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ASO Playbill Spring 2020

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SPRING 2020

bruce anthony kiesling, music director

SERIES SPONSORS

SAGE FOUNDATION


Inspiration

IS OUR FORTE

adrian.edu | 517.265.5161


The Brand New Look...

2020 GMC Acadia

cliftauto.com

(517) 265-6107

1


Adrian Symphony Orchestra

2019-20 Season

WELCOME TO THE 2019-20 SEASON WITH

THE ADRIAN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA.

Welcome to the 2nd half of the 2019-2020 Season of the

Adrian Symphony Orchestra. Our fall season was filled with

some amazing highlights, including the audience favorite

“Rose of Sonora” concerto and the orchestra’s moving

performance of Tchaikovsky’s final symphony.

The next few months continue to share the greatest

music for orchestra, both old and new. Recent music is

highlighted in February with “MARVEL-ous Heroes,”

our celebration of the great movie music of Marvel and DC

comic heroes.

In March, we visit with the two great musical prodigies,

Mozart and Mendelssohn in a new venue at Siena Heights

University. May brings the “Big” concert of the year with

two stunning orchestral masterpieces that will blow you away.

Throughout all of these programs, you’ll enjoy all that

you love about your wonderful professional orchestra.

Great music, right here in our community, made by talented

and passionate musicians.

The success of our orchestra and its longevity are a direct

result of the great community support that we have enjoyed

throughout the decades. I’m convinced that our orchestra is

in the beginning of another golden age, being a major part

of the fabric of our community.

As always, our season wraps up with a pops concert.

This year we take a trip down memory lane with the music

of Simon and Garfunkel, as their legendary “Concert in

Central Park” is recreated, song by song, on the stage of

Dawson Auditorium.

Make plans to attend each program for something to

wow your senses and touch your spirit.

See you there!

SEASON AT A GLANCE

MARVEL-OUS HEROES

SAT February 15 at 7 pm

Dawson Auditorium

Music from your favorite

superhero movies

MENDELSSHON & MOZART

FRI

March 13 at 8 pm

Sister Kevin McLaughlin

Music Hall

Steven Lin, Piano

Bruce Anthony Kiesling

Music Director

PICTURE IT!

FRI

May 1 at 8 pm

Dawson Auditorium

Andrew Tyson, Piano

OLD FRIENDS

FRI

June 5 at 8 pm

Dawson Auditorium

A tribute to Simon

and Garfunkel

2


leave a legacy with the aso

Many donors feel strongly about preserving the legacy of classical music in the

community. They are able to do so by remembering the Adrian Symphony Orchestra

in their wills, or by creating a planned gift to benefit the ASO. These gifts can be

un-restricted, or designated for a special purpose such as the endowment of the ASO.

The array of giving options and the ways you can incorporate them into your planning are

as varied as the circumstances they serve. We are always available to provide you with

further information and suggestions on gifts that fit your lifestyle and philanthropic goals.

Thank you to the following people who have recognized the importance of live music

in their community by including the Adrian Symphony Orchestra in their estate plans.

DIRECTOR’S CIRCLE (PLANNED GIVING)

Bob & Muriel Bell

Patricia L. Dunlap

Richard Ehnis, Ph.D.

Nick Handler

Robert E. Price

Hildreth Spencer, Ph.D.

Charlie & Marianne Steffens

If you have chosen to remember the ASO in this manner, we would like to hear from

you and to include you either by name or anonymously (your choice) as a member

of the Director’s Circle. Members will enjoy a variety of ASO activities as major donors.

3


Music Director

Bruce Anthony Kiesling

ADRIAN

SYMPHONY

ORCHESTRA

19-20 SEASON

Active in a wide variety of music, Bruce has a national profile as a

conductor and music educator from coast to coast, from classical

repertoire at Carnegie Hall to the stage of the Hollywood Bowl

conducting with Stevie Wonder and Latin superstars Juanes and

Gloria Estefan.

Music Director of the orchestra since 2016, his short tenure so

far has been marked by a growing and enthusiastic audience drawn

regularly to the symphony by his engaging, relaxed, and slightly

irreverent commentary from the stage and the preconcert lectures.

