18.04.2020 Views

VGB POWERTECH 5 (2019)

VGB PowerTech - International Journal for Generation and Storage of Electricity and Heat. Issue 5 (2019) - Nuclear power. Technical Journal of the VGB PowerTech Association. Energy is us! Nuclear power and nuclear power plant operation. Nuclear power plant flexibility at EDF.

VGB PowerTech - International Journal for Generation and Storage of Electricity and Heat. Issue 5 (2019) - Nuclear power.
Technical Journal of the VGB PowerTech Association. Energy is us!
Nuclear power and nuclear power plant operation. Nuclear power plant flexibility at EDF.

SHOW MORE
SHOW LESS

Create successful ePaper yourself

Turn your PDF publications into a flip-book with our unique Google optimized e-Paper software.

International Journal for Generation and Storage of Electricity and Heat

5 2019

Focus

• Nuclear power

and nuclear power

plant operation

Resources and

reserves for the

global energy supply

Nuclear power plant

flexibility at EDF

ANALYTICAL INSTRUMENTS

ANALYTICAL ANALYTICAL

ANALYTICAL INSTRUMENTS INSTRUMENTS

INSTRUMENTS

Acid conductivity monitoring –

No more resin change

Acid conductivity Acid conductivity monitoring monitoring –

– –

AMI CACE

No more resin No No more change

resin change

Conductivity After Cation Exchange (CACE) has never been

easier to measure than with the new EDI technology for catio

AMI CACE

AMI CACE

removal from the sample

Conductivity Conductivity After Cation After Exchange Cation (CACE) Exchange has (CACE) never been

has has never never been been

easier to measure easier than to to measure with the than than new with EDI with the technology the new new EDI EDI technology for cation

for for cation cation

SWAN Analytische Instrumente AG ∙ CH-8340 Hinwil

removal from removal the sample

from the the sample

www.swan.ch ∙ swan@swan.ch

SWAN Analytische SWAN Analytische Instrumente Instrumente AG ∙ CH-8340 AG AG Hinwil ∙ CH-8340 ∙ Hinwil Hinwil

www.swan.ch www.swan.ch ∙ swan@swan.ch

∙ swan@swan.ch

∙ Targeting innovation

at cost drivers

The German

Quiver project

Publication of VGB PowerTech e.V. l www.vgb.org

Water Steam Cycle

Water Steam Cycle

Water Steam Water CycleSteam Cycle

Water Steam Cycle

ISSN 1435–3199 · K 43600 l International Edition


ANNOUNCEMENT

VGB CONGRESS 2019

VGB KONGRESS 2019

INNOVATION IN POWER GENERATION

SALZBURG CONGRESS, AUSTRIA

4 AND 5 SEPTEMBER 2019

The meeting place of European electricity and heat production

for the energy system of the future.

l Participants from more than 20 countries

l Accompanying exhibition

Plenary & lecture programme with current topics

l Innovation in power generation – Utility & industry perspective

l Technologies for the future

l Digitisation in power generation

l System stability & Flexibility

l Decentralised generation

l Training & education

l Special: Start-up presentations

Interesting side programme

l Get-together in the exhibition

l Welcome evening

l Technical visits

l Sight-seeing

Information on participation: Ms Ines Moors

Phone: +49 201 8128-274 E-mail: ines.moors@vgb.org

Information on the exhibition: Ms Angela Langen

Phone: +49 201 8128-310 E-mail: angela.langen@vgb.org

Photos ©:Tourismus Salzburg


VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Editorial

Not perhaps

“nuclear energy for future” after all?

The only actually economic

and available option for solving

the energy challenge (until

the introduction of nuclear fusion

around 2050) is nuclear

fission, currently used by 31

countries worldwide, with in

five more newcomers under

construction and four more in

concrete planning. The nuclear

fuels uranium and thorium

are available worldwide for

many centuries and for practically

nothing else usable, with

use in advanced reactors even

for many thousands of years.

The residues - the “nuclear waste” to be finally disposed of - are

minimal and - in contrast to carbon - have been completely retained

from the outset for safe disposal. The total volume of all

high-level waste from over 50 years of nuclear energy use in

Germany is no more than two sports halls. The myth of “one million

years” biosphere closure is misleading, as each radioactive

atom can decay only once, depending on the isotope either the

activity is high and the half-life short or the activity low and the

half-life long. Highly active long-radiating nuclear waste does

not exist.

The radiotoxicity at least of reprocessing residues corresponds

by natural decay to that of natural uranium ore after already

about ten thousand years. At the same time, practically all the

host rocks proposed so far also meet the long-term requirement

simply because they are demonstrably much older (salt domes,

for example, 250 mil-lion years old).

Nonetheless, Germany is the only country world-wide today to

be making a real nu-clear exit. France, for example, has recently

decided to extend its operation licenses by (initially) ten years,

with little public notice.

The key country in terms of global CO 2 emissions, China (over

22 % of global CO 2 equivalent emissions, e.g. for the export of

mass steel), now operates 48 nuclear power plant units (approx.

5 % of electricity), has 33 under construction and around 200

in planning by 2035.

Assuming an average cost advantage of nuclear energy of only

4 €ct/kWh compared to conventional power generation, the

premature decommissioning of the 17 formerly existing German

nuclear power plant units at about half of their technically

possible operating life (at approx. 30 years) corresponds to an

economic loss of around 200 billion euros, far more than the loss

caused by the destruction of the six units of Fukushima in Japan

in 2011 by the tsunami (clean-up, demolition and compensation

payments).

Nevertheless, this “nuclear energy” option is no longer mentioned

in any public dis-cussion in Germany, although one

should rather ask oneself whether this reaction was perhaps

premature and unnecessary.

The cause of the accident in Fukushima was the deliberate ignoring

of a known high probability of flooding of the site (estimated

once every three hundred years). In contrast to e.g.

German facilities, Fukushima was topographically and technically

not protected against flooding. If the plant had only had

watertight doors, the site would not even have been on the evening

news on 11 March 2011. European nuclear power stations,

on the other hand, are regularly designed to withstand floods,

which only have to be assumed once every 10,000 years, and

then not as sudden flooding, but with levels slowly rising above

ground, making targeted countermeasures easy.

The legitimate and decisive question about Fukushima had to be

self-evident: Are other damage scenarios conceivable that could

lead to similarly inadmissible consequences?

This question could be answered in the negative for all European

nuclear power plants after the subsequent “RSK Test” (Reactor

Safety Commission) and the parallel “EU Stress Test” (in which

even the Ukraine participated) carried out throughout Europe.

In particular, the German sites excelled here with special additional

safety reserves and a high level of equipment (for which

almost no meaningful further retrofits could be identified).

As the World Health Organisation concluded, nobody in Fukushima

has been harmed by radioactivity.

The probability of occurrence of major tsunamis on Japanese

coasts of once in thirty to three hundred years (all 15 Japanese

nuclear power plant sites are located on coasts) can be compared

with the frequency of occurrence of hazardous accidental

nuclear releases from European nuclear power plants reliably

confirmed in extensive safety research programmes in the range

of one to one million (reactor operating) years.

These circumstances were not taken into account in the German

phase-out decision 2011. No nuclear technicians or risk analysts

were represented in the “Ethics Commission”, which was appointed

exclusively by the then Federal Government.

In view of today’s findings on the climate issue, the protests of

the younger generation and true global responsibility, would it

not be appropriate to rethink this decision in the meantime?

Dr.-Ing. Ludger Mohrbach

Head Nuclear Power Plants

VGB PowerTech e.V., Essen, Germany

1


Editorial VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Nicht vielleicht doch

„Kernenergie für die Zukunft“?

Einzige tatsächlich wirtschaftliche

und verfügbare Option zur

Lösung des Energieproblems

(bis zur Einführung der Kernfusion

ca. um 2050) ist die Kernspaltungsenergie,

derzeit weltweit

von 31 Ländern genutzt,

bei fünf weiteren Newcomern in

Bau und in vier weiteren in der

konkreten Planung. Die Kernbrennstoffe

Uran und Thorium

sind weltweit für viele Jahrhunderte

ausreichend vorhanden

und für prak-tisch nichts anderes

nutzbar, bei Nutzung in

fortgeschrittenen Reaktoren für

viele Tausend Jahre.

Die Rückstände – der endzulagernde „Atommüll“ ist minimal und

wurde – im Gegensatz zum Kohlenstoff – von Anfang an vollständig

zur gesicherten Entsorgung zurückgehalten. Das Gesamtvolumen

aller hochaktiven Abfälle aus über 50 Jahren Kernenergienutzung

in Deutschland ist nicht umfangreicher als zwei Turnhallen. Die

Mär von „einer Millionen Jahre“ Biosphärenabschluss führt in die

Irre, da jedes radioaktive Atom nur einmal zerfallen kann, je nach

Isotop ist entweder die Aktivität hoch und die Halbwertszeit kurz

oder die Aktivität gering und die Halbwertszeit lang. Hochaktiven

langstrahlenden Atommüll gibt es nicht.

Die Radiotoxizität zumindest von Wiederaufarbeitungsrückständen

entspricht durch natürlichen Zerfall dem von natürlichem Uranerz

nach bereits rund zehntausend Jahren. Gleichwohl erfüllen

praktisch alle bisher vorgeschlagenen Endlagerwirtsgesteine auch

die Langfristforderung allein durch die Tatsache, dass sie nachweislich

sehr viel älter sind (Salzstöcke z.B. 250 Millionen Jahre).

Gleichwohl ist das weltweit einzige Land, das heute einen echten

Ausstieg betreibt, Deutschland. So hat z.B. Frankreich, von der Öffentlichkeit

kaum bemerkt, kürzlich eine Laufzeitverlängerung um

(zunächst) zehn Jahre beschlossen.

Das Schlüsselland in Bezug auf globale CO 2 -Emissionen, China

(über 22 % der weltweiten CO 2-Äquivalent -Emissionen, u.a. für den

Export von Massenstahl), be-treibt inzwischen 48 Kernkraftwerksblöcke

(Stromanteil ca. 5 %), hat 33 in Bau und rund 200 in der

Planung bis 2035.

Einen unterstellten durchschnittlichen Kostenvorteil der Kernenergie

gegenüber konventioneller Stromerzeugung von nur

4 €ct/kWh, so entspricht die vorzeitige Außerbetriebnahme der

17 ehemals vorhandenen deutschen Kernkraftwerksblöcke zu

rund der Hälfte ihrer technisch möglichen Betriebszeit (bei ca.

30 Jahren) einem volkswirtschaftlichen Schaden von rund 200

Milliarden Euro, weit mehr als der Schaden durch die Zerstörung

der sechs Blöcke von Fukushima in Japan 2011 durch den

Tsunami (Aufräum,- Abriss,- und Entschädigungszahlungen).

Gleichwohl wird diese Option „Kernenergie“ in keiner öffentlichen

Diskussion in Deutschland mehr erwähnt, obschon man sich doch

eher eigentlich fragen sollte, ob diese Reaktion nicht vielleicht vorschnell

und unnötig war.

Ursache für den Unfall in Fukushima war die bewusste Missachtung

einer bekannten hohen Eintrittswahrscheinlichkeit für Überflutungen

des Standorts (abgeschätzt zu einmal in dreihundert Jahren).

Im Gegensatz zu z.B. deutschen Anlagen war Fukushima gegen

Überflutungen topografisch und technisch nicht gesichert. Hätte

die Anlage nur über wasserdichte Türen verfügt, wäre der Standort

nicht einmal in die Abendnachrichten am 11. März 2011 gekommen.

Europäische Kernkraftwerke sind dagegen regelmäßig gegen

Hochwasser ausgelegt, die nur einmal in 10.000 Jahren unterstellt

werden müssen, und dann nicht als plötzliche Überflutung, sondern

mit über Tage langsam ansteigenden Pegeln, was gezielte Gegenmaßnahmen

einfach macht.

Die berechtigte und entscheidende Frage nach Fukushima musste

selbstverständlich sein: Sind andere Schadensszenarien denkbar,

die zu ähnlich unzulässigen Konsequenzen führen könnten?

Diese Frage konnte nach dem in der Folge durchgeführten „RSK-

Test“ (Reaktorsicherheitskommission) und dem parallelen, europaweit

flächendeckend durchgeführten „EU-Stresstest“ (an dem sich

sogar die Ukraine beteiligte) für alle europäischen Kernkraftwerke

verneint werden. Insbesondere die deutschen Standorte taten sich

hier mit besonderen zusätzlichen Sicherheitsreserven und einem

hohen Ausrüstungsstand (bei dem fast keine sinnvollen weiteren

Nachrüstungen mehr identifizierbar waren) hervor.

Bei all dem ist in Fukushima – wie auch die Weltgesundheitsorganisation

abschließend festgestellt hat – niemand durch Radioaktivität

zu Schaden gekommen.

Die Eintrittswahrscheinlichkeit für große Tsunamis an japanischen

Küsten von einmal in dreißig bis dreihundert Jahren (alle insgesamt

15 japanischen Kernkraftwerksstandorte liegen an Küsten) ist zu

vergleichen mit den in umfangreichen Sicherheitsforschungsprogrammen

zuverlässig bestätigten Eintrittshäufigkeiten für gesundheitsgefährdende

unfallbedingte nukleare Freisetzungen aus Europäischen

Kernkraftwerken im Bereich von eins zu einer Million

(Reaktorbetriebs-)Jahren.

Diese Verhältnisse sind beim Deutschen Ausstiegsbeschluss 2011

nicht berücksichtigt worden. In der ausschließlich von der damaligen

Bundesregierung berufenen „Ethikkommission“ waren keine

Kerntechniker oder Risikoanalysten vertreten.

Wäre es angesichts der heutigen Erkenntnisse zur Klimafrage, zu

den Protesten der jungen Generation und im Sinne wahrer globaler

Verantwortung nicht inzwischen angebracht, diese Entscheidung

neu zu durchdenken?

Dr.-Ing. Ludger Mohrbach

Leiter Kernenergie

VGB PowerTech e.V., Essen, Deutschland

2


© michaeljung@163.com – Fotolia

Ihr neuer Job findet Sie – mit einem Inserat in der VGB PowerTech.

Find a new challenge?

Kontakt: Sabine Kuhlmann, Tel: +49 201 8128-212

ads@vgb.org | powerjobs.vgb.org


Contents VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Acid conductivity monitoring – No more resin change

SWAN has reinvented Conductivity measurement After

Cation Exchange (CACE).

The AMI CACE continuously measures conductivity before and

after cation exchange without the need to change resin columns

every month and replace or regenerate resin.

An EDI module is removing the cations from the sample in the

same way the conventional resin used to do.

The monitor AMI CACE is a key component in controlling water

steam cycle chemistry. Its new EDI technology is significantly

reducing maintenance cost and the environmental impact, saving

resin and regeneration chemicals.

• No resin change or regeneration required.

• No rinse down time required, short response time.

• Less/No bias from ion leakage from resin.

• Continuous monitoring of sample flow to validate results.

International Journal for Generation

and Storage of Electricity and Heat 5 l 2019

Not perhaps “nuclear energy for future” after all?

Nicht vielleicht doch „Kernenergie für die Zukunft“?

Ludger Mohrbach 1

Abstracts/Kurzfassungen6

Targeting innovation at cost drivers –

How the UK can deliver low cost, low carbon,

commercially investable power

Innovation auf Kostentreiber ausrichten –

Wie Großbritannien kostengünstigen, CO 2 -armen,

kommerziell investierbaren Strom liefern kann

Benjamin Todd 42

Members‘ News 8

The role of resources and reserves

for the global energy supply

Die Rolle von Ressourcen und Reserven

für die weltweite Energieversorgung

Hans-Wilhelm Schiffer 26

Nuclear power plant flexibility at EDF

Flexibler Betrieb der Kernkraftwerke bei EDF

Patrick Morilhat, Stéphane Feutry,

Christelle Lemaitre and Jean Melaine Favennec 32

The German Quiver Project – Quivers for

damaged and non-standard fuel rods

Das deutsche Köcher-Projekt

Sascha Bechtel, Wolfgang Faber, Hagen Höfer,

Frank Jüttemann, Martin Kaplik, Michael Köbl,

Bernhard Kühne and Marc Verwerft 46

Advanced sectorial gamma scanning for the

radiological characterization of radioactive waste packages

Fortschrittliche Gamma-Scans zur radiologischen

Charakterisierung von Verpackungen mit radioaktiven Abfällen

M. Dürr, M. Fritzsche, K. Krycki, B. Hansmann,

T. Hansmann, A. Havenith, D. Pasler and T. Hartmann 55

4


VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Contents

For more information…

ANALYTICAL INSTRUMENTS

Acid conductivity monitoring –

No more resin change

AMI CACE

Conductivity After Cation Exchange (CACE) has never been

easier to measure than with the new EDI technology for cation

removal from the sample

SWAN Analytische Instrumente AG ∙ CH-8340 Hinwil

www.swan.ch ∙ swan@swan.ch

SWAN ANALYTICAL

INSTRUMENTS AG

CH-8340 Hinwil, Switzerland

E-mail: swan@swan.ch

www.swan.ch

Water Steam Cycle

Review of the analytical methods used in nuclear

decommissioning

Application vs. aspiration – an EU-wide survey of

methods in radioanalytical chemistry

Review der Analysemethoden für die Stilllegung

kerntechnischer Anlagen

Alexandra K. Nothstein, Ursula Hoeppener-Kramar,

Laura Aldave de las Heras and Benjamin C. Russell 63

From Technical Documentation to the Information Space

Information for everyone – company-wide, digital, mobile

Von der Technischen Dokumentation zum Informationsraum

Informationen für alle – unternehmensweit, digital, mobil

Petra Erner 72

Operating results 92

VGB News 93

Inserentenverzeichnis94

Events 95

Imprint96

Preview VGB PowerTech 6|2019 96

Operating experience with nuclear power plants 2018

Betriebserfahrungen mit Kernkraftwerken 2018

VGB PowerTech 76

Annual Index 2018: The Annual Index 2018, as also of previous

volumes, are available for free download at

https://www.vgb.org/en/jahresinhaltsverzeichnisse_d.html

Jahresinhaltsverzeichnis 2018: Das Jahresinhaltsverzeichnis 2018

der VGB POWERTECH − und früherer Jahrgänge−steht als kostenloser

Download unter folgender Webadresse zur Verfügung:

https://www.vgb.org/jahresinhaltsverzeichnisse_d.html

5


Abstracts VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

The role of resources and reserves for the

global energy supply

Hans-Wilhelm Schiffer

The assured availability and competitiveness of

the various energy sources, as well as climate

compatibility, determine their use. Conditions

on the energy markets are also subject to continuous

change. This article examines the extent to

which the availability of energy resources and

the orientation of energy policies influence the

energy mix, particularly power generation. It

also outlines strategies for achieving the energy

policy goals – security of supply, value for money

and environmental compatibility (including

climate protection) – in the best possible way.

Nuclear power plant flexibility at EDF

Patrick Morilhat, Stéphane Feutry, Christelle

Lemaitre and Jean Melaine Favennec

Based upon existing experience feedback of

French nuclear power plants operated by EDF

(Electricité de France), this paper shows that

flexible operation of nuclear reactors is possible

and has been applied in France by EDF’s

58 reactors for more than 30 years without any

noticeable or unmanageable impacts: no effects

on safety or on the environment, and no

noticeable additional maintenance costs, with

an additional unplanned capability load factor

estimated at only 0.5 %. EDF’s nuclear reactors

have the capability to vary their output between

20 % and 100 % within 30 minutes, twice a day,

when operating in load-following mode. Flexible

operation requires sound plant design (safety

margins, auxiliary equipment) and appropriate

operator skills, and early modifications

were made to the initial Westinghouse design

to enable flexible operation (e.g., use of “grey”

control rods to vary reactor core thermal power

more rapidly than with conventional “black”

control rods). The nominal capacities of the

present power stations are sufficient, safe and

adequate to balance generation against demand

and allow renewables to be inserted intermittently,

without any additional CO 2 emissions. It

is a clear demonstration of full complementarity

between nuclear and renewable energies.

Targeting innovation at cost drivers –

How the UK can deliver low cost, low

carbon, commercially investable power

Benjamin Todd

When it comes to creating affordable, reliable,

low carbon energy, the UK consortium led by

Rolls-Royce, is bringing a modern, holistic approach

to small nuclear power station design.

The design concept is driven by improving the

economics and market requirements of nuclear

power; targeting cost drivers such as schedule

uncertainty; and focusing innovation efforts to

reduce or remove those cost drivers entirely.

The result is a compelling, commercially investible

design for a whole power station, not just a

small modular reactor, that can help the world

meet its low carbon energy challenges.

The German Quiver Project – Quivers for

damaged and non-standard fuel rods

Sascha Bechtel, Wolfgang Faber, Hagen Höfer,

Frank Jüttemann, Martin Kaplik, Michael Köbl,

Bernhard Kühne and Marc Verwerft

The GNS IQ® Integrated Quiver System is a versatile

tool for the disposal of damaged fuel rods

from both PWR- and BWR-NPPs. The Quivers

can safely accommodate several fuel rods and –

featuring the same dimensions as complete fuel

elements – fit into the standard basket positions

of the transport and storage casks for PWR-FA

and for BWR-FA respectively. The Quivers are

designed like a “second cladding” to accommodate

large varieties of fuel rods with defects, e.g.

in terms of deformations and defect morphologies,

and also leakers. Their robust design provides

sufficient margins for safety requirements.

E.ON Kernkraft (EKK, now PreussenElektra)

started a project in 2005 to establish a solution

for the dry interim storage of their failed fuel

rods in the on-site storage facilities. In 2006

EKK asked GNS Gesellschaft für Nuklear-Service

mbH to join the project and later on further

companies. In 2009 the four German utilities

jointly asked GNS to take over one of the concepts

and develop it towards cask-licensing. In

2018, the first PWR-quivers were loaded at Unterweser

NPP. Further dispatch campaign are

already in implementation.

Advanced sectorial gamma scanning for the

radiological characterization of radioactive

waste packages

M. Dürr, M. Fritzsche, K. Krycki, B. Hansmann, T.

Hansmann, A. Havenith, D. Pasler and T.

Hartmann

The management of radioactive waste is under

strict regulatory control to ensure the compliance

with safety guidelines. For the disposal in

the Konrad geological repository for non-heat

generating radioactive waste in Germany, acceptance

criteria for radioactive waste packages

have been derived from the safety case. The

waste designated for disposal is subject to product

control which is conditional for approval of

the waste package by the operator of the disposal

facility. The non-destructive assay using

gamma radiation detection techniques is a costeffective

measure to characterize radioactive

waste and serves to verify the conformity with

the acceptance criteria. In the past decades,

the pre-dominantly used method is segmented

gamma scanning of waste drums, which is

based on simplifying assumption of a uniformly

distributed activity and a homogeneous waste

matrix. The simplification reduces the accuracy

of the measurement leading to large conservative

estimates for the activity content which in

turn leads to an excessive and inefficient exhaustion

of activity limits for waste packages

and to higher costs for disposal. An Advanced

Sectorial Gamma Scanning (ASGS) method is

developed, which includes a software module

for the efficiency calculation of inhomogeneous

activity distributions (ECIAD) to reconstruct the

spatially resolved activity distribution from the

acquired measurement data. This method can

be applied for a wider range of the composition

of the radioactive waste, which is of relevance

in the qualification of legacy waste and the increasing

stream of waste from decontamination

and decommissioning of nuclear installations.

Review of the analytical methods used in

nuclear decommissioning

Application vs. aspiration – an EU-wide

survey of methods in radioanalytical

chemistry

Alexandra K. Nothstein,

Ursula Hoeppener-Kramar,

Laura Aldave de las Heras and

Benjamin C. Russell

The wave of decommissioning of nuclear facilities

that Europe is facing now and in the near

future requires a solid basis of efficient chemical

and radiochemical analytical methods and

capabilities. This study presents the results of a

survey among European laboratories to summarize

current practices, covering radionuclides,

activity levels, sample types, and analytical

instrumentation to create a clearer picture of

the present status and future challenges. The

results reflect the particularity of decommissioning,

which requires analysis of a wide range

of sample matrices. As a result, a wide variety

of radioanalytical methods are deployed. However,

gamma spectrometry, liquid scintillation

counting and alpha spectrometry remain by far

the dominant analytical methods. Despite the

need for novel methods for specific nuclides,

laboratories did not consider specialization or

miniaturization of instruments as a focus for

future developments. Rather, two types of challenges

emerged most prominently: firstly, process

optimization, such as improved and more

integrated communication with customers and

regulatory bodies and secondly, methodical

improvements, such as the more widespread

application of new technologies and enhanced

availability of reference materials.

From Technical Documentation to the

Information Space

Information for everyone – company-wide,

digital, mobile

Petra Erner

Digitization, industry 4.0, mobile computing,

social selling and big data will influence the

products of tomorrow and ultimately shape

the development of our entire society. Information

becomes the lubricant of our digital world.

Companies need an intelligent concept for making

their collected knowledge available to all

areas of the company: At the touch of a button,

up-to-date, digital and mobile. DOCUFY, manufacturer

of professional software solutions for

technical documentation, has developed a solution

concept: the information space.

Operating experience with

nuclear power plants 2018

VGB PowerTech

The VGB Technical Committee “Nuclear Plant

Operation” has been exchanging operating

experience about nuclear power plants for

more than 30 years. Plant operators from several

European countries are participating in

the exchange. A report is given on the operating

results achieved in 2018, events important

to plant safety, special and relevant repair, and

retrofit measures.

6


VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Kurzfassungen

Die Rolle von Ressourcen und Reserven für

die weltweite Energieversorgung

Hans-Wilhelm Schiffer

Die sichere Verfügbarkeit und die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit

der verschiedenen Energieträger bestimmt

– ebenso wie die Klimaverträglichkeit

– deren Nutzung. Dabei sind die Bedingungen

auf den Energiemärkten einem kontinuierlichen

Wandel unterworfen. Im Rahmen dieses

Beitrags wird untersucht, inwieweit die

Verfügbarkeit der Energieressourcen und die

energiepolitische Ausrichtung den Energiemix

insbesondere der Stromerzeugung beeinflussen.

Ferner werden Strategien aufgezeigt, wie

die energiepolitischen Ziele – das sind Versorgungssicherheit,

Preiswürdigkeit und Umweltverträglichkeit

(einschließlich Klimaschutz) –

bestmöglich erreicht werden.

Flexibler Betrieb der

Kernkraftwerke bei EDF

Patrick Morilhat, Stéphane Feutry,

Christelle Lemaitre und Jean Melaine Favennec

Basierend auf den vorliegenden Erfahrungen

des Betriebs der französischen Kernkraftwerke

von EDF (Electricité de France) zeigt dieser

Beitrag dass ein flexibler Betrieb von Kernkraftwerken

nicht nur möglich sondern in Frankreich

seit mehr als 30 Jahren und in allen 58

Reaktoren von EDF tägliche Praxis ist. Es sind

weder limitierende betriebliche Effekte noch

einschränkende Einflüsse auf Sicherheit oder

Umwelt festzustellen. Die Kernkraftwerke der

EDF können ihre Leistung innerhalb von 30

Minuten zweimal täglich auf ein Niveau zwischen

20 und 100 % der Nennleistung einstellen,

wenn sie im Lastfolgebetrieb eingesetzt

werden. Der flexible Betrieb erfordert die vorliegende

verlässliche Anlagenauslegung sowie

gute Anlagenkenntnisse. Frühzeitig wurden in

Frankreich dazu Anpassungen am ursprünglichen

Westinghouse-Design vorgenommen. Mit

der vorhandenen flexiblen Gesamtleistung der

bestehenden Kernkraftwerke im französischen

Netz ist eine sichere und ausreichende Stromerzeugung

möglich, um die volatile Einspeisung

aus erneuerbaren Energien ohne zusätzliche

CO 2 -Emissionen zu gewährleisten. Dies ist ein

deutlicher Beweis dafür, wie sich Kernenergie

und erneuerbare Energien ergänzen.

Innovation auf Kostentreiber ausrichten –

Wie Großbritannien kostengünstigen,

CO 2 -armen, kommerziell investierbaren

Strom liefern kann

Benjamin Todd

Für bezahlbare, zuverlässige und kohlenstoffarme

Energie, bietet das britische Konsortium

unter Leitung von Rolls-Royce einen modernen,

ganzheitlichen Ansatz für die Planung kleiner

Kernkraftwerke, sogenannter SMR – Small

modular reactors. Das Designkonzept zielt auf

eine Verbesserung von Wirtschaftlichkeit und

Marktintegration der Kernenergie, der Ausrichtung

auf Kostentreiber wie Terminunsicherheit

und der Fokussierung auf Innovation zur Reduzierung

oder zum vollständigen Ausschließen

von identifizierten Kostentreibern. Das Resultat

ist ein kommerzielles Design für ein SMR-Kernkraftwerk,

das bei der Herausforderungen eine

kohlenstoffarmen Energieversorgung sicherzustellen,

einen wichtigen und wesentlichen Beitrag

liefern kann.

Das deutsche Köcher-Projekt

Sascha Bechtel, Wolfgang Faber, Hagen Höfer,

Frank Jüttemann, Martin Kaplik, Michael Köbl,

Bernhard Kühne und Marc Verwerft

Das integrierte Köchersystem GNS IQ® ist ein

vielseitiges Werkzeug für die Entsorgung von

beschädigten Brennstäben aus Druck- und Siedewasserreaktoren.

Der Köcher kann mehrere

Brennstäbe sicher aufnehmen und passt – mit

den gleichen Abmessungen wie komplette Brennelemente

– in die Standardkorbpositionen der

Transport- und Lagerbehälter für Druck- und

Siedewasserreaktor-Brennelemente. Der Köcher

ist wie eine „zweite Umhüllung“ ausgelegt,

um viel Arten von Brennstäben mit Defekten,

z.B. in Form von Deformationen, sowie sogenannten

„Leakers“ aufzunehmen. Ihr robustes

Design sorgt für eine zuverlässige Einhaltung

der Sicherheitsanforderungen. E.ON Kernkraft

(EKK, jetzt PreussenElektra) startete 2005 ein

Projekt zur Erarbeitung einer Lösung für die

trockene Zwischenlagerung ihrer defekten

Brennstäbe in den Standortzwischenlagern. Im

Jahr 2006 wurde die GNS Gesellschaft für Nuklear-Service

mbH in das Projekt mit eingebunden

und danach noch weitere Unternehmen.

Im Jahr 2009 beauftragten die vier deutschen

Kernkraftwerksbetreiber die GNS, eines der bis

dahin entwickelten Konzepte umzusetzen und

die Zulassung des Systems zu erwirken. Nach

Erteilungen der notwendigen Zulassungen und

Genehmigungen für die Köcherlösung durch die

deutschen Behörden fand Ende des Jahres 2018

im Kernkraftwerk Unterweser die erste erfolgreiche

Abfertigungskampagne statt. Weitere

befinden sich aktuell in der Umsetzung.

Fortschrittliche Gamma-Scans zur

radiologischen Charakterisierung von

Verpackungen mit radioaktiven Abfällen

M. Dürr, M. Fritzsche, K. Krycki,

B. Hansmann, T. Hansmann, A. Havenith,

D. Pasler und T. Hartmann

Die Entsorgung radioaktiver Abfälle unterliegt

einer strengen behördlichen Kontrolle, um

die Einhaltung von Sicherheitsrichtlinien zu

gewährleisten. Für die Entsorgung im geologischen

Endlager Konrad für nicht wärmeentwickelnde

radioaktive Abfälle in Deutschland

wurden für den Sicherheitsnachweis Annahmekriterien

für radioaktive Abfallpackungen abgeleitet.

Die zur Entsorgung vorgesehenen Abfälle

unterliegen einer Produktkontrolle, die von

der Genehmigung der Abfallverpackung durch

den Betreiber der Entsorgungseinrichtung abhängig

ist. Die zerstörungsfreie Untersuchung

mit Gammastrahlungsdetektionstechniken ist

eine kostengünstige Maßnahme zur Charakterisierung

radioaktiver Abfälle und dient der

Überprüfung der Konformität mit den Annahmekriterien.

Es wurde eine Advanced Sectorial

Gamma Scanning (ASGS)-Methode entwickelt,

die ein Softwaremodul zur Effizienzberechnung

von inhomogenen Aktivitätsverteilungen

(ECIAD) beinhaltet, um die räumlich aufgelöste

Aktivitätsverteilung aus den erfassten Messdaten

zu ermitteln. Diese Methode kann für einen

breiteren Bereich der Zusammensetzung von

radioaktiven Abfällen angewendet werden, der

für die Qualifizierung von Altabfällen und den

zunehmenden Abfallstrom bei der Dekontamination

und Stilllegung von kerntechnischen

Anlagen von Bedeutung ist.

Review der Analysemethoden für die

Stilllegung kerntechnischer Anlagen

Alexandra K. Nothstein, Ursula Hoeppener-

Kramar, Laura Aldave de las Heras und

Benjamin C. Russell

Die Rückbauprojekten nuklearer Einrichtungen

vor der Europa jetzt und in naher Zukunft steht,

erfordert eine solide Basis effizienter chemischer

und radiochemischer Analytikmethoden

und -fähigkeiten. In dieser Studie wurde eine

Umfrage an europäischen Laboren durchgeführt,

um die gegenwärtig angewendeten Verfahren

zusammenzutragen. Dies erstreckt sich

über Radionuklide, Aktivitätslevel, Probentypen

und analytische Gerätschaften, um ein

klareres Bild der gegenwärtigen Lage und zukünftigen

Herausforderungen zeichnen zu können.

Die Ergebnisse spiegeln die Besonderheit

des Rückbaus wieder, welche die Analytik einer

großen Spanne von Probenmatrices erfordert.

Infolgedessen wird eine große Bandbreite an

radioanalytischen Methoden verwendet. Dennoch

bleiben Gammaspektrometrie, Flüssigszintillationszähler

und Alphaspektrometrie die

vorherrschenden analytischen Methoden. Trotz

der Notwendigkeit für neuartige Methoden für

spezifische Nuklide, liegt für die Labore der Fokus

für zukünftige Herausforderungen nicht auf

Spezialisierung oder Miniaturisierung von Instrumenten.

Hingegen zeigten sich zwei Arten

von Herausforderungen am deutlichsten: erstens

Prozessoptimierung, wie die verbesserte,

starker vernetzte Kommunikation mit Kunden

und Behörden und zweitens, Methodenverbesserungen,

wie die weitverbreitete Anwendung

neuer Technologien und besserer Verfügbarkeit

von Referenzmaterialien.

Von der Technischen Dokumentation zum

Informationsraum

Informationen für alle – unternehmensweit,

digital, mobil

Petra Erner

Digitalisierung, Industrie 4.0, Mobile Computing,

Social Selling und Big Data beeinflussen

die Produkte von morgen und prägen letztlich

die Entwicklung unserer gesamten Gesellschaft.

Informationen werden zum wesentlichen Mittel

unserer digitalen Welt. Unternehmen benötigen

ein intelligentes Konzept, wie sie ihr gesammeltes

Wissen allen Unternehmensbereichen zur

Verfügung stellen: Auf Knopfdruck, aktuell,

digital und mobil. DOCUFY, Hersteller professioneller

Softwarelösungen für die Technische

Dokumentation, hat dazu ein Lösungskonzept

entwickelt: den Informationsraum

Betriebserfahrungen mit

Kernkraftwerken 2018

VGB PowerTech

Innerhalb des VGB-Fachausschusses „Kernkraftwerksbetrieb“

wird seit mehr als 30 Jahren ein

intensiver Austausch von Betriebserfahrungen

mit Kernkraftwerken gepflegt. An diesem Erfahrungsaustausch

sind Kernkraftwerksbetreiber

aus mehreren europäischen Ländern beteiligt.

Über im Jahr 2018 erzielte Betriebsergebnisse

sowie sicherheitsrelevante Ereignisse, wichtige

Reparaturmaßnahmen und besondere Umrüstmaßnahmen

wird berichtet.

7


VGB POWERTECH as printed edition,

monthly published, 11 issues a year

Annual edition as CD or DVD

with alle issues from 1990 to 2019:

Profount knowledge about electricity

and heat generation and storage.

Order now at www.vgb.org/shop

1/2 2012

European

Generation Mix

• Flexibility and

Storage

1/2 2012

International Journal for Electricity and Heat Generation

The electricity sector

at a crossroads

The role of

renewables energy

in Europe

Power market,

technologies and

acceptance

Dynamic process

simulation as an

engineering tool

European

Generation Mix

• Flexibility and

Storage

The electricity sector

at a crossroads

The role of

renewables energy

in Europe

Power market,

technologies and

acceptance

Dynamic process

simulation as an

engineering tool

Publication of VGB PowerTech e.V. l www.vgb.org

International Journal for Electricity and Heat Generation

ISSN 1435–3199 · K 123456 l International Edition

1/2 2012

European

Generation Mix

• Flexibility and

Storage

The electricity sector

at a crossroads

The role of

renewables energy

in Europe

Power market,

technologies and

acceptance

Dynamic process

simulation as an

engineering tool

Publication of VGB PowerTech e.V. l www.vgb.org

ISSN 1435–3199 · K 123456 l International Edition

International Journal for Electricity and Heat Generat

Publication of VGB PowerTech e.V. l www.vgb.org

ISSN 1435–3199 · K 123456 l International Edition

Fachzeitschrift: 1990 bis 2019

· 1990 bis 2019 · · 1990 bis 2019 ·

Diese DVD und ihre Inhalte sind urheberrechtlich geschützt.

© VGB PowerTech Service GmbH

Essen | Deutschland | 2019

© Sergey Nivens - Fotolia

VGB PowerTech

Contact: Gregor Scharpey

Tel: +49 201 8128-200

mark@vgb.org | www.vgb.org

The international journal for electricity and heat generation and storage.

Facts, competence and data = VGB POWERTECH

www.vgb.org/shop


VGB-PowerTech-DVD

More than 25,000 digitalised pages with data and expertise

Volumes 1990 to 2019 , incl. search function for all documents.

Volumes 1976 to 2000 | English edition available now!

Technical Journal: 1976 to 2000

Fachzeitschrift: 1990 bis 2019

English Edition

· 1976 to 2000 · · 1976 to 2000 ·

Fachzeitschrift: 2019

· 1990 bis 2019 · · 1990 bis 2019 ·

Diese DVD und ihre Inhalte sind urheberrechtlich geschützt.

© VGB PowerTech Service GmbH

Essen | Deutschland | 2018

All rights reserved.

© VGB PowerTech Service GmbH

Essen | Germany | 2019

· CD 2019 · · CD 2019 ·

Diese CD und ihre Inhalte sind urheberrechtlich geschützt.

© VGB PowerTech Service GmbH

Essen | Deutschland | 2018

VGB-PowerTech-CD-2019

Volume 2019 of the international renowed technical journal

VGB POWERTECH digital on CD.

Place your order in our shop: www.vgb.org/shop


Members´ News VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Members´

News

VERBUND präsentiert das

„Digitale Wasserkraftwerk 4.0“

• Europaweit einzigartige Live-Demonstration

im steirischen Pilotkraftwerk

Rabenstein: VERBUND präsentiert gemeinsam

mit der europäischen Kraftwerks-Vereinigung,

mit der Technischen

Universität Graz sowie mit Technologiepartnern

erstmals die Zukunft der Stromerzeugung

in einem „digitalisierten

Wasserkraftwerk 4.0“.

(verbund) Der Tauchroboter kann zentimetergenau

an das Laufrad der Turbine

gesteuert werden. Die Anomalie-Detektoren

hatten zuvor aufgrund der Sensordaten

aus dem hundert Tonnen schweren

Maschinensatz angeschlagen. Im „digitalen

Zwilling“ wurde eine massive Lebensdauerverkürzung

wichtiger Maschinenteile

erkennbar. Und noch während die Betriebsingenieure

die Turbine für eine

Schnellinspektion abstellen, wird für eine

eventuell erforderliche Trockenlegung der

Einlaufbereich der Maschinen mit dem

Echtzeit-3D-Sonar auf Ablagerungen unter

Wasser kontrolliert.

Der Blick in die Arbeitswelt der Zukunft

wurde im steirischen Murkraftwerk Rabenstein

bereits Realität: VERBUND präsentierte

im Rahmen eines internationalen

Workshops der europäischen Kraftwerksvereinigung

VGB PowerTech und der Technischen

Universität Graz das „digitale Wasserkraftwerk

4.0“.

Wasserkraft goes digital:

Europaweit erstmalige Leistungsschau

im Pilotkraftwerk

Was vor wenigen Jahrzehnten noch bahnbrechend

war - etwa die zentrale Fernsteuerung

ganzer Wasserkraftwerksgruppen -

ist heute technisch bewährter Standard.

Die Digitalisierung erfasst mittlerweile alle

Bereiche des Alltags. Auch die seit mehr als

100 Jahren bewährte Stromerzeugung aus

Wasserkraft steht vor den Herausforderungen

der vierten industriellen Revolution.

Mit dem Innovationsprogramm „Hydropower

4.0 - Digitales Wasserkraftwerk“ wurden

von VERBUND bereits vor zwei Jahren

Entwicklungsmodule gestartet, um die

Wasserkraftbranche für die Anforderungen

der Energiewende zu rüsten: „Unser

Ziel lautet, alle für die Wasserkraft denkbaren

Möglichkeiten von digitalen Anwendungen

zu evaluieren und die erfolgversprechendsten

Technologien in einem Pilotkraftwerk

auf den Prüfstand zu stellen“,

sagte Karl Heinz Gruber, Geschäftsführer

der VERBUND Hydro Power GmbH, im

Rahmen der ersten Live-Demonstration

des digitalen Wasserkraftwerks 4.0.

„VERBUND konnte bei diesem Know-how-

Aufbau von Beginn weg auf die enge Zusammenarbeit

mit zahlreichen österreichischen

und internationalen Forschungsund

Technologiepartnern zählen“, so

Gruber. Dieser Ansatz ist in der Wasserkraftbranche

einzigartig und findet daher

auch international große Aufmerksamkeit.

Digitale Innovationen wurden im

Murkraftwerk Rabenstein erprobt und

weiterentwickelt

Im Pilotkraftwerk Rabenstein werden seit

mehr als einem Jahr vielversprechende digitale

Testsysteme konzipiert und erprobt.

In weiterer Folge wurde die Praxistauglichkeit

dieser Technologien im täglichen Betrieb

rund um die Uhr getestet und gegebenenfalls

für einen optimalen Einsatz in der

Wasserkraft weiterentwickelt. „Mit dem

Programm Hydropower 4.0 werden alle Dimensionen

für einen erfolgreichen digitalen

Weg erreicht: Agilität, Zusammenarbeit

über alle Bereiche, Schnelligkeit in der

Umsetzung innovativer Konzepte, basierend

auf einer flexiblen IoT-Plattform“,

sagt Thomas Zapf, Holding-Bereichsleiter

Digitalisierung in der VERBUND AG.

