of

whether or not bats are resident.

4.10 Should a bat roost be present then a Natural England European Protected Species (EPS) Licence

to fell the tree will be required.

Bat Mitigation Strategy

4.11 Given the urban location of the Site and the type of the PRFs, it is anticipated, that should a bat

roost be present within T5, it is likely to be of a common and widespread species that utilises

urban areas, such as common pipistrelle or soprano pipistrelle, as opposed to the UKs rarer bats.

The mitigation and compensation for common and widespread species (such as common

pipistrelle and soprano pipistrelle) is well understood, well-practiced and considered generally

deliverable.

4.12 The presence of a bat roost within T5 has not been confirmed. However, within the Site there

exists opportunity to compensate for the removal of tree T5. The proposals would allow for bat

tubes or lifted/raised weatherboarding to be installed on the eastern or south-west facing aspect

of the proposed studio building that is to be constructed on the eastern boundary of the southern

garden. In this area, the mature trees provide sufficient shelter from both weather conditions and

visitor disturbance, whilst also providing clear flight paths for entrance/exit. Alternatively, bat

boxes could be installed within mature trees within the Site, which would provide a similar

function as the PRFs that are present on T5.

4.13 The exact details of the bat mitigation and compensation would be determined by the results of

the further surveys and if a bat roost is present then mitigation and compensation would be

secured by a European Protected Species licence.

nest (distance to be decided at the ecologist's discretion). This buffer must remain intact until is

has been confirmed that that the young have fledged, and the nest is no longer in use.

4.17 The tree housing the current bird boxes is not scheduled for removal or disturbance. New tree

planting is proposed within the Site which will provide additional nesting opportunities within the

Site in the long term. In addition, wildflower meadow is proposed which will support a greater

abundance and more diverse invertebrate assemblage, thereby increasing food provision for

birds.

Enhancements

4.18 A number of additional measures are proposed within the scheme, which will further enhance the

ecological value of the Site:

• Planting of scattered trees in the southern garden, creating a woodland feel, providing areas of

shading;

• Wildflower meadow planted in the eastern side of the southern garden; and

• A wildflower seed mix also used to create a green roof on the studio building proposed to be built

in the south garden.

• Extra bird boxes installed on additional, suitable trees within the southern part of the Site.

4.19 These enhancement measures, along with the mitigation and compensation measures outlined

above would significantly increase the ecological value of the Site.

4.14 Based on the above premise, if a bat roost is present within T5, then bat mitigation and

compensation can be delivered within the Site and would be secured by EPS licence. Therefore,

the further survey work, outlined in 4.8, could be conditioned via a Grampian (precommencement)

planning condition as part of any planning application granted for the Site,

without jeopardizing the favourable conservation status of any bat species using T5 as a bat roost

(if determined as present by the conditioned surveys). This is reasoned in line with guidelines put

forward by the British Standards Institute (BSI) 5 and CIEEM 6 .

Birds

4.15 The proposals have the potential to harm nesting birds via the removal of scattered shrubs and

one lime (T5). Disturbance of works could also have an effect on nesting birds, works are

proposed within 5m of two nesting bird boxes found on the large horse chestnut tree (T2), which

are suitable for both finches, and sparrows and tits.

4.16 In order to mitigate for this any of the vegetation to be removed and any construction works

occurring within the southern are of the Site should be carried out outside the nesting bird season

(from March-August inclusive). Should it be necessary to remove conduct work during the bird

nesting season, the area must be checked in advance for the presence of bird's nests by a

suitably competent person. If there is no evidence of breeding birds, the works can, starting no

later than 48 hours after inspection, be carried out. If active nests are identified, any of the

vegetation clearance must cease and an appropriate buffer zone must be established around the

5 BSI (2013). Biodiversity – code of practice for planning and development, BS 42020:2013. British Standards Institution, Bristol.

Section 9.24c. Page 36.

6 CIEEM (2017). Guidelines for Preliminary Ecological Appraisal. 2

nd

Edition. Chartered Institute for Ecology and Environmental

Management, Winchester. Box 4 – Point C. Page 11.

Ecological Impact Assessment for St.Marys Church, Redcliffe 19 September 2019

Ecological Impact Assessment for St.Marys Church, Redcliffe 20 September 2019


5 Conclusion

Appendix 1

Site Plan

5.1 The Site is of low ecological value, supporting a range of urban typical habitats: amenity

grassland, several mature trees, a small area of shrubbery and ornamental planting, and several

formal lines of trees, with the grounds intersected with hardstanding.

5.2 A tree (T5) was found with the potential to support a bat roost. One survey of this tree has been

undertaken, however further surveys are required to determine if this tree supports a bat roost.

This tree is scheduled to be removed as a result of the proposals and therefore a bat mitigation

strategy, including the conditioning of further bat surveys, has been outlined.

5.3 Migration and compensation has been outlined for all habitats and species to be effected by the

proposals. Enhancement measures provided to increase the ecological value of the site.

Ecological Impact Assessment for St.Marys Church, Redcliffe 21 September 2019

Ecological Impact Assessment for St.Marys Church, Redcliffe 22 September 2019


Appendix 2

Policy & Legal Considerations

Planning Policy Legislation

Statutory nature conservation sites and protected species are a ‘material consideration’ in the UK planning

process (DCLG 2018). Where planning permission is not required, for example on proposals for external

repair to structures, consideration of protected species remains necessary given their protection under UK

and EU law.

Natural England Standing Advice aims to support Local Planning Authorities decision making in respect of

protected species (Natural England 2012). Standing advice is a material consideration in determining

the outcome of applications, in the same way as any individual response received from Natural England

following consultation.

The Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2017 transpose the requirements of the

European Habitats Directive (Council Directive 92/43/EEC) and Birds Directive (Council Directive

79/409/EEC) into UK law, enabling the designation of protected sites and species at a European level.

The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (as amended) forms the key piece of UK legislation relating to

the protection of habitats and species.

The Countryside Rights of Way Act 2000 provides additional support to the Wildlife and Countryside

Act 1981; for example, increasing the level of protection for certain species of reptiles.

The Wild Mammals (Protection) Act 1996 sets out the welfare framework in respect to wild mammals,

prohibiting a range of activities that may cause unnecessary suffering.

Species and Habitats of Principal Importance for Conservation in England and Wales and priority

habitats and species listed on the Surrey Biodiversity Action Plans (BAP) are species which are targeted for

conservation. The government has a duty to ensure that involved parties take reasonable practice steps

to further the conservation of such species under Section 41 of the Natural Environment and Rural

Communities Bill 2006. In addition, the Act places a biodiversity duty on public authorities who ‘must, in

exercising their functions, have regard, so far as is consistent with the proper exercise of those functions,

to the purpose of conserving biodiversity’ (Section 40 [1]). Criteria for selection of national priority habitats

and species in the UK include international threat and marked national decline.

The National Planning Policy Framework (DCLG 2018) states (Section 11), that the planning system

should minimise impacts on biodiversity, providing net gains in biodiversity where possible. It also states

that local planning authorities and planning policies should:

• Plan positively for the creation, protection, enhancement and management of networks of biodiversity

and green infrastructure.

• Take account of the need to plan for biodiversity at a landscape-scale across local authority

boundaries.

• Identify and map components of the local ecological networks, including: international, national and

local sites of importance for biodiversity, and areas identified by local partnerships for habitat

restoration or creation.

• Promote the preservation, restoration and re-creation of priority habitats, ecological networks and the

recovery of priority species populations, linked to national and local targets and identify suitable

indicators for monitoring biodiversity in the plan.

Protected Species Legislation

Bats

All British species of bat are listed on the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (as amended) Schedule 5. It

is an offence to deliberately kill, damage, take (Section 9(1)) a bat; to intentionally or recklessly disturb a

bat whilst it occupies a place of shelter or protection (Section 9(4)(b)); or to deliberately or recklessly

damage, destroy or obstruct access to a bat roost (Section 9(4)(c)). Given the strict nature of these

offences, there is an obligation on the developer and owner of a site to consider the presence of bats.

All British bats are listed on the Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2010, Schedule

2. Regulation 41 strengthens the protection of bats under the 1981 Act against deliberate capture or killing

(Regulation 41(1) (a)), deliberate disturbance (Regulation 41(1) (b)) [1] and damage or destruction of a

resting place (Regulation 41(1) (d)).

A bat roost is defined as any structure or place which is used for shelter or protection, irrespective of

whether or not bats are resident. Buildings and trees may be used by bats for a number of different

purposes throughout the year including resting, sleeping, breeding, raising young and hibernating. Use

depends on bat age, sex, condition and species as well as the external factors of season and weather

conditions. A roost used during one season is therefore protected throughout the year and any proposed

works that may result in disturbance to bats, and loss, obstruction of or damage to a roost are licensable.

Application for a Natural England EPS Licence

Development works that may cause killing or injury of bats or that would result in the damage, loss or

disturbance of a bat roost would require a Natural England (NE) Bat Mitigation Licence.

For a Mitigation licence to be granted three tests must be met. Evidence is needed to determine these three

tests: whether there is a need for the development which justifies the impact on the European Protected

Species (EPS); whether there is an alternative which would avoid the impact and need for an EPS licence;

and whether mitigation proposed is sufficient to maintain the conservation status of the EPS in question.