The musicians of the orchestra also enjoy his relaxed but focused

rehearsal style that has been producing exciting results heard from

the stage during each of the programs.

Bruce’s other passion is music education, where he regularly works

with outstanding youth orchestra programs. For five years, Bruce was

the YOLA conductor for the Los Angeles Philharmonic where he

led multiple orchestras of different levels including most of the 700

students at YOLA’s three sites. YOLA is Gustavo Dudamel’s

signature music education program, which brings free-of-charge

musical opportunities to underserved youth in Los Angeles.

Bruce has conducted at the country’s most storied halls, including

the Kennedy Center, Carnegie Hall, the Hollywood Bowl, Walt

Disney Concert Hall, Ozawa Hall at Tanglewood, and SPAC. Bruce

has worked with Dmitry Sitkovetsky, David Kim, Tai Murray,

Alexander Paley, Steven Lin, Andrew Tyson, Alexi Kenney, Jeffrey

Biegel, Lindsay Deutsch, Jennifer Check, Anthony Dean Griffey,

Gary Hoffman, Darren Criss, Gloria Estefan, Stevie Wonder, Ricky

Minor, Grace Potter, Jason Alexander, Lonny Price, Jodi Benson,

Doug LeBrecque, Doc Watson, David Holt, Stevie Wonder, Gloria

Estefan, Juanes, Gospel performers Richard Smallwood and Curt

Carr, and his orchestras have accompanied multiple performances

with The Airborne Toxic Event, Clay Aiken, Natalie Cole, and

Michael Bolton among others. He has prepared orchestras for

performances with Simon Rattle, Marin Alsop, Gustavo Dudamel,

Thomas Wilkins, and David Robertson. Recently, Bruce created

several original orchestrations to accompany the legendary rock band

“Journey” for their performance at the Hollywood Bowl.

He also spent 8 years as resident conductor of the wonderful

Greensboro Symphony Orchestra in North Carolina before

relocating to California. Following that, Bruce was the Assistant

Conductor of the Pasadena Symphony and Pops and Music Director

of the Pasadena Youth Symphony.

Bruce is active in higher education where he served for three

years on the faculty of the Longy School of Music of Bard College:

MAT program (Master of Arts in Teaching). Currently, Bruce

conducts the University Orchestra and Opera at the University

of California Santa Cruz.

Then there’s also his addiction to film music, which finds its way

on to many of his concert programs, including full performances of

the films “Raiders of the Lost Ark,” (2019) “Psycho,” and “Casablanca.”

And also there is his whole musical theater phase where he

served as musical director for dozens of productions including the

original production of Darren Criss (of TV’s “Glee”) “A Very Potter

Sequel,” which became a top ten hit on iTunes. He also musical

directed several productions of the five-time Emmy winner “The

News in Revue,” and also “They’re Playing Our Song” at Reprise

Theater starring Jason Alexander.

Bruce holds graduate degrees from the University of Michigan,

The University of Miami, and The University of North Carolina

School of the Arts. Recent guest conducting appearances include

The Pacific Symphony, The Toledo Symphony, The Long Beach

Symphony, San Luis Obispo Symphony, the Fresno Philharmonic,

the Owensboro Symphony, the Greensboro Symphony, the

San Bernardino Symphony Orchestra, the Western Piedmont

Symphony, the Lakeside Symphony (OH), and the Young Artists

Orchestra at Tanglewood.

In spite of his intrepid schedule, Bruce somehow finds time

to vacation a bit. Most recently, Bruce learned that downhill skiing

really is like riding a bike (in the sense that after you haven’t ridden

a bike in five years you might fall a couple of times before you

remember how it’s done). Although based in Los Angeles, he

also loves New York City´s cultural scene, both in classical music

and theater. A diagnosed cinephile, he’s grateful that LA has such

a lively theater, music, and film scene to enjoy, where Bruce makes

too-often appearances at the Arclight Theater in Hollywood, easily

the world’s greatest movie theater.

4


Julia Dejonghe Londa Pickles Matt Garrow Rick Gurdjian Karla Stanton Allison Ott

Rick Gurdjian of

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and Matt Garrow of

Engler, Garrow & Roth, Ltd.

work together to provide

comprehensive financial

planning and insurance services

that coordinate and manage

our clients’ financial decisions

today so they can achieve

their goals for tomorrow.