Die an die jeweiligen Systeme gestellten

Anforderungen sind sehr herausfordernd,

zumal es die bereits hohe Effizienz und

Verlässlichkeit der Wasserkraft noch weiter

zu erhöhen gilt. Bernd Hollauf, VER-

BUND-Projektleiter für das „digitale Wasserkraftwerk

4.0“: „Die Bandbreite der im

Pilotkraftwerk Rabenstein getesteten digitalen

Technologien ist denkbar vielfältig

und reicht von intelligenten Sensorik-Konzepten,

Anomaliedetektions- bzw. Prognosemodellen,

digitalen Zwillingen, mobilen

Assistenzsystemen, virtuellen Kraftwerksmodellen,

neuartigen autonomen Vermessungs-

und Inspektionskonzepten bis hin

zu vernetzten Plattformlösungen.“

Intelligente Sensorik-Konzepte, wie beispielsweise

akustische Überwachungssysteme,

verknüpft mit künstlicher Intelligenz

stellen die Datenbasis für Anomaliedetektions-

und Prognosemodelle dar. Mit derartigen

Modellen kann ein Störfall bzw. auch

Maschinenversagen rechtzeitig vorhergesagt

werden.

Unter Digitalen Zwillingen werden im Pilotkraftwerk

speziell entwickelte Prognosemodelle

verstanden. Diese errechnen

mit Hilfe der Sensordaten die Restlebensdauer

von wichtigen Maschinenteilen. Außerdem

können die Auswirkungen unterschiedlicher

Betriebsweisen untersucht

werden.

Kann trotz der digitalen Überwachungssysteme

ein Störfall nicht vermieden werden,

stellen mobile Assistenzsysteme alle

für die Störungsbehebung erforderlichen

Informationen zeitnah über mobile Endgeräte

(z.B. Tablet, Smartphone, Datenbrillen)

an jedem Ort im Kraftwerk bereit. Ein

virtuell begehbares Kraftwerksmodell bietet

neue vielversprechende Möglichkeiten

etwa für Schulungszwecke, für Vorbereitungen

auf Krisenfälle, für Umbauprojekte

oder auch in definierten Fällen für den Betrieb

und die Instandhaltung von Wasserkraftwerken.

Für den Bereich der vorgeschriebenen umfassenden

Inspektion und Vermessung der

Anlagen und des Gewässeruntergrunds

Wasserkraft goes digital: Vortrag des Projektleiters Bernd Hollauf

(Foto: VERBUND)

Präsentation des Digitalen Wasserkraftwerks in Rabenstein (Mur).

(Foto: VERBUND)

8


VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Members´ News

können dank moderner, vorwiegend aus

dem Offshore-Bereich stammender Technologien,

neue Konzepte entwickelt werden.

Sogenannte Remotely Operated Vehicles

(ROV) und Autonomous Surface Vehicles

(ASV) werden bereits im realen

Betrieb in einzelnen Kraftwerken eingesetzt

und die autonome Vermessung und

Inspektion könnte bald in allen Anlagen

Realität werden.

Nicht zuletzt sollen vernetzte Plattformlösungen

im Wasserkraftwerk bisher isolierte

Daten- und Informationssysteme miteinander

verbinden. Daten sollen bereichsübergreifend

und auf Knopfdruck dezentral

und zentral zur Verfügung stehen und

schnelle Analysen ermöglichen.

„Digitale Technologien werden unsere Mitarbeiter

in den Kraftwerken nicht verdrängen,

sondern diese vielmehr in Form eines

zuverlässigen Assistenzsystems in ihrer

täglichen Arbeit unterstützen“, sagt VER-

BUND Hydro Power-Geschäftsführer Karl

Heinz Gruber.

Digitalisierungs-Barometer – Weltpremiere

für ein System zur Statusbeurteilung

Ein auf die Besonderheiten der Wasserkraft

zugeschnittenes Bewertungstool soll Wasserkraftunternehmen

bei der Verwirklichung

der digitalen Transformation unterstützen:

Der „Digitalisierungs-Barometer“

ermöglicht die Evaluierung sowohl des

Ist-Zustands als auch des angestrebten

Ziel-Zustands in drei Jahren im Vergleich

zum Branchendurchschnitt. Bewertet und

ausgewertet werden dabei mehr als 30

Handlungsfelder zu digitalen Maßnahmen.

Mit dem Digitalisierungs-Barometer kann

jedes Wasserkraftunternehmen eigenständig

seinen aktuellen Status auf dem Weg in

die digitale Zukunft mit den eigenen Zielvorgaben

sowie dem gesamten Marktumfeld

abgleichen.

Hochkarätiger Expertenaustausch:

Europäische Wasserkraft-Spezialisten in

der Steiermark

VGB PowerTech ist der internationale

Fachverband der Kraftwerksbetreiber und

hat in Graz gemeinsam mit VERBUND und

dem Institut für Elektrizitätswirtschaft und

Energieinnovation der TU Graz den 2. internationalen

Workshop „Digitalisierung

in der Wasserkraft“ organisiert, um den europaweiten

Erfahrungsaustausch der Wasserkraftexperten

zu forcieren.

Einen Tag lang tauschten sich 170 Fachleute

aus 90 Unternehmen und Institutionen

aus 14 Ländern unter dem Vorsitz von VER-

BUND über digitale Entwicklungen im

Energie-Sektor aus. Im Mittelpunkt stand

dabei auch die Themenstellung Datenschutz

und Cybersicherheit.

LLwww.verbund.com

Alpiq mit starkem Europa- und

Handelsgeschäft

(alpiq) Die Alpiq Gruppe erwirtschaftete

aus den fortgeführten Aktivitäten im Geschäftsjahr

2018 einen Nettoumsatz von

5,2 Mrd. CHF (2017: 5,5 Mrd. CHF) und

ein EBITDA vor Sondereinflüssen (EBIT-

DA) von 166 Mio. CHF (2017: 242 Mio.

CHF). Die Haupttreiber für das tiefere

EBITDA sind wie angekündigt die unter

den Produktionskosten liegenden abgesicherten

Strompreise aus den Vorjahren,

welche die Schweizer Stromproduktion

weiterhin belasten. Die Stromproduktion

in Europa sowie das Energiehandels-,

Grosskunden- und Retailgeschäft in Südund

Westeuropa wirtschafteten sehr erfolgreich.

Weitere Meilensteine im

Projekt Nant de Drance

Im Geschäftsjahr 2018 wurde beim Pumpspeicherkraftwerk

Nant de Drance, an dem

Alpiq zu 39 Prozent beteiligt ist, mit der

Anlieferung und Montage der Spiralgehäuse

ein weiterer Meilenstein gesetzt. Mit 900

Megawatt installierter Leistung wird es zu

den leistungsfähigsten Pumpspeicherkraftwerken

Europas zählen, eine notwendige

Ergänzung zu den neuen erneuerbaren

Energien und unerlässlich für die Stabilität

des schweizerischen und europäischen

Stromnetzes sein. Nant de Drance wird ab

2019 schrittweise in Betrieb gehen.

Internationale Produktion liefert

substanzielle Beiträge

Der Geschäftsbereich Generation International

leistete den grössten Beitrag zum

operativen Ergebnis der Gruppe. Die internationale

thermische Produktion erwirtschaftete

erneut deutlich positive Beiträge.

Alpiq prüft derzeit aus strategischen Gründen

den Verkauf ihrer beiden tschechischen

Kohlekraftwerke Kladno und Zlín.

Ein möglicher Abschluss der Transaktion

steht wie immer unter der Bedingung, dass

die drei festgelegten Kriterien − Preis,

Transaktionssicherheit und vertragliche

Konditionen − kumulativ erfüllt werden.

Auch der Bereich Renewable Energy Sources

erwirtschaftete ein starkes Ergebnis.

Alpiq baute ihr Portfolio mit Windenergieund

Photovoltaikanlagen in Italien aus. In

der Schweiz wurden die drei Windkraftprojekte

Bel Coster, Tous-Vents und EolJorat

Nord vorangetrieben. Die drei Windkraftwerke

sollen zukünftig die entsprechenden

Regionen mit umweltfreundlichem Strom

versorgen.

LLwww.alpiq.com

Axpo und das Hamburger

Investmenthaus Aquila Capital

unterzeichnen langfristige

Stromabnahmeverträge für zwei

Windparks in Schweden

(axpo) Axpo baut ihr Geschäft im Bereich

der langfristigen Power Purchase Agreements

(PPA) für erneuerbare Energie in

Nordeuropa weiter aus: Die Tochtergesellschaft

Axpo Nordic AS wird den gesamten

produzierten Strom aus den Windparks

Nylandsbergen und Högkölen in Nordschweden

abnehmen und vermarkten. Beide

Anlagen befinden sich im Besitz von

Aquila Capital, einer in Hamburg ansässigen

Investmentgesellschaft, die sich unter

anderem auf Investitionen in erneuerbare

Energien in Skandinavien konzentriert.

Außerdem verschafft Axpo der Gegenpartei

den Marktzugang für den Handel mit

den entsprechenden Stromzertifikaten

und Herkunftsnachweisen (Guarantees of

Origin, GoO).

Schweden hat sich in den vergangenen

Jahren zu einem der wichtigsten europäischen

Märkte für Windenergie entwickelt,

da das Land günstige Windverhältnisse

aufweist und ein stabiles Investitionsumfeld

bietet. Das Onshore-Windkraftprojekt

Nylandsbergen liegt in der Nähe von

Sundsvall im dünn besiedelten Norden,

etwa 400 Kilometer nördlich von Stockholm.

Der Windpark mit einer Leistung von

68,4 MW befindet sich derzeit im Bau, die

18 Turbinen mit einer Nabenhöhe von 112

Metern sollen im Spätsommer 2019 den

Getriebeservice

» Instandsetzung aller Typen und Fabrikate

» Vor-Ort-Inspektionen und Diagnose

» Sonderkonstruktionen

D - 46395 Bocholt · Tel.: +49 (0) 2871 / 70 33 · www.brauer-getriebe.de

9


Members´ News VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Betrieb aufnehmen. Nur zwei Autostunden

von Nylandsbergen entfernt liegt der

Onshore-Windpark Högkölen mit einer

Leistung von 64,8 MW. Die Anlage in der

Gemeinde Ljusdal ist seit Dezember 2018

in Betrieb.

Axpo hat kürzlich mit Aquila Capital einen

langfristigen Vertrag über die Abnahme

des Stroms aus diesen beiden Windparks

unterzeichnet. Ebenfalls Bestandteil des

Vertrages ist der damit verbundene Marktzugang

für Zertifikate und GoO. Aquila Capital

gehört zur Aquila-Gruppe, einem unabhängigen

deutschen Asset- und Investmentmanager.

Das Unternehmen

beschäftigt 300 Mitarbeitende an 14

Standorten in Europa und Asien und konzentriert

sich auf alternative Investments.

Die Windenergie in Skandinavien ist dabei

eine der Säulen der Real Asset Strategie

von Aquila Capital: Das Unternehmen managt

Kapazitäten mit einer installierten

Leistung von rund 1600 MW.

Nachfrage nach PPAs steigt

Kjetil Holm, Head Origination Axpo Nordic,

zeigt sich erfreut: „Die beiden Stromabnahmeverträge

mit Aquila Capital zeugen

davon, dass sich Axpo langfristig in

Nordeuropa engagiert. Wir haben uns zu

einem wettbewerbsfähigen und soliden

Partner für PPA in den nordeuropäischen

Märkten entwickelt. Dass wir gleich zwei

Abschlüsse gleichzeitig vornehmen konnten,

freut uns sehr. Dies ist eine gute Basis,

um die Geschäftsbeziehung zu Aquila Capital

weiter auszubauen.“

Roman Rosslenbroich, Mitgründer und

CEO von Aquila Capital, kommentiert:

„Mittlerweile sind wir einer der aktivsten

Investoren im Bereich der erneuerbaren

Energien in Schweden. Seit der Gründung

des Unternehmens hat Aquila Capital in erneuerbare

Energien mit einer Gesamtkapazität

von rund 4 GW investiert. Unser Ziel ist

es, unsere Präsenz in Nordeuropa in den

kommenden Jahren weiter auszubauen. Die

Zusammenarbeit mit Axpo ist im Hinblick

darauf ein wichtiger Meilenstein für uns.“

Axpo Nordic hat sich seit ihrer Gründung

im Jahr 2003 zu einem führenden Vermarkter

von Strom aus erneuerbaren Energien in

Nordeuropa und dem Baltikum entwickelt.

Langfristige Stromliefer- und Abnahmeverträge

sind dabei eines der wichtigsten

Wachstumsfelder, da die Kundennachfrage

in diesem Segment deutlich gestiegen ist.

Neben dem PPA-Geschäft hat sich Axpo

Nordic darauf spezialisiert, für ihre Kunden

aus Handel, Industrie und Energieerzeugung

massgeschneiderte Produkte und Services

anzubieten. Die Aktivitäten in den

nordeuropäischen Ländern sind Teil der

Die Axpo Gruppe produziert, handelt und vertreibt Energie zuverlässig für über 3

Millionen Menschen und mehrere tausend Unternehmen in der Schweiz und in über

30 Ländern Europas. Rund 4500 Mitarbeitende verbinden die Expertise aus 100 Jahren

klimaschonender Stromproduktion mit der Innovationskraft für eine nachhaltige

Energiezukunft. Axpo ist international führend im Energiehandel und in der Entwicklung

massgeschneiderter Energielösungen für ihre Kunden.

Fachspezialist Alterungsüberwachung m/w

100 % | Beznau

Interessiert? Weitere Informationen finden Sie auf unserer Website.

www.axpo.com/jobs

10


VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Members´ News

Strategie von Axpo, ihre internationale Präsenz

und Geschäftstätigkeit im Bereich der

Energielösungen für ihre Kunden weiter

auszubauen. Mittlerweile ist das Unternehmen

in 28 Ländern präsent und in 39 Märkten

in Europa und den USA aktiv.

LLwww.axpo.com

BKW nimmt neues Windkraftwerk

in Norwegen in Betrieb

(bkw) Die BKW hat das Onshore-Windkraftwerk

in Marker im Südosten von Norwegen

in Betrieb genommen. Mit einer installierten

Leistung von 54 MW soll der

Park 193 GWh Strom pro Jahr produzieren.

Das entspricht dem Energiebedarf von

43.000 Schweizer Haushalten. Damit

stärkt die BKW ihr Engagement zur

CO 2 -neutralen Stromerzeugung sowie ihre

Schweizer Führungsrolle beim Betrieb von

Windkraftwerken im In- und Ausland. ​

Die im Herbst 2017 begonnenen Bauarbeiten

verliefen nach Plan. Vor einigen Tagen

wurden die letzten Windkraftanlagen ans

Netz angeschlossen. Proxima Scandinavia,

die auf die Betreuung von Windkraftanlagen

in Skandinavien spezialisierte Tochtergesellschaft

der BKW, war während der

Bauphase mit der Projektleitung betraut

und wird diese auch in der Betriebsphase

weiter innehaben. Neben dem Bau und

dem Kauf von Onshore-Windparks führt

die BKW auch den Ausbau ihres Dienstleistungsgeschäfts

im On- und Offshore-Bereich

weiter.

Mit einer Nabenhöhe von 142 Metern und

68 Meter langen Rotorblättern handelt es

sich bei den 15 Windkraftanlagen des

Parks um die grössten Turbinen auf norwegischem

Boden. Mit dem neuen Windkraftwerk

und der bestehenden Beteiligung an

Fosen Vind, dem grössten Onshore-Windparkprojekt

Europas, wird die BKW in Norwegen

über eine installierte Leistung von

173 MW verfügen. Die ersten Windkraftanlagen

von Fosen Vind gingen Ende 2018 in

Betrieb, die letzten Anlagen werden Ende

2020 in Betrieb gehen.

Die Windverhältnisse sowie die Wirtschaftlichkeit

der Anlagen machen Windkraftinvestitionen

in Norwegen attraktiv. Zudem

profitiert die BKW dadurch von einem geografisch

wie regulatorisch breit abgestützten

Windkraftportfolio. Die BKW betreibt

Windparks in der Schweiz, in Deutschland,

Italien, Frankreich und Norwegen.

LLwww.bkw.ch

Die Axpo Gruppe produziert, handelt und vertreibt Energie zuverlässig für über 3

Millionen Menschen und mehrere tausend Unternehmen in der Schweiz und in über

30 Ländern Europas. Rund 4500 Mitarbeitende verbinden die Expertise aus 100 Jahren

klimaschonender Stromproduktion mit der Innovationskraft für eine nachhaltige

Energiezukunft. Axpo ist international führend im Energiehandel und in der Entwicklung

massgeschneiderter Energielösungen für ihre Kunden.

Fachspezialist Qualitätssicherung m/w

100 % | Beznau

Interessiert? Weitere Informationen finden Sie auf unserer Website.

www.axpo.com/jobs

11


Members´ News VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Das Installationsschiff „Brave Tern“ im Hafen von Esbjerg in Dänemark vor der Beladung mit

Windkraftanlagen für den Windpark „EnBW Hohe See“.

CEZ Group joins other

German wind energy projects

under development

(cez) In April 2019 CEZ Group acquired

wind power plant projects in Germany

with a total installed capacity of more than

110 MW. This resulted from a 50 % joint

venture with the active international early

stage investor Holt Holding Group. Most of

these projects will compete in the German

auction system in 2022.

“Current investment is directed into a portfolio

of projects in locations with some of

the best wind potential across Germany—

and therefore ideal for success in auctions.

The complete portfolio of our German projects

is now valued at more than 300 MW

of potential installed capacity. Along with

assets in France, we are now developing

wind energy projects in Western Europe at

different stages of progress with a combined

output of around 550 MW,” said

Tomáš Pleskač, director of the New Energy

and Distribution division. ČEZ Group companies

currently operate 53 wind power

plants in Germany with a total installed

output of 135 MW.

“Our experience in wind energy markets in

Western European countries clearly confirms

that investment in development offers

better profitability than joining finished

projects. By combining purchasing

power, available funding and wind farm

operating experience, we can achieve exciting

returns on investment in this highly

competitive market. Cooperation with local

partners can help solve the local specifics

of development,” said Veronika Nosková,

head of the ČEZ project acquisition

group.

Projects from the recently acquired portfolio,

which are planned for north western

Germany and have an installed capacity

exceeding 110 MW, will compete in the

German auction system in 2022.

Germany has long been the number one

business partner of the Czech Republic,

with more than 30% of our exports heading

to our western neighbour every year,

and imports of roughly 25%. Conditions on

the energy market are similar. Cross-border

flows to the Czech Republic exceeded

7.5 TWh of electricity in 2018, while 4.9

TWh of electricity flowed in the opposite

direction. The long-term stability of the investor

environment makes Germany a

guarantee of good returns on projects, given

its established system of auction mechanisms

for competitively determining support

and overall market development. Operation

on the German RES market is also

an advantage in terms of transferring experience

in how the auction system functions,

a model that could similarly be introduced

in the Czech Republic.

LLwww.cez.cz

Meilenstein in der Nordsee: Erste

Anlagen des Offshore-Windparks

„EnBW Hohe See“ stehen

(enbw) Seit Freitagnacht steht sie: Die erste

Windkraftanlage des Offshore-Windparks

„EnBW Hohe See“. Die Installation

weiterer Anlagen geht gleich weiter. Seit

2010 errichtet EnBW hochmoderne und

effiziente Windparks auf See, mit denen sie

die Energiewende im Land weiter vorantreibt.

„Hohe See“ und der benachbarte

„Albatros“, ebenfalls ein Projekt der EnBW,

ergeben gemeinsam ein richtiges „Windkraftwerk“.

Voraussichtlich Ende 2019

werden die insgesamt 87 Windkraftanlagen

mit 609 Megawatt installierter Leistung

ans Netz gehen und so viel Energie

produzieren, wie ein modernes Gaskraftwerk.

Rechnerisch genug Strom, um alle

Privathaushalte von München mit grüner

Energie zu versorgen.

Mit der ersten Windkraftanlage von Hohe

See wurde ein wichtiger Meilenstein beim

Bau erreicht, der zügig voranschreitet. Das

Installationsschiff „Brave Tern“ hatte im

Hafen von Esbjerg in Dänemark die Bauteile

für die ersten vier Windkraftanlagen an

Bord genommen. Nach einer zwölfstündigen

Fahrt in das Baufeld auf See hat das

Schiff die erste Anlage auf das bereits im

Meeresboden verankerte Fundament gesetzt.

Unterstützung für die weiteren Installationsarbeiten

erhält die „Brave Tern“

in den nächsten Tagen von dem Schiff

„Blue Tern“.

„EnBW Hohe See und Albatros werden in

einem Zug errichtet und sind das größte

Offshore-Projekt, das derzeit in Deutschland

realisiert wird“, erklärt Dr. Hans-Josef

Zimmer, Technikvorstand der EnBW. „Wir

werden beide Windparks noch 2019 in Betrieb

nehmen.“ Hierfür arbeiten zu Hochzeiten

mehr als 600 Mitarbeiter auf der

Großbaustelle mitten im Meer. An dem Bau

sind rund 50 Schiffe beteiligt. Das Großprojekt

ist eine logistische Herausforderung,

die von der Offshore-Niederlassung der

EnBW in Hamburg aus koordiniert wird.

Windenergie auf hoher See gilt für die

nächsten Jahre als wichtigster Treiber für

den Ausbau der erneuerbaren Energien.

Die EnBW investiert im Rahmen ihrer Strategie

massiv in den Ausbau der Erneuerbaren

Energien. In den vergangenen Jahren

hat das Unternehmen bereits über 1.200

Megawatt Leistung aus regenerativen

Quellen zugebaut. Bis 2025 plant die

EnBW Investitionen in Höhe von über fünf

Milliarden Euro in den weiteren Ausbau

der Erneuerbaren Energien in Deutschland

und in ausgewählten Auslandsmärkten. Allein

im Bereich Windkraft – also auf See

und an Land – sollen bis 2025 mindestens

3.500 Megawatt realisiert werden.

Das kanadische Energieinfrastruktur-Unternehmen

Enbridge Inc. hält 49,9 Prozent

an beiden Windparks, die EnBW jeweils die

restlichen 50,1 Prozent.

LLwww.enbw.com

ESB welcomes Ireland’s Draft

National Energy and Climate Plan

(esb) ESB welcomes the recent publication

of the responses received to the National

Energy and Climate Plan (NECP) by the

Department of Communications, Climate

Action and Environment.

ESB contributed to the NECP report, an important

blueprint that will chart Ireland’s

energy and climate future to 2030 and beyond.

ESB’s contribution to the NECP work builds

upon the key themes from our Dimensions

Report and sets out a number of options for

Ireland to deliver a low carbon society, underpinned

by a secure electricity system.

ESB looks forward to the upcoming publication

of the Climate Action Plan by the

Government and stands ready to work with

all stakeholders to transition Ireland to a

low carbon society.

As outlined in ESB’s submission, the transition

to a low-carbon energy system should

include emission targets for each sector in-

12


VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Members´ News

cluding heat, transport, electricity and agriculture,

as well as a comprehensive monitoring

and reporting mechanism. Also,

the carbon tax in the non-ETS sector should

be set on an increasing trajectory so as to

incentivise low carbon alternatives while at

the same time ensuring that the overall tax

is designed in a fair and equitable manner.

There is a mounting body of international

evidence which supports using electricity

as a key route to decarbonise large parts of

society. This is because low carbon electricity

can be produced at scale and due to the

inherent efficiencies in electric technologies

such as heat pumps and EVs compared

to fossil fuel alternatives. Electrification in

Ireland should be promoted as it offers a

lower carbon solution than oil and gas to

transport and heating even with the current

electricity fuel mix. The following sectoral

measures will help Ireland achieve its

decarbonisation targets.

Electricity: Less than a fifth of total emissions

come from the electricity sector. The

electricity system will decarbonise and

electrification will further support emission

reductions in other sectors. This would

be enabled by a modernised regulatory

framework for offshore wind and a regime

that allows hybrid connections to the grid

of different generator types at a single location.

Furthermore an underlying backbone

of low carbon predictable generation is required;

biomass can be a part of the transition

to low carbon generation and Carbon

Capture and Storage (CCS) should be investigated

for the future.

Heat: Around a fifth of total emissions come

from energy used in the heating sector. Decarbonisation

of space and water heating in

domestic and commercial buildings can be

achieved by moving away from fossil fuels

in new buildings and by retrofitting existing

buildings and moving them to a low carbon

heat source. Electrification of hot water in

existing buildings represents a significant

opportunity to accelerate decarbonisation.

Electricity can also play an increasing role

in decarbonising industrial heat.

Transport: Around a fifth of total emissions

come from the transport sector. Electrification

of lighter transport (cars and

vans) has significant potential for

decarbonisation and it is important

that Government support for

new EVs are retained and that a

comprehensive national charging

infrastructure is maintained. Electricity

can also play an increasing

role in decarbonising heavier

transport.

LLwww.esb.ie

Dublin hosts bootcamp event for

30 global energy start-ups

• 60 entrepreneurs and 10 global utilities

attend three-day Dublin bootcamp to

develop and refine energy solutions for

customers

• Three Irish companies to compete for final

spots on coveted Free Electrons Accelerator

Programme

(esb) Thirty energy start-ups from across

the globe have descended upon Dublin to

compete in an intensive bootcamp event,

with each vying for a spot on the international

Free Electrons Programme.

Hosted by ESB, the start-ups will pitch

their market-ready solutions to 10 global

utilities and industry experts. Following

the bootcamp, 12 companies will be selected

to participate in three modules in Ohio,

Hong Kong and Lisbon with the final winner

selected in October.

The Free Electrons Programme is a global

accelerator initiative that connects worldwide

utilities with entrepreneurs to refine

and test their products with the potential

to reach 73 million customers in more than

40 countries.

Taking place in The Smock Alley and Guinness

Storehouse, the Dublin bootcamp

event took place in April. More than 500

energy start-ups applied to the programme,

with 30 of the best selected to participate

in the Dublin bootcamp.

Jerry O’Sullivan, ESB’s Deputy Chief Executive,

said: “ESB is proud to host the Free

Electrons bootcamp event in Dublin which

once again demonstrates the organisation’s

and country’s commitment to supporting

innovative start-ups that are developing

energy solutions for customers. This

is a great opportunity to showcase to other

leading utilities and start-ups how Ireland

is leading the transition to a low-carbon future,

with creative ideas, radical thinking

and new technologies at the heart of this

movement.

Jede ist zu ersetzen!

Redesign

PE01

S4

S2

“As a founding and committed partner to

this global accelerator programme, ESB is

proud to continue working closely with a

number of previous participants including

Climote and Verv. We look forward to partnering

with other global start-ups so we

can work together and create a brighter future

for all.”

Three companies from Ireland are participating

in the Dublin bootcamp including

GridBeyond, Xenotta and VorTech Water

Solutions.

For the participating global utilities, this

programme offers them the opportunity to

work with start-ups that will drive the next

generation of ideas in clean energy, energy

efficiency, e-mobility, digitisation, and

on-demand customer services.

LLwww.esb.ie

E.ON baut neues Wind-

Großprojekt in den USA

(eon) E.ON gibt den Baustart für ein neues

Großprojekt in den USA bekannt. Im texanischen

Refugio County ist das erste Fundament

für die Turbinen des Windparks

Cranell gegossen worden. Das 220-Megawatt-Projekt

soll noch in diesem Jahr in

Betrieb gehen.

Cranell wird mit 100 Turbinen des Herstellers

Vestas angetrieben und erzeugt genügend

Strom für mehr als 66.000 Haushalte.

Mit der Übernahme von Cranell verfügt

E.ON im Bundesstaat Texas über eine Gesamtkapazität

von mehr als 3000 Megawatt

Windkraft.

Erst kürzlich hat E.ON den Baubeginn eines

weiteren Onshore-Windparks in Südtexas,

das 151-Megawatt-Projekt Peyton

Creek in Matagorda County, bekannt gegeben.

Auch Peyton Creek wird in diesem

Jahr ans Netz gehen.

LLwww.eon.com

plug and play

100% kompatibel

Baugruppen ab Lager:

KE3 Leistungselektronik

6DT1013 bis 6DT1031 Stepper

Luvo-Sonden und Controller

... und viele Andere, fragen Sie an!

Stellungsgeber

VEW-GmbH Edisonstr. 19 28357 Bremen

FON: 0421-271530 www.vew-gmbh.de

13


Members´ News VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Die Ehrengäste nahmen den Offshore-Windpark Arkona mit Unterstützung von Kindern der

Kindertagesstätte Kunterbunt aus Sassnitz in Betrieb. Im Hintergrund von links: Vorsitzender des

Aufsichtsrats von Equinor, Jan Erik Reinhardsen, Norwegens Minister für Energie und Erdöl, Kjell

Borge Freiberg, Bundeskanzlerin Angela Merkel, E.ON-Vorstandsvorsitzender Johannes Teyssen,

Mecklenburg-Vorpommerns Ministerpräsidentin Manuela Schwesig, Chris Peeters, Vorsitzender

des Aufsichtsrats von 50 Hertz, Holger Matthiesen, Projektdirektor Arkona.

Größter Offshore-Windpark

der Ostsee eröffnet

• Kanzlerin Merkel nimmt Arkona

in Betrieb

• Erfolgreichstes Bauprojekt der Branche

bringt Energiewende voran

(eon) Der Offshore-Windpark Arkona von

E.ON und Equinor ist mit einer feierlichen

Veranstaltung im Hafen Sassnitz-Mukran

auf Rügen in Betrieb gegangen. Bundeskanzlerin

Angela Merkel, Mecklenburg-Vorpommerns

Ministerpräsidentin

Manuela Schwesig sowie der norwegische

Minister für Energie und Erdöl, Kjell-Børge

Freiberg, haben die Stromerzeugung gemeinsam

mit dem E.ON Vorstandsvorsitzenden

Johannes Teyssen und weiteren

Ehrengästen gestartet. Arkona ist der größte

Windpark in der gesamten Ostsee.

Bundeskanzlerin Angela Merkel: „Arkona

setzt einen Maßstab für den Umbau des

Energiesystems. Wir werden weiter miteinander

darüber diskutieren, wie wir die Klimaziele

erreichen. Es reicht nicht, die

Energieerzeugung umzustellen. Großes

Potenzial haben wir im Wärmebereich. Wir

stehen außerdem vor einem großen Wandel

des Verkehrssektors.“

Johannes Teyssen: „Es gilt jetzt, die Erneuerbaren

Energien kraftvoll weiter auszubauen

und gleichzeitig günstiger zu machen.

Dabei muss die grüne Energie viel

effizienter als bisher zu den Menschen und

Betrieben gebracht werden. Das ist eine

Herkulesaufgabe, die die ganze Kraft großer

Unternehmen erfordert. E.ON wird

sich auf die bessere Integration und Nutzung

der Erneuerbaren für unsere Kunden

und die Gesellschaft konzentrieren.“

Ministerpräsidentin Manuela Schwesig:

„Heute senden wir ein starkes Signal aus:

Es geht voran mit der Energiewende.

Offshore-Windkraft ist dabei ein entscheidendes

Element. Das ist ein Weg mit Zukunft.

Ein Weg, den wir mit starken Partnern

wie E.ON und Equinor gemeinsam

gehen. Ich gratuliere sehr herzlich zur Fertigstellung

des Projektes Arkona.“

Norwegens Energieminister Kjell-Børge

Freiberg: „Wir feiern heute nicht nur die

Inbetriebnahme von Arkona und die produktive

Partnerschaft von E.ON und

Equinor. Die Veranstaltung ist gleichzeitig

ein Symbol für die engen Beziehungen zwischen

Norwegen und Deutschland im Bereich

Energie.“ Und weiter: „Technologische

Entwicklung und Kostensenkung haben

Offshore-Wind in Europa einen Schub

gegeben. Es freut mich zu sehen, dass

Equinor und weitere norwegische Unternehmen

sich mit Partnern wie E.ON auf

dem Markt etabliert haben.“

Die Eröffnung von Arkona stellt einen Meilenstein

für Equinor dar. Der Windpark versorgt

bis zu 400.000 deutsche Haushalte

mit grünem Strom. Equinor liefert bereits

rund ein Viertel des Erdgases in Deutschland.

Arkona ist Equinors vierter Windpark,

der seit 2012 in Betrieb geht und trägt entscheidend

dazu bei, Equinor zu einem breit

aufgestellten Energieunternehmen zu entwickeln.

„Wir danken insbesondere E.ON

für seine hervorragende Arbeit im Bereich

der Entwicklung und des Betriebs von Arkona“,

sagt Jon Erik Reinhardsen, Aufsichtsratsvorsitzender

von Equinor.

Chris Peeters, Aufsichtsratsvorsitzender

von 50Hertz: „Die Netzanbindung des

Offshore-Windparks Arkona konnte von

50Hertz termingerecht und für den Netzkunden

günstiger als ursprünglich kalkuliert

realisiert werden. Hierauf sind wir

ebenso stolz wie auf das sehr kooperative,

europäische Miteinander bei diesem

Großprojekt mit den beiden Partnern E.ON

und Equinor. Die gemeinsame Offshore-Plattform

ist dafür ein deutlicher Beleg

und hat zudem einen neuen Standard bei

der Umsetzung solcher Projekte gesetzt.

Für die Energiewende in Deutschland und

in Europa sowie für die Entwicklung der

Offshore-Windenergie in der Ostsee ist

heute ein wirklich guter Tag.

Der Windpark Arkona liegt 35 Kilometer

nordöstlich von der Insel Rügen. Der Windpark

verfügt über eine Leistung von 385

Megawatt und versorgt rechnerisch etwa

400.000 Haushalte mit erneuerbarer Energie.

Das Investitionsvolumen beträgt 1,2

Milliarden Euro. Im Vergleich zu konventionell

erzeugtem Strom spart Arkona jährlich

bis zu 1,2 Millionen Tonnen CO 2 ein.

Installiert wurden 60 Turbinen der

Sechs-Megawatt-Klasse des Herstellers

Siemens. Arkona ist ein Joint Venture von

E.ON mit dem norwegischen Energieunternehmen

Equinor.

LLwww.eon.com, www.equinor.de

E.ON und Kyuden Mirai Energy

unterzeichnen Kooperationsvertrag

für Offshore-Windprojekte

in Japan

(eon kyuden) E.ON und Kyuden Mirai

Energy haben eine Kooperationsvereinbarung

zur gemeinsamen Entwicklung von

Offshore-Windprojekten in Japan unterzeichnet.

Die Zusammenarbeit konzentriert

sich auf die Technologie mit fest installierten

Fundamenten und beginnt mit

einer Studie zur gemeinsamen Auswahl

eines Projekts für Entwicklung, Bau und

Betrieb im Kyushu-Gebiet, der südlichsten

Insel Japans. Die Unternehmen prüfen, die

Partnerschaft auf andere Regionen in Japan

auszuweiten.

Die Kooperation folgt auf die Entscheidung

von E.ON, in den japanischen Windmarkt

einzusteigen. E.ON will seine Erfahrung

und sein technisches Know-how aus der

1,8 Gigawatt (GW) installierten Offshore-Windkapazität

von Europa nach Japan

übertragen. Dort hat E.ON mit einem

Standort in Tokio bereits eine lokale Präsenz

aufgebaut.

Kyuden Mirai Energy ist einer der führenden

Entwickler des Offshore-Windpark-Projekts

Hibiki-nada in Kyushu und

prüft parallel dazu Möglichkeiten für neue

Offshore-Windprojekte in ganz Japan. Das

Offshore-Windparkprojekt Hibiki-nada ist

das erste Erneuerbaren-Projekt, das nach

den neuen japanischen Gesetzen ausgeschrieben

wurde.

Sven Utermöhlen, Chief Operating Officer

bei E.ON Climate & Renewables: „Unsere

Strategie für den Eintritt in den japanischen

Markt basiert auf einer vertrauensvollen

und langfristigen Zusammenarbeit

mit lokalen Akteuren. Wir sind der Meinung,

dass Kyuden Mirai Energy ein ausgezeichneter

Partner für uns ist. Unsere Fähigkeiten

ergänzen sich gegenseitig, während

wir die gleichen Werte und den

Ehrgeiz teilen, das Wachstum der Offshore-Windenergie

in Japan voranzutreiben.“

14


VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

thermprocess.de

Members´ News tbwom.de

Yasuji Akiyama, Präsident von Kyuden

Mirai Energy: „Dieses Jahr könnte entscheidend

für die Offshore-Windindustrie

in Japan mit dem neuen allgemeinen Seerecht

zur Förderung der Offshore-Windenergie

werden. Es ist ein guter Zeitpunkt

für uns, gemeinsame Aktivitäten mit E.ON

als bestem Partner für den Eintritt in den

neuen Markt zu starten. E.ON verfügt über

bemerkenswerte Erfahrungen mit fest installierter

Offshore-Windenergie und teilt

mit uns die gleichen Werte für einen ambitionierten

Ausbau von Offshore-Wind in

Japan.“

Über Kyuden Mirai Energy

Kyuden Mirai Energy ist ein führendes Unternehmen

in der Entwicklung, dem Bau

und dem Betrieb von Projekten im Bereich

der erneuerbaren Energien in Japan seit

der Abspaltung von Kyushu Electric Power

Company CO. im Jahr 2014 und der Ausweitung

der Entwicklungs- und Geschäftsaktivitäten

nicht nur im Kyushu-Gebiet.

Kyuden Mirai betreibt derzeit 189 Megawatt

(MW) erneuerbare Energie aus

Onshore-Wind, Solar und Biomasse in Japan

und hat weitere 511 MW in der Entwicklung.

Darüber hinaus hat das Unternehmen

bereits erste Schritte in die Offshore-Windenergie

unternommen und ist als

führendes Unternehmen im Konsortium

zur Entwicklung des circa 220 MW-Offshore-Windprojekts

Hibikinada tätig und

strebt einen weiteren Ausbau seiner

Offshore-Windaktivitäten an.

LLwww.q-mirai.co.jp/english,

www.eon.com

worldwide

12. INTERNATIONALE FACHMESSE UND

SYMPOSIUM FÜR THERMOPROZESSTECHNIK

EDP deploys its largest solar farm

with energy storage in the country

(edp) EDP will deploy its largest solar photovoltaic

farm with energy storage in Portugal.

The agreement signed today with

battery maker Exide Technologies Lda.

provides for the deployment of two photovoltaic

solar production units, with a total

capacity of 3.8 MWp, for self-consumption

in its facilities in Castanheira do Ribatejo

and Azambuja.

Spanning 20.000 m 2 , the farms will have

more than 10,000 solar panels and will be

operational by the first quarter of 2020.

The energy produced by the system, which

would be enough to supply over 2,000

homes, will cover part of the electricity

consumed by the two Exide facilities,

Taking the annual consumption from a

clean energy source into consideration, the

project will also avoid the emission of

31,000 tons of CO 2 , corresponding to 1 million

planted trees and a 208-million-kilometer

car trip.

The batteries used in the farm will be manufactured

by Exide and charged by the solar

panels. Surplus energy will be stored

and injected into the grid mostly in the

summer season, when the plant‘s energy

Metals

EFFICIENT PROCESS SOLUTIONS

Neue Werkstofflösungen durch

Wärmebehandlung

Die THERMPROCESS mit Symposium deckt alle

Geschäfts felder rund um industrielle Thermo prozessanlagen

ab – mit Neuheiten und Innovationen aus

den Bereichen Industrieöfen, Wärmeerzeugungsanlagen

und thermische Verfahrenstechnik.

Plattform für Know-how-Transfer

Vorträge zu den neuesten Entwicklungen aus

Wissen schaft, Forschung und Industrie ergänzen

die Ausstellung.

Willkommen in Düsseldorf!

Messe Düsseldorf GmbH

Postfach 10 10 06 _ 40001 Düsseldorf _ Germany

Tel. +49 211 4560-01 _ Fax +49 211 4560-668

www.messe-duesseldorf.de

15


Members´ News VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

consumption is lower. This kind of system

is a major long-term trend for the energy

market because it makes it possible to convert

renewable energies, such as wind or

solar energy, into more stable and resilient

energy sources.

The production units were contracted

through the Energy Manager business

model. EDP will be in charge of the farm‘s

operation, maintenance and real-time

monitoring.

„EDP is committed to providing its customers

with sustainable and efficient solutions,

and this innovative, pioneering project represents

a competitive advantage in the

market, strengthening our commitment to

lasting relationships with benefits for all

parties. This is EDP‘s largest solar energy

project, and it will allow us to take an important

step towards the world of storage

technology,“ says EDP Comercial CEO Vera

Pinto Pereira.

„More and more companies will rely on

self-generated power backed by a BESS

(battery energy storage system) in years to

come, especially in energy-demanding sectors

like manufacturing. Companies can

significantly reduce their ecological footprint

and achieve operational savings,“

said Exide President EMEA and Executive

Vice President, Stefan Stübing.

Exide Technologies, which has been in the

market for 130 years, manufactures and

recycles batteries for the industrial and automotive

segments in more than 80 countries.

The company has been supplying reliable

batteries for energy storage projects

across the globe for decades. With the help

of EDP, Exide will now implement its first

energy efficiency project on their own

manufacturing site in order to assess replicating

similar projects in other facilities

around the world.

This partnership is strategically aligned

with EDP‘s new positioning. Innovation to

ensure better use of resources is the central

focus of the EDP, which invests globally

and continuously, through this and other

pioneering projects to retaining its position

as a global clean energy leader.

A leader in the Portuguese solar energy

market, EDP Comercial has deployed more

than 15,000 photovoltaic solar systems in

private homes and companies across the

country, with a total installed capacity of

36.7 MWp.

LLwww.edp.com

EDF launches Hynamics:

Subsidiary to produce and

market low-carbon hydrogen

(edf) EDF announces the creation of “Hynamics”,

a new subsidiary for the Group

(1) responsible for offering effective

low-carbon hydrogen for industry and mobility.

With this commitment, EDF’s ambition is

to become a key player in the hydrogen sector

in France and around the world, as well

as consolidating its contribution to the

fight against climate change and for a lowcarbon

world.

According to a report released by McKinsey(2),

hydrogen consumption will represent

18 % of the world’s final energy demand

in 2050. 95 % of hydrogen is currently

produced from fossil fuels. Unlike this

method, which produces a lot of carbon dioxide,

Hynamics has opted for water electrolysis

to produce its hydrogen, a technology

that does not emit very much CO 2 at all,

as long as the electricity used itself comes

from lowcarbon production methods.

Hynamics offers two different low-carbon

hydrogen solutions:

• For industrial clients, for whom hydrogen

is a necessity (refinery, glassware,

agri-food, chemistry etc.), Hynamics installs,

runs and maintains hydrogen

production plants, by investing in the

necessary infrastructure;

• For mobility providers, both public and

professional, Hynamics helps link up

different areas with service stations to

provide hydrogen to recharge fleets of

commercial vehicles, like trains, buses,

bin lorries, utility vehicles and means of

waterway transport. These services constitute

an additional asset for the Electric

Mobility Plan announced by the

Group in October 2018.

At the end of March 2019, Hynamics teams

have identified and work on some 40 target

projects, in France as well as other European

countries including Belgium, Germany

and the United Kingdom. Hynamics is the

result of an “intrapreneurial” project led by

ten or so employees and nurtured within

EDFPulse Expansion, the Group’s start-up

incubator. After the acquisition of EDF’s

stake in the French company McPhy, a

leading player in this market, the creation

of this new subsidiary confirms the EDF

Group’s ambition when it comes to low-carbon

hydrogen, and applies it to new uses.

Cédric Lewandowski, EDF Group executive

director in charge of Innovation, corporate

responsibility and strategy announced:

“The production of hydrogen without CO 2

emissions is a key factor in the ecological

transition. By embracing a new area of activity,

the Group is capitalising on its employees’

skills, expertise and capacity for

innovation, for the benefit of our clients.