A Mitigation Licence application will generally only be considered by NE on receipt of planning consent, and

once any pre-commencement conditions of relevance to ecology have been discharged.

There are two licensing routes now available for bats, which comprise:

Full NE England EPS Mitigation Licence:

• NE aim to determine the application within six weeks (although this can take longer).

• The application comprises three components including an application form (broad details of the

applicant, site and proposals); a detailed Method Statement providing the survey methods and

findings, impact assessment and mitigation measures (including detailed maps and schedule of

works); and a Reasoned Statement outlining the ‘need’ for the development and consideration of

alternatives.

NE Low Impact Class Licence

• This new route provides an alternative, quicker route (with a much-reduced application form, and a

target of 10 days to determine an application).

• This Low Impact Class Licence is only available to Registered Consultants identified by NE.

• This is available for sites which support up to three low status roosts (day roosts, night roosts, feeding

roosts and transitional roosts) of a maximum of three common species. The common species which

can be covered by this licence include common pipistrelle, soprano pipistrelle, brown long-eared,

whiskered, Brandts, Daubenton’s and Natterer’s bat.

• All licensed works require evidence that there is a need for the development and that appropriate

mitigation, including seasonal constraints and provision of alternative habitat and/or roosting

structures is considered.

• Before Natural England can confirm the site is registered and licensable works can commence, an

assessment of the three tests must be undertaken by the Registered Consultant. Although this does

not need to be submitted to NE, NE may subsequently undertake a review of the project and request

to see all evidence as collected by the Consultant. This can only be undertaken following a survey and

impact assessment which must be carried out in accordance with licence conditions and BCT survey

guidelines.

[1] Relates specifically to deliberate disturbance in such a way as to be likely to significantly affect i) the ability of any significant group

of animals of that species to survive, breed or rear or nurture their young or ii) the local distribution of that species.

Ecological Impact Assessment for St.Marys Church, Redcliffe 23 September 2019

Ecological Impact Assessment for St.Marys Church, Redcliffe 24 September 2019


• This licence cannot be used in relation to trees.

Several species of bat, including brown long-eared and soprano pipistrelle are listed as species of principal

importance under the NERC Act (2006). Section 41 of the Act is used to guide decision-makers such as

public bodies, including local and regional authorities, in implementing their duty under section 40 of the

Natural Environment and Rural Communities Act 2006, to have regard to the conservation of biodiversity

in England, when carrying out their normal functions.

Appendix 3

Great Crested Newt

GCN and their places of shelter are subject to the same level of protection as bats as a European Protected

Species (see above).

Reptiles

Phase 1 Habitat Survey Results

All UK reptiles and amphibians are legally protected from intentional and reckless killing and injury under

the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (as amended).

Hedgehog

Hedgehogs are protected by Schedule 6 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (as amended). This Act

gives protection to hedgehog with regard to killing and taking by certain methods.

Nesting Birds

Birds and their nests are protected by the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (as amended). This Act gives

protection to all species of bird with regard to killing and injury, and to their nests and eggs with regard to

taking, damaging and destruction. Certain species listed on Schedule 1 of the Act, are afforded additional

protection against protection.

Ecological Impact Assessment for St.Marys Church, Redcliffe 25 September 2019

Ecological Impact Assessment for St.Marys Church, Redcliffe 26 September 2019


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0 25 50

Metres

Sources: Esri, HERE, Garmin, Intermap, increment P Corp., GEBCO, USGS, FAO, NPS, NRCAN, GeoBase, IGN, Kadaster NL, Ordnance Survey, Esri Japan, METI, Esri China (Hong Kong), (c) OpenStreetMap contributors, and the GIS User Community CB:CB EB:Bean_C LUC FIGX_10802_Phase1_r0_A3L 29/10/2019

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Map Scale @A3: 1:500

Source: LUC, OS


Appendix 4

Appendix 5

Phase 1 Habitat Survey Target Notes

BRP Features on T5

Target Note Number

Description

1 Treeline 1 consisting of predominantly small-leaved lime trees except

for one silver birch. Trees are semi-mature.

2 Tree line 2 made entirely of lime trees of a similar age to trees in

treeline 1, assumed planting at the same time.

3 Treeline 3 – row of four mature trees labelled T2-T5, from north to

south the individuals are lime, horse chestnut, lime, lime. The trees

are mature.

4 A single mature London plane Platanus × acerifolia mature.

5 Area of ornamental planting, all at shrub level, 2-4m high. Species

include: elder, yew, cherry, bramble, buckthorn, ash, lime, ivy.

6 Bird box and bird feeder attached to Horse Chestnut

First feature on Tilia cordata, one metre from the ground

Second feature on Tilia cordata, two metres from the ground

Ecological Impact Assessment for St.Marys Church, Redcliffe 27 September 2019

Ecological Impact Assessment for St.Marys Church, Redcliffe 28 September 2019

Ecological Impact Assessment for St.Marys Church, Redcliffe 29 Se


10.3 MEP STRATEGY

4 Site Infrastructure

Meter number 1: (Vodafone) MPAN 2200031827047

The proposed development will be positioned in the immediate vicinity to the existing church and surrounding roads and

walkways. To understand the impact of the new development on the underground services and to eliminate any

unforeseen risks, the utility assessment has been carried out. The assessment consisted of:

• Record information received from WPD

• Demand calculations for the proposed developments.

• Review of the existing network capacities.

• Consideration to the services and sustainability strategies.

4.1 Existing site infrastructure and enabling works

Electrical infrastructure

A number of LV cables run in the vicinity of the site as well as a number of HV (11kV) cables. There are 3no. existing

supplies into the church as further described below.

Usage

27/9/18 to 28/9/19: 35853kWh

28/9/17 to 27/9/18: 35884kWh

This meter doesn’t report back maximum demand.

Meter number 2: (Main church) MPAN 2200017143764

Usage

1/10/18 to 1/10/19: 60030kWh

1/10/17 to 1/10/18: 57131kWh

This meter also seems to report back a monthly Maximum Demand which can also be viewed on the screen of the meter

itself, highest recently is 32kVA in March 2018; typically 22kVA.

The main church meter and Vodafone meter in the cupboard in the north porch are a “looped” supply arrangement i.e.

they share an incoming cable. Both are fused at 80A per phase (55kVA); the loop arrangement limits the safe loading for

the two combined to 100A per phase (69kVA).

Meter number 3: (Church kitchen) MPAN 2200017143773 (located in the kitchen under counter)

1563.R1 – Stage 2 report Page 8 of 29


1563.R1 – Stage 2 report Page 9 of 29

Usage

17/9/18 to 21/9/19: 26340kVA

14/9/16 to 17/9/18: 42900kVA ~ 21450kVA/yr

That is fused at 80A/phase and is not looped.

To know how much “headroom” there is does depend hugely on the usage pattern of the Vodafone supply. Considering

it “constant” 24/7/365 would mean 4kVA, so a headroom of 69-4-32=33kVA. Applying the Vodafone annual usage against

a standard commercial usage profile infers a maximum demand of 33kVA so a headroom of 69-33-32=4kVA.

Figure 2 - Existing gas infrastructure.

The required services capacities are as indicated in the design criteria second of this report. The conclusion is that the

new development requires significantly more energy than can be provided from the existing supplies.

Water

An existing water main serves the site from Redcliffe Way.

Telecommunication infrastructure

The existing telecommunication connection into the building will be extended to serve the new areas.

Gas

The location of local gas infrastructure has been investigated to determine the impact it will have on building works. As

of the enquiries performed in November 2019, there is a gas main running within the road adjacent to the development,

with a gas main running across the front of the church to serve the existing boiler and kitchens.


5 Proposed infrastructure

This option utilises reusing the existing abandoned cable from the Broughton house substation and extending it (green

line below) to Saint Marry Redcliffe to provide supply for the phase 1 (90kVA).

5.1 Gas

There is an existing gas supply to the site that serves the existing boilers and kitchens. This is to be retained and left

untouched, unless a risk is identified due to construction. In this case it will be diverted to suit the new layout.

5.2 Water

Any existing cold-water supply will be upgraded if required to serve the new development. Currently, there is no water

storage is proposed for the site. This is to be confirmed by the Client.

5.3 Drainage

New drainage connections from the new build extensions will be required.

5.4 Electrical supply

Electrical load assessment

5.4.2.1 Application for new connection for Phase 1 & 2

The electrical load assessment has been carried out with the support of the design team and the Client to determine the

electrical load profile of the new buildings.

The developed design calculations indicate that the new buildings could use in region of 220kVA including 10% spare

capacity for future.

An application was made to WPD for the new supply, reference number 3478246. Consequently, QODA met with WPD

on site to discuss various supply options including re-using spare capacity on the existing incomers.

WPD confirmed that there is no spare capacity in the area at Low Voltage which would mean a new HV/LV substation will

need to be provided. The budget cost for this is £52,800 as identified by WPD.

5.4.2.2 Application for new connection at Low Voltage for Phase 1 only

This load can be split between the two significant project phases into South and North and are 130kVA for South and

90kVA for North. Splitting the load into the two phases gives more advantage as it could be possible to supply the smaller

90kVA load without a substation with anticipation that when the phase 2 goes ahead there will be more inbuilt capacity

in the WPD network for the phase 2 to avoid substation. If the substation has to be provided then it would be provided

only for the phase 2.