Office 517-263-0754 311 North Winter Street

Toll Free 800-306-0754 Adrian, Michigan 49221

www.gurdjian.com www.egrfinancial.com

Registered representatives offer securities through Sigma Financial Corp., member FINRA/SIPC.

Fee-based investment advisory services offered through Sigma Planning Corporation, a registered investment advisor.

Gurdjian Insurance Group, Inc. and Engler, Garrow & Roth, Ltd. are independent of Sigma Financial Corp. and Sigma Planning Corp.

P r o u d M e M b e r s o f

A G r e A t C o M M u n i t y.

5


Adrian Symphony Orchestra

History, Staff and Board of Directors

ADRIAN

SYMPHONY

ORCHESTRA

19-20 SEASON

About the Adrian Symphony Orchestra

The Adrian Symphony Orchestra was founded in 1981 with the

mission to create musical performances of the highest quality and to

present activities that educate, enhance, and improve the quality of

life for the citizens of Lenawee County and Southeast Michigan.

Now in its 39th season, the ASO is committed to providing excellent

Music for Everyone through diverse seasons of classical, pops, and

school-day educational concerts. Our goal is to create remarkable live

concert experiences now and for many years to come.

Finest Musicians

The ASO attracts the finest musicians from the world’s stage to

produce performances of the high quality normally experienced in

a larger city. Members of the orchestra are professional musicians

active in Northwest Ohio and Southeast Michigan. These musicians

have trained at prestigious music schools including Juilliard,

Eastman, Yale, and the University of Michigan and they perform

with other professional orchestras, ballets, and opera companies.

Many teach music in the region, in private studios, colleges,

universities, and public schools.

The orchestra regularly collaborates with extraordinary soloists,

including prize winners of the Naumburg, Leeds, and Tchaikvovsky

competitions. ASO guest artists have appeared with internationallyknown

orchestras in venues ranging from New York’s Carnegie Hall

and Lincoln Center to Vienna’s Musikverein. Recent ASO soloists

have appeared with the New York Philharmonic, Philadelphia

Orchestra, Los Angeles Philharmonic, and the Dresden Staatskapelle,

as well as other prestigious orchestras around the world.

Beginning of a New Era

The ASO has been served by three previous music directors in its 38

year history: Art Shaw (1981-1986), David Katz (1987-1999), and

John Thomas Dodson (2001-2015). The 2015-2016 Season featured

four finalists in the ASO’s search for a new music director. In the

2016-2017 season we welcomed our new Music Director Bruce

Anthony Kiesling (bio listed on page 4).

Community Supported

The ASO serves as the Professional Orchestra-in-Residence

at Adrian College and is governed by a community-based volunteer

Board of Directors. The ASO would not succeed without support

from individuals like you! The ASO is a Michigan non-profit 501(c)

(3) corporation and is funded through concert ticket sales, program

advertising, sponsorships, foundation and government grants and

donations from our loyal patrons. We hope you will choose to enrich

your life with live music. We are confident that you will find ASO

concerts to be remarkable experiences.

THE ASO BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Officers

Patt Hayes, Chair

Mark Schersten, Vice Chair

Millie Pruett, Treasurer

Michele Buku, Secretary

Board Members

Larry Bogusz

Gerry Burg

Jim Colman

Sr. Pat Fischer

Grace Garno

Ashley Hutchison

Rep. Bronna Kahle

Katie Mattison

Chris Miller

Barb Mitzel

Chip Moore

Hon. Michael Olsaver

JoAnn Sanborn

Hon. Catherine Sala

Amanda Davis Scott

Trevor Van Valkenburg

Advisory Board Members

Allan Brittain

Frank Dick

Patrick Farver

David Hickman

Doug Kapnick

We hope you

will choose to

enrich your life

with live music.

We are confident

that you will find

ASO concerts

to be remarkable

experiences.