Together with all the different stakeholders,

EDF would like to contribute to the

French and European hydrogen sector in

an international market that represents a

fantastic opportunity in terms of growth

and jobs.”

Christelle Rouillé, Hynamics’s Managing

Director, explained: “Working with industry

and different regions by supporting

their decarbonation projects is a challenge

that Hynamics plans to embrace with a

solution for producing hydrogen without

CO 2 emissions with multiple uses and in an

economically efficient way. We are focusing

in particular on industry and mass mobility,

two sections of the economy that

produce a lot of CO 2 , with a view to nurturing

partnerships.”

(1) EDF Pulse Croissance Holding is the

100% shareholder in Hynamics.

(2) “Let’s develop hydrogen for the French

economy”, 2018 Afhypac report, produced

with McKinsey

LLhynamics.com/en

www.edf.com

eins energie in sachsen:

Neue Wärme für Chemnitz:

Arbeiten beginnen am

Standort Heizkraftwerk

(eins) eins gestaltet ihre Energieerzeugung

zukünftig noch umweltschonender und

deutlich flexibler: Motorenheizkraftwerke

(MHKW) und ein Holzheizkraftwerk

(Holz-HKW) werden Strom und Wärme erzeugen.

Die mit Methan betriebenen MH-

KWs können Erdgas, Biogas oder synthetisches

Gas verbrennen. Insgesamt reduzieren

die neuen Anlagen den CO 2 -Ausstoß

um rund 60 Prozent gegenüber der bisherigen

Technik – das entspricht der Einsparung

des CO 2 -Ausstoßes von ca. 260.000

PKWs pro Jahr.

Ab April 2019 beginnen die bauvorbereitenden

Arbeiten am Standort Heizkraftwerk

Chemnitz. Anfang 2020 wird die Errichtung

der neuen Kraftwerksanlagen beginnen.

Sie werden 2022 in Betrieb gehen.

In 2023 ist geplant, den ersten Braunkohleblock

stillzulegen.

Das neue Motorenheizkraftwerk wird auf

dem Gelände errichtet, auf dem sich bis vor

kurzem eine Photovoltaikanlage (PVA)

und zuvor bis 2004 das Heizkraftwerk

Nord 1 befand. Die PVA wurde auf dem Gelände

im Umfeld des eins-Batteriespeichers

am Dammweg neu aufgebaut. Das Heizkraftwerk

Nord 1 wurde bis 2004 oberirdisch

abgerissen, die Fundamente verblieben

im Erdboden. Das neue Motorenheizkraftwerk

benötigt einen stabilen

Untergrund. Daher werden in diesem Jahr

die alten Fundamente zurückgebaut. Im

Vorfeld untersuchten Experten intensiv

den Untergrund und verglichen die Ergebnisse

mit alten Unterlagen.

16


VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Members´ News

Hintergrund

Fernwärme in Chemnitz

Der Anteil der Erdgas- und Fernwärme am

Chemnitzer Wärmemarkt ist höher als 90

Prozent. Fernwärme deckt rund 40 Prozent

des Chemnitzer Wärmemarkts. Das

Erdgas- und das Fernwärmenetz sind zum

Teil parallel verlegt. Die meisten Gebäude

wurden nach der Wende energetisch saniert.

Das Geschäftsfeld „Wärme“ ist eine

wichtige Unternehmenssäule für eins (Umsatzerlöse

Wärme: rund 70 Millionen Euro

im Geschäftsjahr 2017).

Neue Wärme für Chemnitz

eins untersuchte den Wärmebedarf und

verschiedene Erzeugungstechnologien.

Dabei zeigte die Gasmotorentechnik die

besten Ergebnisse hinsichtlich niedriger

Emissionen, Flexibilität, Versorgungssicherheit

und Wirtschaftlichkeit. Die MH-

KWs entstehen an den bisherigen Standorten

Heizkraftwerk Chemnitz und Heizwerk

Altchemnitz. Jedes der einzelnen Module

wird rund 30 Meter lang und zehn Meter

breit sein sowie eine Leistung von etwa

zehn Megawatt haben. Das Holz-HKW soll

im Gewerbegebiet an der Neefestraße entstehen.

Durch die drei Standorte wird das

Fernwärmenetz noch optimaler genutzt,

denn dann fließt die Wärme von mehreren

Punkten in das Netz.

Im Jahr 2023 geht der Erste von zwei Kohleblöcken

des Heizkraftwerks Chemnitz

vom Netz; 2029 soll der zweite Kohleblock

stillgelegt werden. Dann hat eins den

Braunkohleausstieg komplett vollzogen. In

den nächsten fünf Jahren wird eins mehr

als 200 Millionen Euro in die neue Wärmeund

Stromversorgung investieren. Auch in

Zukunft bietet eins ihren Kunden günstige

Fernwärmepreise an.

LLwww.eins.de

ENERVIE Gruppe: Jahresergebnis

2018 steigt um 16 Prozent - Motor

der Energiewende in der Region

(enervie) Die ENERVIE - Südwestfalen

Energie und Wasser AG, Hagen, erreicht im

Geschäftsjahr 2018 das beste Ergebnis seit

Gründung des Unternehmensverbundes.

„Gute, stabile Beiträge der Geschäftsfelder

Vertrieb und Netz haben ebenso wie Sondereffekte

zu einem insgesamt sehr zufriedenstellenden

Jahresergebnis beigetragen“,

zieht ENERVIE Vorstandssprecher

Erik Höhne ein positives Fazit. „Die weitere

Stärkung unserer Ertragskraft bleibt eine

wichtige Herausforderung. Zudem wollen

wir der Motor der Energiewende in der Region

sein.“

Weitere wesentliche Einflussfaktoren im

Geschäftsjahr 2018 waren der vollzogene

Ausstieg aus der Steinkohle-Verstromung

(Schließung Steinkohleblock E4 in Werdohl-Elverlingsen

zum 31. März 2018),

die Modernisierung des Pumpspeicherwerks

(PSW) in Finnentrop-Rönkhausen

sowie die Entwicklung und Einführung

innovativer Produkte.

Insgesamt schafft ENERVIE in der Region

rund 190 Mio. Euro „Werte“ durch Investitionen,

Beschäftigung, Dividende und Konzessionsabgaben/Steuern.

Unterschiedliche Absatz- und

Erlösentwicklung bei Strom und Gas

Der Stromabsatz im ENERVIE Konzern hat

sich 2018 im Wesentlichen aufgrund eines

gesunkenen Handelsvolumens um 11,8

Prozent verringert. Dagegen stieg der Gasabsatz

insbesondere wegen erhöhter Handelsabsätze

deutlich um 20,9 Prozent. Die

Trinkwasser- und Wärmeabgabe an Endverbraucher

ist gegenüber 2017 annähernd

gleichgeblieben.

Im Erzeugungsbereich setzt ENERVIE nach

dem Ausstieg aus der Steinkohleverstromung

verstärkt auf die Flexibilisierung des

Stromangebots durch das Gas- und Dampfturbinenkraftwerks

Herdecke und – nach

erfolgter Modernisierung – das Pumpspeicherkraftwerk

Rönkhausen. Zudem baut

ENERVIE – neben der Modernisierung bestehender

Wasserkraftanlagen – neue Anlagen

zur Stromerzeugung aus Erneuerbaren

Energien.

LLwww.enervie-gruppe.de

ENGIE to sell its German and

Dutch coal assets and boosts the

implementation of its strategy

(engie) ENGIE announces today the signing

of an agreement with Riverstone Holdings

LLC, a global energy-focused investment

firm, for the sale of its shares in coalfired

power plants in the Netherlands and

in Germany.

The assets sold are the coal-fired power

plants of Rotterdam 1 in the Netherlands,

Farge 2 , Zolling 3 and Wilhelmshaven 4 in

Germany. These assets represent a total installed

capacity of 2,345 MW. The proposed

transaction will reduce ENGIE’s net

consolidated debt by approximately 200

million euros. This sale is subject to customary

conditions, with closing expected

during the second semester 2019.

After this sale, coal will represent 4% of

ENGIE’s global power generation capacities,

down from 13% at the end of 2015

when the Group announced that it would

gradually close or dispose of its coal assets

and no longer build any new coal plants. In

the past 3 years, ENGIE has reduced its

coal-based electricity generation capacity

by approximately 75 %.

Isabelle Kocher, ENGIE CEO, said: “This

transaction is fully in line with the Group‘s

strategy to be the world leader in the zero-carbon

transition. We are focusing investments

on solutions for corporates and

local authorities, large-scale development

of renewable energy and the necessary adaptation

of power and gas networks to the

energy transition. We will allocate 12 billion

euros to these activities from 2019 to 2021,

as previously announced during our Capital

Market Day held this past February 28th”

As a leading actor in the energy sector in

Germany and the Netherlands with 11,000

employees, ENGIE will pursue investments

in these two countries with the ambition to

lead and speed up the zero carbon transition

for all its clients.

1 731 MW – 100% ENGIE shareholding

2 350 MW – 100% ENGIE shareholding

3 472 MW – 100% ENGIE shareholding, in

addition a biomass power plant (21 MW, a

50% ENGIE owned unit) and gas turbines

(46 MW, 100% ENGIE shareholding)

4 726 MW, 52% owned by ENGIE

LLwww.engie.com

EVN: Kleinwasserkraftwerk Brunn

• von Mathias Salcher & Söhne über Harlander

Coats hin zur EVN

(evn) Viele Kleinwasserkraftwerke liegen

an historisch bedeutungsvollen Orten, so

auch das Kraftwerk Brunn. Gelegen im

St.Pöltner Stadtteil Harland auf dem ehemaligen

Fabriksgelände der Harlander Coats,

produziert es noch heute Strom für

zahlreiche Haushalte.

Kleinwasserkraftwerk Brunn.

Von Mathias Salcher & Söhne über Harlander

Coats hin zur EVN

Das Kleinwasserkraftwerk Brunn wurde

1859 von Mathias Salcher & Söhne, dem

Gründungsunternehmen von Harlander

Coats, errichtet. Das Kraftwerk war damals

schon maßgeblich für die Stromversorgung

des Betriebs und der zugehörigen

Werkssiedlungen.

Im Jahr 1905 wurde die alte Turbine durch

eine neue getauscht und wird seitdem regelmäßig

gewartet. „Die regelmäßigen Kontrollen

der Turbinen sind maßgeblich, um

die Energieerzeugung durch Kleinwasserkraftwerke

gewährleisten zu können. Viele

unserer Kraftwerke sind über 100 Jahre alt,

17


Members´ News VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

da ist es besonders wichtig, regelmäßige

Überprüfungen durchzuführen“, erläutert

EVN Sprecher Stefan Zach.

Seit 1991 befindet sich das Kleinwasserkraftwerk

Brunn im Besitz der EVN. Noch

heute produziert es jährlich 480 MWh, damit

können rund 140 regionale Haushalte

versorgt werden.

LLwww.evn.at

HELEN: New, unique heat pump

utilising sea water heat to be built

in Vuosaari

(helen) Helen will build a heat pump in

connection with the Vuosaari power plant,

utilising the power plant’s own cooling water

circulation and the heat of sea water as

heat sources. A heat pump of this scale utilising

the heat of the sea water is unique in

Finland.

Helen aims to reduce emissions from energy

production and increase the amount of

renewable energy. The company has recently

invested especially in heat pumps

and heat accumulators, and the new heat

pump to be built in Vuosaari pursues the

same objectives. What is novel in the Vuosaari

solution is the utilisation of the heat

of sea water – this has not been tested in

Helsinki or, as far as we know, anywhere

else in Finland until now. The heat pump

will utilise thermal energy absorbed in sea

water during the summer and the excess

heat from the internal cooling water circulation

in the Vuosaari power plants, turning

it into district heat.

”The heat pump is an excellent solution to

increase the efficiency of the Vuosaari power

plants’ own production process. With

the heat pump, we will be able to recycle

the excess heat of the cooling waters in the

production process and utilise it in the district

heating network. By utilising the heat

of sea water we can extend the annual operating

time of the heat pump and that way

improve the profitability of the investment,”

says Helen’s Project Manager Karoliina

Muukkonen.

Heat pump investments are part of a

climate-neutral future

The smart energy system and the district

heating and cooling networks in Helsinki

make it possible to combine new technologies

and production methods in a flexible

way. At Helen, heat pumps are seen as an

important part of the future energy system:

they are a natural way to utilise new heat

sources in district heat production.

The Katri Vala and the Esplanade heating

and cooling plants have already been built

in Helsinki. It is possible to produce the majority

of the required district heat in the

summer by recycling waste and excess

heat. The Katri Vala heating and cooling

plant is currently being extended with a

new, sixth heat pump, and the Vuosaari

heat pump will increase Helen’s

recycled heat production

even further.

More about the possibilities of

using sea water heat pumps in

Helsinki in the blog.

Facts

• A heat pump will be built as

part of the process of the

Vuosaari CHP plant, to be

located in a separate annex

next to the current power

plant building.

• The heat sources of the heat

pump include the excess heat

of the internal cooling

water circulation of the power

plant in the winter

months and, during the rest

of the year, the heat of the

sea water that can be utilised for about

half of the year on average.

• It is estimated that the heat pump will

be utilising, on average, 20 per cent of

the heat of the sea water and 80 per

cent of the excess heat of cooling waters

from the power plant’s internal process

circulation.

• The heat pump is large on the Finnish

scale, corresponding to the size of the

pumps in Helen’s Esplanade heating

and cooling plant.

• The district heat output of the heat

pump is about 13 MW and district cooling

output 9.5 MW.

• The construction will start in 2020, and

the new heat pump will be in production

use by 2022.

• The value of the investment is about

EUR 15 million.

• The heat pump will reduce Helen’s carbon

dioxide emissions by an estimated

30,000 tonnes per year.

• Helen is already using two underground

heating and cooling plants: the Katri Vala

plant in Sörnäinen and the Esplanade

plant in the city centre. The Katri Vala

plant is current being extended with a

new, sixth heat pump.

• Electricity tax has a considerable impact

on the cost-effectiveness of the heat

pumps.

LLwww.helen.fi

innogy eröffnet offiziell ersten

Windpark in Irland

Eröffnung Dromadda Beg. Cathal Hennessy, Managing

Director innogy Renewables Ireland, mit Hans Bünting,

Vorstand Erneuerbare Energien innogy SE

• Wachstumsstrategie in neue Märkte erfolgreich

umgesetzt

• Bau des Onshore Windparks Dromadda

Beg legt den Grundstein für weitere

Vorhaben in Irland

• Aktuelles Entwicklungsportfolio in Irland

von rund 800 MW

(innogy) Die innogy SE treibt ihre Expansionsstrategie

für erneuerbare Energien voran

und erschließt neue Märkte: Das Unternehmen

hat seinen ersten Windpark in Irland

offiziell eröffnet. Außerdem hat

innogy diese Woche den Bau des

32MW-Onshore-Projektes Mynydd y Gwair

in Wales abgeschlossen. Und für den schottischen

Windpark Bad á Cheo mit 26 Megawatt

(MW) plant innogy in Kürze den Betrieb

aufzunehmen.

Erfolgreicher Markteintritt in der

Republik Irland

Der Windpark Dromadda Beg verfügt mit

seinen drei Windkraftanlagen im County

Kerry im Südwesten der Republik Irland

über eine installierte Leistung von 10,2 Megawatt

und ist Ende 2018 in Betrieb gegangen.

Hans Bünting, Vorstand für Erneuerbare

Energien der innogy SE: “Ich freue mich,

den Windpark Dromadda Beg offiziell zu

eröffnen – unser erstes Projekt in Irland.

Diese drei Windkraftanlagen beweisen,

dass unsere vor drei Jahren getroffene Entscheidung

für den Eintritt in den irischen

Markt die richtige war. Wir planen weitere

Langzeitinvestitionen in diesen vielversprechenden

Windmarkt und unterstützen

damit die irische Regierung dabei, ihre Ziele

hinsichtlich Klimawandel und Ausbau

der erneuerbaren Energien zu erreichen.“

Aktuelles Entwicklungsportfolio in Irland

liegt bei rund 800 MW

Neben weiteren Onshore-Windparks und

Speicheranlagen in Irland entwickelt innogy

das Offshore-Projekt Dublin Array. 2018

ist innogy mit dem irischen Unternehmen

Saorgus Energy eine Partnerschaft eingegangen,

um die Entwicklung des geplanten

600 MW-Projekts in der Irischen See, vor

der Küste Dublins, fortzusetzen. Die Partner

führen derzeit technische Studien

durch, um die Entwicklung bis hin zur Planungsgenehmigung

voranzubringen. Diese

Entwicklungsphase wird von innogy mit

Unterstützung von Saorgus Energy geleitet.

18


VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Members´ News

Kontinuierliches Wachstum

in Großbritannien

In Großbritannien betreibt innogy bereits

ein operatives grünes Portfolio von rund

zwei Gigawatt installierter Kapazität und

ist einer der wichtigsten Betreiber von

Windkraftanlagen. Das Unternehmen baut

seine Position in Großbritannien mit über

einem Gigawatt Windprojekten in Bau und

Entwicklung stetig weiter aus.

“Großbritannien ist einer unserer Schlüsselmärkte.

Ich bin stolz auf die Rolle, die

wir hier bereits spielen und wir haben sehr

ehrgeizige Wachstumspläne zur weiteren

Unterstützung der britischen Erneuerbaren-Industrie“,

erklärt Hans Bünting.

In Schottland betreibt innogy bereits fünf

Onshore Windparks und hat kürzlich den

Bau seines 26,65MW Windparks Bad á

Cheò abgeschlossen, der im Mai 2014 genehmigt

wurde und im Februar 2015 einen

CfD (Contract for Difference) erhielt. Alle

13 Senvion MM92-Windkraftanlagen sind

installiert und werden in Kürze den kommerziellen

Betrieb aufnehmen.

In Wales hat innogy eine starke Präsenz mit

drei Offshore und einem Onshore-Windpark

in Betrieb, und zwei weiteren Onshore-Windparks

im Bau. Mynydd y Gwair ist

ein 32,8MW- Projekt, das aus 16 Onshore-Turbinen

in South Wales besteht. Alle 16

Turbinen erzeugen bereits Strom und werden

auf den kommerziellen Betrieb vorbereitet.

Die Baustelle für die 27 Turbinen des 96MW

Windparks Clocaenog Forest in North Wales

wird derzeit mit Komponenten beliefert,

wobei die erste Turbine Ende dieses Monats

installiert werden soll. innogy plant, das

Projekt Ende 2019 abzuschließen.

Über die Hälfte des operativen Windportfolios

im Vereinigten Königreich befindet

sich in England, wo das Unternehmen derzeit

den Offshore-Windpark Triton Knoll

(ca. 860 MW, innogy-Anteil: 59%) baut.

Die Vorbereitungen für Offshore-Arbeiten

sind im Gange, die Erstellung der Fundamente

und Anordnung sowie das Legen der

Übertragungskabel hat begonnen. Die Installation

der 90 Turbinen beginnt voraussichtlich

Ende dieses Jahres/Anfang 2020.

Der Start der Inbetriebnahme ist für 2021

vorgesehen. Nach der kompletten Inbetriebnahme

wird Triton Knoll in der Lage

sein, rechnerisch ausreichend grünen

Strom für den Bedarf von über 800.000

britischen Durchschnittshaushalten zu erzeugen.

LLwww.innogy.com

innogy weiht Fischtreppe am

Wasserkraftwerk Hohenstein ein

• Fischaufstiegsanlage nach nur einem

Jahr Bauzeit fertiggestellt

• Neuester Stand der Technik

(innogy) Die Ruhr ist um eine Attraktion

reicher: Die Fischtreppe am Wasserkraftwerk

Hohenstein wurde offiziell eingeweiht.

Innerhalb eines Jahres hat innogy

die Fischwanderhilfe im vergangenen Jahr

fertig gestellt und in Betrieb genommen.

Auch der Ruhrtalradweg ist seitdem wieder

ohne Umleitung befahrbar. innogy hat

in die Maßnahme zur Herstellung der ökologischen

Durchgängigkeit rund zwei Millionen

Euro investiert.

Die Fischwanderhilfe dient dem Schutz des

Fischbestandes in der Ruhr. Durch das

Wehr und den Aufstau der Ruhr können

hinaufschwimmende Wanderfische den

Höhenunterschied an Wasserkraftwerken

nur schwer überwinden. Dies schränkt die

Wanderung von beheimateten Fischarten

wie Barbe, Rotauge, Brasse, Döbel, Schleie

und Aal ein, die im Laufe ihres Lebenszyklus

verschiedene Habitate auffinden müssen.

Um den Fischen die Wanderung zu

erleichtern, hat innogy die veraltete

Fischaufstiegsanlage durch eine umfassende

Wanderhilfe ersetzt, die dem neuesten

Stand der Technik entspricht. Außer der

Fischtreppe hat innogy im Herbst 2018 zudem

einen Abstieg für Blankaale eingebaut.

Sonja Leidemann, Bürgermeisterin der

Stadt Witten: „Schon früh gab es mit der

Stadt Witten ein Bekenntnis zu „grünem

Strom“. Bereits seit 1925 erzeugt das denkmalgeschützte

Wasserkraftwerk Hohenstein

jedes Jahr zuverlässig grünen Strom

für rund 3.000 Haushalte. Mit der hier für

gut zwei Millionen Euro verbauten Fischtreppe

und Aalabstiegsanlage leistet innogy

einen sehr wichtigen Beitrag zum Fischschutz

in der Ruhr!“

Sandra Silva Riano, Leiterin Wasserkraft bei

innogy: „Keine andere erneuerbare Technologie

leistet für die Grundlast einen so wichtigen

Beitrag zur Energiewende und somit

für die Erreichung der Klimaschutzziele wie

die Wasserkraft. Als einer der größten Betreiber

in Deutschland liegt uns ein nachhaltiger

Betrieb am Herzen. Auch hier in

Hohenstein haben wir im Sinne einer wirksamen

Maßnahme zur Fischdurchgängigkeit

nachgerüstet. Ein herzliches Dankeschön

an alle Anwohner, die Verständnis für

die Bauarbeiten und damit verbundenen

Beeinträchtigungen gezeigt haben.“

Für die aufwendigen Baumaßnahmen zum

Neubau der Fischwanderhilfe wurde eigens

eine Baustraße von der gegenüberliegenden

Ruhrseite aus angelegt, um die

Baustelle zu beliefern. Insgesamt wurden

10.000 Tonnen Boden und 3.000 Tonnen

Schüttgüter sowie 1.100 Tonnen Stahlbeton

bewegt. Der Ruhrtalradweg wurde aus

Sicherheitsgründen während des Baus umgeleitet

und nach dem Abschluss der Arbeiten

wieder in seinen Ursprungszustand

zurück versetzt.

Details Fischaufstiegsanlage

und Aalabstieg

Fischwanderhilfen können auf verschiedene

Arten ausgeführt werden. In Hohenstein

kommt ein sogenannter Schlitzpass

zur Ausführung. Dabei wird der durch das

Wehr entstehende Höhenunterschied von

circa 4,6 Metern mit einem 127 Meter langen

Beckenpass aus 37 aufeinanderfolgenden

Becken überwunden. In den Becken

herrscht eine relativ niedrige Fließgeschwindigkeit,

sodass diese von den Fischen

beim Durchschwimmen der Fischwanderhilfe

als Ruhezone genutzt werden.

Jeweils im Schlitz zwischen zwei

Becken treten höhere Fließgeschwindigkeiten

auf. Die Becken und die Schlitze

sind dabei so dimensioniert, dass die vorinnogy:

Wasserkraftwerk Hohenstein mit der neuen Fischaufstiegsanlage

19


Members´ News VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

kommenden Fischarten diese problemlos

durchschwimmen können. Am Boden des

Beckenpasses sind als Substrat Steine und

Kies eingebracht. So können auch am Boden

lebende wirbellose Tierarten die Wanderhilfe

nutzen.

Auch der Aal ist Teil der natürlichen Lebensgemeinschaft

der Ruhr. Hier wächst er

heran, wird erwachsen und fortpflanzungsfähig

und tritt bei speziellen Umweltbedingungen,

wie z.B. hinsichtlich Abflusssteigerung,

Wassertemperatur und Wassertrübung

seine aktive Wanderung in

Richtung Nordsee und weiter in die Sargassosee

an. Hier laichen die Tiere ab. Die geschlüpften

Larven wandern dann über

Strömungen an die europäischen Küsten.

Ein Teil davon gelangt anschließend über

natürliche Wanderung ins Binnenland

oder wird an den Küsten abgefangen und

in geeignete Aufwuchsareale im Binnenland

gebracht.

Die in Hohenstein verbaute Aalabstiegsanlage

besteht aus einem 26 Meter langen

Edelstahl-Zick-Zack-Rohr mit insgesamt 15

Öffnungen zum Einschwimmen der Aale.

Das Aalrohr befindet sich auf dem Flussboden

parallel vor den Turbineneinläufen.

Das System erzeugt einen sogenannten

Strömungsschatten, einen Bereich ohne

oder mit nur wenig Strömung. Die Aale

werden durch die Zick-Zack-Form des

Sammelrohrs zu den Öffnungen geleitet.

Über eine anschließende Bypassleitung

schwimmen die Aale mit der Strömung bis

in die Fischtreppe, die sie zum weiteren

Abstieg nutzen.

LLwww.innogy.com

innogy’s Sofia increases

capacity to 1.4GW

• Sofia Offshore Wind Farm, the largest

project in innogy’s development portfolio,

has been granted approval to increase

its maximum installed capacity

by 200 megawatts (MW) from

1200 MW to 1400 MW.

(innogy) The Marine Management Organisation

(MMO) has now approved amendments

to the deemed marine licences,

which correspond to changes to the development

consent order decided by the Rt

Hon Greg Clark, Secretary of State for Business,

Energy and Industrial Strategy in late

March.

The capacity increase means the amount of

renewable electricity generated by Sofia

once operational could be boosted by

around 15 percent. This additional boost

represents the annual electricity requirements

of approximately 150,000 average

UK homes, which means the total amount

of power Sofia could generate would be

enough to potentially provide almost 1.2

million average UK homes with their electricity

needs each year.

As well as the increase in overall installed

capacity, the approvals grant innogy the

permission to use larger turbines with a

maximum rotor diameter of 288 metres, up

from the 215 metres that was in the original

consent.

Sofia Project Director David Few said that

the increase was requested by innogy in applications

submitted to the Planning Inspectorate

and the MMO in June 2018.

“We applied to change the project’s development

consent order and marine licences

to ensure that Sofia would be able to employ

the latest generation of larger, more

efficient and technologically advanced

wind turbines. The approval decisions are

clearly excellent news and now mean that

Sofia will be able to make an even bigger

contribution towards achieving the UK’s

carbon emission reduction targets”.

The wind farm site covers an area of almost

600 square kilometres and is located 165

kilometres off the UK’s North East coast on

Dogger Bank in the North Sea. Electricity

generated by Sofia will feed into the national

grid at an existing substation located

in Lackenby, Teesside.

The project was granted its development

consent order in August 2015 and is due to

take part in the Government’s next Contracts

for Difference allocation round, expected

in May this year.

LLwww.innogy.com

KMW: Kraftwerke Mainz-

Wiesbaden: Im Schritttempo durch

die Nacht

(kwm) Der Transportweg beträgt nur

knapp zwei Kilometer lang und doch war

es auch für den Mainzer Schwertransport-Spezialisten

Riga im April eine Herausforderung:

Auf der Ingelheimer Aue in

Mainz brachte ein Tieflader im Schritttempo

am frühen Morgen den gut 102 Tonnen

schweren Läufer der Gasturbine aus dem

Gas- und Dampfturbinenkraftwerk der

Kraftwerke Mainz-Wiesbaden AG zum benachbarten

Containerterminal am Mainzer

Rheinufer. Dort wurde das etwa zehn

Meter lange und bis zu 3,25 Meter im

Durchmesser breite Anlagenteil zunächst

auf ein Schiff geladen und anschließend

nach Berlin transportiert. Der KMW-Läufer

wird in Berlin revidiert und nach dem Einbau

in einem Gaskraftwerk der BASF Strom

produzieren.

Seit Sommer 2014 lagerte der Turbinenläufer

in einer Werkhalle auf dem KMW-Gelände.

Er war damals aus dem Kraftwerk

ausgebaut worden und bei einer millionenschweren

Modernisierungsmaßnahme des

Gaskraftwerks durch einen neuen Rotor

ersetzt worden.

LLwww.kmw-ag.de

LEAG prüft Bau einer Energie- und

Verwertungsanlage

(leag) Für eine neue Energie- und Verwertungsanlage

(EVA) am Industriestandort

Jänschwalde werden derzeit die Unterlagen

für das Genehmigungsverfahren vorbereitet.

Die Investitionsentscheidung zur

Errichtung der Anlage, mit der rund 50

neue Arbeitsplätze geschaffen würden,

könnte im Jahr 2021 erfolgen. Drei Jahre

später könnte die Inbetriebnahme erfolgen.

Die Realisierung des Projektes ist dabei

mit einem Partner aus der Entsorgungswirtschaft

angedacht. In der Anlage sollen

aufbereitete, nicht-recycelbare Abfälle

thermisch verwertet werden. Die dabei anfallende

Wärmeenergie wäre als Fernwärme,

Prozessdampf und zur Stromerzeugung

nutzbar. Somit könnte die Anlage

langfristig unter anderem zur Fernwärmeund

Prozessdampfversorgung eingesetzt

werden.

LEAG-Kraftwerksvorstand Hubertus Altmann

unterstreicht die mit dem Projekt

verbundenen positiven Effekte. „Wir sehen

mit einem solchen Investitionsprojekt die

Möglichkeit, ein Initial zu setzen für den

langfristen Erhalt und die Entwicklung des

Energie- und Industriestandortes – durch

sichere Jobs und regionale Wertschöpfung

für die vorhandenen Servicepartner und

Energiedienstleistungen, mit denen zusätzlich

neue Industrieansiedlungen unterstützt

werden können“, so Altmann. Damit,

so ergänzt Altmann, würde ein aktiver Beitrag

zur Strukturentwicklung in der Lausitzer

Energieregion geleistet.

Die EVA Jänschwalde wird nach neuesten

europäischen Effizienz- und Umweltstandards

geplant. Die Anlage könnte an einem

bereits erschlossenen Standort im Industriegebiet

Kraftwerk Jänschwalde östlich

des Kraftwerksblocks F entstehen.

LLwww.leag.de

LEAG: Wasser für Klein-, Großund

Pinnower See fließt im Mai

(leag) Innerhalb eines Dreivierteljahres

nach dem Erlass einer entsprechenden Anordnung

des Landesamtes für Bergbau,

Geologie und Rohstoffe (LBGR) hat die

Lausitz Energie Bergbau AG (LEAG) die

notwendigen Voraussetzungen dafür geschaffen,

dass der Kleinsee, Großsee und

Pinnower See im Landkreis Spree-Neiße

wie angekündigt ab dem Frühjahr 2019

langfristig mit zusätzlichem Wasser aus eigens

dafür errichteten Brunnen versorgt

werden können.

Bei den drei Seen nördlich des Tagebaus

Jänschwalde war vor allem aufgrund klimatischer

Einflüsse in den vergangenen

Jahren eine hohe Verdunstungsrate und

damit einhergehend ein fortschreitender

Wasserverlust zu verzeichnen. Darüber hinaus

war im Ergebnis von Grundwasser-

20


VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Members´ News

modellierungen im vergangenen Jahr festgestellt

worden, dass künftig ein zunehmender

bergbaulicher Einfluss auf diese

Seen durch die Grundwasserabsenkung

für den Tagebau Jänschwalde anzunehmen

ist. Daher hatte das LBGR mit einer

nachträglichen Anordnung zum Hauptbetriebsplan

des Tagebaus Jänschwalde am

24. Juli 2018 den Bergbaubetreiber beauftragt,

ab dem Frühjahr 2019 für eine

Stützwasserversorgung der drei Gewässer

zu sorgen. Damit sollen die für die Seen

vereinbarten Zielwasserstände erreicht

bzw. gehalten werden. Ein viertes Gewässer,

der Pastlingsee, wird bereits seit Oktober

2015 durch die LEAG mit zusätzlichem

Wasser versorgt.

„Für jeden der drei Seen haben wir speziell

auf deren konkrete Situation zugeschnittene

separate Brunnenanlagen, Transportleitungen

und Einlaufkaskaden errichten lassen.

Diese können im Mai 2019 in den Dauerbetrieb

gehen, nachdem der

vorgeschriebene zweitägige Leistungspumpversuch

erfolgreich abgeschlossen

wurde“, kündigt Dr. Thomas Koch, Leiter

Wasserwirtschaft bei der LEAG, an. „Die

mit dem LBGR abgestimmten Abnahmetermine

stellen sicher, dass das gesteckte Ziel,

im Frühjahr 2019 Wasser in die drei Seen

einzuleiten, erreicht wird – trotz des mehr

als ambitionierten Zeitplanes und ungeplanter

Verzögerungen wegen längerer

Lieferfristen bei verschiedenen Ausrüstungskomponenten.“

LLwww.leag.de

LEAG kooperiert mit

Energie-Startups

(leag) Bei der Entwicklung von neuen Geschäftsfeldern

setzen Lausitz Energie Bergbau

AG und Lausitz Energie Kraftwerke AG

(LEAG) künftig auch auf die Zusammenarbeit

mit jungen Gründerfirmen. LEAG-Vorstandsvorsitzende

Dr. Helmar Rendez und

der Geschäftsführer des SpinLab, Dr. Eric

Weber, unterzeichneten dazu in der Baumwollspinnerei

Leipzig den Vertrag über

eine Themenpartnerschaft im Bereich

Energie. Damit wird die LEAG Partner eines

Förderprogramms, welches das Spin-

Lab in Zusammenarbeit mit der HHL Leipzig

Graduate School of Management auflegt.

Mit ihm soll jährlich 16 bis 20 Startups

in den Bereichen Energie, Smart City, eHealth

bzw. Querschnittthemen dieser Bereiche

die Gelegenheit gegeben werden, ihre

Geschäftsideen erfolgreich zu entwickeln.

Das Konzept des Gründerprogramms wurde

mit ergänzenden Projekten unter dem

Titel „Smart Infrastructure Hub“ als einer

von zwölf digitalen Leuchttürmen vom

Bundeswirtschaftsministerium auszeichnet

und wird in den kommenden Jahren

weiter wachsen.

Die LEAG sieht in dem direkten Zugang zu

Start ups, neuen Technologien und Innovationen

im Energiebereich ein großes

Potential. „Wir sind

derzeit selbst auf dem

Weg, über unser Kerngeschäft

der Förderung

und Verstromung

von Braunkohle hinaus

neue Geschäftsfelder

zu erkunden und

sie auf wirtschaftlich

tragfähige Füße zu

stellen. Unsere geplante

BigBattery Lausitz,

einer der europaweit

bislang größten Batterie-Stromspeicher

mit

intelligenter, flexibler

Verknüpfung zum

Stromnetz, ist nur ein

Beispiel dafür“, sagt

Dr. Helmar Rendez,

Vorstandsvorsitzender

der Lausitz Energie

Bergbau AG und Lausitz Energie Kraftwerke

AG (LEAG). „Deswegen hat es für uns

Sinn, uns gemeinsam mit jungen, kreativen

Köpfen direkt an der Diskussion zu

aktuellen technologischen Herausforderungen

zu beteiligen, um darauf gegebenenfalls

auch Kooperationen und Pilotprojekte

zwischen Startups und LEAG

aufzubauen.“

„Mit LEAG engagiert sich ein weiteres

starkes Unternehmen aus der Region für

Startups und profitiert von der Anwendung

innovativer Technologien. Startups

finden über uns eine Vielzahl starker Partner

mit hoher Marktexpertise und Marktzugang.“,

so Dr. Eric Weber, Gründer vom

SpinLab und Koordinator des Smart Infrastructure

Hubs.

LLwww.leag.de

Kernkraftwerk Leibstadt publiziert

Geschäftsbericht

(kkl) Die Kernkraftwerk Leibstadt AG hat

am 29. April 2019 ihren Geschäftsbericht

publiziert.

Das Werk produzierte in seinem 34. Betriebsjahr

netto insgesamt 7‘799 GWh

Strom. Die Jahreskosten betrugen 564.5

Mio. CHF. Die Produktionskosten lagen im

Berichtsjahr bei 7.24 Rp/kWh.

Die Stromproduktion war auf Grund der

längeren Jahreshauptrevision sowie der

reduzierten Reaktorleistung unter dem

langjährigen Durchschnitt, was zu den

überdurchschnittlichen Produktionskosten

beitrug.

LLwww.kkl.ch

SpinLab-Geschäftsführer Dr. Eric Weber und LEAG-

Vorstandsvorsitzender Dr. Helmar Rendez unterzeichneten einen

Vertrag zur künftigen Themenpartnerschaft im Energiebereich.

Initiative GET H2 gibt Startschuss

für deutschlandweite

Wasserstoffinfrastruktur

• Erstes Projekt geht ins Rennen im

Ideenwettbewerb „Reallabor der

Energiewende“

• Kernelemente sind Power-to-Gas-Anlage

mit 105 MW Leistung, Transport,

Speicherung und Wasserstoffnutzung

(rwe) Mit Wasserstoff die Energiewende

voranbringen, das ist das Ziel der Initiative

GET H2, in der sich die Unternehmen RWE

Generation SE, Siemens, ENERTRAG, die

Stadtwerke Lingen, Hydrogenious Technologies,

Nowega sowie das Forschungszentrum

Jülich und das IKEM – Institut für Klimaschutz,

Energie und Mobilität jetzt zusammengeschlossen

haben. Als erstes

Teilprojekt planen die Partner den Aufbau

einer Wasserstoffinfrastruktur im Emsland,

die entlang der gesamten Wertschöpfungskette

die Sektoren Energie, Industrie, Verkehr

und Wärme verbindet. Kernelemente

sind die Errichtung einer Power-to-Gas-Anlage

mit einer Leistung von 105 MW, die

Strom aus Windkraft in „grünen Wasserstoff“

umwandelt, Transport und Speicherung

des reinen Wasserstoffs in bestehenden

Infrastrukturen sowie die Nutzung des

Wasserstoffs.

Mit diesem ersten Projekt nehmen die Unternehmen

am Ideenwettbewerb des Bundeswirtschaftsministeriums

„Reallabore

der Energiewende“ teil. Eine Projektskizze

haben sie am 5. April beim Bundeswirtschaftsministerium

eingereicht. Mit einer

Entscheidung darüber ist bis Ende Juni zu

rechnen. In zwei Jahren wollen die Unternehmen

in die konkrete Umsetzung des

Projektes gehen.

„Erneuerbare Energien, Strom- und Gasnetze,

Gasspeicher sowie die konventionelle

Flüssigkraftstoffinfrastruktur bis hin zu

den Abnehmern von Wasserstoff und Abwärme

in der chemischen Industrie: Das

alles gibt es schon in der Region, so dass

21


Members´ News VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

GET H2: Übersicht

ideale Voraussetzungen für diese innovative

Technologie und eine schnelle Projektumsetzung

gegeben sind. In Lingen können

wir die gesamte Wertschöpfungskette

im industriellen Maßstab demonstrieren

und haben durch die vorhandene Infrastruktur

erhebliches Synergiepotenzial“,

erläutert Roger Miesen, Vorstandsvorsitzender

der RWE Generation.

Wasserstoff ist ein wichtiger Zukunftsbaustein

für eine erfolgreiche Energiewende.

Eine Schlüsselrolle kommt dabei der Elektrolyse

auf Basis von erneuerbaren Energien

zu. Strom aus Wind und Sonne wird bei

der Aufspaltung von Wasser zu „grünem

Wasserstoff“, einem Energieträger, der wesentlich

dazu beitragen kann, die

CO 2 -Emissionen auch weit über den Stromsektor

hinaus deutlich zu senken. Für energieintensive

Branchen wie die Stahlindustrie

und die chemische Industrie kann Wasserstoff

ein entscheidender Schritt in

Richtung Klimaverträglichkeit sein. Darüber

hinaus erschließt Wasserstoff die Möglichkeit,

auch große Mengen erneuerbarer

Energien in den vorhandenen Kavernenspeichern

zu lagern.

„Entscheidend ist jetzt, die Technik nicht

nur in kleinen F&E-Projekten zu erproben,

sondern sie auch mit größeren Projekten in

einem ganzheitlichen Ansatz zur Serienreife

zu bringen. Hierzu wollen wir mit unserem

Projekt einen wesentlichen Beitrag

leisten. Anknüpfend an das vorhandene

Leitungsnetz hat das Projekt das Potenzial,

den Startschuss für eine Wasserstoffinfrastruktur

für Niedersachsen und NRW zu

geben, die für eine deutschland- und europaweite

Wasserstoffinfrastruktur entscheidende

Impulse setzen kann“, beschreibt

Jörg Müller, Geschäftsführer von ENER-

TRAG, die weitere Zukunftsperspektive.

„Dies ist ein weltweit einzigartiges Vorhaben,

einen Weg zur Sektorkopplung mit

grünem Wasserstoff im großtechnischen

Maßstab aufzuzeigen. Besonders die sinnvolle

Nutzung vorhandener Infrastrukturen

sowie die Rückverstromung von 100%

Wasserstoff in einer Gasturbine der

60-MW-Klasse machen dies auch für die

Stromerzeugung zu einem einzigartigen

Vorzeigeprojekt“, ergänzt Prof. Dr. Thomas

Thiemann, Leiter des Energy Transition

Teams von Siemens.

Die Realisierung des Projektes steht unter

dem Vorbehalt der Wirtschaftlichkeit.

LLwww.rwe.com

STEAG plant und baut neue

Anlage als Generalunternehmer

• Ruhr Oel investiert Millionen in moderne

Dampfversorgung

(steag) Die Ruhr Oel GmbH – BP Gelsenkirchen

modernisiert in den kommenden Jahren

im Werk Scholven schrittweise die

Dampfversorgung ihrer Prozessanlagen.

Unterstützt wird die Raffinerie dabei von

der STEAG GmbH. Das Essener Energieunternehmen

liefert ein passgenaues und ressourcenschonendes

Energiekonzept für

den gesamten Raffineriestandort, der zu

den größten in Europa zählt. Beide Unternehmen

haben entsprechende Verträge

abgeschlossen.

Künftig wird aus Raffineriegasen Prozessdampf

und in geringem Umfang auch Strom

für den Eigenbedarf produziert. STEAG

plant, baut und nimmt die neue Dampfversorgung

bis 2021 als Generalunternehmer

in Betrieb. Die vorbereitenden Maßnahmen

laufen bereits auf Hochtouren, und für Mitte

des Jahres ist geplant, mit den Bauaktivitäten

an einem der größten Raffineriestandorte

in Europa zu beginnen.

Das Projekt ist Teil eines rund zwei Milliarden

Euro umfassenden Modernisierungsprogramms,

das die Raffinerie in Gelsenkirchen

in den kommenden zehn Jahren fit

für die Zukunft macht. „Unser Anliegen ist

es, durch sicheres und umweltverträgliches

Handeln sowie hohe Rentabilität die

Arbeitsplätze langfristig zu sichern. Dafür

ist die Investition in eine moderne Dampfversorgung

ein bedeutender Schritt“, sagt

Raffinerieleiter Nick Spencer.