More research has been done in co-operation with WPD to establish the feasibility of supplying phase 1 at low voltage.

The following possible option has been identified and is currently being reviewed by WPD (22/11/2019).

Temporary solution

The Phase 1 Low voltage supply option is currently being reviewed by WPD. At present the agreed solution is to allow for

space for the new 500kVA substation in the location of the phase 2 project with the possibility to build the substation

during phase 1 if there is no other way. E.g. if the option 2 low voltage supply doesn’t become possible.

5.5 Telecommunications

The current proposal is to relocate the existing patch cabinet into the new Vestry back office and redirect all existing

services into this new location. The services will include Fibre optic cable, copper data cables and security services. At

present it is not envisaged that a new telecommunication services will be required.

1563.R1 – Stage 2 report Page 10 of 29


6 Low/Zero Carbon Technologies

The following table sets out QODA’s feasibility study of using low/zero carbon technologies within the design of the new visitor center at St Mary Redcliffe Church. The baseline option would be to use mains gas for space heating and hot water and

electricity from the grid for lighting and power. Technologies have been assessed based on their technical viability at this stage.

Technology How it works Key Considerations Viability for St Mary Redcliffe

Biomass • Energy by burning solid organic matter in the form of

wood chips or sawdust pellets.

• Biomass boilers can provide energy for heating and hot

water systems.

• A carbon neutral energy source.

• Best suited for relatively continuous operation.

• Require store facilities to accommodate the fuel.

• Ideally, biomass fuel should be sourced locally to reduce transport

costs and associated carbon emissions.

• Use may be limited in Smoke Control Zones.

To allow Biomass to be viable for the site ideally you would want

to create a centralised energy centre that would provide heating

and hot water for the whole site. A Biomass system does require

a large area for storage and good access for delivery lorries.

Therefore, looking at this development in its own right then


biomass would not be a viable option.

Ground-source Heat

Pump (GSHP)

• GSHPs transfer heat from the ground into a building to

provide space heating and/or hot water.

• The ground tends to be at a constant temperature of

around 12°C throughout the year and, through the use

of a refrigerant cycle this constant low grade heat can

be harnessed to provide a useful level of heat for a

building.

• Feasibility depends on space for the piping circuit and whether the

geology is suitable for either boreholes or trenches.

• Heat pumps are most suitable for low temperature heating systems

such as underfloor heating.

• The capital cost of GSHPs are significantly higher that fossil-fuel

boiler.

• Greatest carbon savings when combined with renewable electricitygenerating

technologies.

Due to the restraints of the site being a city centre and burial

location the only way to incorporate a GSHP system would be

through using boreholes. Detailed investigations would need to

be carried out to look at the ground conditions. Therefore, we

have deemed this technology to be not viable on this project.


Air-source Heat Pump

(air to water ASHP)

• Heat pumps and exchangers extract heat from outside

air to provide space heating and/or hot water.

• ASHPs are less efficient than GSHP due to the lower

average temperature of outside air and greater

variance across the year.

• Requires a suitable location for the external unit to the building -

planning permission may be required.

• The noise generated by the external unit must be considered.

• Like GSHPs, air to water ASHPs are most effective when providing

space heating via under-floor heating systems designed to operate at

temperatures of around 30°C-40°C.

• ASHPs are easier and cheaper to install than GSHPs however GHSPs

are more efficient.

ASHP work best when working at low temperatures. Therefore,

this would be most viable for the new build extension areas. In

the existing church the ASHP would struggle to reach the

required temperatures to link into the existing system. We are

currently looking to use a variation of an ASHP which allows for

cooling and heating via an air to air system. This is often

referred to as a VRF or multi split system.


1563.R1 – Stage 2 report Page 11 of 29


1563.R1 – Stage 2 report Page 12 of 29

Technology How it works Key Considerations Viability for St Mary Redcliffe

Cobined Heat and

Power (CHP)

• CHP is the simultaneous generation of both usable heat

and electrical power from the same source.

• Fuel (usually mains gas or oil) is combusted in an engine

where the mechanical power produced is used to

generate electricity while the heat emitted provides

space heating or hot water.

• CHP requires predictable and fairly constant electricity and heating

loads for best performance.

• CHP units are best suited for hotels, residential homes, pupil

accommodations, hospitals and schools.

• The unit should be sized on heat demands, rather than electrical

requirements - units are usually sized on the building’s hot water

load as this is continuous throughout the year.

CHP works best on schemes that have a high hot water

demand as allows the system to work efficiently all year round.

The development has a relatively low requirement for hot

water and there for a CHP system would not be viable. As per a

biomass boiler if the whole site was looked at and a centralised

energy centre created this would then become viable from a

cost saving technology, however due to the national grid


decarbonising this technology now offers little in the way of

carbon savings.

Solar Thermal • Solar thermal panels generate hot water from the sun’s

energy through the use of solar collectors.

• A mixture of water and anti-freeze is circulated through

the solar collectors and a heat exchanger within the

water storage cylinder to heat the water in the tank.

• Most effective in a south-facing position on an incline of 30-40

degrees.

• Panel locations should be clear of obstructions and over shading.

• Requires space for a hot water cylinder close to the collectors.

• Most economically viable in buildings with a high hot water demand

or where a building is not on the national gas grid.

This potentially could be incorporated on the roof space

however due to low hot water demand the space would be

better served by PV panels


Photovolatics (PV)

• PV arrays are made up of semi-conductor solar cells

which convert sunlight into electricity.

• The position of the PV array will affect the energy generation and,

consequently the carbon and financial savings.

Yes, this would be viable and appropriate roof locations would

need to be investigated. The church have previously had PV

• Energy from sunlight causes an electrical current to

flow between difference atomic energy levels within

the solar cells.

• PV panels may require regular cleaning to avoid a reduction in

efficiency

• PV panels should be free from shading from adjacent buildings/trees.

sized to go onto the main roof and a feasibility study was

carried out.


• PV panels are made of solar cells, and several panels

create a PV array.

• Permission is required from the DNO (Distribution Network

Operator) to connect the array to the grid (the cost of this grid

connection is dependent on the size of the array and its location on

the grid).

Wind • Wind turbines produce energy by using wind power to

drive a generator.

• Turbines can either be free-standing or roof-mounted.

Roof-mounted wind turbines require an average wind

speed of 3 m/s to be viable whereas larger, stand-alone

turbines require greater speeds of approximately 6 m/s

to be viable.

• Rural areas are better suited than urban areas as the wind speeds

are higher and less turbulent.

• Pay-back periods are strongly dependent on wind conditions plus the

length of cabling required to connect the turbine to the building.

• Planning permission is required and is often a contentious issue

Not viable in the city centre


7 Condition assessment of the existing services in the spaces

identified for refurbishment.

The services in spaces identified for refurbishment are generally at the end of their economic life. The proposal is to strip

out services from these areas and provide with new.

8 Building Services – Plantroom requirements

Adequate provision is to be made in terms of plant rooms, routes and risers providing adequate access for operation and

maintenance and flexibility for the future. All plant is to be concealed. All plant is to be located in dedicated secure areas

which can be locked and allow access by authorised personnel only.

The QODA drawings show the plant / riser space allocated, main services routes and an initial test to fit plant configuration

has been undertaken to ensure adequate plant space provision.

The following list identifies plantrooms required to efficiently operate the building. These plant spaces have already been

requested to be incorporated into the building in close liaison with the Architect and the design team. For further

information please refer to the appendix B of this report.

8.1 Electrical plant requirements

1. External HV/LV substation within GRP enclosure or Architecturally designed building. The substation will be

owned and maintained by WPD.

2. LV utility intake and metering room with main DB and possibly with power factor correction equipment. The cutout

and meter will be owned and maintained by WPD.

3. Comms cabinet located in new Vestry back office. The cabinet will house all security head end equipment and

patch panels for data distribution.

4. Distribution board cupboards throughout the building as identified on QODA drawings.

5. Photo-Voltaic plant on roof of the church. An adequate access will need t be provided to ensure save access for

maintenance.

8.2 Mechanical plant requirements

Figure 3 - lighting in existing spaces

1. Ventilation plant serving the Hogarth Gallery.

2. Outdoor heat pump plant space.

3. Ventilation plant for the event space

4. Water storage will be reviewed at stage 3 and will be dependent on available mains pressure and the

developments usage estimates.

8.3 Other plant which may be required subject to design development

• Sprinkler tank and pump room - fire consultant to advise if sprinkler provision is necessary

• Smoke extract plant – this is not expected but should be confirmed by a fire consultant.

• High level ventilation plant will generally be required to serve smaller areas such as offices and WC’s.

1563.R1 – Stage 2 report Page 13 of 29


9 Mechanical Services Strategy

9.1 Heating

Insulation

Passive Design Measures

Reducing the U-values of external building elements will significantly reduce heat loss through

the building fabric. This in turn will mean that less energy is required to condition the building.

A U-value is a measure of heat loss. It is expressed in W/m²K and shows the amount of heat lost

in watts (W) per square metre of material (for example wall, roof, floor etc.) per degree of

temperature difference between indoor and outdoor temperatures in Kelvin. The lower the U-

value, the better the insulation provided by the material.