Der Auftrag an STEAG umfasst ein Projektvolumen

in dreistelliger Millionenhöhe.

„Wir freuen uns über das große Vertrauen,

das uns Ruhr Oel mit diesem Auftrag entgegenbringt“,

sagt Joachim Rumstadt, der

Vorsitzende der Geschäftsführung der

STEAG GmbH. Die zukünftige Dampfversorgung

am Standort Scholven erfolgt über

vier hochmoderne und nach dem Stand

der Technik ausgelegte Dampfkessel, die

auf dem Werkgelände der Raffinerie errichtet

werden.

Die energieeffizienten Kessel werden von

dem Unternehmen Standardkessel Baumgarte

GmbH in Duisburg angefertigt. Als

Brennstoff für die Dampferzeugung wird

vor allem das am Standort anfallende Raffineriegas

genutzt. Durch diese energetische

Verwertung kann der sicherheitsnotwenige

Fackelbetrieb verringert werden –

zum Beispiel bei An- und Abfahraktivitäten

von Produktionsanlagen der Raffinerie.

Gleichzeitig ersetzen die neuen energieeffizienten

Dampfkessel die bisherige, über

Jahrzehnte erfolgte Dampfversorgung

durch das benachbarte Steinkohlekraftwerk.

Weiterer Vorteil ist die deutliche

Senkung der Emissionen.

Dampf ist ein sehr bedeutender Betriebsstoff

in einer Raffinerie. Er wird entweder

durch Erhitzen von Wasser in Dampfkesseln

direkt vor Ort erzeugt oder über

Dampfleitungen importiert, etwa von

Kraftwerken. Dieser Dampf wird dann dem

Raffinerieprozess zur Verfügung gestellt.

In Trennkolonnen wird das Kohlenwasserstoffgemisch

mit dem Dampf so weit erhitzt,

dass ein bestimmter Bestandteil gasförmig

wird und dadurch von den festen

Inhaltsstoffen getrennt werden kann.

Hintergrund

BP betreibt in Gelsenkirchen mit rund

1.900 Mitarbeitern und 170 Auszubildenden

die beiden Werke in Horst und Scholven

als einen integrierten und komplexen

Raffinerie- und Petrochemie-Standort. Die

Verarbeitungskapazität beträgt ca. zwölf

Millionen Tonnen Rohöl pro Jahr. Daraus

entstehen neben Benzin, Diesel, Düsentreibstoff

und Heizöl mehr als 50 verschiedene

Produkte vor allem für die Chemieindustrie.

LLwww.steag.com

STEAG meldet zwei saarländische

Kraftwerke zur vorläufigen

Stilllegung an

• Netzbetreiber entscheidet über fortgesetzte

Systemrelevanz

(steag) Das Energieunternehmen STEAG

hat im April 2019 seine beiden saarländischen

Kraftwerke Weiher 3 (724 Megawatt)

und Bexbach (780 Megawatt) bei

der Bundesnetzagentur erneut zur vorläufigen

Stilllegung angemeldet. Das Verfahren

wurde formal eingeleitet, um gesetzliche

Fristen einzuhalten und die Perspekti-

22


VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Members´ News

Freuen sich auf die enge Zusammenarbeit zwischen der Ruhr Oel GmbH und der STEAG GmbH

(v. l.).: Derek Butler, stellvertr. Projektleiter Steam Ruhr Oel; Dr. Wolfgang Cieslik, Mitglied der

Geschäftsführung der STEAG GmbH; Nick Spencer, Vorsitzender der Geschäftsführung der Ruhr

Oel GmbH; Joachim Rumstadt, Vorsitzender der Geschäftsführung der STEAG GmbH; Michaela

Hodyas, Mitglied der Geschäftsführung der Ruhr Oel GmbH; Alfred Geißler, Mitglied der

Geschäftsführung der STEAG GmbH Foto: Marco Stepniak/STEAG

ven für beide Standorte über das Jahr

2020 hinaus auszuloten. Die gesetzlich

vorgeschriebene Veröffentlichung auf der

REMIT-Plattform, der offiziellen Transparenzplattform

des Energiegroßhandelsmarkts,

ist soeben erfolgt.

Ungeachtet des neuen Antrags bleiben beide

Kraftwerke zunächst bis Ende April

2020 systemrelevant. Nach Einschätzung

des Übertragungsnetzbetreibers Amprion

sind sie unverzichtbar, um im Notfall das

Stromnetz stabilisieren zu können. Von Dezember

2018 bis Februar 2019 wurden beide

STEAG-Kraftwerke aus diesem Grund je

dreimal angefordert. Die Bundesnetzagentur

muss jetzt auf Antrag Amprions entscheiden,

inwieweit Systemrelevanz über

den 30. April 2020 hinaus besteht - oder ob

die angemeldeten Kraftwerke ab Mai 2020

vorläufig vom Netz genommen werden. Bereits

im Frühjahr 2017 hatte Amprion erstmals

Systemrelevanz bis zum 30. April

2019 festgestellt. Aus diesem Grund muss

STEAG beide Anlagen in ständiger Betriebsbereitschaft

halten. Der aktuelle Beschluss

gilt bis zum 30. April 2020.

LLwww.steag.com

„In Summe investiert die TIWAG 110 Mio.

Euro in den Ausbau der Anlage. Damit ist

Kirchbichl das derzeit größte Bauprojekt

im Tiroler Unterland mit einer enormen

Wertschöpfung für die Region und die lokale

Wirtschaft“, betonte TIWAG-Eigentümervertreter

und LH Günther Platter am

Freitag im Rahmen einer Baustellenbesichtigung:

„Gemeinsam mit dem neuen Laufkraftwerk

GKI im Tiroler Oberland sowie

dem geplanten Ausbau von Sellrain-Silz

stellen wir mit unserem Landesenergieversorger

TIWAG die Weichen in Richtung einer

sicheren und nachhaltigen Stromversorgung

Tirols.“

Nach Ausheben der bis zu 20 Meter tiefen

Baugrube laufen derzeit die Betonarbeiten

für das zweite Krafthaus. Das erste maschinelle

Anlagenteil wurde kürzlich mit dem

Einheben der Saugrohrpanzerung montiert.

Bis zum Sommer soll das Krafthaus

im Rohbau stehen, anschließend folgen die

Montagearbeiten inkl. Innenausbau. Die

Inbetriebnahme des Krafthauses 2 ist für

Oktober 2020 geplant. Bis dahin sind auch

die Bauarbeiten am Entlastungsbauwerk

abgeschlossen. „Der Triebwasserweg wird

im Zuge der Werksabstellung von November

2019 bis April 2020 saniert und im Einlaufbereich

sowie im Bereich des Krafthauses

erweitert“, ergänzt TIWAG-Vorstandsdirektor

Johann Herdina.

„Nach Abschluss aller Rückbau- und Rekultivierungsarbeiten

wird unser erneuertes

Kraftwerk Kirchbichl voraussichtlich im

Dezember 2020 den Regelbetrieb aufnehmen“,

so TIWAG-Vorstandsvorsitzender

Erich Entstrasser: „Mit der erweiterten Anlage

können bis zu 40.000 Haushalte mit

sauberem Strom aus Tiroler Wasserkraft

nachhaltig und sicher versorgt werden.“

LLwww.tiwag.at

Gemeinschaftskraftwerk Inn:

Erfolgreicher Durchschlag der

Tunnelvortriebsmaschine Nord

(tiwag) Die Tunnelvortriebsmaschine

(TVM) Nord, auch bekannt unter ihrem

Spitznamen „Zauberbohrer“, hat am 9. April

2019 mit dem Durchschlag zum Gegenvortrieb

in Prutz/Ried ihr Ziel erreicht.

„Trotz geologischer und maschinentechnischer

Schwierigkeiten, die den Vortrieb

mehrfach verzögert haben, konnten die

Vortriebsarbeiten durch die TVM Nord erfolgreich

abgeschlossen werden“, betont

GKI-Geschäftsführer Johann Herdina.

„Nach der Fertigstellung des Krafthauses in

Prutz im vergangenen Herbst ist dies ein

nächster Meilenstein auf dem Weg zum Gemeinschaftskraftwerk

Inn. Nun gilt unsere

volle Aufmerksamkeit dem weiteren Vortrieb

der Südmaschine sowie den Arbeiten

an der Wehranlage und dem Dotierkraftwerk

in Ovella.“

TIWAG – Kraftwerk Kirchbichl:

Dotierkraftwerk fertiggestellt

(tiwag) Mit Inbetriebnahme des Dotierkraftwerks

konnte jetzt ein nächster Meilenstein

umgesetzt werden. Das über das

Wehr abgegebene Dotierwasser von 15

m 3 /s, das zugleich die Fischdurchgängigkeit

in der Innschleife sicherstellt, wird

künftig auch für die Stromerzeugung genutzt.

Dadurch können bis zu sechs Gigawattstunden

Strom zusätzlich in das Tiroler

Stromnetz eingespeist werden. Nach

Abschluss der Erweiterung werden im

Kraftwerk 165 GWh Strom erzeugt werden.

Das entspricht einer Steigerung von

25 Prozent.

Kraftwerk Kirchbichl: Dotierkraftwerk fertiggestellt. Baustellenbesuch von LH Günther Platter mit

Thomas Bodner von der bauausführenden Firma Bodner Bau sowie den TIWAG-Vorständen

Erich Entstrasser, Johann Herdina und Thomas Gasser. Foto: TIWAG/Vandory

23


Members´ News VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Über 90 % des Tunnelvortriebes

zurückgelegt

Seit 25. Februar 2016 arbeitete sich die

über 1.000 Tonnen schwere Tunnelvortriebsmaschine

vom Fensterstollen in Maria

Stein in nördliche Richtung über eine

Länge von über 9.400 Metern vor, wobei

rund 320.000 m 3 Festgestein ausgebrochen

wurden. Unvorhergesehene Schwierigkeiten

wie Bergwasserzutritte oder geologische

Störungen sorgten mehrfach für

Verzögerungen bzw. eine verringerte Vortriebsleistung.

Insgesamt sind über 90 % des 23,3 km langen

Triebwasserstollens (inklusive Schrägschacht

und Gegenvortrieb) ausgebrochen.

Die Südmaschine „Magliadrun“ kommt

weiterhin gut voran – die Vortriebsarbeiten

an der rund 12 km langen Südröhre sollen

im Sommer 2019 abgeschlossen werden.

LLwww.tiwag.at

Trianel sichert Zuschläge für

60 MWp Freiflächen-PV

• Stadtwerke-Kooperation gewinnt in erster

PV-Sonderausschreibung

(trianel) In der ersten PV-Sonderausschreibungsrunde

der Bundesnetzagentur mit Gebotstermin

zum 1. März 2019 hat sich die

Stadtwerke-Kooperation Trianel gemeinsam

mit kommunalen Partnern gut behauptet.

Trianel konnte sich für insgesamt neun

PV-Projekte mit einem Gesamtvolumen von

60 MWp den Zuschlag sichern. Der durchschnittliche

Zuschlagswert für die PV-Freiflächenprojekte

in vier Bundesländern liegt

oberhalb des Ausschreibungsdurchschnitts

von 6,59 ct/kWh.

„12 Prozent des bezuschlagten Ausschreibungsvolumens

können wir für uns verbuchen

und bauen damit die Marktposition

von Trianel im PV-Bereich weiter aus“,

zeigt sich Andreas Lemke, Abteilungsleiter

Dezentrale Energiesysteme der Trianel

GmbH, mit dem Ausschreibungsergebnis

zufrieden. „Wir haben eine adäquate Vergütungshöhe

auch für anspruchsvollere

PV-Projekte unserer kommunalen Partner

erzielt.“ Die deutschlandweiten PV-Projekte

sind zum Großteil in einem frühen Stadium

und sollen bis 2021 zur Baureife geführt

werden.

Gemeinsam mit Stadtwerken, regionalen

Energieversorgern und kommunalnahen

Partnern entwickelt Trianel deutschlandweit

PV-Freiflächenanlagen und Windparks.

Dazu wurde ein kompetentes Entwicklungsteam

sowie ein umfangreiches

Netzwerk aus Akquisiteuren, technischen

Dienstleistern und Projektpartnern aufgebaut.

Im PV-Bereich setzt Trianel neben der

Entwicklung von Projekten mit lokalen

Partnern für die Ausschreibungsrunden auf

die Akquise von PV-Bestandsprojekten und

sucht für den deutschlandweiten Ausbau

der Projektpipeline stetig neue Partner.

LLwww.trianel.com

Uniper and BP are driving

production of “green” hydrogen

for use in fuels

(uniper) BP and Uniper, together with the

Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation

Research ISI, submit project outline

for the „Real-world laboratories energy

transition“ competition

The planned project envisages the integration

of renewable energy in the form of hydrogen

into the transport sector

Power-to-gas technology (PtG) in refinery

processes (PtGtR) makes a positive contribution

to the energy transition

In order to demonstrate the technical and

economic feasibility of a PtG plant at the BP

refinery in Lingen, BP and Uniper, under

the scientific supervision of Fraunhofer ISI,

have examined and developed options for

using the climate-friendly PtG technology

for the refinery process. To this end, the

partners have submitted a project outline

for the ideas competition “Reallabore der

Energiewende (Real-world laboratories as

a tool for a participatory energy transition)”,

which was launched by the Federal

Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy.

In a first step, the planned project includes

the construction and operation of an electrolysis

with 15MW electric output, which

produces so-called green hydrogen from

renewable electricity. By incorporating

green hydrogen into existing refinery processes

at BP, a renewable component can

be added to the production process of conventional

fuels.

In the second step, a power-to-liquids process

is to be realized. The considerations

are to built a Fischer-Tropsch plant in which

green gas with biogenic CO 2 can be used to

produce synthetic fuels and chemical intermediates.

These fuels – like conventional

bio-fuels – can be mixed with conventional

fuels or even put to use as pure fuel.

While individual elements of the project

have already been tested, the innovation is

the combination of these systems as well as

the entire upscaling beyond the already

tested laboratory scale. The project is an

example of the holistic sector interconnect

approach, as evident from covering the entire

value chain from renewable electricity

to (synthetic) fuels and chemical and pharmaceutical

sector products. Applying this

approach in a refinery therefore can contribute

significantly to the success of the

energy transition. The renewable forms of

energy will be integrated into large-scale

industrial production processes. This eliminates

efficiency losses that otherwise occur

in a hydrogen recycling process. Also,

the climate benefits from this: By using

PtG, it’s possible to avoid 90 percent of the

greenhouse gases generated by conventional

processes used at refineries in the

production of hydrogen. Along with the

flexibilization of renewable energy in the

gas and heating sectors, power-to-X processes

also make possible the production of

“green” fuels, thereby resulting in an immediate

and direct reduction in the CO 2

produced by vehicles. These “green” electricity-based

fuels will make it possible to

bridge the gap between the renewable

power sector and sustainable mobility.

Wolfgang Langhoff, Chief Executive Officer

of BP Europa SE, says: “In order to be

able to present the use of green hydrogen

economically in the future, the political

signals must literally be green. In concrete

terms, this means that the economic operation

of such a plant could work if, among

other things, the green hydrogen is offset

against the greenhouse gas reduction quota

in the fuel sector, the former biofuel quota.

This would then also form the basis for

a decision for a power-to-gas plant at the

Lingen site.“

Eckhardt Rümmler, Chief Operating Officer

at Uniper, says: “The real laboratory

funding is a good basis for launching projects

on an almost industrial scale, with

which the energy transition is being driven

forward. With a coherent design of the Renewable

Energy Directive (RED II), politicians

now have the opportunity to close the

gap to economic viability and bring these

applications to the market without subsidies.”

LLwww.uniper.energy

www.bp.com

Uniper sells remaining stake in

Brazil based Eneva S.A.

(uniper) Uniper sells its remaining 6 %

stake in Brazil-based Eneva S.A. within a

secondary placement by several shareholders

in Eneva. Uniper expects to receive proceeds

of about €75 million equivalent. The

settlement of the secondary placement is

expected to take place on April 10, 2019. As

a result of this divestment, Uniper has no

further business operations in Brazil.

Eneva is a Brazil-based integrated energy

company active in gas production and power

generation.

Uniper´s Chief Financial Officer Christopher

Delbrück says: “In line with our corporate

strategy, we consider non-strategic

shareholdings for asset rotation. The sale

of our Eneva stake is an example of how

we’re systematically implementing this

strategy.”

LLwww.uniper.energy,

www.eneva.com.br/en/

24


VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Members´ News

VERBUND: Spatenstich für die

Fischwanderhilfe Abwinden-Asten

(verbund) Feierlicher Spatenstich der Projektpartner

in Abwinden-Asten: VER-

BUND, Österreichs führendes Stromunternehmen

und Betreiber der fünf Donaukraftwerke

in Oberösterreich, rüstet das

Kraftwerk Abwinden-Asten mit einer neuen

Fischwanderhilfe aus. Auf mehr als 5

Kilometern finden künftig am rechten Donauufer

die Fische und weitere Lebewesen

neuen Lebensraum und eine Möglichkeit,

das Kraftwerk zu passieren. Insgesamt werden

etwa fünf Hektar neuer Lebensraum

am Wasser neu geschaffen. Die Gesamt-Investition

dieser Maßnahme, die Teil des

donauweiten Projektes LIFE+ Projekt

„Netzwerk Donau“ ist, beläuft sich auf

rund 6,5 Mio. Euro, die neben VERBUND

zusätzlich von der Europäischen Union,

vom Bundesministerium für Nachhaltigkeit

und Tourismus, dem Land Oberösterreich

und vom oberösterreichischen Landesfischereiverband

finanziell gefördert

werden. Die Arbeiten werden bis zum

Frühjahr 2020 dauern.

Die Wiederherstellung der Durchgängigkeit

der großen Flüsse ist eines der wesentlichen

Ziele, welche die europäische Wasserrahmenrichtlinie

vorgibt. Der naturnahe

Bach ermöglicht den Fischen, die 8

Meter Höhendifferenz des Donaukraftwerkes

Abwinden-Asten einfach zu überwinden.

Notwendig ist dazu ein 5,3 Kilometer

langes Gerinne auf der rechten Seite der

Donau, eingebettet in die ökologisch wertvollen

Flächen im Auwald südlich des

Kraftwerks. Das Einlaufbauwerk ist gleichzeitig

der Ausstieg der Fischwanderhilfe

und befindet sich im Stauraum des Kraftwerks

Abwinden-Asten bei Strom-km

2.122,3, etwas flussauf des Ausees. Die Fischwanderhilfe

mündet 700 Meter unterhalb

des Kraftwerks Abwinden-Asten bei

Strom-km 2.118,9 wieder in die Donau.

Auch das Mitterwasser profitiert vom Projekt,

da im Bereich der Kraftwerkszufahrt

ebenfalls Maßnahmen umgesetzt werden.

Die Bauarbeiten starteten bereits im Jänner

2019 mit Rodungsmaßnahmen im Auwald,

seit Mitte Februar sind die Erdarbeiten

in Gange. Fertiggestellt wird der Bau

im Frühjahr 2020. Der beliebte Donau-Traun-Radweg

R4 wird während der

Bauzeit über eine Umleitung benutzbar

bleiben.

Gemeinsamer Spatenstich der

Projektpartner

Als tatkräftigen Akt versammelten sich die

beteiligten Projektpartner zum traditionellen

Spatenstich in Sichtweite des Kraftwerks

Abwinden-Asten.

„Wir sind stolz auf den vielfältigen Wert

der Wasserkraft. Gerade hier an der Donau

beweisen wir besonders, dass Strom aus

Wasserkraft die nachhaltigste, sauberste

und sicherste Form der heimischen Stromerzeugung

ist“, so VERBUND Vorstands-Mitglied

Achim Kaspar anlässlich

des feierlichen Spatenstichs. „ Aber wir

sind auch Vorreiter in ökologischen Maßnahmen.

Es liegt uns sehr daran, die Ressource

Wasserkraft auf hohem Standard so

ökologisch wie verträglich auszubauen

und das Rückgrat der sicheren, heimischen

Versorgung zu stärken.“

„Saubere Energie aus Wasserkraft steht oft

in einem Interessenkonflikt mit Natur- und

Gewässerschutz“, so Landesrat Elmar Podgorschek.

„Die neue Fischaufstiegshilfe

beim Kraftwerk Abwinden-Asten beweist,

dass mit ausgereifter Technik ein weitgehender

Interessenausgleich erreicht werden

kann. Wir freuen uns, dass das Land

Oberösterreich durch einen Förderbeitrag

zur Umsetzung dieser ökologisch wertvollen

Fischwanderhilfe beitragen kann, womit

wir ein weiteres Stück Natur schaffen

können.“

Robert Fenz, Leiter Abteilung I/3 Nationale

und internationale Wasserwirtschaft im

Bundesministerium für Nachhaltigkeit und

Tourismus betonte die gute Zusammenarbeit

in der Projektierung. „Gute Kommunikation

zwischen den Partnern ist wesentlichen

Faktor für ein gelungenes Projekt“, so

Robert Fenz.

Frischer Lebensraum für Flora und Fauna

„Ganz im Sinne des Projektes LIFE+ Netzwerk

Donau ist die Fischwanderhilfe Abwinden-Asten

ein Bindeglied, um Donauabschnitte

für viele Fischarten wieder erreichbar

zu machen“, informiert Michael

Amerer, Geschäftsführer der VERBUND

Hydro Power GmbH. „Bis 2028 investieren

wir in der

VERBUND Wasserkraft insgesamt mehr als

280 Mio. Euro in die Ökologie. Wir sind

froh, dass wir für die hohe Investition in die

Umwelt auch wichtige Finanzierungspartner

gefunden haben, allen voran natürlich

die Europäische Union sowie den Bund, die

Länder Ober- und Niederösterreich und die

Fischereiverbände aus diesen beiden Bundesländern.“

Spatenstich Fischwanderhilfe Abwinden-Asten. (Foto: VERBUND)

Karl Heinz Gruber, Geschäftsführer der

VERBUND Hydro Power GmbH: „Unser

Ziel steht schon seit längerem, nämlich ist

die gänzliche Barrierefreiheit unserer heimischen

Wasserkraftwerke. Bis heute

konnten wir dazu österreichweit 53 Fischwanderhilfen

fertig stellen. Wobei wir

immer darauf achten, dass wir neben der

Passierbarkeit der Kraftwerke auch gleich

weitere wertvolle Laich- und Lebensräume

für Fische und Rückzugsgebiete für Lebewesen

am Wasser schaffen. Mit kluger

Landschaftsplanung haben wir die Artenvielfalt

an unseren Kraftwerksstandorten

rasch und erstaunlich verbessert.“

Partner im LIFE+ Projekt

„Netzwerk Donau“

VERBUND hat 2011 das LIFE+ Projekt

„Netzwerk Donau“ gestartet, das sich die

Vernetzung des Fischlebensraumes in der

Donau, unter anderem mit der Herstellung

der Durchgängigkeit an ausgewählten

Strecken der Donau, sowie der Errichtung

spezieller Strukturmaßnahmen in Stauwurzelbereichen

in Form von Kiesbänken,

Inseln und Nebenarme zum Ziel gesetzt

hat.

VERBUND verbessert mit einem Gesamtaufwand

von rund 25 Mio. Euro und mit 6

Finanzierungspartnern (Europäische Union,

Ministerium für Nachhaltigkeit und

Tourismus, die Landesregierungen von

Ober- und Niederösterreich, sowie die Landesfischereiverbände

Ober- und Niederösterreich)

die Fischfauna von vier Natura

2000-Gebieten und von Zubringersystemen

wesentlich. Beteiligt sind zudem die

am Kraftwerk Abwinden-Asten strombezugsberechtigten

Unternehmen Energie

AG, KELAG, Salzburg AG und VKW.

LLwww.verbund.com

25


Ressourcen und Reserven für die weltweite Energieversorgung VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Die Rolle von Ressourcen und

Reserven für die weltweite

Energieversorgung

Hans-Wilhelm Schiffer

Abstract

The role of resources and reserves for the

global energy supply

The assured availability and competitiveness of

the various energy sources, as well as climate

compatibility, determine their use. Conditions

on the energy markets are also subject to continuous

change. This article examines the extent

to which the availability of energy resources

and the orientation of energy policies influence

the energy mix, particularly power

generation. It also outlines strategies for achieving

the energy policy goals – security of supply,

value for money and environmental compatibility

(including climate protection) – in the

best possible way.

l

Die sichere Verfügbarkeit und die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit

der verschiedenen Energieträger

bestimmt – ebenso wie die Klimaverträglichkeit

– deren Nutzung. Dabei sind

die Bedingungen auf den Energiemärkten

einem kontinuierlichen Wandel unterworfen.

Im Rahmen dieses Beitrags wird untersucht,

inwieweit die Verfügbarkeit der

Energieressourcen und die energiepolitische

Ausrichtung den Energiemix insbesondere

der Stromerzeugung beeinflussen.

Ferner werden Strategien aufgezeigt, wie

die energiepolitischen Ziele – das sind Versorgungssicherheit,

Preiswürdigkeit und

Umweltverträglichkeit (einschließlich Klimaschutz)

– bestmöglich erreicht werden.

Veränderungen im globalen

Energiemix seit 1985

Der weltweite Energieverbrauch hat sich

seit Mitte der 1980er Jahre fast verdoppelt.

Dieser Zuwachs wurde zu 80 % durch fossile

Energien gedeckt, also durch Erdöl, Erdgas

und Kohle. Damit hat sich der Anteil

der fossilen Energien an der Deckung des

gesamten Primärenergieverbrauchs nur

leicht verringert, von 89 % im Jahr 1985

auf 85 % im Jahr 2017. Erneuerbare Energien

haben zwar – insbesondere in den letzten

zehn Jahren – stark an Bedeutung gewonnen.

Dennoch war der Beitrag von

Wasserkraft, Wind- und Solarenergie, Biomasse

und Geothermie auch 2017 noch auf

insgesamt 11 % begrenzt. 4 % des Primärenergieverbrauchs

wurden 2017 durch

Kernenergie gedeckt (B i l d 1 ).

Einsatzschwerpunkte von Erdöl sind der

Verkehrssektor und die Petrochemie. Erdgas

kommt vor allem im Wärmemarkt – Industrie

sowie private Haushalte und Kleinverbraucher

– zum Einsatz, daneben in der

Stromerzeugung. Kohle und Kernenergie

dienen überwiegend beziehungsweise ausschließlich

der Stromerzeugung. Auch die

erneuerbaren Energien werden bisher bevorzugt

für die Stromerzeugung genutzt.

Dies gilt für die Wasserkraft, aber auch für

die Solarenergie und die Windkraft sowie

– wenn auch zu einem geringeren Anteil –

für die Biomasse und die Geothermie.

Die globale Stromerzeugung hat sich seit

1985 fast verdreifacht. Zwei Drittel des

seitdem realisierten Zuwachses wurden

durch Kohle und Erdgas gedeckt. Der Anteil

der Kohle an der weltweiten Stromerzeugung

war 2017 mit 38 % genau so hoch

wie 1985. Zwar hat sich der Beitrag von Öl

zur Stromerzeugung um acht Prozentpunkte

vermindert. Dies wurde allerdings

durch einen um neun Prozentpunkte gestiegenen

Erdgasanteil mehr als kompen-

6 %

10.242

19 %

29 %

< 1 %

5 %

13.379

6 %

6 %

22 %

25 %

1 %

19.231

4 %

7 %

4 %

23 %

28 %

Sonne/Wind*

Wasser

Kernenergie

Erdgas

Kohle

Autor

Dr. Hans-Wilhelm Schiffer

Member of the Studies Committee,

World Energy Council

London, United Kingdom

41 %

40 %

34 %

1985 2000 2017

* einschließlich andere erneuerbare Energien, wie Biomasse und Geothermie, aber ohne Berücksichtigung der

nicht-kommerziellen Biomasse

Quelle: BP Statistical Review of World Energy June 2018 (Workbook)

Bild 1. Weltweiter Primärenergieverbrauch 1985 bis 2017 in Mio. t SKE.

Öl

26


VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Ressourcen und Reserven für die weltweite Energieversorgung

15.555

17 %

9.882

17 %

1 %

20 %

18 %

15 %

14 %

38 %

38 %

38 %

12 %

9 %

4 %

1985 2000 2017

siert. Entsprechend stellte sich von 1985

bis 2017 keine signifikante Veränderung im

Anteil der fossilen Energien an der Stromerzeugung

ein. 2017 und auch im Jahr

2000 waren es 65 % gegenüber 64 % im

Jahr 1985. Der Anteil der Kernenergie hat

sich von 1985 bis 2017 um fünf Prozentpunkte

auf 10 % vermindert, während der

Beitrag der erneuerbaren Energien um vier

Prozentpunkte auf 25 % zugenommen hat.

Am stärksten waren die Zuwächse bei Sonne

und Wind, insbesondere in den letzten

zehn Jahren. Der Anteil der Wasserkraft ist

seit 1985 trotz absoluter Zuwächse um vier

Prozentpunkte zurückgegangen. Trotzdem

leistet die Wasserkraft auch 2017 den größten

Beitrag zur Stromerzeugung unter den

erneuerbaren Energien (B i l d 2 ).

Bestimmungsfaktoren für den

Energiemix in der Stromerzeugung

nach Staaten

1 %

25.551

9 %

16 %

10 %

23 %

* einschließlich andere erneuerbare Energien ** einschließlich andere nicht-erneuerbare Energien

Quelle: BP Statistical Review of World Energy June 2018 (Workbook)

Bild 2. Weltweiter Stromerzeugungsmix 1985 bis 2017 in TWh.

Deutschland

Frankreich

Norwegen

USA

Brasilien

Südafrika

Saudi

Arabien

Iran

China

Australien

Neuseeland

Kohle Öl Erdgas

Sonne/Wind*

Wasser

Kernenergie

Erdgas

Kohle

Öl**

Der Energiemix zur Stromerzeugung in

den verschiedenen Staaten und Weltregionen

stellt sich – abweichend von den dargelegten

globalen Strukturen – sehr unterschiedlich

dar. Zwei Faktoren sind dafür

entscheidend – die jeweilige Ressourcensituation

und die Ausrichtung der Energiepolitik.

Dies wird bei einer beispielhaften

Betrachtung der Situation in ausgewählten

Ländern deutlich (B i l d 3 ).

In Staaten, die über große Potenziale zur

Nutzung der Wasserkraft verfügen, hält

diese Energiequelle in vielen Fällen hohe

Anteile an der Stromerzeugung. Dies gilt in

Europa (Angaben für das Jahr 2017) vor

allem für Norwegen (96 %), Island (73 %),

Österreich (60 %), Schweiz (59 %) und Albanien

(100 %), in Nordamerika für Kanada

(57 %), in Südamerika für Paraguay

(100 %), Brasilien (63 %), Kolumbien

(76 %), Venezuela (65 %), Uruguay (59 %)

und Peru (55 %), in Ozeanien für Neuseeland

(58 %) und in Asien für Laos, Nepal,

Bhutan sowie Nord-Korea. Weltweiter Spitzenreiter

bei der Nutzung der Wasserkraft

zur Stromerzeugung ist China. Trotzdem

war der Anteil der Wasserkraft an der gesamten

Stromerzeugung des Landes 2017

auf 18 % begrenzt. Auch in Afrika hält die

Kernenergie

erneuerbare Energien

Wasser

Geothermie

Solar/

Biomasse Sonstige

Wind

Quelle: IEA, Electricity Information 2018; BP Statistical Review of World Energy June 2018, Workbook

Bild 3. Stromerzeugungsmix ausgewählter Staaten 2017 in %.

Wasserkraft in einigen Ländern hohe Anteile

an der Stromerzeugung. Dies trifft

unter anderem für Äthiopien zu (93 %).

Ferner beträgt der Anteil der Wasserkraft

in Sambia und im Kongo mehr als 90 %, in

Mozambique über 80 %. Dennoch war die

komplette Stromerzeugung aus Wasserkraft

auf dem gesamten Kontinent Afrika

2017 um 9 % geringer als Norwegens

Stromerzeugung aus Wasserkraft.

In einigen Ländern spielt auch die Geothermie

eine wichtige Rolle für die Stromerzeugung.

Die in absoluten Größen

höchste installierte Leistung auf Basis Geothermie

(TOP 10) besteht in den USA, in

Indonesien, Philippinen, Türkei, Neuseeland,

Mexiko, Italien, Island, Kenia und

Japan. Gemessen an der Stromerzeugungsmenge

des jeweiligen Landes ist der Anteil

der Geothermie mit 27 % in Island und mit

17 % in Neuseeland überdurchschnittlich

hoch.

Bei Bio-Energien (feste, flüssige und gasförmige)

führt Brasilien mit einer Strom-

Erzeugungskapazität von 15 GW die globale

Rangliste an – gefolgt von den USA

(13 GW), China (11 GW), Indien (10 GW)

und Deutschland (9 GW). Die Anteile von

Bioenergien an der Stromerzeugungsmenge

bewegen sich in Ländern wie Brasilien

(9 %) und Deutschland (7 %) über dem

weltweiten Durchschnitt von 2 %.

Bei Solarenergie und Windkraft spielen

zwar auch die natürlichen Bedingungen

eine wichtige Rolle. Allerdings ist noch entscheidender

für den Nutzungsgrad dieser

erneuerbaren Energien die Ausrichtung

der Energiepolitik in den verschiedenen

Staaten – ausgedrückt durch die Intensität

der staatlichen Förderung. Wichtigstes Beispiel

in diesem Zusammenhang ist

Deutschland. Bei der installierten Leistung

von Anlagen auf Basis von Wind stand

Deutschland Ende 2017 – hinter China und

USA – weltweit an dritter Stelle, bei Solarenergie

– hinter China, Japan und USA – an

vierter Position. Gemessen an der Stromerzeugungsmenge

lag der Anteil von Wind

und Sonne in Deutschland 2017 bei 23 %

gegenüber einem weltweiten Durchschnitt

von 6 % – und dies, obwohl Deutschland

gemessen an den natürlichen Bedingungen

nicht zu den weltweit besonders begünstigten

Standorten zählt. Dies gilt bezogen

auf die Windkraft eher für ein Land wie

Dänemark. Dort wurde 2017 rund die Hälfte

der Stromerzeugung auf Basis von Windkraft

bereitgestellt. [1]

Politische Weichenstellungen sind maßgebliche

Treiber für die Intensität der Nutzung

von Kernenergie zur Stromerzeugung.

So hat vor allem Frankreich nach der

ersten Ölpreiskrise im Jahr 1973 auf die

Kernenergie gesetzt. 2017 war die Kernenergie

dort mit 72 % an der gesamten

Stromerzeugung beteiligt. In absoluten

Größen sind bisher die USA Spitzenreiter

bei der Nutzung der Kernenergie. Dort

wurde 2017 doppelt so viel Strom aus

27


Ressourcen und Reserven für die weltweite Energieversorgung VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Kernenergie erzeugt wie in Frankreich. Allerdings

war der Anteil der Kernenergie in

den USA mit 20 % deutlich niedriger als in

Frankreich. Einen – im Vergleich zu den

USA – doppelt so hohen Anteil hält die

Kernenergie in Schweden. In der Ukraine

sind es 54 % und in Belgien 49 %. Auch

Länder wie Deutschland und Japan hatten

– flankiert durch die staatliche Energiepolitik

– in der Vergangenheit stark auf die

Kernenergie gesetzt. In beiden Ländern

hatte der Anteil der Kernenergie an der

Stromerzeugung zeitweise bis zu knapp einem

Drittel erreicht. Nach der Reaktorkatastrophe

von Fukushima im Jahr 2011

hatte Japan die Stromerzeugung aller

Kernreaktoren für verpflichtende Sicherheitsüberprüfungen

und Nachrüstungen

ausgesetzt – mit dem Ergebnis, dass zwischen

September 2013 und August 2015

dort keine Stromerzeugung auf Basis Kernenergie

erfolgte. 2018 wurden in Japan

fünf Kernkraftwerke, die nach dem Reaktorunfall

von Fukushima außer Betrieb gesetzt

worden waren, wieder ans Netz genommen.

Damit sind inzwischen wieder

neun Kernkraftwerke mit einer Kapazität

von 8,7 GW in Betrieb. [2] In Deutschland

wurden nach dem Reaktorunfall von Fukushima

den sieben ältesten Kernkraftwerksblöcken

sowie dem Kernkraftwerk Krümmel

die weitere Betriebserlaubnis entzogen.

Entsprechend wurde der Leistungsbetrieb

dieser acht Anlagen Anfang August

2011 beendet. Für die verbliebenen neun

deutschen Kernkraftwerke wurde ein gestaffelter

Ausstiegsplan vorgesehen, der

mit dem Dreizehnten Gesetz zur Änderung

des Atomgesetzes vom 31. Juli 2011

rechtsverbindlich umgesetzt worden war.

Zwei der erwähnten neun Anlagen sind

inzwischen stillgelegt. Die restlichen sieben

Kernkraftwerksblöcke werden schrittweise

bis Ende 2022 endgültig abgeschaltet.

[3]

Kohle ist mit einem Anteil von 38 % bisher

noch die weltweit wichtigste Energiequelle

zur Stromerzeugung. Überproportional

hoch ist der Anteil der Kohle an der Stromerzeugung

in Staaten, die über kostengünstig

gewinnbare Vorkommen verfügen. Dies

gilt unter anderem für Südafrika (88 %),

Polen (78 %), Indien (76 %), China (67 %)

und Australien (62 %). Aber auch in

Deutschland (38 %) und in den USA (31 %)

war die Kohle 2017 maßgeblich an der

Stromerzeugung beteiligt. In den USA ist

der Anteil der Kohle an der Stromerzeugung

in den letzten Jahren aus wirtschaftlichen

Gründen gesunken. Dies erklärt sich

durch den gestiegenen Einsatz von Schiefergas.

2017 hielt Erdgas mit 31 % den gleichen

Anteil an der Stromerzeugung der

USA wie die Kohle. Anders ist die Situation

in Deutschland. Dort ist – trotz gegebener

Wirtschaftlichkeit der Kohle (Braunkohle

und Import-Steinkohle) – bis spätestens

2038 ein politisch verordneter vollständiger

Ausstieg aus der Kohleverstromung vorgesehen,

um auf diese Weise einen Beitrag

Reserven 1.373 Mrd. t SKE

Braunkohle

45,5 %

Steinkohle

Uran 1,5 %

9,0 % 18,0 %

konv.

Erdöl

18,0 %

konv.

Erdgas

7,3 % nicht-konv.

Erdöl

0,7 % nicht-konv. Erdgas

Ressourcen 18.773 Mrd. t SKE

1,3 % konv. Erdöl

0,6 % Thorium

Uran 1,1 %

Braunkohle

9,5 % 3,6

79,7 %

Steinkohle

2,1 % nicht-konv. Erdöl

2,2 % konv. Erdgas

nicht-konv. Erdgas

Quelle: Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR), BGR Energiestudie 2018, Hannover, März 2019

Bild 4. Reserven und Ressourcen nicht-erneuerbarer Energierohstoffe.

Erdöl

Erdgas

Kohle

zur Einhaltung der nationalen Treibhausgas-Minderungsziele

zu erreichen. [4]

Erdgas war 2017 weltweit mit einem Anteil

von 23 % die zweitwichtigste Energiequelle

zur Stromerzeugung. Auch in diesem

Fall gilt, dass in Staaten, die über große

Erdgasvorkommen verfügen, ein überproportional

hoher Anteil dieses Energieträgers

an der Stromerzeugung kennzeichnend

ist. Dies trifft vor allem auf die Golf-

Kernbrennstoffe

247240

399

100

248 405

679

10

624

Braunkohle

123

308

21

konventionell

nicht-konventionell

konventionell

nicht-konventionell

Steinkohle

1.776

14.966

Reserven

Ressourcen

0 1.000 2.000 3.000 4.000 5.000 16.000

Mrd. t SKE

Quelle: Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR), BGR Energiestudie 2018, Hannover, März 2019

Bild 5. Weltweite Angebotssituation nicht-erneuerbarer Energierohstoffe in Mrd. t SKE.

986 1.342

65 %

35 %

81%

19 %

15.590

96 %

4 %

1.898

94 %

Reserven

Ressourcen

221

6 % 90 % 10 %

Erdöl Erdgas Steinkohle Braunkohle Uran

Quelle: Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR), BGR Energiestudie 2018, Hannover, März 2019

Bild 6. Reserven und Ressourcen nicht-erneuerbarer Energierohstoffe in Mrd. t SKE.

28


VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Ressourcen und Reserven für die weltweite Energieversorgung

Braunkohle

Steinkohle

davon

insgesamt: 747 Mrd. t SKE

Steinkohle: 624 Mrd. t SKE

Braunkohle: 123 Mrd. t SKE

* davon 11 Mrd. t SKE Deutschland *** darunter 58 Mrd. t SKE Russland, 29 Mrd. t SKE Ukraine und

** davon 45 Mrd. t SKE Russland und 1 Mrd. t SKE Ukraine 23 Mrd. t SKE Kasachstan

Quelle: Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR), BGR Energiestudie 2018, Hannover, März 2019

Bild 7. Weltweite Verteilung der Kohlereserven in Mrd. t SKE.

Erdöl

Erdgas

insgesamt: 347 Mrd. t SKE

insgesamt: 258 Mrd. t SKE

„Strategische Ellipse“

62 % der weltweiten

Erdöl- und

Erdgasreserven

* einschließlich nicht-konventionelle Reserven

** davon 62 Mrd. t SKE Russland

Quelle: Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR), BGR Energiestudie 2018, Hannover, März 2019

Bild 8. Weltweite Verteilung der Reserven* an Erdöl und Erdgas in Mrd. t SKE.

Reserven: < 80 USD/kg U

Ressourcen: > 80 USD/kg U

Reserven: 21,1 Mrd. t S

Ressourcen: 199,8 Mrd. t SKE

* davon 52 % Kasachstan, 30 % Russland, 12 % Ukraine und 6 % Usbekistan ** davon 72 % Mongolei

Quelle: Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR), BGR Energiestudie 2018, Hannover, März 2019

Bild 9. Weltweite Verteilung der Reserven und Ressourcen an Uran in Mrd. t SKE.

staaten zu. So lag der Anteil von Erdgas an

der Stromerzeugung in Iran 2017 bei 81 %,

in den Vereinigten Arabischen Emiraten, in

Katar, Oman und Bahrain sogar bei mehr

als 95 %. In Saudi Arabien waren es 2017

immerhin 59 %. In den Staaten der kaspischen

Region, wie Turkmenistan, Usbekistan

und Aserbaidschan, kommt Erdgas auf

einen Anteil von 75 % und mehr. Anteile

von über 60 % und teilweise noch deutlich

höhere Beiträge werden für Libyen, Ägypten,

Algerien, Tunesien und Nigeria ausgewiesen.

In Südamerika ist Bolivien das

Land mit dem größten Erdgasanteil an der

Stromerzeugung (rund drei Viertel). In Argentinien

basiert etwa die Hälfte der

Stromerzeugung auf dem Einsatz von Erdgas.