It will be very hard to improve the thermal performance of spaces within the church. The new build extensions however

give a perfect opportunity to beyond current building regulation standards and even potentially looking at passivhaus

methodology if zero carbon is on the agenda after the sustainability workshop. The below table shows the current

proposed U-values compared to building regulation min standards.

Building Fabric New thermal elements Part L2B Proposed new elements

External wall 0.28 W/m².K 0.18 W/m².K

Roof 0.18 W/m².K 0.16 W/m².K

Floor 0.22 W/m².K 0.16 W/m².K

Glazing 1.8 W/m².K 1.4 W/m².K

Glazing g-value 0.64 Variable

External Doors 1.8 W/m².K 1.4W/m².K

Airtightness

Increasing the air tightness of the building through careful detailing and accurate construction techniques will also reduce

the heating demand. Building airtightness can be defined as the inward or outward air leakage through unintentional

leakage points or areas in the building envelope. This air leakage is driven by differential pressures across the building

envelope due to the combined effects of stack, external wind and mechanical ventilation systems. It is measured in m³ or

air, per m² of envelope, per hour at 50 Pascals differential pressure between the inside and outside of the building.

Airtightness is crucial to improving the energy performance of buildings. In the UK, the temperature of the outside air is

nearly always lower than the temperature of the air inside the building, thus, any air leakage

from the inside to the outside of the building is likely to result in:

1. A significant reduction in the thermal resistance of the thermal insulation, due to air

leakage past the insulation (thermal bypassing), leading to increases in realised fabric U-

values.

2. An increase in the building’s ventilation and fabric heat losses, resulting in an increase in space heating

requirement.

Thermal mass

Thermal mass describes the ability of a

material to absorb, store and release

heat energy with the aim of

moderating the internal environment.

During the day in winter, exposed

thermal mass absorbs and stores heat.

As the temperature drops at night the

thermal mass radiates the heat stored

from the day. This cycle is repeated daily.

Thermal mass is not a crucial aspect of sustainable heating solutions and is most relevant to the control of summer

temperatures.

The existing parts of the building has a lot of exposed thermal mass due to the age of construction. This will help reduce

the cooling demands in areas with high internal gains and also allow the option of looking into a natural ventilation

strategy in certain areas.

Heat Generation Options

As the existing heating plant serving the church has been reported as functioning well, it is not

proposed to modify this to increase capacity for the new areas. The new development will instead

have its own dedicated plant. During stage 2, a number of heat generation options have been

reviewed. These are listed below:

1. Gas fired boilers

2. Air Source Heat Pumps (ASHP)

a. Air to Water heat pumps

b. Variable refrigerant flow (VRF)

3. District heating connection

4. Packaged air handling plant providing space heating

Gas Fired Boilers - A dedicated plant room would need to be provided to serve a new Low Temperature Hot Water (LTHW)

circuit. This system would connect well into a district heating network should the network be sufficiently expanded in line

with the construction programme. This option would also include all associated pressurization, pumping and controls

plant.

Building Air Permeability New thermal elements Part L2B Proposed new elements

Air-tightness standard 10 m³/h.m² @50Pa 3 m³/h.m² @50Pa

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This would also provide heat for hot water production. This option has been discounted due to foreseen issue in

coordinating high level flues to discharge the products of combustion.

Air Source Heat Pumps – Air to Water – External packaged condenser plant produces LTHW all year around. Dedicated

pumping plant complete with pressurization and ancillaries requires an internal plant room or GRP enclosure adjacent

to the external plant space.

This option is most efficient at relatively low water temperatures and is therefore suited to slow reacting heating

strategies such as under floor heating making use of high thermal masses. Radiators can be included, but need to be

oversized to accommodate the lower distribution temperatures.

It is possible to extend this option to generate hot water to serve the kitchen, however,

based on the size and likely usage of the kitchen, this option will likely be inefficient.

Heat Emitter Options

Option 1: Heating to the new build areas can be provided via an

underfloor heating system.

Special plastic pipework would be buried into the floor and piped

back to manifolds. The components of the underfloor systems

are all hidden from view.

Underfloor heating systems have a much longer ‘lag’ than

traditional radiators i.e. they take longer to heat up a room and

longer to respond to changes in the system temperature settings,

but they are generally ‘invisible’.

This is the preferred option for the heating plant serving the North side of the new

development.

Air Source Heat Pumps – VRF – As above, external condenser units are required, but in

this instance, refrigerant is distributed to internal Fan Coil Units (FCU). Heating and

cooling can be provided with this system. As cooling is anticipated to be required to the

events space, this option is considered for these areas.

District Heating Connection – Bristol is currently extending a district heating network in

close proximity to St Mary Redcliffe Church. Plate heat exchangers and associated

pressurization, pumps and controls will be required.

Due to uncertainty with regard to the construction programme of the district heating

network, this option is not feasible for the development. It will, however, be considered

for future connection. The proposed Air Source Heat Pump plant could be disconnected

and replaced with plate heat exchangers at the end of their economic life to make use

of the available district heating.

Packaged Air Handling Plant Providing Heating – Areas with high air volumes can be heated and cooled by heating the

fresh air supply. This is a potential solution for the events space and the Hogarth Gallery. As these spaces have fairly

high occupancy, this drives a high supply air volume requirement, which has the capacity to provide space heating.

A packaged AHU will use a refrigerant compression and expansion system to take heat from exhaust air and “reject” this

into the supply air stream. A thermal wheel will also be used to recover heat from the extracted air.

This option reduces the required external plant in instances where high air volumes are already required.

Underfloor heating systems work well with the low flow temperatures of VRF systems.

Option 2: Heating to existing refurbished areas can be provided via traditional steel panel radiators.

Radiators can rapidly heat-up a space and are individually controllable by the users. They work well with the high flow

temperatures produced by conventional boilers but require oversizing if used with low flow temperatures associated with

VRF systems.

A number of options are available based on the requirements of the architectural aesthetics and the necessity to protect

from scolding.

Cast-iron radiators (or limited ranges

available in steel) can be provided in

areas where the traditional ‘feel’ of

the building is looking to be

preserved. Radiator shapes and

locations can be agreed in

conjunction with the Architect to suit

the aesthetics of the rooms.

Alternatively, flat panel radiators, located under windows (where possible) or along

walls, can be located in less architecturally sensitive areas. As with the low-level

radiators, shapes and locations can be agreed in conjunction with the Architect to

suit the aesthetics of the rooms.


In some public areas low surface temperature (LST) radiators have been required where particularly young children could

be at risk from scalding by conventional radiators. Consideration should be given to

the use of some areas so see if venerable adults or young children are regularly using

the space. Shapes, sizes and styles for LST radiators are more limited. Finishes for all

radiators are generally white but can be coloured as necessary.

All radiators would be fitted with thermostatic valves for local control.

Radiators sizing will need to take into account the lower water temperatures expected

to be generated by the air source heat pump and will therefore be “oversized” to

achieve the same output as from a traditional gas fired boiler system.

Existing Heating Plant

The existing boiler plant serving the church is to be retained as there are no reports of issues with this system.

The current architectural layouts currently require the slab above this plant room to be lowered. From site inspection,

this will likely affect the distribution pipework that leaves the plant room at high level. A survey will need to be conducted

to make recommendations regarding the required diversions.

Heating Distribution

LTHW and refrigerant distribution pipework will be distributed largely within ceiling voids and vertically via dedicated

risers. Pipework will all be insulated to mitigate the risk of overheating.

9.2 Cooling

Where possible, cooling is not proposed for the new development. Natural ventilation solutions will instead provide

outdoor air to mitigate the risk of overheating.

These will be thermally modelled at stage 3 to inform the expected conditions in the space and any limitations that this

puts on the use and occupancy of the spaces.

At this stage the expected exception to this is the events space due to its high occupancy and glazing. 2No. options to

provide the cooling to this space are being considered as described below:

Air Source Heat Pumps – VRF – As described in the heating section above the external heat pumps and FCUs are able to

provide both heating and cooling

Packaged Air Handling Plant Providing Cooling – Areas with high air volumes can be heated and cooled by heating the

fresh air supply. This is a potential solution for the events space and the Hogarth Gallery. As these spaces have fairly high

occupancy, this drives a high supply air volume requirement, which has the capacity to provide cooling.

A packaged AHU will use a refrigerant compression and expansion system to take heat from exhaust air and “reject” this

into the supply air stream. A thermal wheel will also be used to recover heat from the extracted air.

This option reduces the required external plant in instances where high air volumes are already required.

9.3 Domestic Water Services

Cold Water

The proposed extension will increase the domestic cold-water demand of the site. It is therefore expected that an upgrade

to the mains cold water will be required to serve the existing and new water outlets.

No cold-water storage has been identified on site, and so it is assumed to be a mains fed system. Therefore, it is reasonable

to assume that sufficient pressure is available and can a mains fed system can be extended to serve the new development.

Confirmation of the cold-water requirements of the kitchen is required.

Hot Water

Due to the distributed nature of the WCs and kitchen facilities, local hot-water provision is

preferred.