Aber auch in einigen europäischen

Staaten, die über größere Erdgasvorkommen

verfügen, wie Russland, Großbritannien

und die Niederlande, war der Erdgasanteil

an der Stromerzeugung 2017 mit

49 % (Russland), mit 48 % (Niederlande)

und mit 40 % (Großbritannien) überproportional

hoch. In Japan – das Land verfügt

über praktische keine eigenen fossilen

Energieressourcen – hat sich der Erdgasanteil

(Import-LNG) an der Stromerzeugung

wegen der Kernenergiesituation 2017 auf

39 % erhöht. In den USA liegt Erdgas – begründet

durch den Shale Gas-Boom – in

der Stromerzeugung mit einem Anteil von

31 % gleichauf mit der Kohle.

Erdöl ist im weltweiten Durchschnitt nur

noch mit 4 % an der Stromerzeugung beteiligt.

Allerdings gehört Öl in einigen der

Golfstaaten zu den wichtigsten Erzeugungsquellen.

Dies gilt für Saudi Arabien

(41 %) und noch verstärkt für Kuwait und

Irak mit Ölanteilen um die zwei Drittel. In

Libyen ist immerhin rund ein Drittel der

Stromerzeugung Öl basiert.

Perspektiven der Stromerzeugung

nach Energieträgern

Anders als in den vergangenen Jahrzehnten

werden die erneuerbaren Energien große

Teile des erwarteten weiteren Zuwachses

in der Stromnachfrage decken. Dies erklärt

sich nicht aufgrund etwaiger

Begrenzungen in den Reserven und Ressourcen

an fossilen Energien. Reserven

und vor allem Ressourcen sind reichlich

vorhanden. Dies gilt vor allem für Kohle,

aber auch für Erdgas und für Erdöl (B i l d

4 bis 9 ). Aufgrund verbesserter Fördertechnologien

und gestiegener Preise auf

den Weltmärkten hat sich die statische

Reichweite der Reserven, definiert als Reserven

im Verhältnis zur jeweiligen aktuellen

weltweiten Jahresförderung, sogar vergrößert

(B i l d 10 ). Dabei sind Reserven

als „nachgewiesene, zu heutigen Preisen

und mit heutiger Technik wirtschaftlich gewinnbare

Energierohstoffmengen“ zu verstehen.

Die darüber hinaus existierenden

Ressourcen, definiert als „nachgewiesene,

aber derzeit technisch-wirtschaftlich und/

29


Ressourcen und Reserven für die weltweite Energieversorgung VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Jahre

350

300

250

200

150

100

50

0

308

113

56

53

21

Braunkohle Steinkohle Erdöl Erdgas Uran

Verhältnis zwischen Reserven (einschl. nicht konventionelle Reserven) und Förderung des Jahres 2017

Quelle: Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR), BGR Energiestudie 2018, Hannover, März 2019

Bild 10. Statische Reichweite der weltweiten Reserven nicht-erneuerbarer Energierohstoffe.

Scenario – vorgenommen wurde, privatund

marktgetrieben. In der Stromversorgung

sind sogar mehr als 90 % der bis 2040

weltweit als erforderlich angesehenen Investitionen

staats- und regulierungsgetrieben

(B i l d 11 ).

Im New Policies Scenario kommt die IEA

zu folgenden Aussagen über die Höhe und

Struktur des weltweiten Energieverbrauchs

und der Stromerzeugung bis

2040: Die auch künftig erwarteten Zuwächse

im Primärenergieverbrauch und

insbesondere in der Stromerzeugung werden

zu einem deutlich größeren Teil als in

der Vergangenheit durch erneuerbare

Energien gedeckt. So steigt der Anteil der

erneuerbaren Energien am weltweiten

Primärenergieverbrauch auf 20 % im Jahr

2040. Der Beitrag der erneuerbaren Energien

zur Stromerzeugung vergrößert sich

von 25 % im Jahr 2017 auf 42 % im Jahr

2040 (Bild 12). Damit lösen die erneuerbaren

Energien die Kohle als bisher wichtigste

Energiequelle zur Stromversorgung ab.

Die größten Zuwächse werden für Solarenergie

und für Windkraft erwartet. Be-

oder wirtschaftlich nicht gewinnbare sowie

nicht nachgewiesene, aber geologisch ner garantierten Rendite – ausgelöst. Nur

staatliche Regulierung – etwa in Form ei-

mögliche, künftig gewinnbare Energierohstoffmengen“

sind nach Angaben der Bun-

sind gemäß der Einschätzung, die von der

knapp 30 % der weltweiten Investitionen

desanstalt für Geowissenschaften und IEA für das Hauptszenario des World Energy

Outlook – das ist das New Policies

Rohstoffe mehr als zehn mal so groß wie

die Reserven. [5]

Restriktionen in der Nutzung der fossilen

Kumulierte Investitions-Erfordernisse im New Policies Scenario

Energievorkommen bestehen aufgrund der

2018 - 2040

Emissionen an Treibhausgasen, die mit deren

Inanspruchnahme verbunden sind. Um

den Zielen des Klimaschutzes und den Anforderungen

des Pariser Klimaüberein-

Brennstoffversorgung getrieben (53%)

marktgetrieben

staats- und regulierungs-

privat- und

kommens gerecht zu werden, haben sich

die Vertragsstaaten der Klimarahmenkonvention

der Vereinten Nationen zu konkre-

Stromversorgung staats- und regulierungsgetrieben (> 90 %)

vollem Marktrisiko

ausgesetzt

ten Begrenzungen bei der Emission von

Treibhausgasen verpflichtet. So hat beispielsweise

die Europäische Union rechts-

5 10 15 20 25

verbindlich zugesagt, die Emissionen an

Mehr als 70 % der 2 Billionen US-Dollar, die weltweit jährlich in die Energieversorgung

Treibhausgasen bis 2030 um 40 % gegenüber

dem Stand des Jahres 1990 zu verrin-

eine durch Regulierung vollständig oder teilweise garantierte Rendite.

investiert werden müssen, stammen von staatlich geführten Unternehmen oder erzielen

gern. [6]

Grundsätzlich stehen vier Strategien für Quelle: IEA, World Energy Outlook 2018, Paris 2018

die zum Klimaschutz erforderliche Reduktion

der Emissionen an Treibhausgasen zur Bild 11. Treiber der Investitionen in die weltweite Energieversorgung in Billionen USD (2017).

Verfügung:

––

Ausbau der erneuerbaren Energien

––

Verbesserung der Energieeffizienz

40.443

––

Erweiterte Nutzung der Kernenergie

––

Abscheidung und Nutzung beziehungsweise

Speicherung von CO 2

33.510

Andere

27 %

Erneuerbare

20 %

Entscheidend für Fortschritte bei der Umsetzung

dieser möglichen Pfade sind die

15 % Wasserkraft

25.679

9 %

16 %

Regierungen, die durch ihre jeweilige Politik

die Schwerpunkte in der Ausrichtung

16 %

9 % Kernenergie

10 %

der nötigen Investitionen zur Transformation

der weltweiten Energieversorgung be-

1 %

22 % Erdgas

15.441

10 %

17 %

23 %

22 %

stimmen.

17 %

4 %

2 %

1 % Öl

Die Internationale Energie-Agentur (IEA)

18 %

hat in ihrem im November 2018 vorgelegten

World Energy Outlook kumulierte In-

Kohle

8 %

38 %

30 %

26 %

39 %

vestitionserfordernisse in Höhe von jährlich

2 Billionen US-$ in die weltweite Energieversorgung

ermittelt. [7] Gemäß den

2000 2017 2030 2040

Angaben der IEA werden mehr als 70 % Quelle: IEA, World Energy Outlook 2018, New Policies Scenario, Paris 2018, Seite 538

dieser Investitionen von staatlich geführten

Unternehmen erbracht oder durch Bild 12. Entwicklung der globalen Stromerzeugung bis 2040 in TWh.

30


VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Ressourcen und Reserven für die weltweite Energieversorgung

günstigt wird diese Entwicklung durch die

in den letzten Jahren erreichte Kostendegression

vor allem bei Solaranlagen, aber

auch bei Windkraft.

Bei der Verbesserung der Energieeffizienz

werden – gestützt durch staatliche Politiken

– künftig ebenfalls deutliche Fortschritte

erreicht. Dies kommt in einer zunehmenden

Entkopplung der Entwicklung

des Energieverbrauchs vom Wirtschaftswachstum

zum Ausdruck. In Deutschland

war dies bereits in den vergangenen Jahrzehnten

zu beobachten. So ist der spezifische

Energieverbrauch, also der Primärenergieverbrauch

pro Einheit Bruttoinlandsprodukt,

in Deutschland im Zeitraum

1990 bis 2018 um 42 % zurückgegangen.

[8] Vergleichbare Entwicklungen dürften

sich in Zukunft auch in anderen Staaten

vollziehen.

Der Ausbau der Kernenergie ist auf Länder

begrenzt, in denen die Regierungen

diese Technologie durch entsprechende

politische Flankierung unterstützen. Dies

gilt insbesondere für China, Indien, Russland

sowie einige Staaten des Mittleren

Ostens und Europas. Die IEA weist im

World Energy Outlook 2018 aus, dass von

dem bis 2040 weltweit erwarteten Neubau

an Stromerzeugungsleistung in Höhe von

insgesamt 7.730 GW mit 270 GW nur 3,5 %

auf die Kernenergie entfallen. Bei zwei

Drittel des Neubaus handelt es sich um Anlagen

auf Basis erneuerbarer Energien, bei

20 % um Gas- und bei 10 % um Kohlekapazitäten

(B i l d 1 3 ).

Auch 2040 wird voraussichtlich noch rund

die Hälfte der weltweiten Stromnachfrage

durch fossil gefeuerte Kraftwerke bereitgestellt

werden. An der Deckung des Primärenergieverbrauchs

sind Kohle, Erdöl und

Erdgas gemäß dem New Policies Scenario

der IEA 2040 sogar noch zu 75 % beteiligt.

Zudem steigt der gesamte Primärenergieverbrauch

bis 2040 um etwa 25 %, und bei

der Stromnachfrage wird sogar ein Wachstum

von mehr als 50 % gegenüber 2017

erwartet. Bei Realisierung dieser Entwicklung

wird 2040 in absoluten Größen noch

mindestens die gleiche Menge an fossilen

Energien genutzt werden wie 2017, und

zwar sowohl zur Deckung des gesamten

Primärenergieverbrauchs als auch zur

Stromerzeugung.

Zur Einhaltung der ambitionierten Klimaziele

gemäß dem Pariser Übereinkommen

ist deshalb eine breite Umsetzung der

Technologie der Abscheidung und Nutzung

beziehungsweise Speicherung von

Sonstige 32

EU-28 13

Afrika 31

Russland 23

Sonstiges

Asien/Pazifik

185

Indien

242

China

157

Nord- und

Südamerika 10

Sonstiges

Europa 47

700

Wasser

740 Kohle

Wind

1640

Quelle: IEA, World Energy Outlook 2018, Seite 346

CO 2 unverzichtbar, und zwar sowohl in Industrieprozessen

als auch in der Stromerzeugung.

Beim Global Summit on Carbon

Capture, Utilization and Storage (CCUS)

am 28. November 2018 in Edinburgh hat

der General Secretary der IEA, Fatih Birol,

erklärt: „Without CCUS as part of the solution,

reaching our international climate

goals is practically impossible.“ [9]

Der World Energy Council (London) wird

beim World Energy Congress, der vom

9. bis 12. September 2019 in Abu Dhabi

stattfindet, neue Energieszenarien zu den

weltweiten Perspektiven der Energieversorgung

vorstellen. Zentrales Thema der

Konferenz, zu der mehrere tausend Teilnehmer

erwartet werden, ist Energy for

Prosperity.

Strategie der Bundesregierung -

Fazit

Die Klimaschutz-Politik verspricht die

größten Erfolge, wenn die Instrumente so

gewählt werden, dass die kostengünstigsten

Möglichkeiten zur Reduktion der Treibhausgas-Emissionen

prioritär zum Tragen

kommen. Der europäische Treibhausgas-

Emissionshandel ist ein marktwirtschaftliches

Instrument, mit dem dies für die darin

einbezogenen Sektoren, Energiewirtschaft

und Industrie, im Grundsatz EU-weit gewährleistet

wird. Technologieverbote, wie

unter anderem die in Deutschland bestehende

gesetzliche Regelung zur Verhinderung

der Abscheidung und Speicherung

7.730 GW

2430

Sonne

Öl

90

Andere

Erneuerbare 350

Kernenergie 270

Erdgas

1510

Sonstige 8

Nord- und Südamerika 12

Mittlerer Osten 14

Sonstiges Europa 18

EU-28

29

Russland

30

Sonstiges Asien/Pazifik 17

Indien

33

Bild 13. Weltweite Neubauten an Stromerzeugungskapazitäten gemäß New Policies Scenario der

IEA 2018 bis 2040 in GW.

China

109

von CO 2 , sind allerdings Restriktionen, die

diesem Ansatz widersprechen. Dies verteuert

den Klimaschutz, wodurch die Aussichten,

dass sich andere Staaten dem ambitionierten

Vorgehen Deutschlands bei der

Reduktion von Treibhausgasen anschließen,

verschlechtert werden.

Literatur

[1] Schiffer, H.W. (2018) Bilanz des weltweiten

Ausbaus der erneuerbaren Energien in der

Stromerzeugung, in: Energiewirtschaftliche

Tagesfragen 68. Jg. (2018) Heft 7/8.

[2] U.S. Energy Information Administration

(2019) Nuclear reactor restarts in Japan displacing

LNG imports in 2019. Washington

DC, March 4, 2019.

[3] Schiffer, H.W. (2019) Energiemarkt Deutschland.

Springer Vieweg Verlag, Wiesbaden.

[4] Kommission „Wachstum, Strukturwandel

und Beschäftigung“ (2019) Beschluss vom

26. Jan. 2019.

[5] Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und

Rohstoffe (BGR) (2019) Energiestudie 2018.

Hannover, März 2019.

[6] Schiffer, H.W. (2019) Zielvorgaben und

staatliche Strategien für eine nachhaltige

Energieversorgung, in: Wirtschaftsdienst 99.

Jg., Heft 2, Februar 2019.

[7] International Energy Agency (2018) World

Energy Outlook. Paris, November 2018.

[8] Schiffer, H.W. (2019) Deutscher Energiemarkt

2018, in: Energiewirtschaftliche Tagesfragen

(ET), 69. Jg. (2019) Heft 3.

[9] International Energy Agency (2018) IEA and

UK kick-start a new global era for CCUS. Edinburgh,

28 November 2018.

l

FIND & GET FOUND! POWERJOBS.VGB.ORG

ONLINE–SHOP | WWW.VGB.ORG/SHOP

31


Nuclear power plant flexibility at EDF VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Nuclear power plant flexibility

at EDF

Patrick Morilhat, Stéphane Feutry, Christelle Lemaitre and Jean Melaine Favennec

Kurzfassung

Flexibler Betrieb der Kernkraftwerke

bei EDF

Basierend auf den vorliegenden Erfahrungen

des Betriebs der französischen Kernkraftwerke

von EDF (Electricité de France) zeigt dieser Beitrag

dass ein flexibler Betrieb von Kernkraftwerken

nicht nur möglich sondern in Frankreich

seit mehr als 30 Jahren und in allen 58

Reaktoren von EDF tägliche Praxis ist. Es sind

weder limitierende betriebliche Effekte noch

einschränkende Einflüsse auf Sicherheit oder

Umwelt festzustellen. Auch ist ein flexibler Betrieb

mit keinen relevanten zusätzlichen Instandhaltungskosten

verbunden und die zusätzliche

ungeplante Verfügbarkeit ist kleiner

als 0,5 % anzusetzen.

Die Kernkraftwerke der EDF können ihre Leistung

innerhalb von 30 Minuten zweimal täglich

auf ein Niveau zwischen 20 und 100 % der

Nennleistung einstellen, wenn sie im Lastfolgebetrieb

eingesetzt werden. Der flexible Betrieb

erfordert die vorliegende verlässliche Anlagenauslegung

sowie gute Anlagenkenntnisse. Frühzeitig

wurden in Frankreich dazu Anpassungen

am ursprünglichen Westinghouse-Design vorgenommen.

Mit der vorhandenen flexiblen Gesamtleistung

der bestehenden Kernkraftwerke

im französischen Netz ist eine sichere und ausreichende

Stromerzeugung möglich, um die volatile

Einspeisung aus erneuerbaren Energien

ohne zusätzliche CO 2 -Emissionen zu gewährleisten.

Dies ist ein deutlicher Beweis dafür, wie

sich Kernenergie und erneuerbare Energien ergänzen.

l

Authors

Patrick Morilhat

Stéphane Feutry

EDF Generation Division

Christelle Lemaitre

Jean Melaine Favennec

EDF R&D

EDF Research & Development

Chatou, France

Based upon existing experience feedback

of French nuclear power plants operated by

EDF (Electricité de France), this paper

shows that flexible operation of nuclear reactors

is possible and has been applied in

France by EDF’s 58 reactors for more than

30 years without any noticeable or unmanageable

impacts: no effects on safety or on

the environment, and no noticeable additional

maintenance costs, with an additional

unplanned capability load factor estimated

at only 0.5 %. EDF’s nuclear reactors

have the capability to vary their output

between 20 % and 100 % within 30 minutes,

twice a day, when operating in loadfollowing

mode. Flexible operation requires

sound plant design (safety margins,

auxiliary equipment) and appropriate operator

skills, and early modifications were

made to the initial Westinghouse design to

enable flexible operation (e.g., use of “grey”

control rods to vary reactor core thermal

power more rapidly than with conventional

“black” control rods). The nominal capacities

of the present power stations are sufficient,

safe and adequate to balance generation

against demand and allow renewables

to be inserted intermittently, without any

additional CO 2 emissions. It is a clear demonstration

of full complementarity between

nuclear and renewable energies.

Introduction: Nuclear and

renewable energies are the

two pillars of FrancE’s low

carbon electricity

The fight against climate change has entered

a crucial phase with the objective set

by COP 21 to keep global warming “well

below” +2 °C at the horizon 2100. Today,

energy accounts for most CO 2 emissions

worldwide and the electricity sector in particular

is a prime candidate for deep decarbonization.

A recent MIT study 1 says that

unless nuclear energy is incorporated into

the global mix of low-carbon energy technologies,

the challenge of climate change

will be much more difficult and costly to

meet. Although nuclear energy raises the

problem of nuclear waste management, solutions

have been identified, and it is the

climate change challenge that is overwhelming.

In this respect, France – which already has

low carbon intensity facilities – is a step

ahead of its major European neighbours.

This low carbon and competitive mix must

be preserved in the long term, drawing on

the complementary relationship between

renewable energy sources and nuclear energy.

France’s electricity generation is built

on a mix of varied generation units, based

upon nuclear power plants (NPPs), renewable

energies sources (RES) consisting of

hydropower plants, wind turbines, solar

farms or biomass plants and a few remaining

set of conventional units.

With an overall net generation capacity of

129.3 GWe (92.3 GWe in mainland France),

generating 580.8 TWh (424.7 TWh in

mainland France) in 2017 2 , the EDF group

is one of the world’s leading electricity producers.

EDF’s fleet generates 87 % carbonfree

electricity, due to the predominance of

nuclear and hydropower generation facilities,

in an increasingly restrictive environmental

regulatory context.

EDF is among the world’s 10 largest global

power suppliers, and produces the smallest

amount of CO 2 per kilowatt-hour, with direct

emissions currently at 82 gCO 2 /kWh 2

(25 gCO 2 /kWh for EDF France Mainland),

which is far less than the world average for

the sector (506 gCO 2 /kWh in 2015) and

the average for the main European electricity

providers (275 gCO 2 /kWh in 2016).

EDF group’s decarbonization strategy is

first and foremost based on an ambitious

industrial policy focused on a low-carbon

generation with a balanced mix of nuclear

and renewable energy.

More specifically concerning nuclear power,

EDF is the world’s biggest NPP operator.

EDF operates 58 nuclear units in mainland

France, based on PWR (Pressurized Water

Reactor) technology; A “unit” is defined

here as a generation facility including a reactor,

steam generators, a turbine, a generator,

the related equipment and the

buildings that house them. These units are

spread over 19 sites, with an average age

of 32 years. They are divided into three series

according to the electrical power available:

a 900 MW series consisting of 34

units, a 1,300 MW series consisting of 20

units, and a 1,500 MW series consisting of

4 units.

Built in the 1980-90s and originally based

on a Westinghouse design, with upgrades

implemented by EDF and Framatome, the

French nuclear fleet grew at a quick pace,

32


VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Nuclear power plant flexibility at EDF

France´s Installed capacity (130.7 GW)

Solar 6 % Bioenergy 2 %

Wind 10 %

Hydroelectricity

53,6

France´s Installed output (530 TWh)

Wind

24

Solar

9,2

Bioenergy

9,1

Hydroelectricity

20 %

Nuclear 48 %

Fossil Fuel - Coal

9,7

Fossil Fuel - Gas

40,9

Fossil Fuel - Oil

3,8

Nuclear

379,1

Fossil Fuel - Coal 2 %

Fossil Fuel - Gas 9 %

Fossil Fuel - Oil 3 %

Fig. 1. France’s 2017 installed capacity and electricity output 3 .

Thermal **

9,436 MW

10 %

Hydropower ***

29.5 TWh

7 %

Thermal ***

16.1 TWh

4 %

Hydropower *

19,767 MW

21 %

Nuclear

63,130 MW

69 %

Nuclear

379.1 TWh

89 %

Installed capacity

Output

Fig. 2. EDF’s 2017 installed capacity and electricity output in mainland France 2 .

reaching about 72 % of the total electricity

generated in France 3 in 2017 (see F i g -

ure 1 ), 89 % of electricity generated by

EDF alone in mainland France 2 (see F i g -

u r e 2 ). Thus, EDF’s nuclear facilities are

already giving France a major lead compared

to its neighbours in terms of curbing

greenhouse gas emissions, while still ensuring

lower electricity costs.

In the past 30 years, EDF has striven to further

increase the operational flexibility of

its reactors, to make them more compatible

with load fluctuations and to the intermittent

renewable energy sources that are a

crucial and growing part of any energy

mix. France‘s situation is particular in that

nuclear units must themselves be able to

provide this flexibility of generation, because

of their predominant share of electricity

supply. EDF relies on feedback from

30 years’ experience, showing that, except

for some minor impacts on the secondary

system (water/steam cycle), flexibility has

no significant operational impact: in particular,

nuclear safety is not affected.

In the rest of the world, most of nuclear

plants run on a full-power basis, also

known as base-load operation, since they

contribute to a minor share of electricity

supply (typically 10 % to 30 %): flexibility

is achieved by gas, coal and other fossil fuel

units, contributing to additional CO 2 emissions.

To ensure a continuous supply of electricity,

it is therefore necessary either to store a

part of the electricity generated by renewables

and use it when wind and sun are not

available, or to introduce generation units

able to easily modulate their own electricity

output.

What is plant flexibility?

Although high electricity storage capacity

is the current target for electricity utilities

worldwide, electricity cannot yet be stored

on a significant industrial scale 4 . Thus an

electrical power system must be able to adjust

to rapidly varying electricity demand/

generation balance. Whereas balancing levers

exist on the demand side, this document

focuses on balance on the generation

side.

Base-load operation refers to a steady power

output which depends on the unit series

5 . Power changes may occur, whether

planned (reduction or shut-down for refueling

or periodic maintenance) or unplanned

(specific maintenance to address

emergent plant issues); but for a base-load

operated plant, these are triggered by

events occurring at plant level rather than

grid system level. Historically, most of the

nuclear power plants in the world have

been operated as base-loaded units: operating

at a constant power level is simpler

and less demanding in terms of plant

equipment and fuel, not to mention the

economic benefit to operate as long as pos-

33


Nuclear power plant flexibility at EDF VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

sible nuclear power plants that have high

investment costs with low variable costs.

(nuclear variable costs are mainly fuel-related

costs and represent less than 30 % of

operating costs).

In contrast to base-load operation, flexible

NPP operation refers to any mode of operation

in which power output varies to meet

the demand of the electrical grid system.

As electricity demand varies continuously,

the gap between output and demand results

in variation in grid frequency: frequency

drops when demand increases

(lack of generation) and rises when demand

decreases (excess of generation).

Two types of flexibility are usually distinguished:

large load variation programs

agreed in advance between grid operator

and plant operator, known as “load following”

(applied to nuclear plants in France

but not in all countries), and minor automatic

load variations aimed at controlling

grid frequency, known as “primary and secondary

frequency control”, usually implemented

on all nuclear plants when available.

These two types of flexibility can be

superimposed.

In Load Following mode 6 , the nuclear power

plant follows a load pattern determined

to match the electrical demand expected

by the grid operator (depending on time,

day, week, season or emergent grid events)

and the actual capabilities of the plant. The

power output is set manually by the plant

operator. Power ranges between maximum

output (depending on the series: i.e.,

900 MW, 1,300 MW or 1,500 MW) and a

minimum output corresponding to the

minimum required to supply the automatic

plant controls (about 20 % of the nominal

power of the plant: i.e., 180 MW for standard

900 MW plants, 260 MW for 1,300 MW

PWRs, and 370 MW for 1,500 MW PWRs).

In France, a nuclear power plant is able to

ramp up or down between 100 % and 20 %

of nominal power in half an hour, and

again after at least two hours, twice a day.

In Frequency Control mode, the power

plant has to monitor the frequency of the

grid and immediately adapt its level of generation

in order to keep the frequency stable

at the desired value (50 Hz ± 0.5 Hz in

Europe). This is achieved through an Automatic

Frequency Control (AFC) process,

which acts at different amplitudes and

time scales.

Primary frequency control allows shortterm

adjustments (in less than 30 seconds)

and is used to stabilize grid frequency transients.

An automatic control implemented

on the turbine increases the electrical output

if the frequency falls, or decreases output

if the frequency rises. The magnitude

of variation under primary frequency control

is set at ±2 % of the unit’s nominal

power.

Secondary frequency control operates over

a longer timeframe (up to 15 minutes), and

Capacity

1500

1200

900

600

300

Down

900 MW

in less than

30 min

Adaptation to lower

consumption during

the night

Adaptation to slight variations

to maintain grid frequency

Up 900 MW

in less than

30 min

is aimed at what is known as the “frequency

restoration reserve”, an operational reserve

activated to restore grid frequency to

the nominal frequency at national and European

scale. An automatic signal is sent

remotely by the grid operator to the plant

to change its power output within a range

of ±5 % of the unit’s nominal power (i.e.,

50 MW for 900 MW plants, 65 MW for

1,300 MW plants and 75 MW for 1,500 MW

plants).

Taken together, primary and secondary

control provide additional flexibility up to

±7 % of the unit’s nominal power (i.e.,

70 MW for 900 MW series, 90 MW for

1,300 MW series and 100 MW for 1,500 MW

series).

An example of a flexible operation power

record for a French NPP is shown in F i g -

u r e 3 below. It illustrates typical power

variations in a single reactor (unit) at a

1,300 MW PWR plant over a 24-hour period.

Load-following and frequency control are

two levers of flexibility at the within-day

timescale. Other levers are worth mentioning.

On a timescale of a week, plant availability

can be adjusted by shifting routine

tests by a few days. On a seasonal timescale,

refueling and maintenance operations

can be scheduled during periods of

low demand, providing 100 additional

TWh during the season of highest demand.

A study by EDF showed that, until 2030,

the nominal capacities of EDF’s nuclear

NPPs (2 variations per day: change from

100 % to 20 % power in half an hour) are

sufficient to balance the intermittency of

renewables in most situations 7 . EDF is able

to keep two in three units in flexible mode

(capable of power variation between 100 %

and 20 % of nominal power). In spring or

summer, when 12 to 15 reactors are shut

Down

900 MW

in less than

30 min

Up 900 MW

in less than

30 min

Adaptation during the day to

increases and decreases of intermittent

generation from renewables

0

00h 01h 02h 03h 04h 05h 06h 07h 08h 09h 10h 11h 12h 13h 14h 15h 16h 17h 18h 19h 20h 21h 22h 23h

Fig. 3. Power generated by one plant reactor (1,300 MW capacity) over a 24-hour period in

Sept’ 2015, in response to variations in electricity demand and in supply of local

intermittent renewables.

Time

down for maintenance or reloading, about

45 nuclear units out of 58 remain connected

to the grid. If 30 units can vary their output

by 500 MW each, the total fleet has a

flexibility capacity of 15,000 MW, in addition

to the existing capacities of hydro-generation,

fossil-fuelled power stations and

export/import surplus.

EDF has also striven to limit or optimize

operating rules which could reduce the

present flexibility: a simple example is the

optimization, so as to meet flexibility requirements,

of scheduling of periodic fullpower

tests such as flux mapping tests (performed

to calibrate core instrumentation).

Nuclear and renewable alliance:

getting along with flexibility

There are two main constraints for dispatchable

power plants: power variations

due to consumers’ fluctuating demand,

and the inevitable fluctuations of intermittent

renewable energy generation because

of varying weather conditions and the day/

night cycle. This requires flexibility from

large power plants, such as nuclear or fossil-fuelled

units, in addition to hydro-generation

which is naturally flexible.

Electricity consumption

Electricity consumption obviously varies

constantly. In France, the annual difference

between maximum and minimum

hourly consumption can exceed 60 GW:

30,199 MW on August 13 at 7 am and

94,190 MW on January 20 at 9 am. Risk in

supply-demand balance differs between

winter and summer, as seen in F i g u r e 4

and F i g u r e 5 , mainly due to heating in

winter.

In terms of frequency control, the winter

risk (lack of capacity) is greatest at the

34


VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Nuclear power plant flexibility at EDF

MW

100,000

50,000

0

Lundi

Consommation par usage en été

Profil hebdomadaire de la puissance appelée à températures de référence

selon les usages lors de la 3éme semaine de juin

Heating

Electrical loss

Mardi

Mercredi

Others uses

lndustry & Energy

Fig. 4. Demand in France in a 2017’ summer week.

MW

100,000

50,000

0

Lundi

Chauffage

Pertes

Mardi

Mercredi

peak hour of 7 pm on weekdays, whereas

the summer risk (risk of over-capacity) is

mainly around the lowest consumption levels,

encountered early morning at weekends,

between midnight and 5 am. French

generating facilities are sized to meet the

winter consumption peak.

Inherently variable renewable energy:

wind and solar

Renewable energy sources are of two

types: dispatchable or controllable sources

such as hydroelectricity, biomass and geothermal

power; and non-dispatchable

sources, also known as variable renewable

energies (VRE), that are intrinsically

highly fluctuating (like wind and solar

power).

Approximately 1,800 MW of renewable energy

have been added to the French generation

capacity every year since 2010, the

equivalent of one new nuclear unit every

year. Wind power capacity amounted to

13,559 MW as of December 31, 20173.

Wind power generation saw a sharp increase

of 14.8 % compared to 2016. A new

maximum wind turbine production rate

was recorded at 1.30 pm on December 30,

with power output of 11,075 MW. With

887 MW new capacity in mainland France,

solar energy capacity reached 7,660 MW in

2017. Solar power generation increased by

9.2 % compared to 2016.

The 2015 French “Energy transition for

sustainable growth” law set a target of

Vendredi

Lighting

Air conditionning

Vendredi

Samedi

Domestic hot water

Electrical vehicles

Samedi

Cooking

Consommation par usage en hiver

Profil hebdomadaire de la puissance appelée à températures de référence

selon les usages lors de la 3éme semaine de janvie

Autres usages

lndustrie & énergie

Fig. 5. Demand in France in a 2017’ winter week.

Eclairage

Climatisation

Eau chaude sanitaire

Véhicule électrique

Dimanche

Dimanche

Cuisson

40 % of renewables in power generation by

2030 in France.

In 2017, RTE – the French Transmission

System Operator – issued a comprehensive

study to identify challenges and solutions

for upcoming developments in the electricity

production/consumption balance 8 . The

document forecast an increase in wind capacity

of 1.5 to 2 GW per year and an increase

in solar capacity of 1.4 to 1.8 GW per

year up to 2023. Beyond 2023, the pace of

development is expected to be maintained,

reaching 40 to 51 GW wind capacity and 28

to 36 GW solar capacity by 2030, for a production

of 96 to 122 TWh for wind energy

and of 33 to 43 TWh for solar energy (see

Figure 6).

At the European level, renewables have

been a feature of the power system for

GW

many decades, in the form of hydroelectricity.

The countries with the highest proportions

of renewables today have a mix

that is heavily reliant on hydro resources:

Norway (96 %), Sweden (47 %), Switzerland

(59 %) and Austria (60 %).

The power systems of these countries have

low carbon intensity (see F i g u r e 7 ).

Countries with higher carbon intensity,

usually with limited hydro potential, are

turning to VRE generation, in the form either

of wind or solar power or a combination

thereof, in a bid to lower CO 2 emissions

from power generation: for example,

Germany, Ireland, Denmark and Spain.

However, reducing CO 2 emissions through

massive VRE development greatly depends

on the generation mix, and may not be immediately

successful. France stands out in

this regard, with carbon intensity comparable

to countries with large hydro resources

with only about 10 % hydroelectric generation,

thanks to the development of nuclear

energy combined with renewables.

For the next decades, the European Commission

has set targets for the reduction of

CO 2 emissions and the development of renewable

energy to help the EU achieve a

more sustainable energy system. Targets

for 2020 are binding and call for a reduction

of 20 % in carbon emissions compared

to 1990, a 20 % share of renewable energies

in the final gross energy consumption,

and a 20 % gain in energy efficiency. Targets

for further horizons call for a reduction

in CO 2 emissions of 40 % by 2030 and

at least 80 % by 2050 compared to 1990,

and a renewable energy share of 27 % in

the final gross energy consumption by

2030. This last target is under discussion

and might be increased to 32 %, but the focus

is mostly on the heating and transport

sectors.

For the power sector, a set of European reference

scenarios, taking account of European

targets and policies agreed upon at

EU and member-state level, were developed

in 2016. They include ambitious development

of solar and wind power across

Europe through 2030, with most European

countries able to lower their CO 2 emissions

by 2030. Therefore, the share of VRE is in-

Trajectoires retenues dans le Bilan prévisionnel pour le déploiement piloté des EnR

(Trajectories used in the forecast balance sheet for the pilot deployment of RE)

Wind, onshore Wind, offshore Photovoltaics

60

16

60

30

0

2010/ Year 2035/

2011 2036

Historic

Low scenario

8

0

2010/ Year 2035/

2011 2036

High scenario

Medium scenario

Fig. 6. Trajectories for VRE in France. Source: RTE adequacy report, 2017.

30

0

2010/ Year 2035/

2011 2036

Turning point, high

Turning point

35


Nuclear power plant flexibility at EDF VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

2015

2030

Carbon intensity % if RES-E % of VRE

0 100 % 0 100 % 0 71 %

Fig. 7. Left – percentage of non carbon-free production in total country generation; Middle –

percentage of RES production in country generation, Right – percentage of Variable

Renewable Energy production in country generation.

Source: 2015 – EIA.gov, 2030 – EU Reference Scenarios (2030).

creasing in every country, changing the

landscape of the power system. France’s

neighbors will be net importers by 2030

(see F i g u r e 8 ), while France, with its renewable

capacity and nuclear fleet, will

continue to export a large volume of competitive

low-carbon electricity.

Merit order

The term “merit order” refers to the order

in which the electricity market uses the

various sources of electricity production.

Use of the fleet’s various components is

managed by giving priority, at any given

2015 2030

-64 TWh 64 TWh

Net exporter

time, to the generation type offering the

lowest variable costs: non-dispatchable

production such as wind or photovoltaic

solar power, and river hydropower plants

are used for base generation, since these

resources (river flow, wind, sun) are “free”

and lost if not converted into electricity;

nuclear plants, because of their low variable

operation costs, are used for base and

mid-merit generation; adjustable hydropower

generation (lakes, pumped storage

stations) and the thermal fleet (mostly gas

turbines or combined cycles) are used for

mid-merit and peak generation.

Net importer

Fig. 8. European-wide yearly net exchange balance (Source: 2015 – eia.gov and 2030 –

EU Reference Scenarios 2016).

But, obviously, VRE generation depends on

local weather conditions (wind, sun,

clouds, etc.), which are not necessarily present

when needed. For instance, a sunny

day in the summer will show a strong variation

following sunrise, and production

will be highest at 2 pm: the power increase

rate can be as much as 900 MW in 1 hour,

which is equivalent to one PWR, and therefore

will be dispatched to several NPPs.

A similar situation can occur with wind, in

case of peak wind speed. On the other

hand, a cloudy day in winter with no wind

provides no renewable generation, and

“conventional” generation (fossil fuels, nuclear

power, etc.) has to satisfy the demand.

Nuclear power must adapt to the

variations in residual demand.

Therefore, as shown F i g u r e 9 , the introduction

of a greater share of renewable energies

(including hydro) will displace the

merit order, shifting away high variable

cost units (coal, gas, oil) and putting market

price at the level of nuclear generation

costs.

The typical model for pure base-load generation

is to produce at maximum power

all year long and pay back the costs on the

energy-only market by spreading the variable

and marginal costs. Today, nuclear

plants in France have to adapt to demand

variations when net demand gets very low

and deviates from the maximum poweronly

model. Load-following allows nuclear

plants to provide ancillary services, for

which they are paid: they provide an additional

service needed for the stability of the

power system. Load-following also allows

the producer to optimize the scheduling of

refueling operations, thereby giving additional

value to the fuel loaded in the core.

The periods where net demand is low have

a marginal cost for the system that is low.

Saving the fuel in the core when the spread

is small, usually over the spring or summer,

allows the power producer to use it when it

is most needed and consequently when

prices are highest, usually in winter. This

ensures that the largest number of plants

are available over the period of highest demand

and that no plants are offline for refueling

during these periods.

A future with a large volume of renewable

wind and solar energy entails a power system

with a large proportion of non-synchronous

generation. Therefore, complementary

services not provided by non-synchronous

generation will emerge, and the

storage value of fuel will increase. Producers

will find new compensations for their

base plants. For example, the recent capacity

market provides complementary payments

to suppliers. In future, massive

growth of renewable energy will lead to

new services to ensure the safety of the

power system, and these services will have

payments associated.

One example of new services could be payback

for inertia service. The rotational

36


Variable cost €/MWh

Variable cost €/MWh

VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Nuclear power plant flexibility at EDF

Generating assets

Unused assets

Generating assets

Unused assets

Oil

Oil

Market price

= marginal cost

Coal

Gas

Coal

Gas

Nuclear

Market price

= marginal cost Nuclear

RES

More RES

Available capacities (GW)

Available capacities (GW)

Fig. 9. Impact of RES share increase on the merit order.

speed of alternators is important to control

and stabilize grid frequency. Conventional

technologies such as nuclear or hydropower

plant alternators comprise heavy rotating

masses with high inertia, a physical

phenomenon which impedes rapid slowdown

or acceleration of rotation. Consequently,

they have a very significant stabilizing

effect on grid frequency. In contrast,

wind turbines, not to mention solar panels,

have lower inertia effects. Therefore, a major

change in production technology could

decrease grid frequency stability, which in

turn could lead to a need to reward inertia

capability.

Nuclear plants can play a front role in these

new services. At the same time, their fuel

will be able to provide flexibility to the system,

and optimizing fuel use throughout

the campaign will allow producers to maximize

return.

In tomorrow’s power system, producers

will be paid for their production from a variety

of sources and not only from the energy

market. Nuclear plants with their intrinsic

characteristics will be a great asset

for the power system and its safety.

Safe and cost-effective plant

flexibility at EDF’s nuclear plants

Basics of flexible operation

As can be seen in F i g u r e 10 , heat generated

in the primary water by uranium fission

and neutron absorption reactions in

the vessel is transferred to a secondary system

through a steam generator where water

is transformed into steam, which feeds

turbines in turn driving an electrical generator.

The electricity is then transferred

through transformers and lines to the electricity

grid.

The nuclear plant’s electrical output is controlled

by changing the mass flow rate that

enters the turbine. To do so, plant operators

can vary the steam production from

the steam generator, and thus the nuclear

reaction in the vessel.

Nuclear power control

(primary system)

An alternative solution is to maintain constant

reactor core thermal power and divert

steam away from the turbine through

bypass or relief valves to the condenser or

the atmosphere. However, this solution has

some limitations: potential thermal pollution

of the environment, condenser integrity

concerns, impaired plant efficiency,

etc.

Control of reactor core thermal power

Changing reactor-core thermal power, by

modulating fission reactions, is effective

but has significant impact on core neutronics

(flux distribution, burn-up rate, fission

by-products), materials (thermal limit)

and safety (response to transients). Two

main means of reactivity control are used:

control rods and boric acid concentration,

both being neutron absorbers.

Control rods allow real-time control of the

uranium fission process. Composed of materials

that absorb neutrons, the rods provide

a reactivity margin able to ensure reactor

safety, and are used for rapid reactor

power changes (e.g., shutdown and startup).

Compared to the original pressurized water

reactors design (Westinghouse’s), the

Water/steam cycle

(secondary system)

Electrical power

output (generator)

Fig. 10. Typical 1,300 MWe unit able to perform power flexibility (power control in the reactor

core, water/steam cycle energy conversion, and electrical power output from the

generator).

main change in EDF’s PWR fleet was to adjust

the types of control rods and their positions

in the reactor core 9 (Figure 11).

It is noteworthy that French nuclear power

plants (PWR 900 and 1,300) have the

greatest worldwide experience in using

“grey” control rods specially adapted for

plant flexibility 10 .

Whereas most nuclear reactors are still fitted

with standard “black” control rods,

with high neutron-absorbing effect, most

of EDF’s reactors have “grey” control rods,

designed to have lower neutron-absorption,

allowing adjustment to local power

patterns. “Grey” control rods lessen the deformation

of neutron flux distribution that

occurs when standard “black” control rods

are inserted in or withdrawn from the core.

This feature makes them particularly suited

to governing core thermal power changes:

when power load has to be reduced,

several groups of grey rods are gradually

inserted.

Another mean of controlling core reactivity

is boric acid reactivity control. Boric acid is

a soluble neutron absorber added to the

reactor coolant to provide negative reactivity

throughout the fuel cycle, thereby assisting

regulation of the core’s long-term

37


Nuclear power plant flexibility at EDF VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

control rod

fuel rod

guide

thimble

Fig. 11. Control rod. insertion in the reactor

core.

reactivity. Boric acid control, unlike control

rods, ensures an even power and flux distribution

over the entire core.

When full power load is stabilized, xenon,

a neutron-absorbing fission product, is distributed

homogeneously in the reactor

core. Xenon is produced by fission reactions

(proportional to local power) and

builds up and then later decreases, at a certain

delay, if the power decreases. Once the

power is lowered, the amount of xenon

changes, its distribution varying locally:

this is managed by injecting boric acid in

the primary circuit, to compensate for an

overall decrease in xenon concentration, or

by dilution to reduce the concentration

when xenon levels increase.

Boron dilution explains the reduced amplitude

of possible power variations in the last

third of the cycle. With the boron concentration

in the circuit decreasing along the

cycle, it takes more and more water to remove

the same quantity of boron. As the

flow of dilution is limited, the amplitude of

power decreases has to be reduced to manage

power changes at the normal pace.

Characterization of Load following

transients recorded from 2002 to 2016

In the following sections, analysis of the

impact of flexible operation is based on

load-following operations recorded by

EDF. We focus on the period 2002-2016,

representing 15 years of experience feedback

in flexible operation, for which a comprehensive

study was conducted by EDF in

order to obtain the most representative assessment

of the potential impact of large

load transients. Two main parameters were

recorded: overall load transient duration,

and depth of load drop.