Each remotes WC area will be provided with a direct un-vented water heater to provide hot

water to the basin outlets. The heater will be located under sinks or concealed in risers/store

rooms as required.

Due to the limited size of the proposed kitchen, it is not anticipated that this will have a high hot

water demand and will therefore also be suited to local electric hot water production, but in this

case with a small amount of storage.

The hot water requirements of the kitchen are to be confirmed.

9.4 Ventilation

A successful ventilation strategy is essential to ensure there is adequate fresh air in all areas within the building and that

a comfortable temperature is maintained in Summer.

All areas and rooms such as gallery, exhibition spaces, event spaces and kitchens etc should be adequately ventilated so

they are fit for purpose.

The proposed strategy, in keeping with the passive design approach, is to provide natural ventilation for overheating and

fresh air to as much of the new development as possible.

Where necessary, mechanical ventilation shall be provided. The AHUs (Air Handling Unit) providing the mechanical

ventilation need to have high efficiency heat recovery and be designed such that the ductwork pressure drop is minimised

to reduce the associated energy consumption.

Exhibition Spaces, Café & Education Space

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A passive approach is proposed as a means of ventilating the exhibition spaces, the cafe and the education space.

Openings into these areas are to be agreed during stage 3. Where possible, louvres and / or openable windows are to be

provided on opposing walls to assist with cross flow ventilation.

Thermal modelling will be completed at stage 3 which will inform the expected conditions in these spaces and any

limitations that this imposes on the use and occupancy of the spaces. To complete this, expected usage details will be

required.

complete with a DX cooling and heating coil. The benefit of this system is that it will not require any separate

plant for condenser units and will not require any FCUs to be mounted internally. The required AHU plant

space is currently under review as this is the preferred option.

2. High level MVHR units, as per the choir room, could be installed which are ducted to high level louvres. This

will reduce external ventilation plant, but it will require external condensers units to provide heating and

cooling. This option has been discounted due to the high-level services in the space. The architectural

preference is to minimize high level services distribution.

Cooling strategies such as night-time cooling can be explored at the next stage of design.

Hogarth Gallery

Fresh air will be supplied and extracted from the Hogarth Gallery via a dedicated Air Handling Unit (AHU). This will be

located on the plant deck adjacent to the space and will consist of filtration, attenuation, open/close dampers, DX

cooling/heating coil and thermal wheel for heat recovery.

Humidity control will be required to provide the required conditions for the displayed artwork.

Insulated ductwork will be distributed up within the service void at the rear of the multi-use space to the plant deck. From

here, it will serve induction diffusers to ensure that the conditioned airt can be thrown to the low, occupied level within

the space. High level return air grilles will allow extract air back to the AHU.

The air volume will be sized to provide heating and cooling.

As the Hogarth gallery is open to the adjacent exhibition space, the proposed ventilation system will need to provide the

same conditions to both spaces.

Choir Room

Figure 4- Mechanical Ventilation with Heat

Recovery Unit.

Mechanical Ventilation with Heat Recovery (MVHR) units are

proposed for the Choir Room. The unit will draw fresh air and

exhaust stale air to louvres in the façade. The units will include a

plate heat exchange and summer bypass to assist with free cooling

in summer.

Air will be ducted to and from linear grilles in bulkheads and ceilings

directly.

Air distribution within the space will either be through low level supplies integrated into the joinery or alternatively a high

level, high pressure supply and extract integrated into a bulkhead detail. Refer to Appendix B for details.

Kitchen

The existing kitchen at St Mary Redcliffe church has an extract hood connected to a low-level discharge on the North Side

of the site. It is proposed to continue this strategy for the new kitchen as the size and use of the kitchen is anticipated to

be the same.

A dedicated extract fan will be located within the kitchen. The use of the kitchen needs to be confirmed to inform a

suitable make up air strategy. Low extract rates will not require any dedicated plant, but a heating load

WC

A high level of ventilation shall be provided to all WCs and changing areas as these have high humidity.

10 ACH (Air Changes per Hour) shall be provided within these areas to remove the humid air via local extract fans mounted

either in the wall direct to outside or within ceiling voids.

Attenuation

Atmospheric attenuation shall be installed on all inlet and exhaust ventilation systems to minimise noise breakout from

the development.

Cross talk attenuation shall also be installed where ductwork is shared between rooms to prevent the transfer of noise.

Smoke Ventilation

A fire engineer or building control officer will be required to advise on the requirements for smoke ventilation. Current

plant spaces have not allowed for a mechanically ventilated smoke extract system.

9.5 Waste and Disposal

Event Space

2No. options have been considered for the event space main plant.

1. Packaged AHU providing heating and cooling – The space will require a large amount of fresh air due to its

high occupancy. It is therefore possible to provide heating and cooling through this air volume with and AHU

All sanitary appliances will be provided with a gravity waste water system connecting to the existing below-ground

drainage system. Consultation with the design team will be undertaken during the next design stage to co-ordinate the

position of above ground drainage.

Materials:


Drainage is provided to the existing changing rooms via floor gullies and cast-iron pipework. The pipework is routed at

high level within the Lower Ground Floor plant room.

9.6 Building Energy Management Systems (BEMS)

A BEMS shall be installed to allow the automatic operation and user

configuration of the mechanical services. New control panels shall be provided

to the plant rooms.

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10 Electrical Services Strategy

ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTION

10.1.3.1 Small power systems

Small power systems will consist of socket outlets, isolators and switched connection units. A consistent finish for outlets

will be used throughout the facility. It is proposed that brushed chrome outlets with white inserts are be used.

The main panel board within the electrical plantroom will distribute the power throughout the building.

Small power outlets in process and plant areas will be of robust quality and surface mounted metal clad.

Internal Artificial lighting

10.1.4.1 General

Energy monitoring and sub-metering

Energy sub-metering will be provided to facilitate effective monitoring of energy consumption as part of an overall site

energy management strategy.

All sub-meters will be linked to the BMS system using mod bus to facilitate data collection and

monitoring on site. This system will assist the facilities management staff to advise on areas where

power consumption appears excessive, assist in fault monitoring, manage power quality, and

control the power network efficiently.

Sub-meters will generally be mounted within individual distribution boards and will be of the

Smart Meter type with pulsed output.

It is proposed that multi-functional digital type sub-meters are provided on the main switch-panels to monitor kWh, kVA,

Volts, Amps, PF and max demand. In addition to meet the requirements set out within Building Regulations Part L2A each

general distribution board will be split type providing the capability to measure small power and lighting loads

independently.

The lighting system throughout the facility will be designed for maximum comfort and energy efficiency. Best Practice in

lighting design will be achieved by reference to the Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers’ (CIBSE)

publication “Code for Lighting” (2012); and associated CIBSE Lighting Guides.

All luminaires will be supplied from reputable approved manufacturers with the capability to provide support within the

surrounding area.

LED light sources are affordable and offer very viable paybacks compared to obsolete technologies such as fluorescent or

incandescent lighting. The quality of light is also superior therefore LED lighting is proposed to be utilised for this project

for internal and external areas.

Robust impact resistant luminaires will be specified for areas prone to damage such as plant and external areas.

The lighting types will be kept to minimum to ease maintenance and limit the quantity of spare parts. Lighting controls

will generally be automatic with a combination of DALI Presence Detection and Daylight dimming.

To prevent the ceiling appearing dark, the ceiling average illuminance from both the direct/indirect and reflected

component should be at a minimum of 20% of the average horizontal Illuminance. In large spaces with ceiling heights of

2.4m or less this may be difficult to achieve and in such circumstances the proportion of light on the ceiling should be as

high as is practicable.

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Lighting levels and luminaire types will be specified to conform to the requirements of the table within the design criteria activity and with


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The new buildings CCTV system will consist of internal and external CCTV cameras. It is envisaged that the main entrances,

building facades and main corridors will be monitored.

The cameras will be either static or Pan Tilt Zoom (PTZ).

The current incumbent specialist is Select Electrics Limited, Ray Murphy, 07966 112233, 0117 963 1888, 10 Deery Road,

Ashton, Bristol BS3 3JX

Security systems

10.1.8.1 Access Control

The building will be equipped with an electronic access control system. A preliminary strategy has been indicated on the

protective services drawings and will need to be further developed with the Client and the design team.

This system will provide control for areas of the building and include the following elements.

• Proximity Card Reader or fobs

• Push Button request to exit

• Emergency Exit within Protective Plastic Enclosure

The access control systems will be backed up by a local integral UPS/battery system.

10.1.8.2 Intruder Detection

The system will consist of a separate stand-alone panel, with the facility to be remotely monitored. It will be installed to

conform to BS4737 and NACOSS GOLD and should incorporate sequential alarm confirmation technology and comply with

the requirements BS 8243:2010. Each area should be zoned to provide more flexibility to the system.

The system will consist of a number of presence detectors and door contacts. Where required key-pads will be located to

activate or deactivate the system. A preliminary strategy has been indicated on the protective services drawings and will

need to be further developed with the Client and the design team.

The Intruder detection system will be also monitored by remote monitoring system via a dedicated telephone link.

The current incumbent specialist is ADT Fire and Security, 0344 8001999

10.1.8.3 CCTV

The existing building features an Analogue CCTV system with recording and head end equipment in the Head Verger’s

office.