Statistical analysis showed that PWR

900 MW and 1,500 MW units presented

fewer load transients (respectively, about

40 transients/unit/year and 30 transients/

unit/year) than 1300 MW units (average of

about 70 transients/unit/year).

Furthermore, the analysis indicated that

the great majority of load transients occurred

when the fuel cycle (period between

two refueling outages) had less than 60 %

coverage. Only 13 % of load transients occurred

in cycles with more than 80 % coverage.

Impacts of power flexibility on

plant systems and components

Feedback from 40 years’ experience in reliable

flexible operation allows EDF to draw

some conclusions about the impact of loadfollowing

and frequency control on plant

operation and maintenance 11 . The following

sections address the main fields (F i g -

u r e 1 2 ) that have been assessed.

Nuclear fuel integrity

Safety demonstration

studies

Safety first: additional safety studies to

demonstrate the safety of flexibility

conditions for nuclear core integrity

EDF’s studies showed that operating in a

flexible mode had no impact on reactor

safety, since all variations in power were

within areas of operation for which modeling

and experimental studies demonstrated

the absolute safety of the nuclear core.

This also means that, if any incident occurred

during an operation at intermediate

load (lower than full nominal power), the

reactor could be operated according to existing

procedures, and also if the event occurred

at full load.

Feedback from EDF’s experience shows

that safety-risk events (IAEA INES level 0

or 1) due to load-following were rare. No

additional LCOs (Limited Conditions of

Operation) or SCRAMs (automatic shutdown)

were reported due to flexible operation.

For a reactor operating a few days per year

at any level of intermediate power, safety

studies have to be extended to the full operating

power range. The operator must

demonstrate that accidental situations

would be handled safely regardless of the

initial state of the reactor at the time of the

event.

Load reduction occurs firstly with partial

insertion of rods in the core. The power

flux pattern, roughly homogeneous at full

load, is then locally modified: less power

where rods are inserted, and proportionally

more power in areas not reached by the

rods. It follows that, if half of the rated

power was provided by only a quarter of

the height of the core, the concentration of

power, and thus the fuel-cladding temperature

(or other local parameters) would be

locally very high, with a risk of exceeding

acceptable limits.

To avoid such a situation, load variation is

maintained within an area of operation

which ensures that the specified limits are

respected at all times.

Absence of impact on

nuclear fuel integrity

A specific safety concern is the phenomenon

known as “pellet-clad interaction”. By

design, there is a gap in a fuel rod between

the cladding and the pellets. Inside the

cladding of the fuel rods, there are uranium

pellets (F i g u r e 1 3 ), but also gas: gas

deliberately introduced during fuel rod

fabrication, but also fission gas generated

by the nuclear reactions. When the reactor

is operating, fuel pellets expand, and exert

contact stress on the cladding. At a given

power level, a balance is reached between

the external pressure of the cladding (155

bars: i.e., the pressure of the water in the

vessel and primary system) and the internal

contact stress to the cladding, and the

fuel is then said to be “conditioned”. When

thus “conditioned”, the fuel can be used for

limited periods at power levels lower than

the conditioned power level. But, if the

Impacts on key

components

Plant operators' skills

Remaining lifetime of

the plant

Fig. 12. Relevant fields for assessing the safety of flexibility in existing PWR units.

Environnent impacts

38


VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Nuclear power plant flexibility at EDF

Nuclear fuel assembly for a pressurised water reactor

Top nozzle

Top nozzle

Spacer

End plug

Fuel rods

Cotrol

rods

Guide

thimble

tube

Holddown

spring

(Pellet)

Grid

spacer

Bottom

nozzle

Bottom

nozzle

(Fue assembly)

(Fuel rod)

Cladding tube

End plug

Fig. 13. Nuclear fuel assemblies in a reactor core (left), and uranium pellets (right).

power level is kept below the conditioned

power level for an extended period of time,

clad creeping reduces rod diameter. In that

case, if reactor power increases, excessive

contact stress between fuel and cladding

(i.e., pellet-clad interaction) may occur,

and may eventually lead to a crack in the

cladding. Subsequently restrictions on

power ramp rates and operating times at

reduced power must be applied.

Moreover, where control rods are inserted,

local power decreases and fuel irradiation

is lower. Once rods are extracted at full

load, these areas provide increased local

power. This increase must remain within

certain limits, otherwise hot spots

would appear. These limitations are taken

into account by using specific credits that

are defined for a fuel cycle (period between

two unit outages) and followed on a daily

basis.

Therefore, EDF has implemented permanent

monitoring of the state of fuel conditioning,

to ensure sufficient margins in clad

stress during power transients. The Operational

Technical Specifications thus provide

for monitoring of a coefficient, “credit

K”, corresponding to the available stress

margin and determining the number of

days authorized at reduced power operation.

Specific studies and feedback from

years of experience have shown that current

flexibility situations do not increase

this particular risk in any way as long as

credit K remains positive.

The credit is consumed over time if the unit

operates with extended reduced power:

this is the case for all power decreases exceeding

8 hours over any 24 h period. The

credit is reconstituted when the plant operates

at base load, over which the primary

and secondary frequency controls can be

superimposed.

As long as credit K remains positive, contact

stress between cladding and pellets is

limited. These credits are sufficient to enable

changes in power and the introduction

of a significant share of renewable energy.

The integrity of the first containment barrier

is thus not jeopardized by operation in

the current flexibility mode.

Nuclear flexibility has no impact on

primary system components integrity

Like the second containment barrier, the

primary circuit (vessel, pressurizer, pumps,

steam generators and associated pipes) has

been designed with mechanical restrictions

and a limited number of allowable

stress cycles, based on the power changes

expected over plant lifetime. The number

of transients allowed for a given amplitude

is determined by studies, and periodic

inspections are scheduled. As long as the

circuit has not reached this limit, impact on

materials and welds is non-significant.

Reactor thermal power changes during

flexible operation result in more frequent

variations in reactor coolant system temperature

and volume, and in particular in

the surge line and pressurizer, where hot

water expands and pressure is controlled.

While pressure remains stable at 155 bar,

temperature varies by more than 30 °C on

the side of the hot legs (between the vessel

and the steam generator).

Regular cycle counting (counting the number

of cycles at an expected stress level, to

determine fatigue usage factor) is implemented

in EDF’s nuclear plants. Each

change in temperature exceeding a certain

threshold is logged as a situation of transient

loading. Throughout plant lifetime,

continuous monitoring counts and keeps

track of the number of transients, to ensure

that the remaining margin is sufficient,

by comparing accumulated cycles

versus allowable limit. For some specific

locations, online fatigue monitoring have

been implemented and tested (determining

actual fatigue based on measured conditions).

Feedback shows that, in practice, actual

power variations since unit commissioning

remain well below allowed cycle-counting

limits and are fully compatible with vessel

aging.

Operating in flexible mode increases wear

in control rod drive mechanisms (CDRMs),

depending on power variation frequency

and amplitude. CRDMs currently used in

EDF’s French nuclear reactors were redesigned

mechanically to allow for an increased

number of rod movement cycles

under flexible operation. Cycle counting

ensures they are replaced before fatigue

failure occurs. After a predefined number

of maneuvers, CDRMs have to be changed,

with associated direct and indirect costs

(components, outage, dosimetry).

No noticeable effect of flexible operation

has been detected on I&C (Instrumentation

and Control).

Plant flexibility has no noticeable impact

on the Environment

In order to assess the impact of flexible

plant operation on the environment, the

following issues have been examined: additional

waste quantities (solid, liquid, gaseous),

effluent temperature and discharge

volume, and respect of environmental regulatory

limits.

39


Nuclear power plant flexibility at EDF VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Chemistry considerations

One drawback of flexible operation is the

increased demand on plant chemistry systems.

Reactivity control by boric acid requires

the operator to borate and dilute

the reactor coolant system frequently. Primary

coolant dilution uses large volumes

of water, which must be stored and processed

before use (to maintain reactor

grade purity) and after use (due to presence

of dissolved radionuclides) in the primary

system. If water is added to the circuit,

an equivalent amount must be removed:

plant operation thus produces

primary effluents, without, however, any

additional emission into the environment.

These effluents are removed, stored in

closed circuits and tanks and treated (gas

stripper, evaporator to separate boron

from water). Water is first degassed, then

distilled to separate boron from pure water.

The boron is returned to water tanks

for re-injection of into the primary system.

The hydrogen concentration in the primary

circuit also needs continuous monitoring

by the control room operator. Boric

acid reactivity control affects reactor coolant

chemistry pH. Lithium, in the form of

lithium hydroxide (LiOH), is commonly

added, to raise primary coolant pH and inhibit

corrosion.

Providing this monitoring and good coordination

between chemistry and operation is

adhered to, no negative impact on chemistry

has been noticed in EDF’s nuclear plants

since the beginning of flexible operation

It is noteworthy that, since tritium and carbon

14 releases are directly correlated to

neutron flux, and hence to the energy produced,

the total quantity of tritium produced

and released in a plant operating

under load-following (i.e., not at full load)

tends to be less than with a base load unit.

Liquid waste and chemical reagent

consumption

Feedback from EDF’s experience with its

fleet identifies two main factors regarding

liquid waste volume and chemical reagent

consumption: power variation amplitude

and the timing of the variation within the

fuel cycle. Power variations at the end of

the fuel cycle (later than 66 %) and at low

power (below 45 % of nominal power)

have the greatest impact. Therefore, planning

large power variations at low burn-up

and smaller variations at high burn-up is a

straightforward way to reduce the volume

of liquid effluent due to plant flexibility.

Additional volume averaged +20 % of the

annual volume released by the Nuclear Island

Liquid Radwaste Monitoring and Discharge

System. Impact in terms of additional

radioactivity was undetectable. No

impact of plant flexibility on liquid effluent

from the secondary circuit, and hence on

consumption of chemical reagents used for

secondary-side chemistry control, was

identified.

Fig. 14. Cooling of a nuclear unit, by river or sea water in an open circuit (left), or with a cooling

tower in a closed circuit (right).

Solid waste

With increasing use of boric acid for reactivity

control, nuclear units operating in

flexible mode require greater volumes of

primary water for boron dilution, generating

greater volumes of liquid effluent, plus

variations in primary circuit pH and corrosion

product solubility, and requiring

more demanding use of water purification

systems circuits, filters and demineralizers.

The impact, but still slight, of flexibility is

on the boron recycling system, used for the

treatment of primary liquid effluent. This

impact was estimated on two types of solid

waste: spent ion exchange resins (+5.6 %

of the average annual volume) and wastewater

filters (+3.4 % of annual consumption).

However, the increase had no impact

on waste management (storage, emission

limits, transportation or workforce).

Thermal Discharge

The maximum thermal discharge of a plant

may be limited by a number of factors, including

maximum plant outlet temperature,

maximum temperature change from

plant inlet to plant outlet, and maximum

plant volumetric flow rates as specified in

environmental permits.

Flexible units have less impact on the open

environment because they release less heat

into the cooling source (river or sea water,

in either open or closed circuit: see F i g -

u r e 14 ). Local conditions vary greatly

from one plant to another (depending on

river flow, temperature, and season). When

the plant is operating under flexible conditions,

the unit will obviously release less

heat into the cooling source.

The various chemicals used for water

cleaning and treatment (e.g., in the condenser,

which is the largest heat exchanger

with the cooling source) are used in quantities

limited by regulations.

Environmental Limits

Based on feedback from EDF’s flexible operations

over the period 2012-2015, an internal

study showed that flexible operation

had very limited environmental impact,

well within regulatory limits. No noticeable

effect was identified for additional radioactivity

or operation limitations, even

for the most flexible plants (PWR 1,300 MW

series).

Flexibility has limited impact on the

secondary systems

The secondary system (water and steam

thermal cycle) consists mainly of heat exchangers

connected by pipes, valves and

pumps. During variations in load, these circuits

encounter variations in pressure, temperature

and steam characteristics. Valves

open or close, depending on power level.

Repetition of these transients can accelerate

erosion, possibly including circuit corrosion

that can sometimes lead to short

unplanned outages. Statistically, comparison

of groups operating in load-following

mode versus groups permanently at full

load shows only very slight differences in

performance, and certainly no impact on

operational safety. The most noticeable impacts

on secondary circuits are leakage at

welded joints, erosion of pipes and ageing

of heat exchangers.

Flexibility does not significantly increase

maintenance costs

Feedback from experience with EDF’s PWR

fleet showed no significant additional

costs. From 2000 to 2014, 10 units were deliberately

maintained at full stable load (no

flexibility periods): in terms of operating

performance, the difference between these

base-load operated plants and other units

operating in load-following mode were

within normal scatter: i.e., difficult to evaluate.

Further investigations showed that, since

2010, the load factor unavailability capability

in EDF NPPs has remained around

2-2.5 %, 0.5 % of which is attributed to

flexible operation (as observed for the

PWR 900 series).

Statistical studies showed a minimal increase

in maintenance costs in EDF units

resulting from increased flexibility.

Plant operators’ skills are called upon

to manage more frequent power

ramps

The ability to operate in load-following

mode is part of the control room operator’s

training and skill.

40


VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Nuclear power plant flexibility at EDF

While control rod positions are determined

by power output, water and boron management

is ensured manually by the control

room operator. The operator’s skill is regularly

called upon for control of the core. A

good understanding of physical phenomena

such as changes in xenon, water and

boron levels and rod effects is required. As

xenon effects are not immediate, the control

room operator must be attentive to reactor

control several hours after load-following.

To help control room operators, full-scope

simulators are used for training, and technical

specifications and procedures provide

general instructions.

Detailed conditions depend strongly on recent

core history. After 3 days at full load,

power and xenon are balanced in the core;

a power decrease ramp will have simple,

foreseeable effects. But, if the reactor

shows 3 or 4 variations in the period, with

different amplitudes and durations, power

profile and xenon distribution will be different.

The next power decrease liable to change

these balances should be managed with

care; a control strategy must always be defined

and adjusted by the control room operators,

under the control of the shift manager

of the unit. Training courses include

this issue, but control-assistance tools have

also been developed over the last 15 years.

These applications calculate change power

flux balance, and allow the operator to better

anticipate phenomena and optimize

control strategy so as to remain within the

center of the authorized area and better

predict transient following. Based on recent

core history records, these dedicated

simulators help control room operators to

forecast xenon levels and prepare dilution/

borication strategies.

Conclusion and perspectives: nuclear flexibility

is the safe CO 2 -free solution to extend

the share of renewables in France

While renewable energies have a key role

to play in the European strategy for the decarbonization

of electricity production,

dispatchable generation remains necessary

in order to ensure system stability and security

of supply. Long term study aimed at

understanding the technical and economical

feasibility of massive deployment of

wind and solar across the European system

shows that a contribution of nuclear is necessary

in order to obtain the required CO 2

reductions 12 .

Flexible operation of nuclear reactors is

possible, and has in fact been implemented

in France in EDF’s fleet of 58 reactors for

more than 30 years without any noticeable

or unmanageable impact on safety or the

environment, nor any significant additional

maintenance costs.

Flexible operation requires sound plant design

(safety margins, auxiliary equipment)

and appropriate operator skills. But three

decades of best practices and feedback

from a huge experience show that the nominal

capacities of the installed fleet (two

significant power decreases per day, transitions

from 100 % to 20 % of power in half

an hour) are safe and able to balance demand

with generation, even with renewables

on the grid.

New power plant designs with a larger capacity,

such as EPRs, include flexibility features.

Studies for future small modular reactors

(SMRs, units ranging from 50 to

300 MW) include flexibility features in

their specifications.

To remain the leader in very low carbon

electricity generation, the EDF group is intensifying

the development of renewable

energies while ensuring the safety, performance

and competitiveness of the existing

nuclear facilities and new nuclear investments.

EDF announced a plan to increase

its portfolio of renewable energy generation

by 2030. Investments in renewable

energy, with the launch of the Solar Power

Plan, represent a significant step towards

meeting the Group’s goals. By 2035 in

France, 30 GW of solar capacity will have

been installed with partners. This amounts

to quadrupling the country’s current solar

capacity. In addition to its solar roadmap,

EDF has recently introduced an electricity

storage plan. EDF will invest to ramp up

storage capacity to 10 GW. It is likely that

the increase in renewables and storage facilities

will keep on challenging the flexibility

capabilities of nuclear power plants.

R&D studies are on-going on to determine

future prospects up to 2050.

Electricity is a key factor for the direct reduction

of CO 2 emissions, as well as a substitute

for fossil fuels in the transport, construction

and industrial sectors. In the forward-looking

scenarios limiting global

warming to +2 °C, low-carbon electricity

should thus become the leading source of

energy by 2040-2050: the use of electricity

should therefore be stepped up, in order to

bring down emissions to a quarter of current

levels by 2050, and to aim at carbon

neutrality.

In this perspective, a strong alliance between

nuclear and renewables is a safe,

cost-effective and clean solution to achieve

a low-carbon generation mix to combat climate

change and meet the goal of going

beyond the 2°C target set by COP21.

References

1 The Future of Nuclear Energy in a Carbon-

Constrained World, an interdisciplinary MIT

study, MIT Energy Initiative, Massachusetts

Institute of Technology (2018); http://energy.mit.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/

09/The-Future-of-Nuclear-Energy-in-a-Carbon-Constrained-World.pdf.

2 EDF’s reference document for the 2017 financial

year (2018); https://www.edf.fr/

sites/default/files/contrib/groupe-edf/espaces-dedies/espace-finance-en/financialinformation/regulated-information/reference-document/edf-ddr-2017-accessibleversion-en.pdf.

3 RTE, 2017 Annual Electricity Report (2018);

http://www.rte-france.com/sites/default/

files/rte_elec_report_2017.pdf.

4 Comité de prospective de la Commission de

Régulation de l’Electricité, “La flexibilité et le

stockage sur les réseaux d’énergie d’ici les années

2030“ (2018); http://www.eclairerlavenir.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/

Rapport_GT2.pdf.

5 “Non-baseload operation in nuclear power

plants: load following and frequency control

modes of flexible operation”, IAEA Nuclear

Energy Series NP-T-3.23 (2018); https://

www-pub.iaea.org/MTCD/Publications/

PDF/P1756_web.pdf .

6 S. FEUTRY, “Load following EDF experience

feedback”, presented at the International

Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Technical

Meeting on Flexible (Non-Baseload) Operation

Approaches for Nuclear Power Plants,

Paris, France, September 4-6, 2013.

7 S. FEUTRY, “Production renouvelable et nucléaire:

deux énergies complémentaires”, Revue

Générale Nucléaire, N°1 January-February,

23, (2017); https://doi.org/10.1051/

rgn/20171023.

8 RTE Generation Adequacy Report, “Bilan

prévisionnel de l’équilibre offre-demande

d’électricité en France“ (2018); https://www.

rte-france.com/sites/default/files/synthese-bilan-_previsionnel-2018.pdf.

9 S. FEUTRY, “Flexible nuclear and renewables

alliance for low carbon electricity generation”,

presented at the OECD meeting, July 18th,

2018.

10 H. HUPOND, “Load following and Frequency

Control Transients vs. Loading and Design-

EDF experience and practice” presented at

the International Atomic Energy Agency

(IAEA) Technical Meeting on Flexible (Non-

Baseload) Operation Approaches for Nuclear

Power Plants, Paris, France, September

4-6, 2013.

11 “Program on Technology Innovation: Approach

to Transition Nuclear Power Plants to

Flexible Power Operations“, Final Report

N°3002002612, Electric Power Research Institute

(2014).

12 A. BURTIN, V. SILVA, “Technical and economic

analysis of the European electricity system

with 60 % RES”, report INIS FR 15-0634

(2015). http://www.energypost.eu/wpcontent/uploads/2015/06/EDF-study-fordownload-on-EP.pdf

l

41


Targeting innovation at cost drivers VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Targeting innovation at cost drivers –

How the UK can deliver

low cost, low carbon,

commercially investable power

Benjamin Todd

Kurzfassung

Innovation auf Kostentreiber ausrichten -

Wie Großbritannien kostengünstigen,

CO 2 -armen, kommerziell investierbaren

Strom liefern kann

Für bezahlbare, zuverlässige und kohlenstoffarme

Energie, bietet das britische Konsortium unter

Leitung von Rolls-Royce einen modernen,

ganzheitlichen Ansatz für die Planung kleiner

Kernkraftwerke, sogenannter SMR – Small modular

reactors.

Das Designkonzept zielt auf eine Verbesserung

von Wirtschaftlichkeit und Marktintegration

der Kernenergie, der Ausrichtung auf Kostentreiber

wie Terminunsicherheit und der Fokussierung

auf Innovation zur Reduzierung oder

zum vollständigen Ausschließen von identifizierten

Kostentreibern.

Das Resultat ist ein kommerzielles Design für

ein SMR-Kernkraftwerk, das bei der Herausforderungen

eine kohlenstoffarmen Energieversorgung

sicherzustellen, einen wichtigen und wesentlichen

Beitrag liefern kann.

l

When it comes to creating affordable, reliable,

low carbon energy, the UK consortium

led by Rolls-Royce, is bringing a modern,

holistic approach to small nuclear

power station design.

The design concept is driven by improving

the economics and market requirements of

nuclear power; targeting cost drivers such

as schedule uncertainty; and focusing innovation

efforts to reduce or remove those

cost drivers entirely.

The result is a compelling, commercially

investible design for a whole power station,

not just a small modular reactor, that can

help the world meet its low carbon energy

challenges.

Why now?

Satisfying the growing global demand for

electricity generation is about achieving

more with less. With more people leading

more electricity-dependent lives, the global

energy sector is under pressure to produce

more power in more places with more

certainty over availability, cost, capacity,

and flexibility.

At the same time, there also has to be less;

less capital investment; less environmental

impact, less time spent in build, less pressure

on infrastructure, and less challenging

delivery and commissioning phases.

The solution to bridging that energy gap

lies in a re-examination of existing means

of generation; innovative thinking with the

power to repackage the best of what is already

proven in a new innovative way, so

that more really can be delivered with less.

The UK consortium’s powers station offers

a convincing alternative to reduce the complexity

of financing and constructing large

scale reactors around the world.

How is cost measured?

The metric of levelised cost of electricity

(LCoE) in £/MWehr is a key driver for the

power station design (F i g u r e 1 ). It’s also

Regulatory/Safety Proliferation Resistant Market Timing Code Compliance

Reduce capital: Manage Investment: Reduce O&M:

• commoditised • reduce overnight financing • minimise maintenance / outages

• standardised • maximise return on investment • standardised parts

• factory built

• ease of assembly / reassembly

• transportable

• minimise manning

Cost of Electricity

(£/MWhr)

=

(capital + total O&M + decom + fuel costs + financing cost)

Power generating potential x Capacity factor

Author

Benjamin Todd

Rolls-Royce Civil Nuclear

Benjamin Todd

Derby, United Kingdom

Maximise power: Maximise power/ Reduce Fuel cost:

• max power density reliability: • maximise fuel life

• max output • high reliability • minimise refuel time

• maximise generating • enable rapid • simplify fuel/waste handling,

life maintenance = / refuel. • use existing infrastructure

and capability

Compatibility with

Support Infrastructure

and Sites

Public

Perception

Utility Familiarisation

/ Selection of

Technology

Fig. 1. Factors driving levelised cost of electricity (LCoE).

Global

Market

Delivery

Partnership

Potential

42


VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Targeting innovation at cost drivers

Perceived

Risk Profile

Capital

Cost

Cost of

Borrowing

Construction

Time

-20% -10% 0% +10% +20%

WACC (+/-2%) -18 % 20 %

Construction delay (+ 2 years) 10 %

Capital (+/- 10%) -7 % 6 %

Impact on LCOE

Fig. 2. Creating certainty to reduce cost.

the metric by which all current electricity

costs are measured and offers a single

point of competitiveness for new concepts,

such as the small modular reactor power

station design.

In the case of this power station design, the

consortium has assessed each factor driving

the cost of LCoE and targeted its innovation

at those areas, avoiding innovation

for innovation’s sake.

Fact box – the UK SMR in a nutshell

400 to 450 MWe three-loop pressurised water

reactor

Standard uranium fuel

Modular settle containment

Prefabricated structures

Compatible with existing infrastructure

Designed for road transport

Passive safety systems

Simplified maintenance and operations access

Creating certainty to reduce cost

Creating certainty in order to encourage

cheaper financing is the dominant consideration

of the case for this power station

design, looking across the entire nuclear

and non-nuclear elements of the power station

(F i g u r e 2 ).

Financing cost comprises capital cost, perceived

risk profile and construction time,

so the design targets its innovation at each

of those areas.

The factors considered in the economics of

the utility case are dominated by the degree

of certainty that can be achieved, because

that can bring cheaper financing.

Each of these costs drivers has a different

level of sensitivity to overall LCoE. For example,

the highest impact on LCoE on nuclear

power station projects is the weighted

average cost of capital (WACC), so something

that has nothing to do with physical

elements of building a nuclear power station

(F i g u r e 3 ).

Capital costs for the power station elements

are approximately 20 % on the nuclear

elements, referred to as the nuclear

island; 40 % on civil structures such as

foundations, piling and building fabric;

and 40 % on the non-nuclear systems and

turbine island.

While the physical size and power output

of this small modular reactor-based power

station is much smaller than a large-scale

plant (440 MWe v 1,200 to 1,600 MWe),

there are opportunities for economies of

volume, as opposed to scale. When considered

as a fleet of power stations, with the

application of advanced manufacturing

technologies, factory modular construction

of the whole power plant reduces construction

costs, risk and schedule overruns.

For example, optimising, simplifying and

standardising production processes and logistics;

maximising off-site build and assembly,

the use of digital design processes

and the optimisation of logistics through

the supply chain all the way to site.

The use of digital technologies in manufacturing,

construction and operation are also

an important part of the power station concept,

such as creating a digital twin at the

design stage to support prototyping, to reducing

manufacturing time, improving

construction sequencing, all the way

through to digitally connected facilities so

operations are optimised and maintenance

periods reduced. The application of digital

technologies touch every part of the concept

and operation and each can contribute

to greater certainty.

Other forms of uncertainty could include

regulatory approvals, which could have an

impact on investor confidence, schedule certainty

and development costs, so from the

outset this has been built into the design,

with an expectation that it matures in line

with the regulatory process initially in the

UK, but also to international standards also.

Modularisation’s impact

on certainty

The term modularisation is often used as a

solution but the view of the consortium is

that it’s a solution to a specific set of cost

driver challenges, not a design in itself.

(Figure 4)

Just like digital technologies, modularisation

as a principle flows through the whole

concept of this power station design including

factory manufactured road-transportable

modules ready for assembly on

site. It then extends to site construction elements

from the installation of steel structures,

concrete components and the use of

standardised interfaces, advanced joining

techniques and overall a reduction in the

level of activity required on site

The UK designed an SMR during the late 1980s

and early 1990s so the concept for a small output

reactor is not new, however, large reactors have

remained central to baseload in many markets,

including the UK. Climate change imperatives have

come into play since then too, particularly driving

wind and solar, while reducing fossil fuels.

In addition, the overall footprint of the plant

is small, with a reduced weight and shallower

ground preparation required. And the

use of excavated material on site is planned

into the design of the power station.

Even controlling the weather

Another cornerstone of creating certainty

and reducing cost is controlling the conditions

in which those civil and assembly activities

take place, which is where the site

assembly facility helps greatly. Analysis of

previous nuclear projects puts construction

delays, often due to inclement weather, as

the second largest contributor to cost overruns.

So, the site assembly facility, a large covered

arena over the entire site, creates perfect

weather 24 hours a day in which to

perform all assembly activity. This gives

certainty on a baseline plan that feeds in to

lower premiums on the cost of borrowing

and ultimately lower LCOE. It also creates

LCOE sensitivity assessment

WACC (+/-2 %)

Construction

delay (+ 2 years)

Capital (+/-10 %)

Power Output (+10 %)

Utilisation (+/-5 %)

Op cost (+/-10 %)

Development

Budget (-20 % / +20 %)

-20 % 0 % 20 % 40 %

-18 % 20 %

-7 % 6 %

-9 %

-5 % 5 %

-4 % 3 %

-2 % 2 %

Fig. 3. LCOE sensitivity assessment.

10 %

43


Targeting innovation at cost drivers VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Fig. 4. Some artist´s views of the power station design.

Fig. 5. Artist´s view of civil engineering and construction sectors to

affordably realise modular design benefits.

a far safer and more productive working

environment for workers.

The reduction in capital and risk resulting in

substantially reduced financing costs, opens

up a broader customer base including potentially

non-state backed utility companies

and beyond, for example companies operating

large-scale industrial sites.

A fleet approach

SMRs should not be considered as single

power plants, rather they are designed and

intended to operate as part of a broader

fleet. This fleet deployment order book provides

confidence to the supply chain, allowing

companies in the sector to make

longer term strategic investment in capability

and capacity. A key role for Government

is to enable this fleet approach

through enhanced energy policy.

Fleet deployment enables the level of investment

required in the civil engineering

and construction sectors to affordably realise

modular design benefits (F i g u r e 5 ).

Further, the infrastructure required by

SMRs in the civil and construction industry

are likely to have significant additional

benefits to other major infrastructure programmes

in the UK over the coming years.

Companies in these sectors will be able to

amortise infrastructure and capability investment

over multiple projects. The result

will be significant cost and delivery improvements

to a raft of broader UK infrastructure

programmes such as High-Speed

Rail, increased airport capacity, house

building and urban regeneration.

Nuclear plants contain many high value

components that are fabricated using a

range of complex technical processes. According

to research carried out by the Nuclear

Industry Association (NIA), in theory

the UK supply chain has the capability to

manufacture nearly all of the components

for the large new build nuclear programme,

with the main constraint being the capability

to manufacture the largest components

(NIA, 2012)15.

In practice however, capacity is a pressing

issue given that the 30-year hiatus between

the construction of Sizewell B in the late

1980s and the present day new build programme

has eroded much of the UK’s nuclear

industry experience.

Fleet deployment of a UK SMR design

would provide significant confidence to the

UK nuclear supply chain, allowing for the

rapid development of capacity to meet the

needs of an SMR programme. In turn, this

new manufacturing capacity could be enhanced

by the latest in manufacturing

technology already being developed by

world-leading researchers in the UK – notable

examples being the High-Value Manufacturing

(HVM) Catapult centres like the

Nuclear Advanced Manufacturing Research

Centre (Nuclear AMRC) and the Advanced

Forming Research Centre (AFRC);

and the Manufacturing Technology Centre

(MTC).

44


VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Targeting innovation at cost drivers

Fact box – who is in the consortium led by

Rolls-Royce

The consortium brings together the most respected

and innovative engineering organisations in the

world and blend them with Rolls-Royce nuclear

knowledge.

Rolls-Royce has a global pedigree of more than 50

years in the nuclear industry as technical authority

and nuclear reactor plant designer. It’s also the

supplier of safety-critical nuclear products, systems

and through-life services to almost half the world’s

nuclear reactors.

Rolls-Royce, ARUP, Laing O’Rourke, Nuvia Wood,

SNC Lavalin; BAM; Assystem; National Nuclear

Laboratory, Nuclear Advanced Manufacturing

Research Centre, Siemens; all have a successful

track record of delivering large-scale, complex

engineering and infrastructure programmes.

Rolls-Royce already has 32 patents and patent

applications on SMR technology, and has decades

of design, manufacture, delivery and operations

experience. Using this already-proven technology

and nuclear capability, we are developing a

modular concept for nuclear technology that can

be installed and commissioned quickly on site

because it will be factory built and tested.

Adoption of our modular approach will reduce cost

and project risk by being faster to build. It will be a

new way to generate electricity that will be

available to the world.

Possible timings

For a first power station the consortium envisages

a seven-year period for proving the

manufacturing and construction sequence

of civil works and then assembly. Lessons

learned would then be applied to standardised

processes from then on with vision of

reducing time and costs overall, following

a lean manufacturing approach.

A design for life

Overall the power station design offers a

series of cost benefits in terms of the

achievable LCOE: reduced financing; offsite

modular construction using standard

components and advanced manufacturing;

and implementation of digital through-life

management.

It is not just a reactor technology programme,

the consortium has applied its

broad nuclear and non-nuclear skills to

drive modularisation and standardisation

across the whole power plant.

The entire design philosophy for this power

station is driven to deliver electricity at the

lowest cost, with modularisation and

standardisation being applied to every aspect

of the design, from how it can be licensed,

manufactured, constructed, operated,

maintatined and decommissioned.

It’s a design for life.

l

VGB-Standard

RDS-PP ®

Reference Designation System for Power Plants RDS-PP ®

Letter Code for Power Plant Systems (System Key)

(former VGB-B 101e) 4 th revised edition 2016 (Revision c)

VGB-S-821-00-2016-06-EN

DIN A4, 640 Pa ges, Pri ce for VGB mem bers € 335.–, for non mem bers € 470.–, plus VAT, ship ping and hand ling.

The basic international standards for reference designation provide users with generally applicable general

rules and letter codes for main classes for the designation of technical objects and their documentation.

The standard for power plants establishes sector-specific specifications based on the basic standards,

and also includes options to enable application for different power plant types.

The fulfilment of specific designation tasks and addressing of collections of information necessitates coding

systems which establish a relationship between the object names and letter codes.

IEC 81346-2 provides non-sector-specific binding letter codes for main classes and subclasses for technical

systems and components, classifying the objects according to purpose and task.

For the designation of power plant systems, table 3 of IEC 81346-2 provides a framework for the designation

of “infrastructure objects”. This VGB-Standard, VGB-S-821-00, assigns the power-plant-specific

systems to letter codes based on this framework.

This guideline has to be used to designate the systems in power plants.

It should be applied together with ISO/TS 81346-10 The guideline is valid for the data position of the

system code

VGB-Standard

Reference Designation System

for Power Plants RDS-PP ®

Letter Code for

Power Plant Systems

(System Key)

4 th revised edition 2016 (Revision c)

VGB-S-821-00-2016-06-EN

* Access for eBooks (PDF files) is included in the membership fees for Ordinary Members of VGB PowerTech e.V.

VGB PowerTech Service GmbH

Verlag technisch-wissenschaftlicher Schriften

Deilbachtal 173 | 45257 Essen | P.O. Box 10 39 32 | Germany

Fon: +49 201 8128-200 | Fax: +49 201 8128-302 | E-Mail: mark@vgb.org | www.vgb.org/shop

45


The German Quiver Project VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

The German Quiver Project

Quivers for damaged and non-standard fuel rods

Sascha Bechtel, Wolfgang Faber, Hagen Höfer, Frank Jüttemann, Martin Kaplik,

Michael Köbl, Bernhard Kühne and Marc Verwerft

Kurzfassung

Das deutsche Köcher-Projekt

Das integrierte Köchersystem GNS IQ® ist ein

vielseitiges Werkzeug für die Entsorgung von beschädigten

Brennstäben aus Druck- und Siedewasserreaktoren.

Der Köcher kann mehrere

Brennstäbe sicher aufnehmen und passt – mit

den gleichen Abmessungen wie komplette

Brennelemente – in die Standardkorbpositionen

der Transport- und Lagerbehälter für Druckund

Siedewasserreaktor-Brennelemente.

Der Köcher ist wie eine „zweite Umhüllung“

ausgelegt, um viel Arten von Brennstäben mit

Defekten, z.B. in Form von Deformationen, sowie

sogenannten „Leakers“ aufzunehmen. Ihr

robustes Design sorgt für eine zuverlässige Einhaltung

der Sicherheitsanforderungen.

Der Köcher besteht aus einem geschmiedeten

Edelstahlgrundkörper, einem Innenkorb für die

beschädigten Brennstäbe, individuell anzupassen

und in verschiedenen Varianten erhältlich,

einem geschmiedeten Deckel, verschraubt und

mit dem Grundkörper verschweißt, um dauerhafte

Abdichtung zu gewährleisten sowie einem

Anschlagpunkt am oberen Ende des Köcher.

Der Köcher bietet verschiedene Beladungspositionen

mit unterschiedlichen Abmessungen (bis

zu 66 Brennstäbe pro Köcher), je nach den individuellen

Anforderungen des Kunden, und kann

Uran- oder MOX-Brennstoff aus Druck- und/

oder Siedewasserreaktoren mit hohen Anreicherungen

und hohen Abbränden aufnehmen.

E.ON Kernkraft (EKK, jetzt PreussenElektra)

startete 2005 ein Projekt zur Erarbeitung einer

Lösung für die trockene Zwischenlagerung ihrer

defekten Brennstäbe in den Standortzwischenlagern.

Im Jahr 2006 wurde die GNS Gesell-

Authors

Dr. Frank Jüttemann

Martin Kaplik

Michael Köbl

Bernhard Kühne

GNS Gesellschaft für Nuklear-Service mbH

Essen, Germany

Sascha Bechtel, Hagen Höfer

Höfer & Bechtel GmbH

Mainhausen, Germany

Dr. Wolfgang Faber

PreussenElektra GmbH

Hannover, Germany

Dr. Marc Verwerft

Belgian Nuclear Research Centre

(SCK•CEN),

Institute for Nuclear Materials Science

Mol, Belgium

After the political decision to again extend

the operating times of the German NPPs

later in 2010, the focus in the back-end activities

of the utilities temporarily shifted to

the regular cask licenses to ensure undisturbed

operation by timely cask-loading

campaigns. The first plant to be closed was

still KKI-1, but now only in 2020. Hence the

licensing of the quiver solution was temporarily

suspended in favour of the ongoing

licensing processes of transport and storage

casks.

The second and final German phase out decision

of June 2011 again revived the demand

for a solution for failed fuel rods.

Since the oldest plants, that had been taken

off the grid only days after the Fukushima

accident, were to remain shut down

permanently, suddenly the development of

a failed-fuel-rod solution was on a five-year

time schedule.

As early as July 2011, the utilities asked

GNS to resume the efforts with a special

focus on the new time constraints. Regarding

these new boundary conditions, GNS

revised the requirements for such a quiver

solution, now aiming at a very robust licensing

concept as first priority, which was

expected to reliably pass the licensing process

faster than an economically optimized

concept. During a workshop in August

2011 GNS and the utilities discussed this

concept in detail and until November 2011

a specification was drafted. Based on that,

five potential developers were invited to

present their concepts in early 2012. Out of

these five, the utilities finally agreed to

adopt a hot-vacuum drying system with a

quiver being able to accommodate several

fuel rods as it was presented by Höfer &

Bech tel. The quiver would regulatorily be

treated as part of the cask and, to facilitate

timely licensing, a cask-loading with only

quivers was foreseen. In order to reduce

the overall risk of the project, however, the

utilities had also decided to pursue a second,

different approach at the same time –

hot-gas drying of individually capsuled

fuel rods and assembling several capsules

to a quasi-assembly – until the major challenges

in the Höfer & Bechtel concept have

been overcome.

At the time of the actual project start in

mid-2012, there was very limited scientific

information available on irradiated fuel

rods containing water after a cladding perschaft

für Nuklear-Service mbH in das Projekt

mit eingebunden und danach noch weitere Unternehmen.

Im Jahr 2009 beauftragten die vier

deutschen Kernkraftwerksbetreiber die GNS,

eines der bis dahin entwickelten Konzepte umzusetzen

und die Zulassung des Systems zu erwirken.

Nach Erteilungen der notwendigen Zulassungen

und Genehmigungen für die Köcherlösung

durch die deutschen Behörden fand Ende

des Jahres 2018 im Kernkraftwerk Unterweser

die erste erfolgreiche Abfertigungskampagne

statt. Weitere befinden sich aktuell in der Umsetzung.

l

Introduction and background of

the German Quiver Project

During the operational phase of a nuclear

power plant, damaged fuel rods are usually

collected separately in the spent fuel pool

for a later disposal after the plant’s final

shut-down. In Germany the initially

planned disposal path for damaged fuel

rods was reprocessing. However, as part of

the agreement on the first nuclear phaseout

in 2000 in Germany (“Atomkonsens”),

also transports of spent fuel to reprocessing

plants were banned effective July 2005.

With the first NPP to be shut-down in 2011

(KKI-1), its operator E.ON Kernkraft (EKK,

now PreussenElektra) started a project in

2005 to establish a solution for the dry interim

storage of their failed fuel rods in the

on-site storage facilities, that had to be

erected due to the end of reprocessing.

Since the collected failed fuel rods were to

be taken out of the pools only after the last

regular fuel assemblies, a feasible storage

solution for the failed fuel rods would have

been needed by about 2016.

In 2006 EKK asked GNS Gesellschaft für

Nuklear-Service mbH to join the project to

ensure compatibility with the requirements

of the transport and storage casks.

By early 2007 two companies, one of them

already Höfer & Bechtel, provided first design

ideas and drawings. In 2009 the four

German utilities jointly asked GNS to

take over one of the concepts and develop

it towards cask-licensing. In June 2010

this quiver solution was presented to Bundesanstalt

für Materialforschung und -prüfung

(BAM) to obtain a first authority feedback,

in order to create a licensing documentation

for transportation and storage.

46


VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

The German Quiver Project

foration during operation occurred. EKK

then decided to launch a research project

with the Belgian nuclear research center

SCK•CEN in Mol. As an additional partner

SYNATOM, the company responsible for

the front and the back end of the nuclear

fuel cycle in Belgium, decided to join the

so-called WETFUEL project. As will be described

in more detail later, hydraulic properties

were measured, proof of principle for

temperature assisted vacuum drying was

provided and finally water removal rates

were determined. During this intensive research

programme the overall concept

could be validated and the industrial feasibility

was shown.

Based on these results GNS in cooperation

with Höfer & Bechtel developed two quivers

for non standard fuel rods to fit into the

basket slots of the existing cask types

CASTOR ® V/19 (PWR) and CASTOR ®

V/52 (BWR). The customizable internal

baskets of the quivers facilitate the disposal

of a large variety of nuclear inventory. Furthermore,

the quiver features a robust design

and a unique welded closure system,

to provide a second cladding for the damaged

fuel rods. This design and the accompanying

dispatch equipment have been

verified by a series of tests and qualification

processes supervised by the German authorities,

and have proven to be a reliable

solution within the specified period of only

five years.

The package design approvals for the quiver

for CASTOR ® V/19 and V/52 have been

issued by the German authorities in 2017

and 2018, respectively. This first of its kind

quiver solution is thus able to assure the

dry interim storage of all non-standard fuel

rods from the German NPPs in standard

transport and storage casks.

In April 2018, the first three PWR-quivers

were loaded at Unterweser NPP, while

their final dispatch campaign including

drying and welding was successfully carried

out in October and November 2018.

The next dispatch campaign has already

started at Biblis NPP.

The Quiver – Design and function

The quiver for non standard fuel rods has

been designed to be accommodated by the

standard baskets of the CASTOR ® V/19 or

CASTOR ® V/52.

The boundary conditions for the design of

the quiver were:

––

restoring the limited or missing barrier

of the damaged fuel

––

equivalence to the size and weight of

standard fuel assemblies to fit into the

CASTOR ® baskets

––

full compliance with CASTOR ® license,

regarding

––

criticality

––

dose rate

––

heat dissipation

Fig. 1. PWR-quiver with head- and foot-piece, inner basket, 32AR (upper-) and 6AR (lower

picture), lid of BWR-quiver (upper-), welded lid (lower picture) – (from left to right).