The existing system will be relocated to the new Verger’s office in Phase 2 development and extended together with the

recording equipment to provide coverage for the new areas.

Personal Security Alarm system

The current incumbent specialist is Standfast security systems, 0117 9423366.

Electrical Wiring

The incumbent electrician in the church is Roland Bell, Phil Moss, 07831633742

The electrical final circuits will be installed to be fully re-wireable in all areas of the building.

A network of galvanised, stainless steel and GRP cable trays, basket, ladder and trunking / conduit will be designed and

installed throughout the building to separately support cables for:

1. LV power

2. General lighting and small power

3. Fire Alarm

4. Communications such as data, security, AV and mechanical controls.

The cable containment will generally be routed horizontally within ceiling voids and vertically within designated service

risers.

In general, each element of containment will be sized to accommodate 25% spare capacity.

Service penetrations will be co-ordinated to avoid primary structural elements. Openings through the walls will be

provided for all M&E services. All openings will be properly designed and indicated clearly on the drawings.

Fire stopping will be provided where services pass through fire-rated walls or partitions and as determined by the fire

strategy adopted. The fire stopping provided will be equal to the rating of the partition in which it occurs. In addition, to

enhance property protection and to minimise noise transference, fire stopping will be provided all around services where

they pass through floor plates.

The cable containment system will be continuous throughout and cabling will be mechanically protected to the final

equipment termination point.


Flexible conduits will be used for the final connection from a rigid conduit installation, to the terminal boxes of all

equipment provided with a means of positional adjustment and/or where vibration may reasonably be expected to occur.

All metalwork, cable trays, cable ladders, cable trunking and equipment will be equipotentially bonded. The cable trays,

cable ladders and cable trunking will be jointed in a manner so that electrical continuity is maintained, (copper bonding

links or earth straps are the preferred method) and connected to the earthing system.

Earthing

10.1.11.1 Main External Earthing

The proposed main earthing design will provide an earthing installation that considers all safety potentials (Step and

Touch), Earth potential rise, and site classification (Cold OR Hot Site). The final design will limit all step and touch potentials

to a suitable level.

The design will include for an entire earthing system including (but not limited to) the following:-

• All accessible exposed metal parts containing or supporting HV conductors;

• Metallic substation enclosures of all high voltage and low voltage equipment;

• Cable sheaths/screens/armouring;

• Exposed metal of all floor reinforcing;

• Transformer LV neutrals

• Earth bars

• Equipotential bonding

The It is envisaged that the Distribution Network Operator (DNO) will provide earthing system and earth termination

point by the cut-out.

The Works will be solidly earthed by means of an integrated earthing system compatible with the DNO earthing systems,

and in compliance with the DNO requirements.

All extraneous conductive parts such as structural steelwork, cable support steelwork, steel tanks and piping, compound

and site perimeter fences and gates, will be effectively bonded to the earthing system.

When connecting differing materials together the required material transition plates must, in general, be inserted, in

order to ensure that electrolytic action is avoided. All connecting materials must be corrosion proof and suitable for the

conditions prevailing at the installation point.

The design of the Site earthing grid will be developed as part of the Site-wide earthing strategy and will meet / surpass

the technical requirements of the DNO.

10.1.11.2 Internal Earthing and Bonding

The Earthing system will be installed in accordance with the local mandatory requirements.

The point of connection and characteristics of the site electrical distribution will be established with the DNO.

A copper earth bar will be provided within the main LV plant room. The earth bar will be wall mounted using insulation

type mountings. Earth bars will be arranged with a spare capacity of 50% to allow for connection of future equipment at

a later date.

A clean earth bar will be provided within the communications room to reduce any interference caused by the low voltage

distribution and a clean reference point for sensitive communications equipment.

The earth bar will have removable test links to allow for testing without interference with Earthing conductor connections.

Sub-main and final circuit cables will use circuit protective conductors to distribute earth connections throughout the

installation. High-integrity earthing will be provided where appropriate within the installation.

Equipotential bonding will be provided where required.

Cabling associated with the earthing installation will generally be single core LS0H cables installed on cable trays/Ladder.

Cables used for the safety earthing installation will have a green yellow oversheath. Cables for clean earth will have a

cream LS0H oversheath.

Lightning protection

The lightning protection system will be provided to reliably, safely and substantially reduce the risk of damage to property

and people within the building and disruption to essential services in the event of a strike by lightning. This system will be

designed in accordance with the local mandatory standards.

To ensure that the system is effective, the detailed design, installation, testing and commissioning will be carried out by

a single lightning protection system specialist.

The system will be arranged to prevent fixed metallic components of the building including rainwater disposal systems,

roof mounted equipment, chimneys etc. from defeating the function of the lightning protection system.

Materials which are resistant to atmospheric corrosion will be specified and thus the risk of staining of the external fabric

of the building will be minimised.

The system will be arranged not to undermine the weather proofing and waterproofing of roofs nor any other part of a

building’s fabric.

The system will be designed such that it will utilise as much as the building fabric as possible and be interconnected into

the main building earthing system.

Transient over voltage protection devices will be installed on the main switchboard, panel boards and distribution boards

feeding external services.

The current incumbent specialist is Enlightened, Simon Marcus, 0117 9727123

10.1.12.1 Air Termination Network

Otherwise known as lightning collectors. There are three acceptable methods of providing an air termination network:

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• The grid method: A grid of copper tape across the surface of the roof. The spacing of the mesh should never be

greater than 20 x 20 metres and on some buildings may have to be less depending on results of the initial risk

assessment.

• Air rods: Rods which protrude above the line of the roof

• Catenary conductors: Conductors suspended above the roof

10.1.12.2 Down Conductors

Protection should be provided to all cables which enter or leave a building including:

• Electrical supplies

• Data and communications cabling

• Signal, control and alarm cabling

• CCTV

The down conductors conduct the current from the air terminals to the earth termination network. These can take the

form of earth tape which will be visible down the side of the building or may utilise metallic building fabrics such as steel

columns or rebar.

The spacing between down conductors should never be greater than 20 metres and exact details will be established

during the detail design stage.

The path of the down conductor must be as direct and short as possible and it is not acceptable for the down conductors

to loop.

10.1.12.3 Earth Termination Network

The earth termination network carries the lightning current to earth. There are various acceptable earthing systems but

the most common are:

• Earth rods: A copper-bond rod driven into the ground. They will typically be located around 1 metre from the

edge of the building.

• Earth plates or mats: Used to obtain an effective earth in willow soil with underlying rocks.

• Ring electrode: A ring earth electrode that is sited around the outside of the building can also be used to provide

an earth where the soil is willow. The ring must be in contact with the soil for a minimum of 80% of its length.

The ring should be buried at around 0.5 metres deep and be 1 metre from the edge of the building.

Earth inspection pits should be provided to allow for periodic inspection of the earth termination network. These will

typically have the appearance of small manholes.

10.1.12.4 Connection to Building Main Earth Bar

The lightning protection system will be connected to the building main earth bar. The main earth bar will typically be

found in the main switchroom for the building or at the point at which the electricity supply enters the building.

10.1.12.5 Surge Protection Devices

Transient over voltages are short duration, high magnitude voltage peaks. There are many causes of these over voltages

but lightning strike can be the most extreme and can cause damage to the cabling installation through flashover,

potentially resulting in loss of life through fire and electric shock.

Transient over voltages can also be the cause of data loss and reduced life span or outright failure of sensitive electronic

equipment.

Telecommunication

A site wide communications system will be provided with connections in all areas. The main communication cabinet will

be located in the Vestry back office and will be 42U high, 800mm wide by 1,000mm deep, with front and rear lockable

doors and 19” rack mountings front and rear, and heavy duty lockable castors.

At this stage it is envisaged that the structured cabling will be over CAT6a.

Structured wiring outlet faceplates will be from the same manufacturer as the structured cabling, fitted with CAT6a RJ45

U/UTP shuttered outlets.

Metalclad structured wiring outlets will be provided in areas such as plant rooms and external areas.

Active switches will be provided in each patch cabinet to allow transfer of data to the main server cabinet. All equipment

within the server cabinet will be provided by an ICT specialist appointed separately by the Client in accordance with the

clients requirements e.g. speed, security, data transfer.

All active equipment (Excluding active switches) will be provided by others e.g. telephones, computers, telephone

exchange, server, routers, modems, wifi transmitters, software.

The following data points will be required for this project. These are in addition to any other data requirements associated

with the specified building services systems. E.g. BMS, control panels, security systems, etc.

Dedicated telephone lines will be required for each individual security system, fire alarm and lift.

Audio Video (AV) System

Provision will be made for AV systems to be installed within the new and refurbished buildings as required. The AV system

will generally include:

• Display Lighting

• Sound distribution system

• Temporary control stage equipment stations

• Cabling infrastructure

• Power and Data connections for Flat Screen TV’s and projectors

• Laptop connections will be provided to allow connection of laptops to the TV screen within the room.

The complete AV system detailed requirements will be confirmed and specified by the Client.


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Facilities for disabled

10.1.15.1 Disabled toilet alarms

A disabled alarm system will be provided in disabled toilets. The system will consist of a pull switch with red cord within

easy reach, local reset button with re-assurance lamp and an alarm point over the outside of the entry door with red light

and alarm buzzer.