––

no negative impact especially on the

CASTOR ® lid system, regarding accident

conditions

––

ability to dry the fuel, that might be wet,

due to cladding failure

––

ability to get the license for processing

the damaged fuel from the spent fuel

pool to the loading of the final CASTOR ®

The quiver (F i g u r e 1 ) comprises the following

parts:

––

A forged stainless steel body with the

central cavity to accommodate the inner

basket. The body is made of one single

piece, comparable to the body of the

CASTOR ® .

––

The inner basket, which accommodates

the damaged fuel rods or even parts of

fuel rods and thus provides a defined and

calculable geometry. Furthermore, the

inner basket is designed to facilitate the

drying of the damaged fuel. There are

different types of inner baskets to accommodate

even geometrically distorted

fuel rods.

––

A lid that is screwed into the top of the

body, after the cavity and the fuel have

been successfully dried. Additionally, the

lid is welded to the body, to provide the

gas tight barrier for the fuel.

––

The head- and foot-pieces are designed

as shock absorbers to limit the impact on

the quiver itself and on CASTOR ® lid in

case of an accident. The head-piece also

serves as load attachment point.

The inner basket of the PWR-quiver is licensed

in two different variants. The most

common type called 32AR features 32

tubes of three different diameters for fuel

rods or encapsulated fuel rods of different

diameters. The second type is called 6AR

and is suited for geometrically distorted

fuel rods. It is possible to load more than

one fuel rod into one of the six tubes of the

6AR inner basket.

For the BWR-quiver three different types of

inner baskets have been licensed. These are

18AR and 14AR for 18 resp. 14 fuel rods of

different diameters as well as 8AR for geo-

47


The German Quiver Project VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

metrically distorted fuel rods. The 8AR can

take up one or two fuel rods in each of its

eight tubes.

Unlike a fuel assembly, which bends under

mechanical loads, the quiver is a much

more rigid and stiff structure. One of the

biggest challenges was the design and

qualification of the head- and foot-pieces

regarding their shock absorber functionality

to prevent additional stress to the

CASTOR ® lid system under accident conditions

of transport.

To prove the effectiveness of the head- and

foot-pieces, first the design was optimized

using static loads of a hydraulic press with

maximum force of 300 tons. Later on, the

final design was proven in several drop

tests. For that, the equipment for the drop

tests was set up and qualified at the Höfer

& Bechtel site at Mainhausen. All equipment

for the drop tests of the 880 kg prototype

quivers onto a rigid foundation was

qualified in cooperation with BAM. Drop

tests were performed at temperatures between

-40 °C (F i g u r e 2 ) and +90 °C

(PWR) and -40 °C to +110 °C (BWR). The

optimized design of the head- and footpieces

was able to keep the maximum load

to the quiver itself as well as the force on

the lid system of the CASTOR ® within the

specified limits.

Manufacturing of the quivers and all of its

components is performed under supervision

of different authorities in order to assure

quality specifications laid down in the

license.

be weighed and inspected for dryness, but

the original damaged fuel rods can not.

Fruitful discussions with the experts of

BAM led to the final design of the drying

equipment and to the approved drying procedures.

Participation in the international

WETFUEL research program, which took

place at SCK•CEN, Mol, Belgium, during

the time of the development of the quiver

drying system, was also a great opportunity

to transform the experience from test

rods to real fuel rods.

The Quiver as part of the

CASTOR ® Cask and its licensing

implications

The disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Germany

is essentially based on the established

CASTOR ® V casks. These casks consist

of a thick-walled, monolithic cask body

made of ductile cast iron with radial cooling

fins, a basket for the spent fuel assemblies

and an in-line double lid system. In

case of CASTOR ® V/19 for PWR-FA, the

basket offers 19 positions while in case of

CASTOR ® V/52 for BWR-FA, the basket has

52 positions. F i g u r e 3 displays the design

features using the example of

CASTOR ® V/52 in storage configuration.

In order to provide a comprehensive disposal

concept also for damaged fuel rods,

the quiver for damaged fuel rods had to be

licensed as inventory for transport and

storage in CASTOR ® V casks. To achieve a

straightforward and fast licensing process,

the quiver was designed to be very robust

and to comply with the existing boundary

conditions of the CASTOR ® V cask:

––

equivalence of size and weight of standard

fuel assemblies to fit into the

CASTOR ® baskets

––

no negative impact on the cask, especially

on the CASTOR ® lid system under accident

conditions

––

ability to dry the damaged fuel rods to an

extent, that no extra measures in the

cask or quiver design are necessary.

Cover plate (Storage configuration)

Secondary lid

Primary lid

Trunnion (lid-end)

Fuel assembly basket

Neutron moderator rods

Fig. 2. Drop test at -40 °C, just before impact.

A second major challenge was the qualification

of the drying process of the quiver cavity

and even more so of potentially wet damaged

fuel. Based on theoretical calculations

and published experience with drying of

damaged fuel, the drying concept was developed.

Starting with a mock up for simulating

a single damaged fuel rod up to the

1:1 original drying equipment, the qualification

process for the drying was performed

under supervision of BAM. The ability to

monitor the drying process and to measure

and verify dryness is as important as the

drying process itself, as the test rods could

Cask body with cooling fins

Trunnion (bottom-end)

Fig. 3. Design features of the CASTOR ® V/52 (Storage configuration).

48


VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

The German Quiver Project

The licensing approach was further optimized

regarding the situation of shutdown

NPPs with the need for a fast track

disposal concept for a complete removal of

nuclear fuel from their spent fuel pools.

This led to a two-step approach:

––

Fast track concept featuring:

––

Robust quiver design with significant

safety margins

––

Conservative cask loading pattern

(quiver only)

––

Safety report with very conservative

boundary conditions

––

Substantial experimental tests to accelerate

the safety evaluation process

––

Optimized concept featuring:

––

Robust quiver design with higher load

capacity

––

Optimized cask loading patterns

(quiver and spent fuel assemblies)

––

Safety report with adequate boundary

conditions

The first approach proved successful: The

first transport license for the leading PWRquiver

in CASTOR ® V/19 casks was granted

on schedule in April 2017, subsequently

the first storage license for Biblis NPP in

June 2018. The transport license for the

BWR-quiver in CASTOR ® V/52 casks was

granted in April 2018, the first storage license

for Krümmel NPP in December 2018.

In order to economically optimize the use

of the quiver system, GNS works on improving

the capacity of the quivers and enabling

also mixed cask loadings with both

quivers and regular fuel assemblies. First

feasibility studies have been started.

Quiver handling and service

equipment

The quiver project is divided into three

subprojects. One of these subprojects was

the development and manufacturing of

equipment for handling and preparation

of damaged fuel rods for the loading into

the quivers.

First step: Loading of damaged spent fuel

into the Quiver

Using trusted under water handling tools

the damaged fuel rods are loaded under

water into the quivers. This process is schematically

shown in F i g u r e 4 left.

For the loading of the fuel rods with minor

damages (e.g. gastight with reduced cladding

thickness or gastight with deformations)

the fuel rod is gripped at its upper

pin by means of a plier. The operator lifts

the tool with the crane and positions the

attached fuel rod above the quiver. Subsequently,

the fuel rod is lowered into a free

loading position of the internal basket of

the quiver. Examples of customized internal

baskets for different kinds of damaged

fuel rods are shown in F i g u r e 4 right.

Before loading into the quiver, heavily

damaged fuel rods or even fuel rod sections

Fig. 4. Damaged fuel rods and handling tubes with fuel rod sections are placed in a receptacle,

which is positioned in the fuel assembly storage rack. Next to that the quiver is waiting

for the loading (left). Different internal baskets for varying kinds of bent damaged fuel

rods (right).

Plug

Capsule

Adapter for

Gripping tool

Plug

Closing

mechanism

Capsule

Fig. 5. Handling tube for the collection of heavily damaged fuel rods, smaller sections of fuel rods

or even broken pieces down to the size of pellets (left). In analogy to the loading of fuel

rods with an intact upper pin, the handling tubes are placed in the internal basket of the

quiver (right). Example for a gripper to collect fuel debris for placement in cartridges before

loading into the quiver (bottom).

down to the size of pellets, are placed in

small handling tubes. The handling tubes

are handled with a dedicated gripper

(F i g u r e 5 ). The actual process of loading

the handling tubes into the internal basket

of the quiver remains unchanged compared

to the fuel rods with minor damages,

which are directly loaded into the quiver.

Second step: Dispatch of the Quiver

In contrast to the regular dispatch of spent

fuel assemblies under water in the spent fuel

pool, the dispatch of the quiver is performed

outside the spent fuel pool on the reactor

floor. This approach is motivated by the possibility

to use much simpler technology than

would be required for underwater processing

in the spent fuel pool. This also yields an

increase in process stability. However, this

approach requires some additional equipment

especially with regard to shielding.

After loading of the quiver with damaged

fuel rods a transfer-head piece is attached

a)

b)

c)

to the top of the quiver for handling purposes.

This transfer-head piece allows the

handling of the quiver like a standard fuel

assembly with a gripper. The quiver is lifted

out of the storage rack and is placed into

a shielding basket on the bottom of the

pool. The shielding basket is the primary

shielding of the quiver during handling

outside of the spent fuel pool. In the pool it

is positioned in a loading station waiting to

take up the quiver. As shown in F i g u r e 6

the loading station is located at the position

in the spent fuel pool, where the

CASTOR ® V casks are usually loaded during

a standard defueling campaign. It consists

of a stable base plate with welded lateral

guide and support elements for the

shielding basket. The loading station and

the shielding basket are handled with the

same crane system of the NPP.

After transferring the quiver into the

shielding basket, the transfer-head piece is

removed and a top shielding, closing the

d)

e)

f)

49


The German Quiver Project VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Fig. 6. The quiver is still placed in the fuel-assembly rack with the transfer-head piece already

attached. The primary shielding is inside the loading station at the usual loading position

of the CASTOR ® V cask (left). The quiver is lifted out of the rack and positioned inside the

primary shielding (center). After removal of the transfer-head piece the primary shielding is

closed with a top shielding. Now the shielding basket is ready to be lifted out of the pool

and handled on the reactor floor (right).

Fig. 7. The quiver inside the primary shielding is lifted out of the pool and into the handling

station on the reactor floor (left). Dewatering of the quiver inside the handling station

(center). View into the mobile hot cell on top of the handling station (right).

mobile hot cell is monitored and can be replaced

with an inert gas atmosphere. The

exhaust line from the mobile hot cell is connected

to the building ventilation system

via a particle filter, providing further contamination

control.

Now the dewatering and drying of the

quiver can take place. While the dewatering

is performed by suction of the water the

drying process is more sophisticated: while

the quiver is heated to temperatures above

the boiling point of water by hot air from a

heating unit, a vacuum drying device operates

using a special throughput of hot air,

utilizing humidity sensors to monitor the

residual moisture in the quiver and its inventory.

After drying, the quiver is filled with helium

for helium leak testing and to provide

inert conditions. The lid of the quiver is

screwed in using remote manipulation

tools. In order to provide the gas tightness

of the quiver, a welding seam is produced

by means of a remote welding machine.

The welding process had to be qualified by

the German authorities and it was shown

that the automated process generates a

gastight welding seam fulfilling the design

specifications. Finally, after the welding a

leak tightness test of the welding seam is

performed inside the mobile hot cell.

As mentioned above, all the operations inside

the mobile hot cell are performed by

remote control and are monitored by video.

This significantly reduces the radiation

exposure of the personnel. F i g u r e 8

shows the manipulation device and one of

the six cameras inside the mobile hot cell.

The remote control station is positioned

beside the handling station and is connected

to the mobile hot cell.

After the dispatch, the quiver – still inside

the primary shielding – is transferred back

top of the shielding basket is attached to

the primary shielding. The shielding basket

including the quiver is now lifted out of

the pool and positioned into a handling

station on the reactor floor (F i g u r e 7 ).

The handling station is where the actual

dispatch of the quiver takes place. It consists

of a secondary shielding system, an

operating platform and a mobile hot cell,

which is operated by remote control. The

shielding block as the secondary shielding

system for the quiver consists of a sandwich

structure of polyethylene and steel.

One side can be opened for placing the

shielding basket with the traverse into the

shielding block. An operation platform is

fitted to the shielding block, enabling access

to the upper part of the shielding block

and for inspection works. Inside the mobile

hot cell the drying and welding of the quiver

is performed. The mobile hot cell provides

a barrier between the damaged fuel

rods in the quiver and the atmosphere of

the controlled area in the NPP, retaining

particles etc. The atmosphere inside the

Fig. 8. The remote controlled handling device inside the mobile hot cell with one of the six

cameras inside the cell (top, left). The remote control terminal which is placed next to the

handling station (top, right). The remote controlled automatic welding device (bottom).

50


VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

The German Quiver Project

to the loading station in the pool. Here the

quiver is lifted out of the shielding and put

back into the storage rack, where it remains

until being loaded into the CASTOR ®

cask.

Drying spent nuclear fuel

Boundary conditions for drying fuel

Both the defining criteria of damaged fuel

and the procedures for handling damaged

spent nuclear fuel vary from country to

country depending on the regulatory requirements

[1]. For intact fuel assemblies,

the transfer from wet to dry storage goes

generally without problems as the intact

cladding of the fuel rods ensures that all

water is “easily accessible”. For non-intact

fuel rods, one may expect that the inner

parts of the rod such as the plenum, fuelcladding

gap, cracks and fissures in the

UO 2 , pellet-pellet dishes etc. are partially

or completely filled with water. Extraction

of the water that has seeped into the fuel

may be difficult. As-fabricated fuel rods

have a fuel-cladding gap of several tens of

micrometers, but progressively, the cladding

creeps towards the fuel while the fuel

undergoes thermal expansion and swells

due to fission product accumulation and

after a certain period of time, the fuel-cladding

gap is closed in hot operating conditions.

In cold stage, the gap re-opens due to

the larger thermal contraction of the fuel,

but the gap size of spent fuel is much smaller

than the as-fabricated gap. Already for

non-failed fuels, the gas connectivity in an

irradiated fuel rod is a complex phenomenon

to describe quantitatively. Upon cladding

breach, the fuel rod internals are exposed

to the primary coolant and later to

the spent fuel pool water. After cladding

breach, e.g. as a result of debris fretting

causing a pinhole defect, secondary cladding

defects rapidly develop due to hydrogen

uptake by the Zircaloy cladding [2, 3].

Furthermore, UO 2 potentially oxidizes to

higher oxides upon exposure to oxidizing

conditions (UO 2 UO 2 +x U 4 O 9

U 3 O 7 U 3 O 8 ). Compared to UO 2 , the

higher oxides which essentially keep the

fluorite arrangement of the parent UO 2

structure (UO 2 +x, U 4 O 9 and U 3 O 7 ) show a

net contraction of their structure [4 to 6],

but when the U 3 O 8 phase forms, a huge expansion

(36 %) occurs [7]. For non-intact

fuel, one must thus take into account that

water has interacted with the UO 2 fuel, and

that hydriding and inner wall oxidation of

zircaloy cladding may have occurred,

which further complicates a theoretical

prediction of water removal kinetics.

Hot laboratory drying tests of real spent

nuclear fuel segments (WETFUEL

Project)

In order to reduce the uncertainties of water

removal rates from damaged irradiated

spent fuel rods, an experimental setup was

Fig. 9. Hot-cell installation for wetting and drying experiments on spent nuclear fuel segments:

Design drawing of the two vessels: a large bottom vessel and a much smaller top vessel

(left). 3D cutout view of the equipment with schematic indication of a mounted spent fuel

segment (center). View of the equipment installed in hot-cell (right).

developed to perform wetting and drying

tests under well-controlled conditions. The

setup further allowed to measure the hydraulic

resistance for gas flow as well as the

removal rate of water through a spent fuel

segment of variable length. The device

consisted of two instrumented vessels

holding a fuel rod segment in between

them, sealed in such a way that any water,

gas or vapor flow had to pass through the

clamped fuel rod segment (F i g u r e 9 ).

Spent fuel samples were taken from a

failed fuel rod and from a nearly identical

unfailed fuel rod with a rod average burnup

around 50 GWd/tHM irradiated in the

Belgian Tihange 1 PWR. Tested fuel samples

showed the typical crack pattern for

100 µm

2 mm

Fig. 10. Cross section of the spent fuel segment

WET1, taken from the failed fuel.

The cracks and gap do not show any

particular severe degradation. The

missing part on the bottom side is

caused by sample preparation. Inset:

detail of the gap region, with an overlay

of a Scanning Electron Microscopy

(SEM) image. The greater depth of

view of the SEM allows one to better

assess the width of irregular areas

such as cracks and the pellet-clad gap

than observations made from optical

micrographs.

irradiated nuclear fuel (F i g u r e 10 ). For

analytical studies, fuel rod segments of

various lengths were investigated. In this

article the results obtained from two segments

of 50 cm and one of 10 cm length are

discussed. Prior to tests on real spent fuel

rod segments, mock-up tests were performed

with a segment filled with fine

Al 2 O 3 powder and sealed on both ends

with a porous filter plug.

The test setup allowed various types of

tests:

––

Hydraulic resistance for dry gas flow

––

Wetting-Drying sequence

––

Water pocket drying

The hydraulic resistance can be derived by

measuring a gas flow at constant pressure

difference, which works well for low hydraulic

resistance samples, or by measuring

the rate of pressure change in either of

the two vessels as a function of pressure

difference over the sample, which proved

to be more accurate for samples with high

hydraulic resistance. Under conditions of

laminar flow, the molar flow rate Q m (t) is

equal to:

(1)

where Q m (t) is the instantaneous mass

flow rate (expressed in g.s ‐1 ) through the

segment, P 1 (t) and P 2 (t) are the top and

bottom pressures as a function of time, V 1 is

the volume of the top vessel, r is the radius

for an effective capillary for the gas flow

path, η(T) is the dynamic viscosity of a certain

gas at temperature T (e.g. Ar, air or

H 2 O), M is the molar mass of the considered

gas, L is the flow path length, R is the

universal gas constant. From (Eq. 1), the

effective hydraulic radius can be readily

calculated (see also column 3 of Ta b l e 1 :


(2)

51


The German Quiver Project VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

A complete wetting and drying sequence

consisted of inserting an excess amount of

water in the lower vessel such that the lower

part of the fuel rod segment would be completely

immersed. The gas cushion above

the water was then pressurized such that

the sample segment was progressively filled

with water until the moisture readout in the

top vessel indicated the presence of liquid

water i.e. full percolation did occur. The system

was then soaked for a minimum period

of 2 hours to allow finer cracks and gaps to

be wetted as well. The lower vessel was then

drained and both top and bottom vessels

were heated to a preset temperature while

being pumped. During the pumping sequence,

the pressure was monitored as well

as the moisture content in the exhaust line.

After reaching pressures below 1 mbar in

both top and bottom vessel, a pressure rebound

test was performed [8]. To this end,

the exhaust lines were shut and the pressure

increment was monitored for 30 minutes. If

the pressure would not exceed 4 mbar, the

test was considered complete. The drying

sequence, plotted in F i g u r e 11 , clearly

showed several phases: in a first phase, the

pressure rapidly dropped until ~10 mbar, at

which point the pressure stabilized while

liquid water was slowly removed from the

fuel column. The humidity in the exhaust

lines remained elevated (dew point between

10 °C and 20 °C). Once the liquid water

was removed from the segment, the

pressure and humidity further dropped.

Considering the performance of the pumping

system, the vacuum was expected to asymptotically

approach ~0.5 mbar. In the

example shown in F i g u r e 11 , the first

pressure rebound test was nearly successful

after around 6 h. Upon further drying, the

pressure and humidity gradually evolved to

0.3 ‐ 0.4 mbar and ‐40 °C. A successful dryness

test was performed after 24 h. Further

drying did not result in any significant

changes in vessel pressure or relative humidity

of the exhaust gas. The test was concluded

after 96 h with a third dryness test,

which was again successful.

The wetting and drying sequence yielded a

successful demonstration of the feasibility

of the drying principle but was difficult to

quantify. Quantification of water removal

rates was approached by two methods. At

first, the hydraulic resistance of a fuel rod

segment was assessed under dry conditions

(see above), and in a second stage,

“water pocket tests” were performed at different

temperatures. To this end, 10 ml of

water was poured into the top vessel which

was then sealed, the whole system was

heated and pumping was performed from

the bottom vessel. Depending on the drying

temperature, the drying time was

shorter or longer and correspondingly, the

lower vessel pressure was at a higher or

lower equilibrium during the drying process:

~4 mbar for 3 h when drying at 130 °C

and at ~2.5 mbar for more than twelve

hours when drying at 110 °C.

From the same water pocket drying experiments,

vapor flow rates can be determined

by shortly closing the valves of the bottom

chamber and monitoring the instantaneous

pressure increment (see Eq. (1)). Once

the macroscopic amounts of water were

removed from the top vessel in a water

pocket test, the pressure in the top vessel

dropped and the system evolved to an apparently

dry state. Although both pressure

and relative humidity indicated that the

system reached near perfect dryness, further

tests indicated that the top vessel continued

to contain a minute amount of water

vapor at a pressure of about 60 mbar

that could not escape through the fuel rod.

This can be interpreted as leaving the laminar

flow regime, for which the Knudsen

number (Kn, i.e. the ratio of gas mean free

Pressure in mBar

100

10

1

0.1

Time in days

path – l o the lateral dimension w of the flow

path) is less than 0.01.


(3)

The mean free path is proportional to the

temperature and inversely proportional to

the pressure (see e.g. [9]):


(4)

Herein, k B is Boltzman’s constant, T the absolute

temperature, expressed in Kelvin, P

the pressure, expressed in Pa and d the diameter

of the gas molecules (d = 0.4 nm

for H 2 O). With a vapor pressure of 60 mbar

(6,000 Pa) at 120 °C (393 K) and typical

crack width of 15 µm the Knudsen number

Pressure Top

Pressure Bottom

Dewpoint

-60

0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0

Fig. 11. Drying sequence with monitoring of pressure evolution in both top and bottom vessel and

evolution of the pressure during a 30 minutes dryness test, performed after approximately

6 h of drying, 24 h and 96 h.

q in g/d

1000,00

100,00

10,00

1,0

0,10

89+/-2μm; 0,50m

103+/-2μm; 0,50m

85+/-2μm; 0,10m

102+/-2μm; 0,17m

80μm; 4m

0,01

40 60 80 100 120 140 160

T in o C

Fig. 12. Vapor mass flow rates determined directly for different segments (symbols) and calculated

on the basis of dry hydraulic resistance measurement (thin solid lines). A calculated

release rate for a 4 m long rod with a hypothetical 80 µm hydraulic radius is also

calculated (thick red line).

20

0

-20

-40

Dewpoint in o C

52


VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

The German Quiver Project

Tab. 1. Hydraulic radius of different samples.

Sample ID Length Effective hydraulic

radius

Water removal rate (g/day)

110 °C 120 °C 130 °C

WET1 50 cm 89 ±2 µm 15 ±2 28 ±2 44 ±5

WET2 50 cm 103 ±2 µm 33 ±4 63 ±7 89 ±10

WET3 10 cm 85 ±1 µm 73 ±8 133 ±15 207 ±23

WET5b 17 cm 102 ±2 µm 90 ±10 164 ±18 321 ±36

After mounting the transfer head piece, the

loaded quivers were lifted up out of the

storage rack and transferred to the loading

station into the shielding basket. Here the

head piece was removed and a top shielding

was installed to close the shielding basket

(Figure 16).

The shielding basket containing the loaded

quiver was then lifted up to the reactor

floor. Once the shielding basket is inside of

is Kn = 0.09, well in the transition regime

to molecular flow. Within that flow regime,

mass-flow is considerably lower and vaporremoval

effectively stops.

Mass flow rates were calculated from the

hydraulic radius as derived from the dry

hydraulic resistance measurements (F i g -

u r e 1 2 and Ta b l e 1 ). The excellent

agreement between the different water removal

approaches provided a sound scientific

basis, allowing quantitative assessment

of drying times, thus substantially

reducing risks for the utilities. Furthermore,

the amount of residual water not accessible

with the technique of hot-vacuum

drying can be quantified, showing a huge

margin to design assumptions.

Loading the fuel rods

into the three quivers

Set-up of the equipment

on the reactor floor

Dispatch first quiver

Dispatch third quiver

05/2018 08/2018 10/2018 11/2018

04/2018 07/2018 10/2018 11/2018

Space between rods and

lid filled up with spacers

Site acceptance test

and test of the welding seam

Fig. 13. Preparation, cold trial and dispatch at Unterweser NPP.

Dispatch second quiver

Dismantling and removal

of the equipment

The first Quiver Campaign and

outlook on the industrial use

Preparation and cold trial at

Unterweser NPP

Before the very first dispatch campaign at

Unterweser NPP could start in October

2018, an extended work program had to be

successfully completed. This comprised the

loading of the damaged fuel rods into the

quivers as well as the installation and site

acceptance testing of the complete dispatch

equipment (F i g u r e 1 3 ).

The loading of the PWR quivers (F i g -

u r e 14 ) with the fuel rods was carried out

according to a clearly defined loading

plan. Each loading step was precisely documented.

Before the dispatch campaign, the equipment

had to be set up in the reactor building,

where the site acceptance test was carried

out. In addition, various supporting

documents were submitted to the supervisory

authority for approval. In order to

prove that the welding equipment was set

up correctly and in accordance with the requirements,

a trial weld was carried out

prior to the actual campaign.

First Quiver Campaign – Sequence of

Handling and Service Activities

As described in chapter 4, the handling of

the quivers takes place at two different levels

inside the containment: The loading

station is positioned in the spent fuel pool,

while the service station is located at the

reactor floor outside of the pool (F i g -

ure 15).

Fig. 14. Measuring the length for the spacers (left), insertion of the spacers into the quiver (right).

Fig. 15. Shielding basket and loading station in the spent fuel pool (left) and the service station

with mobile hot cell positioned on the shielding block and equipment on the reactor floor

(right).

Fig. 16. Storage rack and quiver (left), top shielding on shielding basket (right).

53


The German Quiver Project VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

first dispatch.

The major results of the first three dispatch

cycles are:

––

The qualified processes for handling,

drying and welding are robust and reliable.

––

The “out of pool”-handling results in

very low radiation exposures for the service

personnel.

––

It has been shown that it is feasible, to

dry damaged fuel in an industrial process

on site.

Fig. 17. Transport of the shielding basket to the shielding block (left), mobile hot cell (right).

Fig. 18. Close-up of the lid screwing device (left), welding machine and lid screwing device (right).

The following Quiver Campaigns at

Biblis and Krümmel NPP

Meanwhile, also the second PWR quiver

campaign at Biblis NPP has successfully

been completed, comprising 9 PWR quivers.

After installation of the handling and

service equipment, the test of the welding

device by a trial weld was completed in December

2018. The actual campaign had

started in January 2019 and the last quiver

was dispatched in late April 2019.

The first BWR quiver campaign, again comprising

9 quivers, is planned at Krümmel

NPP. The loading of the quivers has already

started and the actual dispatch campaign is

scheduled for summer 2019.

With the Krümmel campaign, the GNS

quiver system will provide conclusive

proof, that it can be used industrially for

failed fuel rods both from PWR- as well as

from BWR-reactors.

References

Fig. 19. Welding device (left), welded lid (right).

the shielding block, in a first step the quiver

was dewatered. Next, the mobile hot cell

was mounted on top of the shielding block

(F i g u r e 17 ). Prior to drying the quiver,

the top shielding was replaced with the

multi cover, which provides connections to

the drying device and the heating device.

The quiver was then evacuated using vacuum

pumps, the humidity was removed

from the quiver and was recovered as condensate

in a condenser. The operating data

of the drying device were recorded and

stored in a stationary computer. After finishing

the drying procedure, the interior of

the quiver was filled with helium.

Next, the lid screwing device (F i g u r e 18 )

was positioned on the base body of the

quiver. It screws the lid into the base body

automatically, while all the parameters can

be monitored remotely by the operator.

Afterwards the welding machine was positioned,

that automatically connected the

lid and the base body of the quiver by

means of a qualified welding procedure

(F i g u r e 19 ). As last step, the leak tightness

of the welding seam was tested.

Finally, the quiver could be transferred

back to the storage rack in the spent fuel

pool.

First Quiver campaign – Main results

The dispatch of the first quiver started in

Unterweser NPP on 12 October and was

completed on 21 October 2018. The drying

process lasted about 6 days. The maximum

dose rate at the service station was less

than 70 µSv/h. The second quiver dispatch

started on 23 October and was completed

on 01 November 2018. Again the drying

process lasted 6 days. The third dispatch

started on 02 November and lasted until 16

November. The drying process took about

11 days. The dose rate of the second and

the third dispatch were comparable to the

[1] IAEA, Management of Damaged Spent Nuclear

Fuel, NF-T-3.6 IAEA Nuclear Energy Series.

Vienna, IAEA, 2009.

[2] Lewis, B.J., Macdonald, R.D., Ivanoff, N.V.,

Iglesias, F.C., Fuel performance and fissionproduct

release studies for defected fuel elements,

Nuclear Technology, 1993, 103: p.

220-245.

[3] Olander, D.R., Kim, Y.S., Wang, W.E., Yagnik,

S.K., Steam oxidation of fuel in defective

LWR rods, Journal of Nuclear Materials,

1999, 270: p. 11-20.

[4] Leinders, G., Cardinaels, T., Binnemans, K.,

Verwerft, M., Accurate lattice parameter

measurements of stoichiometric uranium dioxide,

Journal of Nuclear Materials, 2015,

459: p. 135-142.

[5] Willis, B.T.M., Structures of UO 2 , UO 2 +x and

U 4 O 9 by neutron diffraction, Journal de Physique

I, 1964, 25: p. 431-439.

[6] Leinders, G., Delville, R., Pakarinen, J., Cardinaels,

T., Binnemans, K., Verwerft, M., Assessment

of the U 3 O 7 Crystal Structure by X-

ray and Electron Diffraction, Inorganic

Chemistry, 2016, 55: p. 9923-9936.

[7] McEachern, R.J., Taylor, P., A review of the

oxidation of uranium dioxide at temperatures

below 400 °C, Journal of Nuclear Materials,

1998, 254: p. 87-121.

[8] ASTM, C1553-16, Standard Guide for Drying

Behavior of Spent Nuclear Fuel, ASTM International,

West Conshohocken, PA, 2016.

[9] Jitschin, W., Gas Flow, In: Jousten K, editor.

Handbook of Vacuum Technology. Wein heim,

Wiley-VCH, 2016.

l

54


VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Gamma scanning for the radiological characterization of radioactive waste packages

Advanced sectorial gamma scanning

for the radiological characterization

of radioactive waste packages

M. Dürr, M. Fritzsche, K. Krycki, B. Hansmann, T. Hansmann, A. Havenith,

D. Pasler and T. Hartmann

Kurzfassung

Fortschrittliche Gamma-Scans zur

radiologischen Charakterisierung von

Verpackungen mit radioaktiven Abfällen

Die Entsorgung radioaktiver Abfälle unterliegt

einer strengen behördlichen Kontrolle, um die

Einhaltung von Sicherheitsrichtlinien zu gewährleisten.

Für die Entsorgung im geologischen

Endlager Konrad für nicht wärmeentwickelnde

radioaktive Abfälle in Deutschland

wurden für den Sicherheitsnachweis Annahmekriterien

für radioaktive Abfallpackungen abgeleitet.

Die zur Entsorgung vorgesehenen Abfälle

unterliegen einer Produktkontrolle, die

von der Genehmigung der Abfallverpackung

durch den Betreiber der Entsorgungseinrichtung

abhängig ist. Die zerstörungsfreie Untersuchung

mit Gammastrahlungsdetektionstechniken

ist eine kostengünstige Maßnahme zur

Charakterisierung radioaktiver Abfälle und

dient der Überprüfung der Konformität mit den

Annahmekriterien. In den letzten Jahrzehnten

wird als vorherrschendes Verfahren das segmentierte

Gammascannen von Abfallbehältern

eingesetzt, das auf der vereinfachten Annahme

einer gleichmäßig verteilten Aktivität und einer

homogenen Abfallmatrix basiert. Die Vereinfachung

reduziert die Genauigkeit der Messung,

was zu konservativen Abschätzungen des Aktivitätsgehalts

führt, woraus wiederum eine ineffizienten

Ausnutzung der Aktivitätsgrenzen für

Abfallgebinde und höhere Kosten für die Entsorgung

folgen. Es wurde daher eine Advanced Sectorial

Gamma Scanning (ASGS)-Methode entwickelt,

die ein Softwaremodul zur Effizienzberechnung

von inhomogenen Aktivitätsvertei-

Authors

M. Dürr

K. Krycki

B. Hansmann

T. Hansmann

A. Havenith

Aachen Institute for Nuclear Training GmbH

Aachen, Germany

M. Fritzsche

D. Pasler

T. Hartmann

Mirion Technologies (Canberra) GmbH

Rüsselsheim, Germany

lungen (ECIAD) beinhaltet, um die räumlich

aufgelöste Aktivitätsverteilung aus den erfassten

Messdaten zu ermitteln. Diese Methode

kann für einen breiteren Bereich der Zusammensetzung

von radioaktiven Abfällen angewendet

werden, der für die Qualifizierung von

Altabfällen und den zunehmenden Abfallstrom

bei der Dekontamination und Stilllegung

von kerntechnischen Anlagen von Bedeutung

ist.

l

The management of radioactive waste is under

strict regulatory control to ensure the

compliance with safety guidelines. For the

disposal in the Konrad geological repository

for non-heat generating radioactive waste in

Germany, acceptance criteria for radioactive

waste packages have been derived from the

safety case. The waste designated for disposal

is subject to product control which is conditional

for approval of the waste package by

the operator of the disposal facility. The nondestructive

assay using gamma radiation

detection techniques is a cost-effective measure

to characterize radioactive waste and

serves to verify the conformity with the acceptance

criteria. In the past decades, the

pre-dominantly used method is segmented

gamma scanning of waste drums, which is

based on simplifying assumption of a uniformly

distributed activity and a homogeneous

waste matrix. The simplification reduces

the accuracy of the measurement leading to

large conservative estimates for the activity

content which in turn leads to an excessive

and inefficient exhaustion of activity limits

for waste packages and to higher costs for

disposal. An Advanced Sectorial Gamma

Scanning (ASGS) method is developed,

which includes a software module for the efficiency

calculation of inhomogeneous activity

distributions (ECIAD) to reconstruct the

spatially resolved activity distribution from

the acquired measurement data. This method

can be applied for a wider range of the

composition of the radioactive waste, which

is of relevance in the qualification of legacy

waste and the increasing stream of waste

from decontamination and decommissioning

of nuclear installations.

Introduction

The safe disposal of radioactive waste is one

of the key factors in the sustainable and

safe usage of nuclear energy for electric

power generation. From the waste that is

generated during operation of a nuclear

power plant, the largest amount of radioactivity

(99 %) is contained within the spent

fuel for which dedicated waste management

strategies are developed. The largest

part (95 %) of the waste volume that is classified

as radioactive waste, however, contains

only approximately 1 % of the radioactivity

produced in the process of nuclear

power generation [1]. The safe disposal is

subject to regulatory control and strict safety

requirements which have led to various

approaches for the engineered disposal facility

designs ranging from emplacement in

constructed subsurface structures like caverns,

vaults or silos to repositories in deep

geological formations [2]. With a significant

portion of the nuclear power reactors

nearing the end of their licensed operation

time and due to the decision of several

countries for a nuclear phase out, the number

of nuclear power installations under

decontamination and decommissioning

(D&D) is expected to increase significantly

in the coming two decades [3]. Even if a

large fraction of the material arising from

dismantling of nuclear power plant can be

classified as conventional waste after clearance,

a fraction remains which cannot be

released into the conventional waste management

streams. Compared to normal operation,

the decommissioning of reactors

leads to a significant increase of the volume

of radioactive waste with a higher diversity

in material composition, activity and isotope

content. Moreover, countries with

early nuclear programs are confronted with

the problem of significant inventories of radioactive

waste, which were conditioned

when the current regulatory requirements

had not yet existed. For such kind of socalled

‘legacy waste’ the main issue is in the

lacking documentation of the waste contents

such the composition of the waste is

essentially unknown. In Germany, a geological

repository is currently being set into

55


Gamma scanning for the radiological characterization of radioactive waste packages VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

operation in a former iron-ore mine which

is operated by the federal company for radioactive

waste disposal BGE (Bundesgesellschaft

für Entsorgung). The regulatory

requirements, which are derived from the

site-specific safety case, have led to the formulation

of acceptance criteria for the radioactive

waste designated for disposal in

the geological repository [4]. These criteria

are derived from safety considerations for

the operational safety during waste emplacement,

and for the long-term disposal.

To this end, radioactive waste is processed

and packaged where the conformity with

the acceptance criteria has been approved

under a qualification process (‘Product control’)

[5]. The main hazard is caused from

the radionuclide content of the waste, and

therefore the deliverer is obliged to declare

the radioactive inventory of each waste

package based on the characterization of

the waste product contained within the

waste package.

According to international safety guidelines

the compliance of waste packages is

to be verified [2]. If measurements are

evaluated in the process of verification,

this implies the application of the current

norms, standards and procedures. Since

the operator of the disposal facility is

obliged to adhere to upper limits for the radionuclide

inventories, the uncertainty of

the waste package data declared for the

individual waste package needs to be considered

and is subject to inspection by the

operator of the repository. Such uncertainties

are inherent to the measurement process

and international guidelines exist on

the quantitative evaluation of the uncertainty

in measurement [6]. Based on such

a quantitative evaluation, a conservative

value for the measurement results is determined

for which a degree of confidence of

95 % is stated based on the degree of information

available during evaluation of the

measurement result. Whereas a statistical

(random) nature is inherent to measurements,

so-called Type A uncertainties, additional

sources for the uncertainty are

considered, so-called Type B uncertainties,

such as the uncertainty of the calibration

used for the measurement method. Mathematically,

the evaluation framework is

based on the Bayesian statistics, an example

of its application being the evaluation

of radiation measurements and the determination

of characteristic limits laid down

in the Norm DIN ISO 11929 [7]. Here, the

prior information on the non-negativity of

the radionuclide activity is included in the

quantification of the degree of confidence

associated with the measured quantity. For

the evaluation of measurement results obtained

in non-destructive assay using radiation

measurements, the prior information

on the physical and chemical characteristics

of the waste is used and in consequence

also its uncertainties need to be accounted

for in accordance with the guidelines given

in DIN ISO 11929.

Prob. density

Method 1

Method 2

In the situation of unknown properties of

the waste product, e.g. shielding properties

or the lack of knowledge on the localization

of the activity within the waste

package, the conservative estimate is determined

under assumption of a worst-case

scenario which in many cases leads to a

large uncertainty and therefore a much

higher conservative estimate. This leads to

large inventories of ‘virtual activity’ declared

for the radioactive waste. On the

other hand, if information can be acquired

through the measurement or by other

means, this Type B uncertainty can be reduced

significantly, leading to a much lower

conservative estimate (F i g u r e 1 ). This

facilitates the adherence to activity limits

for the individual waste packages and

helps to avoid exhaustion of permissive

limits with the benefit of lower cost for the

waste producer.

Gamma scanning of waste drums

In terms of dose minimization and economy,

non-destructive testing and more specifically,

gamma scanning, is a widespread

and established method for characterization

of radioactive waste. Typically, gamma

scanning systems are used to simultaneously

identify and quantify radioisotopes in

cylindrical waste drums by measuring the

gamma radiation emitted by radionuclides

using cooled high-purity germanium

(HPGe) detectors, which offer high energyresolution.

The underlying assumptions for

most gamma scanning measurement methods

are the following:

––

Uniform chemical composition and density

of the active matrix

––

Homogenous spatial distribution of the

gamma emitting isotopes in the matrix

In general, gamma scanning relies on the

evaluation of the gamma spectrum obtained

during the measurement. During its

Measured

quantity value

CE 1 CE 2

Fig. 1. Probability distribution describing the degree of knowledge in a measurement of a quantity

value. The conservative estimate CE 1 and CE 2 depends on the total measurement uncertainty

of the applied measurement method.

σ 1

σ 2

radioactive decay, the isotope emits gamma

radiation with one or several characteristic

lines in the gamma spectrum which is

used to identify the nuclide inventory of

the waste. The peak intensity of each line is

used to determine the amount of the radionuclide

activity through the correlation

with the photopeak efficiency, which is determined

for the specific measurement

configuration. This photopeak efficiency

reflects the physical interactions of the

gamma radiation including the self-attenuation

within the active matrix, the attenuation

in the drum wall and the collimator,

and finally, the absorption of the entire

photon energy in the detector crystal. This

quantity is therefore termed the ‘efficiency

calibration’ which is specific to the measurement

object.

Integrated and Segmented

Gamma Scanning

Several different scanning methods have

been developed in the past decades. The

Integrated Gamma Scanning (IGS) records

a single gamma spectrum for the entire

waste drum with a HPGe detector without

collimation [8]. The data is recorded during

a full rotation of the waste drum. The

rotation serves two purposes: firstly, it ensures

that any localized activity that is potentially

unilaterally shielded by the waste

matrix is registered by the detection system

to the largest extent possible, and, secondly,

the rotation leads to an averaging effect

in case the spatial homogeneity is not fulfilled.

The so-called Segmented Gamma

Scanning (SGS) represents the standard

method for characterization of waste

drums containing the waste product [9]. In

the SGS method, a collimated detector is

positioned in varying vertical positions of

the waste drum, where for each vertical position

gamma spectra are acquired while

the drum is rotated (F i g u r e 2 ). Hereby a

56


VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Gamma scanning for the radiological characterization of radioactive waste packages

full surface scan of the waste drum is

achieved to ensure complete coverage of

the volume. The field of view of the detection

system is confined by the collimator

opening angle, such that predominantly

the gamma radiation emitted along the

central axis of the detector is registered

during the scan. The evaluation is performed

on the summed spectrum obtained

during a rotation scan and can be performed

for each individual segment. The

evaluation in IGS and SGS, however, is

made using the ‘efficiency calibration’

which is calculated using the assumption

stated earlier, namely for a uniform matrix

and for homogenous activity distribution of

the isotopes. In its initial form, the efficiency

calibration (photopeak efficiency) was

determined by formulating analytical expressions

which are derived using reasoned

simplifications and have been validated in

experimental studies [10, 8]. With increasing

computer processor speeds available,

calculations for the collimated geometry in

SGS are performed numerically, and the

initial simplifications can be dropped leading

to higher accuracy of the efficiency calculation

[11, 12]. Alternatively, the socalled

mathematical efficiency calibration

can be determined numerically using geometric

modeling of the measurement object

and using a parametrization of the detector

specific photopeak efficiency determined in

an experimental characterization procedure

[13, 14]. With a software tool the

mathematical efficiency calibration is calculated

using prior information on the

measurement configuration and the measurement

object, i.e. the parameters of the

waste drum, external shielding and the active

matrix. In principle, such a calibration

can be calculated for a specific spatial activity

distribution and for a non-uniform composition

of the active matrix, if the information

is available from the documentation or

from other characterization methods.

Segment

Detector

Segmente

Gamma Scanning

Waste Package

Source

Partitions

Detector

Advanced Sectorial

Gamma Scanning

Waste Package

Fig. 2. Characterization of a waste drum using Segmented Gamma Scanning (left) and Advanced

Sectorial Gamms Scanning (right) with a partitioned model of the active matrix.

Advanced Gamma Scanning Methods

Information on the spatial distribution is

determined from measurements by using

other scanning modes in gamma scanning.