Alarms will be presented on a dedicated panel within each building at a normally manned location.

It is envisaged that the system will be required to provide hearing enhancement system for hearing impaired people in

some areas however this requirement is yet to be confirmed with the client and the design team.

An ear symbol denoting the presence of an induction loop should be prominently displayed. A sign will explain clearly, to

people using hearing aids, how they can benefit from the induction loop.

10.1.15.3 Disabled Refuge System

A two-way intercom system will be provided in each disabled refuge station in accordance with fire strategy and local

mandatory requirements.

A disabled refuge master station will be provided at the main entrance of the building and will be sited adjacent to the

fire alarm panel. Direct 2-way communication will be provided between the master station and each disabled refuge

outstations.

Disabled refuge outstations will be provided within each disabled refuge areas.

10.1.15.2 Hard of hearing induction loop system

An induction loop system helps deaf people who use a hearing aid or loop listener hear sounds more clearly because it

reduces or cuts out background noise. The induction loop is a small cable that goes round the perimeter of a room or

listening area and forms a loop. Both ends of the cable are connected to the output of a specialist design loop amplifier.

A current from the loop amplifier powers the cable and the amplifier gets its signal from a direct sound source. This can

be a microphone placed in front of the person speaking or it can be a connection into a TV, PA system, laptop or DVD

player. The resulting electric current in the induction loop produces a magnetic field. The hearing aid user can pick up this

field when they switch their hearing instrument to the T position. The user is then able to hear audible sound very clearly.

Overspill may occur when a loop system is being used, whereby the signal from the loop reaches outside the loop area.

This means that privacy cannot be guaranteed in a room where a loop is fitted.

Each disabled refuge outstations will be flush mounted and consist of a two-way speech unit and call button. The system

will have battery backup for standby duration of 24 hours and 3 hours operational capacity.

The complete system will be wired will be wired in soft skin cable, suitably enhanced for the area installed.

10.2 Electric Vehicle Charging Points

No EV charging is proposed for this project.


10.3 Photo-Voltaic system on the roof

System description

A photovoltaic system, also known as a solar PV system, is an energy system that is designed to transform the energy

from the sun into electricity by means of photovoltaics. This system is safe, reliable, low-maintenance, and provides green

energy without on-site pollution or emissions.

To maximise the feasibility of the system, at this stage, it is recommended to utilise the majority of the multi-use hall roof

which can be made relatively easily and safely accessible from the Level 1 plant deck by means of stairs.

An extensive Photo-Voltaic system can be accommodated on the main church roof.

PV system maintenance

The objective is to reduce health and safety risk associated with the PV system and its maintenance. The PV system will

be designed with appropriate access and maintenance.

The system will be fully coordinated with other aspects of the project such as Architecture, plant, wildlife, etc.

Cleaning of the PV system

Most of the time the rain will keep the solar panels clean. However, a build-up of dirt can affect the system performance.

The degree of soiling will depend on the weather. In extreme case, when dust accumulates, the PV can experience

significant energy production reduction. The design of the system will aim to minimise uneven soiling either through

tilting the panels at 10 plus more degrees, regular cleaning regime may be utilized to increase the overall system

efficiency.

1563.R1 – Stage 2 report Page 25 of 29


35 HYB

ASS'D ROU

1 x 75

35 Hyb AR

TEMPLE GATE M S/S - MATTHENS & SKAILES ETC

DB

1x 100

PL

R

35 Hyb AR

LE

TELEPHONE DEAD

PL

SHELL

185 3c WCON 03/2006

0.06 CU 11kV NE 11/1958

2 - D.C. NOT SHOWN

0.2 4c NC 12/1958

P

LE

LE

G

0.007 2c NC

P

2 x 100

0.2 4c NC

P

0.2 4c NC 12/1958

0.2 4c NC

3 x

P

LE

P

185 3c WCON 03/2006

2 - D.C. NOT SHOWN

185 3c WCON 03/2006

0.2 4c NC

4 x 150

P

2x

LE

PL

LE

R

R

P

LE

LE

LE

LE

c/c

P

LE

LE

LE

P

LE

PL

R

PL

R

LE

LE

PL

P

PL

G

BT

P

ALK

PL

ALK

P

LE

PL

P

LE

PL

R

LE

ALK

PL

P

G

PL

B

R

P

LE

PL

0.3 4c AL NC

B

LE

4c

LE

TS

R

PL

R

LE

R

LE

R

LE

LE

LE

G

LE

LE

300 3c WCON 01/2000

185 CAS 11kV 01/2000

185 CAS 11kV 01/2000

LE

LE

ALK

LE

1 x 100

PL

TECHNO HOUSE - LONDON LFE

REDCLIFFE ST - TECHNO HOUSE

0.0225 2c

G

PL

PL

G

Service

Route

Unknown

TS

G

300 3c WCON 01/2000

PL

G

PL

G

95 3c CON NC

300 3c WCON 01/2000

3 X HTS DEAD

95 3c CON NC

Route

Unknown

PL B

3 X

PL

B

LE

LE

PL

R

MB

PL R

LE

PL

2 x

B

PL

B

LE

LE

Service

Route

Unknown

LE

R

PL

G

L2

PL

R

LE

PL

G

PL

LE

LE

PL

G

Service

Route

Unknown

PL G

PL

R

LE

PL

B

PL

R

LE

PL

PL

.007T

B

B

PL

G

PL

B

3ph

1 x 75

35 Hyb NC

CANYNGE ST-WEAVERS HOTEL ETC

3 x 300 1c TxAL EPR 11kV 07/2007

3 x 300 1c TxAL EPR 11kV 07/2007

CANYNGE ST-LONDON LIFE

REDUNDANT

7

Playground

SJT

SJT

2 x 150

3 x 300 1c TxAL EPR 11kV 07/2007

3 x 300 1c TxAL EPR 11kV 07/2007

1 X 5" PLASTIC

DC (NOT SHOWN)

0.05 CU 6.6kV NE

0.2 CU 6.6kV NE

0.2 CU 6.6kV NE

0.2 CU 6.6kV NE

25 Hyb

CANYNGE ST-LONDON LIFE

3 x 185 1c TxAL EPR 11kV 02/2008

CANYNGE ST-WEAVERS HOTEL ETC

1 X 5"

NO RECORD

OF SERVICE

SJT

185 CAS-

185 EPR

SJT

185 EPR-

185 CAS

95 3c CON NC

0.0225 4c NC

300 3c WCON 01/2000

8823

11/3028

DRAGONARA

LV

HOTEL

0.2 4c NC

0.3 4c

Playground

11/1714

BROUGHTON

HOUSE

25 Hyb

1 x 125

0.2 4c NC

El Sub Sta

0011

185 4c SAC 02/1974

2 x 150

185 3c WCON 12/2001

0.1 4c

SPSL

PHOENIX HOUSE-BROUGHTON HOUSE ETC

7046

0.3 4c 06/1964

0.2 4c 06/1964

0.2 4c 06/1964

TJT

16 c/c

BJT

LDB

185 4c SAC

PH

SJT

SJT

SJT

3x 3 x 185 1c TxAL EPR 11kV 06/2015

25 Hyb

SJT

TJT

1 to 54

Proctor House

0.1 4c 06/1964

1 x 100

1 x 150

LB

0.04 4c

0.04 4c

TJT

BJT

0.1 4c NC 10/1934

185 4c SAC

1 x 6"

SJT

0.3 AL 11kV 01/1969 PHOENIX HOUSE-BROUGHTON HOUSE

0.3 AL 11kV

95 3c WCON 12/2002

16 c/c

0.2 4c

1 to 22

95 3c WCON 12/2002

95 3c WCON 12/2001

16 c/c

0.1 4c 06/1938

0.2 4c

BJT

SJT

1 x 100

SJT

TJT

25 3c

0.1 4c 06/1938

0.2 4c

BJT

3ph Unknown NC

11/4081

TECHNO

0.3 4c AL 01/1969

PHOENIX HOUSE-BROUGHTON HOUSE

0.05 CU 11kV NE

0.15 CU 11kV

SJT

0.15 CU 11kV

0.3 AL 11kV

0.2 4c

Magdalana

3ph REDUNDANT

185 3c WCON 12/2001

0.2 4c

2 x 100

0.3 AL 11kV 01/1969

0.3 CU 11kV 03/1964

0.3 4c 06/1964

0.2 4c 06/1964

1 x 150

0.2 4c 06/1964

0.3 4c 06/1964

0.3 3c NC

0.2 4c 06/1964

TJT

0.2 4c 06/1964

0.3 3c NC

7043

0.2 4c 06/1964

4136

2 x 150

SOMERSET SQUARE

2 x 150

0.3 3c NC

4136

Posts

4136

Warning: PDF designed for A3 colour print only with no page scaling.