The so-called ‘swivel scan’ is a scan mode

which is realized by a slight modification of

a segmented gamma scanner, where gamma

spectra are recorded while the collimated

detector performs an angular sweep

perpendicular to the waste drum central

axis [15]. Hereby, additional information

on the radial localization of the isotope activity

is obtained. Advanced scanning systems

such as the tomographic gamma

scanner (TGS) scan the waste drum to

probe the attenuation properties of the

drum content with an active source in the

so-called transmission mode. Hereby, the

mass attenuation coefficient of the active

matrix and shielding structures is obtained

with 3D spatial information using tomographic

reconstruction. In combination

with the passive emission scanning mode

in addition the spatial activity distribution

of gamma emitting nuclides can be determined.

Such scanners significantly increase

the information on the waste drum

content, and, since the determined activity

inventory is measured without assumptions

on the spatial distribution and the

matrix, the overall performance surpasses

that of SGS regarding measurement uncertainties

where TGS reaches accuracies in

the range of 14 % [16]. The drawback of

tomographic systems are the high system

costs, increased measurement time, and

the increased effort required for the analysis

of the extensive amount of acquired

measurement data. Given the large stock of

waste drums awaiting qualification, a cost

effective and robust measurement method

that can reach a throughput of several

waste drum per day with an automated

analysis is required. Moreover, the acquired

measurement data should be such

that it can be easily reviewed and inspected

to provide quality-controlled measurement

results. The SGS method fulfills these criteria

with one major drawback that the actual

measurement conditions deviate from

the calibration conditions used for the efficiency

calibration.

Advanced Sectorial Gamma

Scanning – ASGS

In this paper, we present a novel gamma

scanning method which addresses the reconstruction

of radionuclide inventories

with inhomogeneous distribution within

the waste drum. To this end, a spatially resolved

reconstruction method is developed

which uses a partitioned model of a cylindrically

shaped active matrix of a waste

package instead of cylindrical segments

(F i g u r e 2 – right). In Advanced Sectorial

Gamma Scanning (ASGS) the waste drum

is scanned in the so-called multi-rotation

mode in a similar fashion as in SGS: At a

fixed vertical position of the collimated

HPGe detector, the drum is rotated in 30 °

steps and a gamma spectrum is acquired

separately at each static measurement position.

The rotation scan is then repeated

after the detector has been translated to

the next vertical scanning position. As a result,

measurement data is acquired for

each individual sector and the additional

spatial information is used for the evaluation

of the measurement data.

System overview

An open collimator geometry is used where

with an automated collimator changing

unit different aperture sizes can be realized.

The opening view angle of the collimation

is such, that a full sector of the cylindrical

drum is covered and therefore a

full surface scan of the drum is accomplished

within the entire scanning procedure.

The collimator design choice was

made to maximize efficiency of the detector

at the same time maintaining a spatial

selectivity for a sectorial partial volume of

the waste drum. An interchangeable collimator

permits switching to varying aperture

sizes which in combination with the

horizontal translation to larger distances

between detector and waste drum increases

the dynamic range with respect to the

activity inventory of the waste drum. The

entire hardware design features industrial

grade components offering reliable and

stable operation in controlled areas and industrial

facilities (F i g u r e 3 ). The gamma

scanner has an operation software which

controls the entire gamma scanning and

data analysis process (F i g u r e 4 ). The

hardware of the gamma scanner consisting

of the mechanical drive for the translation

of the detector, the rotation table and the

drive for the interchangeable collimator

are controlled via a Programmable Logic

Controller (PLC). The system control also

manages the readout of the sensor units

consisting of a weighing scale integrated in

the rotation table, dose rate sensors and

the HPGe detector. The ASGS operation

57


Gamma scanning for the radiological characterization of radioactive waste packages VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Fig. 3. Technical design of the ASGS.

ASGS System

Mechanical drive

HPGe detector

Dose rate sensors

software itself is operated on a standard PC

and provides means of user interaction to

initialize the scanning process and to indicate

the status of the gamma scanner hardware.

In addition, a connection to a database

with the waste drum data can be implemented

whereby the manual data entry

is kept at a minimal level. A multi-rotational

step-wise sectorial scan is performed,

and the acquired gamma spectra are analyzed

automatically using well established

spectrum analysis algorithms (GENIE

Database

ASGS Operation

Software

System

Control

ECIAD

Module

Data

Analysis

Fig. 4. Software used for the ASGS included the ECIAD module for reconstruction of

inhomogeneous activities.

User

2000) and the information from the gamma

peak in each spectrum is extracted for

the radionuclides of interest.

Photopeak-efficiency calculation

An essential core element is the mathematical

calculation of the efficiency and the

reconstruction of activities using the newly

developed software ECIAD module (‘Efficiency

Calculation for Inhomogeneous Activity

Distributions’). The calculation of

photopeak efficiencies (‘efficiency calibration’)

is performed using the a-priori information

for the waste drum to be scanned,

such as composition of the active matrix

and geometrical dimensions. ECIAD creates

a partitioned model of the active matrix

and calculates the mathematical efficiency

calibration for the specific detector

setup of the measurement system. The partitioned

model consists of sub-volumes of

the active matrix, where the efficiency calculation

is performed under the assumption

of a uniform spatial distribution of radionuclides

and for a homogenous composition

and density only on the level of the

sub-volumes. This way, the model can reflect

a non-homogeneously distributed activity

within the waste drum. The attenuation

is determined using a ray-tracing approach

where a set of straight-line paths

are generated which originate from randomly

sampled positions within the source

volume with random directions. For all

paths that cross the detection volume, the

attenuation is determined deterministically

for all objects along the straight path

from the source to the detector volume.

The gamma interaction physics within the

detector crystal is implemented using a

Monte-Carlo sampling approach. For the

path length within the detection volume

the probability of interactions is determined

for the gamma interaction by photoabsorption,

inelastic scattering, pair-creation

as well as generation of bremsstrahlung

based on sampling distributions

derived from physics cross section data.

For each path the probability for full energy

deposition is considered for the extraction

of the peak efficiencies, which is obtained

by averaging all sampled trajectories.

The modeling and the efficiency

calculation in ECIAD are validated for a n-

type HPGe detector (40 % efficiency) for

the energy range of 50 - 1,500 keV. A

benchmark study was performed for several

test cases (F i g u r e 5 ). For the test

case a cement active matrix with a simplified

chemical composition with 60 wt.% O,

35 wt.% Si and 5 wt.% Ca and a density of

2 g/cm 3 was assumed. The radius of the

drum is 28.15 cm, the height of the drum is

40.4 cm which is half the height of a 200-l

waste drum. For the benchmark it is sufficient

to simulate a reduced model of a

waste drum. The thickness of the drum

wall is 1.5 mm and pure iron was taken for

material. The benchmark was performed

for a single measurement position of the

detector at the bottom of the drum. The

partitioned model consists of three layers

of 13.6 cm in height which are subdivided

in 30 ° sectors and where each sector is subdivided

radially at a radius of 14 cm. The

benchmark shows very good agreement

between the values obtained with the

MCNP simulation with 1∙10 9 photons and

the ECIAD calculation up to energies reaching

3,000 keV. As ECIAD is based on a semideterministic

model, very low photo peak

efficiencies can be calculated numerically,

58


VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Gamma scanning for the radiological characterization of radioactive waste packages

where with MCNP a much higher sampling

statistics would be needed to calculate photo-peak

efficiencies below 1∙10 -8 with a sufficiently

low uncertainty. In this respect,

the ECIAD tool outperforms MCNP, where

ECIAD require less computation time than

MCNP by a factor of at least 5000. The calculation

in F i g u r e 5 was performed in

less than 5 minutes on a regular desktop PC

which demonstrates that the efficiency calculation

with ECIAD can be performed well

within the duration of the scanning process.

Reconstruction of activities

The peak efficiency for a given radioactive

source distribution links the content in activity

with the peak count rate for an individual

gamma line determined from the

gamma spectrum obtained during the

measurement. Each single partial volume

contributes additively to the count rate

such that the total peak count rate for a

given measurement position P i is expressed

by the sum over all partial peak efficiencies

weighted with the activity of the partial

volume P i = ∑ k ε ik

. A k . With a source model

consisting of 6 layers and 12 sectors, for

example, this results in 72 summands for

each measurement position. The number

of measurement positions is determined by

the scan mode, where the default mode is a

scan of 12 angular sectors and 6 segments

leading to in total 72 equations for all count

rates obtained from the spectra that were

recorded for each position. In its basic

form, the reconstruction is based on a linear

system of equations which is fully determined

and can be solved for all partial

activities A k , k = {1,..,m} using the P i , i =

{1,..,n} obtained during the measurement

and the m x n calculated partial efficiencies.

If the model is chosen with additional radial

subdivisions, the number of volume

partitions and the number of activities A k

which need to be determined increases,

whereas the number of equations remains

the same. In this case, the system of equations

is undetermined and special solvers

are needed. Mathematically, the problem

becomes an optimization (minimization)

problem for which several mathematical

algorithms exist. The use of non-negative

least-squares solver determines the A k with

the additional constraint that A k >0 for all

k. The solution of this method therefore

automatically fulfills the positivity condition

for the activity because negative values

would mean an unphysical result. The

total activity of the radionuclide is obtained

from the sum of partial activities

obtained from solving the linear equations.

The underdetermined set of equations has

some additional degrees of freedom and

the lack of information can lead to spurious

results for the reconstructed activity

distribution and the total activity. If more

than one gamma line is emitted by the isotope

of interest, however, the additional

information can be used in the set of equations

which provides a stable solution for

the sum activity even for a large number of

radial subdivisions of the source model.

Performance assessment of ASGS

The performance of the reconstruction

method is compared using simulated measurements

for the standard method SGS

and the novel method ASGS. The test object

has the material composition of a

waste drum with a homogenously filled cement

matrix, i.e. the same material composition

of the benchmark case used for the

ECIAD efficiency calculation.

Reconstruction of a localized activity

distribution

A test case was defined, where a hot-spot

activity is located at the drum bottom

where an activity of 78 MBq Eu-152 is located

within a shape of a 30 ° sector of a

cylinder with 14 cm radius (F i g u r e 6 ).

The activity is uniformly distributed within

the cylindrical sub-volume. For SGS a typical

setup with a cylindrical collimator with

20 cm length and a hole diameter of 4 cm

was simulated (F i g u r e 6 – uppper right)

using the validated 40 % n-type detector

model. The resulting segment that is

scanned during every single rotation scan

has the corresponding height of 4 cm and

therefore in total 10 segments are scanned

to cover the entire height of the test object.

In SGS a simplified evaluation is performed

on the basis that the matrix and the activity

distribution is homogenous. In this case,

the activity can be derived from a single expression

A reco = Pr / ε hom, where A reco is the

Benchmark - Partial Efficiencies ECIAD vs. MCNP

Radial 1 Radial 2

10 -4

10 -4

10 -10 10 -10

10 -6

10 -8

10 -6

10 -8

Layer 1 Layer 1

10 -10

10 -6

10 -8

10 -10

10 -6

10 -8

Layer 2 Layer 2

10 -10

10 -6

10 -8

10 -10

10 -6

10 -8

Layer 3 Layer 3

10 -1 10 0 10 -1

10 0

Energy [MeV]

Energy [MeV]

Fig. 5. Comparison of partial peak efficiencies calculated with ECIAD (dots) and MCNP

(solid lines) for a partitioned model of a cement matrix with density 2 g cm -3 .

reconstructed activity, P r is the peak rate

and ε home is the assumed efficiency for the

homogeneous activity distribution within

the volume. Even if the activity is not

equally distributed within the matrix an

average peak rate is determined from the

sum spectrum obtained during the rotation

scan and the evaluation is performed using

the efficiency determined for homogeneous

distribution. The error expressed as the

ratio of the reconstructed to the true activity

is related to the ratio of the true efficiency

ε true to the assumed efficiency for a

homogeneous activity distributionε home

and therefore is determined by A reco/A true

=ε true/ε hom

. The true efficiency ε true is

calculated in a simulation for the assumed

activity distribution with the entire activity

located uniformly within a single sectorshaped

volume. A strong deviation between

ε true and ε hom is observed where the

true efficiency is strongly underestimated

when the actual activity is not within the

field of view during the scan, whereas a

strong overestimation occurs when the activity

is within the view of the detector

(F i g u r e 7 ). In SGS, the individual segments

are evaluated which is performed on

the sum of the registered events recorded

during rotation, divided by the total measurement

time for the individual segment.

This results in an average over the angular

profile for each segment, where the ratio of

true to assumed efficiency at a gamma energy

of 1,408 keV is reduced to maximally

3.3 and therefore the activity of this segment

would be overestimated by this factor.

At this gamma energy, the summation

over all 10 segments results in a ratio of

0.95, which means that SGS reaches the

59


Gamma scanning for the radiological characterization of radioactive waste packages VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

true value of the activity. This, however, is

pure coincidence and depends on the gamma

energy of the line used for evaluation

and the density of the matrix: at the gamma

energies of 122, 344, 779, 964,

1,112 keV the ratio of reconstructed to true

activity for SGS amounts 0.09, 0.32, 0.66,

0.75, 0.82, respectively.

To evaluate the ASGS method, a MCNP

model of the 78 MBq Eu-152 activity distribution

and the waste drum was implemented,

where full gamma spectra for the

40 % n-type detector were simulated for

every measurement position (F i g u r e 8 ).

A full sectorial scan for three segments and

12 sectors per layer was simulated with in

total 36 measurement positions, where the

measurement time for each position is 120

SGS

ASGS

Fig. 6. Left part: Modeled activity distribution with the form of a cylindrical 30 °sector (red).

The dots indicate the locations for which a localized point source was assumed in

simulated measurements of SGS and ASGS. Right part: The field of view of the collimation

geometry shown in comparison between Segmented Gamma Scanning (SGS) and

Advanced Sectorial Gamma Scanning (ASGS).

Segment No.

10

9

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

10 11 12 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Sector No.

Ratio ε true /ε hom - SGS

2 4 6 8 10 12

1 2

ε true /ε hom

Fig. 7. Ratio of true to assumed efficiency in Segmented Gamma Scanning for a non-uniform

activity distribution localized in a cylindrical sector for individual sectors (left) and after

averaging over a rotation scan (right).

10

seconds. For the ASGS geometry, the collimator

design is such that it covers a larger

area of the drum surface in the vertical direction

and therefore less vertical scan positions

are needed (see F i g u r e 6 bottomright).

The spectra were analyzed using a

gamma spectrum analysis software and the

peak area was evaluated for six Eu-152

gamma lines at 122, 344, 779, 964, 1,112,

and 1,408 keV. The peak efficiencies were

calculated for different source partition

models using the ECIAD tool which were

used as an input for the reconstruction using

the non-negative least squares reconstruction

algorithm. Using the analysis of

two of the in total six gamma lines of Eu-

152, the reconstruction algorithm can assign

the activity to the correct location in

9

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

Segment No.

the partitioned model and the total activity

is reconstructed to 77.1 MBq (using the

1,112 and 1,408 keV lines), which is an underestimation

of 1.3 % of the true activity.

The result for the reconstructed activity did

not vary strongly with the choice of gamma

lines used and the deviation ranges from

-1.3 % to + 4.7 % of the true activity. The

reconstruction algorithm leads to a solution,

where a small part of the activity is

assigned to the neighboring layers of the

source partitions, however, this is only a

minor effect and is attributed to the noise

in the gamma spectrum. This showcase

demonstrates, that the partitioned source

model can reconstruct a non-uniform activity

distribution.

Uncertainties, decision threshold

and detection limit

For gamma scanning the largest uncertainty

contribution stems from the unknown

location of the uncertainty which is attributed

as ‘model uncertainty’. These errors

are evaluated by assuming worst-case scenarios

for a non-homogeneous activity distribution

and are treated as Type B uncertainties

according to the GUM and DIN ISO

11929. For the cement waste matrix used

in the previously mentioned test case, single

point sources located in various positions

of the waste drum were simulated

and evaluated with SGS and the ASGS reconstruction

method. In ASGS a finer radial

subdivision was chosen with 6 radially

subdivided partitions for each 30 ° sector.

Hereby, an improved spatial resolution can

be reached to reconstruct a localized activity

distribution. With ASGS the reconstruction

method localizes the point source and

therefore this information reduces the

‘model uncertainty’ relative to SGS. For

ASGS the reconstruction is made for the

evaluation of several combinations of two

gamma lines of Eu-152. Even though the

linear system of equations is underdetermined

the reconstruction algorithm was

able to solve the minimization problem. A

comparison of the ratio for A reco/A true

is

shown for four different point source locations

(indicated as green dots in F i g -

u r e 6 ) representing locations where the

radiation from the source experiences

maximal and minimal self-attenuation

within the active matrix (Ta b l e 1 – Ratios

of true to reconstructed activities for

simulated point source activities located at

four different positions within the waste

drum for SGS and ASGS.). In SGS this ratio

strongly depends on the gamma line chosen

for evaluation and for the worst case

for the gamma line at 122 keV the activity

is underestimated up to a factor of 50 and

overestimated by a factor of 4. In ASGS

multiple lines are used in the analysis,

where the reconstruction of the simulated

measurement of point source activity was

performed using two lines, three lines, and

six lines. For the line energy combinations

shown in Ta b l e 1 the largest spread is ob-

60


VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Gamma scanning for the radiological characterization of radioactive waste packages

Peak Analysis

Waste Drum Model:

Source Partitions

served when the 122 and 1,408 keV lines is

chosen for the reconstruction with an underestimation

by a factor of approximately

1.2 and an overestimation by a factor of approximately

1.8. This spread represents

also the worst case in ASGS for all line combinations

of the six strongest Eu-152 lines.

Therefore, ASGS reconstruction reduces

the bandwidth of errors which is potentially

caused by the unknown activity distribution

and therefore this lack of information

leads to lower model uncertainties

and correspondingly much lower conservative

estimates than in SGS.

The ASGS system relies on the spatial reconstruction

of the activity and therefore uses

the spatial information of the gamma count

rate recorded at the different measurement

positions of the waste drum. The decision

threshold determines the minimum amount

of the radionuclide activity for a given gamma

line which can be detected with a high

degree of certainty in the gamma scan. In

ASGS, the evaluation of the decision threshold

and the detection limit is performed

based on the individual spectra and not on

the averaged gamma spectrum as in conventional

SGS. When a ‘hot spot’ of localized

activity is present in the drum, the evaluation

of the characteristic limits applied in

SGS then becomes invalid whereas the variation

in the count rate in different measurement

positions is accounted for in the ASGS

analysis of the measurement data. In terms

of increasing the detection efficiency, ASGS

uses a larger aperture than the typical collimator

geometry used for SGS which results

in a photopeak efficiency which is by a factor

50 higher. Assuming the background emanates

from the activity within the waste

drum to be measured, the decision threshold

for detection of radionuclides scales with

the square root of the efficiency, such that a

significant reduction by an order of magnitude

can be reached for the ASGS system as

compared to the SGS method within the

same time for the measurement.

ECIAD

Layer 3

Layer 2

Layer 1

Fig. 8. Simulated spectra for sectorial scanning of the simulated test case containing a localized

Eu-152 activity distribution.

Summary

ASGS offers a measurement method for

characterization of radioactive waste

which significantly reduces the model uncertainty

based on a spatially resolved reconstruction.

The ASGS software is designed

to permit the automated operation

of the gamma scanning system which includes

the analysis of the data. The dedicated

ECIAD software module is developed

for the calculation of mathematical efficiencies

for a partitioned source model, the

reconstruction of spatially resolved activities,

and the uncertainty calculation. The

ECIAD software operates without userguidance

in an automated fashion using a

priori information on the waste drum.

With a suitable interface, this information

can be retrieved by the software prior to

the analysis from a database. As a result,

lower conservative estimate can be reached

than in conventional gamma scanning systems,

since the spatial information on the

activity distribution is used for the evaluation

of the measurement data. Therefore,

ASGS provides a far more accurate characterization

of the true activity which facilitates

a better use of the allowed activity

limits. With ASGS, the evaluation is performed

in a consistent manner and will be

coupled with the calculation of uncertainties

according to the current norms and

guidelines for the evaluation of uncertainties.

The evaluation model for the activity

is based on a reconstruction algorithm

which precludes the propagation of uncertainties

using the general law of error propagation.

Therefore, the propagation of uncertainties

is calculated using Monte-Carlo

based methods for the determination of

characteristic limits according to the requirements

of the current guidelines. An

experimental validation of the measurement

method for various measurement

configurations for the active matrix compositions

and density and for different activity

distributions is planned for the near

future using the newly designed gamma

scanning system.

Tab. 1. Ratios of true to reconstructed activities for simulated point source activities located at four

different positions within the waste drum for SGS and ASGS.

E [keV] Center Drum wall

Bottom Middle Bottom Middle

SGS 122 0.02 0.04 2.76 4.08

344 0.19 0.37 1.78 2.40

779 0.59 1.13 1.26 1.99

964 0.70 1.33 1.09 1.72

1,112 0.78 1.50 0.98 1.63

1,408 0.97 1.89 0.92 1.52

ASGS 122 - 1,408 0.82 0.99 1.56 1.79

344 - 1,408 0.85 1.03 1.16 1.41

779 - 1,408 0.83 1.01 1.02 1.27

964 - 1,408 0.80 0.97 1.01 1.25

1112 - 1,408 0.79 0.95 1.00 1.25

122 - 779 - 1,408 0.78 1.37 1.02 1.60

all Lines 0.81 1.17 1.01 1.38

61


Gamma scanning for the radiological characterization of radioactive waste packages VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

References

[1] VGB PowerTech e.V., Waste disposal for nuclear

power plants, Essen, Germany: Working

Panel Waste Management, VGB PowerTech

e.V., 2012.

[2] International Atomic Energy Agency, Disposal

of Radioactive Waste – Specific Safety

Requirements, IAEA Safety Standards Series

No. SSR-5, International Atomic Energy

Agency, Vienna, 2011.

[3] International Atomic Energy Agency, Energy,

Electricity and Nuclear Power Estimates

for the Period up to 2050, Vienna,

Austria: International Atomic Energy

Agency, 2018.

[4] P. Brennecke, Requirements on Radioactive

Waste for Disposal (Waste Acceptance Requirements

as of December 2014) – Konrad

Repository, BfS – Federal Office for Radiation

Protection, Salzgitter, 2015.

[5] S. Steyer, Produktkontrolle radioaktiver Abfälle,

radiologische Aspekte – Endlager Konrad

– Stand: Oktober 2010, BfS – Federal

Office for Radiation Protection, Salzgitter,

2010.

[6] ISO, Uncertainty of measurement – Part 3:

Guide to the expression of uncertainty in

measurement (GUM:1995) ISO/IEC Guide

98-3:2008, 2010.

[7] ISO, Determination of the characteristic

limits (decision threshold, detection limit

and limits of the confidence interval) for

measurements of ionizing radiation – Fundamentals

and applications (ISO

11929:2010), 2011.

[8] P. Filß, Relation between the activity of a

high-density waste drum and its gamma

count rate measured with an unshielded Gedetector,

Applied Radiation Isotopes, vol.

48, no. 8, pp. 805-812, 1995.

[9] E. Martin, D.F. Jones and J.L. Parker, Gamma-Ray

Measurements with the Segmented

Gamma Scan – LA-7059-M, 1977.

[10] P. Filß, Specific activity of large-volume

sources determined by a collimated external

detector, Kerntechnik, vol. 54, no. 3, pp.

198-201, 1989.

[11] M. Bruggeman and R. Carchon, Solidang,

a computer code for the computation of the

effective solid angle and correction factors

for gamma spectroscopy-based waste assay,

Applied Radiation and Isotopes, vol. 52, no.

3, pp. 771-7776, 2000.

[12] T. Krings, C. Genreith, E. Mauerhofer and

M. Rossbach, A numerical method to improve

the reconstruction of the activity content

in homogeneous radioactive waste

drums, Nuclear Instruments and Methods in

Physics Research A, vol. 701, pp. 262-267,

2013.

[13] Venkataraman, Improved detector response

characterization method in ISOCS and Lab-

SOCS, Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear

Chemistry, vol. 264, p. 213, 2005.

[14] D. Nakazawa, F. Bronson, S. Croft, R.

McElroy, W.F. Mueller and R. Venkataraman,

The efficiency calilbration of non-destructive

gamma assay systems using semianalytical

mathematical approaches, in

Proceedings of the WM2010 Conference,

Phoenix, AZ, 2010.

[15] T. Bücherl, Synopsis of Gamma Scanning

Systems, European Commision, Garching,

1998.

[16] R. Venkataraman, S. Croft, M. Villani, R.D.

McElroy und R.J. Estep, Total Measurement

Uncertainty Estimation for Tomographic

Gamma Scanner, in Proceedings of 46th

Annual INMM Meeting, Phoenix, AZ,

2005.

[17] R. Venkataraman, F. Bronson, V. Abashkevich,

B.M. Young und M. Field, Validation

of in situ object counting system (ISOCS)

mathematical efficiency calibration software,

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in

Physics Research A, pp. 450-454, 1999.

[18] T. Goorley, MCNP6.1.1-Beta Release Notes,

Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos,

2014.

l

VGB-Standard

Part 41: Power to Gas

Teil 41: Power to Gas

RDS-PP ® Application Guideline

Anwendungsrichtlinie

VGB-S-823-41-2018-07-EN-DE. German/English edition 2018

DIN A4, 160 pages, Price for VGB-Members* € 280.–, for Non-Members € 420.–, + VAT, ship ping and hand ling

The complete RDS-PP ® covers additionally the publications VGB-S-821-00-2016-06-EN and VGB-B 102;

the VGB-B 108 d/e and VGB-S-891-00-2012-06-DE-EN are recommended.

For efficient project planning, development, construction, operation and maintenance of any industrial plant,

it is helpful to structure the respective plant and assign clear and unambiguous alphanumeric codes to all assemblies

and components. A good designation system reflects closely the structure of the plant and the

interaction of its individual parts.

The designation supports, among others, an economic engineering of the plant as well as a cost-optimized

procurement because parts with similar requirements can be identified much easier and early on.

For operation and maintenance (O&M) a clear designation serves as an unambiguous address for O&M

management systems.

VGB-Standard

RDS-PP ®

Application Guideline

Part 41: Power to Gas

Anwendungsrichtlinie

Teil 41: Power to Gas

VGB-S-823-41-2018-07-EN-DE

Some international standards for the designation of industrial plants and its documentation exist already, in particular the series of

ISO/IEC 81346. The designation system called “Reference Designation System (RDS)” bases on these standards and can generally

be applied to all industrial plants.

For power plants, the sector specific standard ISO/TS 81346-10 was developed and constitutes the normative basis for the

“Reference Designation System for Power Plants” RDS-PP ® .

This sector specific standard covers the application for all engineering disciplines and for all types of plants of the energy supply sector.

This document covers the rules of the

RDS-PP designation system for the Power to Gas plants.

This guideline provides detailed specifi¬cations for the reference designation of plant parts that are specific to Power to Gas plants

(e.g. Electrolyzer, Methanation system).

For the designation of plant parts that vary from project to project, the guideline provides general guidance illustrated by examples,

which has to be applied correspondingly to the specific case. This applies in particular to auxiliary and ancillary systems.

* Access for eBooks (PDF files) is included in the membership fees for Ordinary Members (operators, plant owners) of VGB PowerTech e.V.

VGB PowerTech Service GmbH Deilbachtal 173 | 45257 Essen | P.O. Box 10 39 32 | Germany

Verlag technisch-wissenschaftlicher Schriften Fon: +49 201 8128-200 | Fax: +49 201 8128-302 | Mail: mark@vgb.org | www.vgb.org/shop

62


VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Review of the analytical methods used in nuclear decommissioning

Review of the analytical methods used

in nuclear decommissioning

Application vs. aspiration – an EU-wide survey of methods in

radioanalytical chemistry

Alexandra K. Nothstein, Ursula Hoeppener-Kramar, Laura Aldave de las Heras and

Benjamin C. Russell

Review der Analysemethoden für

die Stilllegung kerntechnischer

Anlagen

Die Welle an Rückbauprojekten nuklearer Einrichtungen,

vor der Europa jetzt und in naher

Zukunft steht, erfordert eine solide Basis effizienter

chemischer und radiochemischer Analytikmethoden

und -fähigkeiten. In dieser Studie

wurde eine Umfrage an europäischen Laboren

durchgeführt, um die gegenwärtig angewendeten

Verfahren zusammenzutragen. Dies erstreckt

sich über Radionuklide, Aktivitätslevel,

Probentypen und analytische Gerätschaften,

um ein klareres Bild der gegenwärtigen Lage

und zukünftigen Herausforderungen zeichnen

zu können. Die Ergebnisse spiegeln die Besonderheit

des Rückbaus wieder, welche die Analytik

einer großen Spanne von Probenmatrices

erfordert. Infolgedessen wird eine große Bandbreite

an radioanalytischen Methoden verwendet.

Dennoch bleiben Gammaspektrometrie,

Flüssigszintillationszähler und Alphaspektrometrie

die vorherrschenden analytischen Methoden.

Trotz der Notwendigkeit für neuartige

Methoden für spezifische Nuklide, liegt für die

Labore der Fokus für zukünftige Herausforderungen

nicht auf Spezialisierung oder Miniaturisierung

von Instrumenten. Hingegen zeigten

sich zwei Arten von Herausforderungen am

Authors

Dr. Alexandra K. Nothstein

Deputy head of radiochemical laboratory

Institute for Safety and Environment (SUM)

Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT)

ggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany

Dr. Ursula Hoeppener-Kramar

Head of radiochemical laboratory

Institute for Safety and Environment (SUM)

Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT)

ggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany

Dr. Laura Aldave de las Heras

Deputy Head of waste management unit

European Commission, Joint Research

Centre – JRC, Directorate G –

Nuclear Safety & Security

Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany

Dr. Benjamin C. Russell

Senior Research Scientist

National Physical Laboratory (NPL)

Hampton Road

Teddington TW11 0LW, Middlesex, UK

The survey was composed of open and

closed style questions. A total of 18 questions

were posed to the participants. Ten

questions indicated the use of several options

(i.e. multiple nuclides with multiple

analytical options) and a free text option to

cover all possibilities. The aim was to collect

information on the type of laboratories

working on decommissioning, the sample

types analyzed, the activity levels measured,

the sample preparation techniques

utilized, the radionuclides determined,

and the analytical methods used. The final

two open style questions asked the participants

to provide their view of the future

and in particular the analytical challenges

for both their laboratory and decommissioning

in general.

The survey was created using the online

tool SurveyMonkey [ref: https://www.surdeutlichsten:

erstens Prozessoptimierung, wie

die verbesserte, starker vernetzte Kommunikation

mit Kunden und Behörden und zweitens,

Methodenverbesserungen, wie die weitverbreitete

Anwendung neuer Technologien und besserer

Verfügbarkeit von Referenzmaterialien. l

Introduction

Decommissioning of the first nuclear reactors

is progressing and Europe is currently

facing a decommissioning wave, which will

continue into the future due to the planned

shutdown of the first and second generation

nuclear power plants (NPPs) and facilities

in the next 5 to 50 years [European

Commission, 2016]. With about a third of

the EU’s 186 reactors requiring decommissioning

at an estimated cost of 4 - 5 billon €

each, this adds up to a total of 200 - 300

billion € for near future decommissioning

projects within the EU [OECD, 2016].

Thus, processes that improve the efficiency

of decommissioning, analytical methods

for radionuclide determination, and availability

of Europe-wide standards are all

becoming increasingly relevant [Judge &

Regan, 2017].

Decommissioning is a strongly regulated

process [McIntyre, 2012], in which a range

of radionuclides must be analyzed using

approved methods that reach specified limits

of detection and accuracy. Decommissioning

also requires a spectrum of analytical

methods because of the multitude of

radionuclides, matrices and sample preparation

procedures, all of which span a vast

range of activity levels [Hou, 2007]. The

choice of methods for each radionuclide

depends on the sample, i.e. sample matrix,

activity level and amount, which, in turn, is

dependent on legal requirements and regulatory

statutes for sampling at nuclear facilities

and power plants during decommissioning.

Detection limits for specific nuclides

are then determined by declaration

criteria. Analysis of radionuclides is therefore

strongly dependent on a number of

parameters and requires a variety of analytical

methods [Hou et al. 2016], which, to

some extent is contradictory to the need for

a highly efficient, routine-based approach

to radioanalytics with high-output capacity

required to meet the challenge of the current

wave of decommissioning.

Moreover, an overview of the analytical

methods and the scope with which they are

employed throughout Europe, is currently

lacking. Meanwhile, standardized measurement

procedures that rely on suitable

reference materials are absent or still being

developed [Larijani et al. 2017]. Therefore,

it is difficult to determine whether the

available analytical methods are sufficient

and valid when compared with requirements.

To improve the understanding of current

capabilities and future needs and challenges,

a survey was conducted for end users of

European laboratories, as part of the Horizon2020

INSIDER project. The survey covered

radionuclides measured, their activity

levels, analytical instrumentation and sample

matrices.

Materials and Methods

63


<

<

Review of the analytical methods used in nuclear decommissioning VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

veymonkey.com/]. Laboratory managers

from the INSIDER consortium, as well as

others contacted through personal networks,

were initially contacted and asked to

collect European-wide data with the intention

to reach a representative sample of

laboratories working in the field. A total of

approximately 140 persons were contacted,

of which 80 agreed to participate. Out of 75

personalized survey links that were sent

out, 34 surveys were completed from 16

countries (10 from Germany, 5 from France,

2 from Belgium, Hungary, Romania, Sweden

and Switzerland. Austria, Croatia, Denmark,

Finland, Italy, and one from each of

the Netherlands, Slovakia, Spain and the

United Kingdom). Five additional surveys

were begun, but not completed. Only completed

surveys were analyzed. The survey

responses were analyzed by exporting the

raw data as a Microsoft Excel ® file

Results

Information on the participating

laboratories (Questions 1 - 5)

The answers to the first three questions

confirmed information on the institutions

and countries of the participating laboratories.

In answer to the question of the final

purpose of the analytical measurements of

decommissioning samples (question 4),

74 % answered “research”, 53 % “declaration

according to waste criteria / final disposal”,

50 % “clearance of decommissioning

material”, 50 % “monitoring environment”,

44 % “monitoring facility

processes” and 32 % answered “environment

remediation”. 27 % of the responses

checked “other” purposes, such as organization

of proficiency tests, samples with

unknown purposes, general analytical support

(determining scaling factors or high

precision isotope analysis) and monitoring

workers.

Regarding sampling (question 5), 47 % of

the 34 laboratories replied that they take

samples themselves, while 53 % replied

they did not. Free-text responses about the

types of samples taken by these 16 laboratories

showed that 8 laboratories took environmental

samples or samples for monitoring

purposes, 7 laboratories took samples

for decommissioning or waste characterization,

and 3 laboratories took samples for

purposes of research or upon client request.

Two answers, in particular, stood

out, one saying their laboratory provided

“the whole service from sampling, analyses

to assessments” and the other saying they

take samples of “soil, water, aerosols, vegetation,

[and] sediment […] for preservation

of evidence”.

Sample characteristics & preparation

(Questions 6 - 10)

Of the sample matrices analyzed for decommissioning

(F i g u r e 1 , F i g u r e 2 ,

F i g u r e 3 , F i g u r e 4 ), the greatest share

of samples analyzed were waste water (analyzed

by 30 out of 34), sludge (analyzed

by 29 laboratories), aqueous samples (27

laboratories), metals, concrete / construction

materials and soil (26 laboratories).

Gaseous samples were less common, and

What are the general activity levels of your various

sample materials?

gaseous (air / ventillation)

nuclear fuel / rod components

filters

resins

concrete-metall mixtures

metals (steel, alloys, etc ... )

concrete / construction waste (non metallic)

soil

meat / animal products (meat, milk, honey, etc ... )

plant material (vegetation, vegetables, etc ... )

organic liquids (oils, alcohols, etc ... )

sludge (waste water + solids, etc ... )

waste water samples (chemical waste water, etc ... )

aqeous samples (fresh water, rain water, etc ... )

0 20 40 60

low (< 0.5 Bq/g)

absolute number of answers

medium (0.5 - 10 2 Bq/g)

high (10 2- 10 5 Bq/g)

not analysed in our lab

Fig. 1. Responses regarding the activity levels of decommissioning samples (question was

mandatory, response options were given and multiple answers were possible).

How much sample mass I volume do you require for

analysis?

analyzed by 12 out of 34 laboratories, as

were animal products (12 laboratories)

and nuclear fuel or nuclear rod components

(14 laboratories).

The results given in the following paragraphs

were calculated as relative percentages

of those that gave a reply other than

gaseous (air / ventillation)

nuclear fuel / rod components

filters

resins

concrete-metall mixtures

metals (steel, alloys, etc ... )

concrete / construction waste (non metallic)

soil

meat / animal products (meat, milk, honey, etc ... )

plant material (vegetation, vegetables, etc ... )

organic liquids (oils, alcohols, etc ... )

sludge (waste water + solids, etc ... )

waste water samples (chemical waste water, etc ... )

aqeous samples (fresh water, rain water, etc ... )

0 20 40 60

< 1 mg (µL)

1 - 10 mg (µL)

10 - 100 mg (µL)

0.1 - 1 g (mL)

1 - 10 g (mL)

10 - 100 g (mL)

0.1 - 1 kg (L)

1 - 10 kg (L)

> 10 kg (L)

none

absolute number of answers

Fig. 2. Responses regarding the sample mass or volume required for decommissioning (question

was mandatory, response options were given and multiple answers were possible).

64


VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Review of the analytical methods used in nuclear decommissioning

What are the usual sample numbers per batch

(or request) of your various sample materials?

gaseous (air / ventillation)

nuclear fuel / rod components

filters

resins

concrete-metall mixtures

metals (steel, alloys, etc ... )

concrete / construction waste (non metallic)

soil

meat / animal products (meat, milk, honey, etc ... )

plant material (vegetation, vegetables, etc ... )

organic liquids (oils, alcohols, etc ... )

sludge (waste water + solids, etc ... )

waste water samples (chemical waste water, etc ... )

aqeous samples (fresh water, rain water, etc ... )

‘not analyzed in our lab / none’; absolute

numbers can be found in the respective figures.

The question on activity levels of samples

(F i g u r e 1 ), revealed that low (< 0.5 Bq/g)

and medium (0.5 - 102 Bq/g) activities

were the main sample levels measured by

the laboratories. The highest activity levels

(102 - 105 Bq/g) were analyzed in all samples

(exception for animal products) with a

limited number of high activity plant material

and soils measurements (4 & 8 % respectively).

High activity measurements

were most common in nuclear fuel or nuclear

rod components (48 %). Medium activity

was reported as being 35 – 44 % of

most sample materials, with only gaseous

samples (29 %), meat / animal products

(24 %) and plant material (19 %) lower.

Samples with a high relative proportion of

low activity levels (< 0.5 Bq/g) were plant

material (77 %), soil (76 %) and gaseous

samples (52 %)..

The results from question 7 on sample

mass/volume required for analysis (F i g -

u r e 2 ) illustrated that sample mass or

sample volume had the strongest variation

(10 kg) for gaseous and filter

samples. Organic liquids, sludge and resin

samples spanned the lowest range with 4

orders of magnitude (0.1 mg – 1 kg).

Concerning the number of samples per

batch (question 8, F i g u r e 3 ), 94 % contained

1 - 25 samples, and 53 % of sample

batches contained 5 samples or less. Batches

of more than 50 samples were rare (1 %

of the all sample batches) and were only

found for waste water or soil samples.

0 20 40 60

1 - 5 absolute number of answers

6 - 10

11 - 25

26 - 50

> 50

none

Fig. 3. Responses regarding the sample numbers per batch analysed for decommissioning

(question was mandatory, response options were given and multiple answers were

possible).

F i g u r e 4 showed the most frequently

analyzed samples (question 9) were waste

water, for which 28 % of laboratories reported

daily or weekly intervals, and only 2

laboratories answered they didn’t analyze

What is the frequency of your sample analyses?

Are they routine measurements?

gaseous (air / ventillation)

nuclear fuel / rod components

filters

resins

concrete-metall mixtures

metals (steel, alloys, etc ... )

concrete / construction waste (non metallic)

soil

meat / animal products (meat, milk, honey ...

plant material (vegetation, vegetables, etc ... )

organic liquids (oils, alcohols, etc ... )

sludge (waste water + solids, etc ... )

waste water samples (chemical waste ...

aqeous samples (fresh water, rain water ...

1 - 5 days

1 - 2 weeks

1 - 2 months

3 - 6 months

1 - 2 years

non-recurrent

none

them at all. In general, all sample types

showed a variety of analysis frequencies

and each sample type was analyzed nonrecurrently.

All laboratories applied some form of sample

preparation (F i g u r e 5 , question 10).

The most commonly used methods were

drying (< 110 °C) / evaporation to dryness

and “classic radiochemistry” / radionuclide

separation (both reported to be 94 %

applicable). The sample preparation methods

used by the fewest laboratories were

gas expelling (68 % not applicable), low

pressure closed (acid) digestion (62 % not

applicable) and (alkaline) melt digestion /

fusion beads (53 % not applicable). Mechanical

sample preparation (i.e. shredding

/ grinding / milling) was reported by

81 % of laboratories.

When comparing methods, F i g u r e 5

suggests that multiple methods were used

in the same laboratories and were complimentary

rather than exclusionary. While

open acid leaching and digestion were both

reported in most laboratories (88 % and

82 %, respectively) medium pressure

closed (acid) microwave digestion (71 %)

was widely used as well. Classic radiochemistry

/ radionuclide separation (94 %)

was applied by more laboratories than extraction

chromatography of radionuclides

using columns from Eichrom ® Technologies

or Triskem International (88 %).

Regarding the frequency of sample preparation

methods, F i g u r e 5 shows that for

0 10 20 30 40

absolute number of answers

Fig. 4. Responses regarding the frequency of samples analysed for decommissioning (question

was mandatory, response options were given and multiple answers were possible).

65


Review of the analytical methods used in nuclear decommissioning VGB PowerTech 5 l 2019

Which steps of sample preparation are performed in your lab in which

frequency?

none

electro-de position / electro-precipitation

extraction chromatography of radionuclides (Eichrom, Triskem)

"dassic radiochemistry" / radionuclide separation

(alkaline) melt digestion / fusion beads

medium pressure closed (acid) microwave digestion

low pressure closed (acid) digestion

closed acid leaching

open acid digestion (complete digestion)

open acid leaching

gas expelling

wet incineration with acid

incineration(> 500 o C)

incineration(< 500 o C)

drying ( < 110 o C) / evaporation to dryness

mechanical sample preparation (i.e. shredding / grinding / milling)

0 10 20 30 40

minutes - hours

1 - 5 days absolute number of answers

1 - 2 weeks

1 - 2 months

3 - 6 months

1 - 2 years

non-recurrent

not applicable

Fig. 5. Responses regarding the frequency of sample preparation types for decommissioning

(question was mandatory, response options were given and multiple answers were

possible).

15 % of the laboratories, the three main

sample preparation methods (classic radiochemistry

/ radionuclide separation, extraction

chromatography of radionuclides

[Eichrom Technologies, Triskem International]

and electro-deposition / electroprecipitation

were performed on a minuteto-hourly

basis. This number rose to 55 %,