Bristol School Meals

0.007 2c

Court

LE 3ph

0.04 4c

7046

3ph

0.05 CU 6.6kV AT 11kV NE

0.05 CU 11kV NE

1x 100

0.15 4c AL IN

0.15 4c AL

0.04 4c

SJT

0.2 4c

0.05 CU 6.6kV AT 11kV NE

0.15 CU 6.6kV PHOENIX AT 11kV

HOUSE-BROUGHTON HOUSE ETC

6939

7046

SJT

16 c/c

1 x 150

1 x 100

0.2 4c

0.15 4c AL

LDB

0.2 4c TAILS

0.2 4c

0.2 4c

1 x 100

0.1 4c 08/1964

1068

0.04 4c

SJT

SJT

PL

R

0.04 4c

0.04 4c

25 Hyb

0.1 4c 10/1964

0.04 4c

SJT

1 x 100

.007T

SJT

PHOENIX HOUSE-BROUGHTON HOUSE ETC

9

10

8

12

11

Dr White's

Close

0.04 4c

7043

0.1 4c 10/1964

1 to 54

Patterson House

1 x 100

.007T

1 x 150

Training Centre

0.04 4c

0.04 4c

COM

25 Hyb

U/A Pillar

}

1

0.2 4c

0.05 CU 6.6kV AT 11kV NE

0.15 CU 6.6kV AT PHOENIX 11kV HOUSE

-BROUGHTON HSE ETC

0.007 2c

}

0.05 CU 6.6kV AT 11kV NE

0.15 CU 6.6kV AT 11kV

SJT

0.15 4c AL

18

SETBACK APRIL '62

SJT

SJT

0051

0.05 CU 6.6kV AT 11kV NE

0.1 CU 11kV NE

SETBACK

NOV '62

0.2 4c

0.1 CU 11kV NE

0.05 CU 6.6kV AT 11kV NE

SJT

Redcliffe

SJT

Methodist

Church

SJT

0.2 CU 11kV

PREWETT STREET

0.06 4c

0.15 4c AL

SJT

SJT

35 Hyb NC

SPSL

portwall lane offices

0.1 4c 04/1946

0.3 4c

BJT

0.25 4c

SJT

SJT

25 Hyb

25 3c Hyb

25 3c Hyb

1 x 100

25 3c Hyb

0.2 4c NC

0.2 4c NC

185 3c CON NC

0.2 4c NC

185 3c WCON 03/2006

0.25 4c NC 06/1947

185 3c WCON 03/2006

185 3c WCON 03/2006

CANYNGE STREET

0.2 4c NC

185 3c WCON 03/2006

185 3c WCON 03/2006

0.2 4c NC

185 3c CON NC 05/1989

SJT

185 3c WCON

185 3c WCON

2 x 125

0.007 2c

185 3c WCON

SJT

BJT

95 3c WCON

185 3c CON

0.2 4c 06/1929

0.2 4c

0.06 4c

0.1 4c 08/1964

0.04 4c

35 Hyb AR

25 Hyb

TJT

SJT

SJT

185 3c WCON

DC NOT SHOWN

SJT

0.2 4c

0.2 4c

0.2 4c

0.2 4c

0.2 4c

0.2 4c 08/1938

0.2 4c 08/1938

0.023 2c

95 3c CON

PL

B

1 x 150

1 x 150

PL

R

0.05 4c NC 06/1941

16 c/c

1 x 150 1 x 150

SPSL

SJT

0.2 4c

9.8m

185 CAS 11kV 10/1981

25 Hyb

REDCLIFFE ST- TECHNO HOUSE

TEMPLE GATE M -MILES DRUCE

TEMPLE GATE M -MATTHEWS & SKAILES ETC

TEMPLE GATE M -PORTWAL LANE No 2 ETC

TEMPLE GATE M -PORTWAL LANE No 1

1 x 100

0.007 2c

0.2 4c 08/1938

0.3 4c AL

16 c/c

SJT

SJT

0.2 4c

542

REDUNDANT

11025752

AD SIGNS

25 Hyb NC

25 Hyb NC

DISC

CAPPED IN PILLAR

1645

TJT

0.2 4c

185 CAS 11KV 10/1981

REDCLIFFE ST - TECHNO HOUSE

2 x 150

0.2 4c 08/1938

LDB

185 4c SAC TAILS

542

1 x 100

KIOSK

REDCLIFFE WAY

1 x 150

1 x 150

1 x 150

0.05 4c 0.05 4c

1 x 150

0.0225 4c NC

16 c/c

9.8m

AD SHELL

25 HYB

TCB

ADSIGN

520

Techno House

0.3 4c AL 01/1969

Townsend House

8.5m

9311

TELE

SJT

Warehouse

69 to 75

P P P

P

DISC EX

PAY AND DISPLAY

MACHINE

35 Hyb AR

40

2 x SJT

185 Con -

0.3 4c

0.06 CU 11kV NE

rehouse

11/4193

OMAS STREET

ST THOMAS STREET

3 X 185 1C TXAL EPR 11KV NE 01/2005

25 Hyb

2 x Pipe

PORTWALL LANE

Chatterton House

520

522

Hotel

522

1 x 6" E/W

DEAD

520

6047

UNKNOWN SIZE 11kV NE

2 X 185 EPR ROUTES NOT RECORDED

NETWORK SERVICES TO CONFIRM POSITION

9311

1762

9311

0.06 CU 11kV NE 11/1958

SJT

0.05 CU 11kV NE

DRUCE (DEAD)

0.05 CU 6.6kV AT 11kV NE

2xPIPES

CROSSING

/ ROUTE

TO BE CONFIRMED

SJT

SJT

(course of)

UNKNOWN SIZE 11kV NE

4 x DC (NOT SHOWN)

2 x

TELE DEAD

0.2 4c

PHIPPEN STREET

2 x 6" SPARE

520

1762

REDUNDANT

0.4 4c

NOV 36

9.1m

3 X 185 1C TXAL EPR 11KV 10/2004

SJT

0.2 4c 08/1939

SPSL

7/0.036 2c

SJT

2 x 150

1 x 100

1 x 100

1 x 150

2 x 150

2 X REDUNDANT

TCB G

INNER PIPE SPLIT

25 Hyb

1 x 150

1 x 150

BM 13.40m

SJT

SJT

EWS & SKAILES ETC (DEAD)

BJT

AL LANE NO 2 ETC (DEAD)

AL LANE NO 1 (DEAD)

LDB

3 X 185 1C TXAL EPR 11KV 10/2004

3 x UNKNOWN SIZE 11kV NE

PP

0.0225 2c

0.2 4c 08/1939

SPSL

BJT

SJT

SJT

0.2 4c

0.2 4c

SJT

0.2 4c 08/1939

TJT

SJT

0.2 4c

1 x 100

0.2 4c

7/0.036 2c

SJT

BJT

1 x 100

0.0225 2c

0.3 4c AL 01/1969

520

SJT

PUMP LANE

SM

7

185 AL 11kV 10/1972

SM

SM

25 3c Hyb

SJT

0.007 2c

TJT

564

1 x 100

1 x 100

PL R

1068

95 3c CON NC 05/1987

95 3c CON NC

BJT

0.3 4c NC

SJT

95 4c WCON 07/1990

SPSL

SPSL

SPSL

SPSL

SJT

SJT

SJT

SJT

BJT

BJT

95 3c CON NC 07/1989

0.04 4c

0.0225 2c

25 Hyb

0.0225 4c

SJT

IN SHELL

0.2 4c

7/0.036 2c

Contact Us

Mapping Enquiries: General Enquiries:

All areas 0121 623 9780 All areas 0800 096 3080

0.2 4c

0.4 4c NC

185 3c WCON 05/2007

Report damage immediately – KEEP EVERYONE AWAY FROM THE AREA

0800 6783 105

1 x 100

0.2 4c

0.2 4c

0.2 4c

IMPORTANT NOTICES

• This information is given as a guide only and its

accuracy cannot be guaranteed. Services or recent

additions to the network may not be shown.

• Cables, overhead lines & substations owned by other

electricity network owners or private companies may

be present and may not be shown.

• You should always verify exact locations of cables

using a cable locator and by careful use of hand tools

in accordance with HSE guidance note HSG47.

• When working within 10m of any overhead electric

line you should follow the requirements of HSE

Guidance Note GS6.

• For further advice on working near our electricity

cables or lines, call our Contact Centre on 0800 096

3080.

• Advice should be sought from the Western Power

Distribution Contact Centre for any work that is to

take place in proximity to 66kV or 132kV underground

cables and 66kV 132kV overhead lines – 0800 096

3080


Date Requested: 29/11/2019

Job Reference: 17121747

Site Location: 359117 172293

Requested by: Mr Patrick Andrews

Your Scheme/Reference: St Mary Redcliffe

Exact Scales:

1:1250 Area or Circle dig site

1:500 Line dig site

Overhead Line

SURF Telecoms

S S

Link Box

Site Location

PL

Service

LV

HV (11kV)

HV (33kV)

HV (66kV)

HV (132kV)

PME Earth

Underground

Earth

Underground Cable

Pilot Cables

P P

Pole Mounted

Transformer

0.06 4c

Line/Area


E

Ground Mounted

Transformer

.0225T

Crown Copyright © All Rights Reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence

numbers: 100022488, 100024877 & 100021807.

WPD Copyright: This copy has been made by or with the authority of

Western Power Distribution (WPD) pursuant to Section 47 of the

Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988 unless that Act provides a relevant

exception to copyright the copy must not be copied without the prior

permission of the copyright owner

1 x 100

Temple Colston

0.3 3c NC

t Mary Redcliffe and Temple School

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