Honorary Members

Don Aspacher^

Richard Barber^

Jean Baker^

Muriel Bell^

Claire Bryant^*+

Karen Caine^

Lois DeMots^+

James Dodd^+

Kay Doyle^

Fred Eaton*

Dr. Howard Eddy*

Magdalena Ezoe*

Roger Fechner^

Lillis Gilmartin*+

Sue Goldsen^

Jennifer Hamlin-Church*

Mary Harkey^+

Denver Hedge^

Anne Jameson*

Mary Kapnick^

Bill Kenyon^

Leo Klein^+

Brenda Knapp^

Marcia Lengnick^

Kathie Locke*

Dr. Michael McAuliffe^

Cheri Ricketts^

David Siler^

Barbie Stanton*

James Toncre^+

Jim Traer*

* Founding Board Member

^ 10+ years of service on the

Board of Directors

+ Deceased

ADMINISTRATIVE

AND ARTISTIC STAFF

Bruce Anthony Kiesling

Music Director

Elizabeth (Libby) Watson

Executive Director

Amber Marks

Audience Services

Chris Momany, Jr.

Stage & Concert

Operations Manager

Fran Wakefield

Orchestra Librarian

Jim Westhoff

Personnel Manager

6


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7


Adrian Symphony Orchestra

Roster

ADRIAN

SYMPHONY

ORCHESTRA

19-20 SEASON

VIOLIN I

Denice Turck,

concertmaster

Mary & Doug Kapnick

Concertmaster Chair

Ann Arbor, MI

James Park,

acting assistant

principal

Ann Arbor, MI

Valerie Palmieri

Adrian, MI

Zack Rubin

Ann Arbor, MI

Leslie Capozzoli

Mark & Becky Schersten

Violin Chair

Ypsilanti, MI

Yanina Nagorny

Sylvania, OH

Cyril Zilka

Ann Arbor, MI

Elaine Moore

Perrysburg, OH

Gina Buzzelli

Perrysburg, OH

Irina Kagan

Portage, MI

Michael Romans

Ann Arbor, MI

Zbigniew Rybinski

Ann Arbor, MI

Jack Whitten

Ann Arbor, MI

VIOLIN II

Phoebe Gelzer-Govatos,

principal

Ann Arbor, MI

Elizabeth Child,

assistant principal

Tecumseh, MI

Nicholas Field

Ann Arbor, MI

Regan Knapp

Ann Arbor, MI

Mike Sieberg

Clyde, OH

Fran Wakefield

Ann Arbor, MI

Carla Weltin

Maumee, OH

VIOLA

Monica Reineck,

principal

Sandusky, OH

Alisa Dyer,

assistant principal

Charlotte, MI

Carol Wells Palms

Manchester, MI

Amy Marr

Britton, MI

Ann Felder

Monroe, MI

Kimberly Lock

Ypsilanti, MI

Max Moore

Ann Arbor, MI

Julie Zinn

Ann Arbor, MI

CELLO

Jim Anderson,

principal

Toledo, OH

Stefan Koch,

assistant principal

Ann Arbor, MI

Kathleen Ford

Ann Arbor, MI

Caitlin Gross

Ann Arbor, MI

Zachary Brown

Port Chester, NY

Hari Khalsa

Ann Arbor, MI

Jeffrey Lang

Jackson, MI

Anthony Marchese

Bowling Green, OH

Margaret Weiss

Ann Arbor, MI

BASS

Robert Rohwer,

principal

Manchester, MI

Andy Monefeldt,

assistant principal

Ann Arbor, MI

Jonathan Hammonds

Ann Arbor, MI

Tim Somers

Sylvania, OH

Christopher Jeffer

Bowling Green, OH

Gillian Markwick

Detroit, MI

Joseph Rockne Starks

Ann Arbor, MI

Jacob Warren

South Lyon, MI

FLUTE

Pam Morgan,

principal

Ypsilanti, MI

Kelly Hill Kretzer

Toledo, OH

Jonathan Sills

Ann Arbor, MI

PICCOLO

Jonathan Sills

Ann Arbor, MI

OBOE

Stephanie Shapiro,

principal

Ann Arbor, MI

Chris Wheeler

Williamston, MI

Alana Rose

Lansing, MI

CLARINET

Shannon Ford,

principal

Toledo, OH

Lisa Raschiatore

Monroe, MI

Andrew Sprung

Pam & Gerry Burg

Clarinet Chair

Brighton, MI

BASSOON

Jim Westhoff,

principal

Ann Arbor, MI

Phelan Young

Ferndale, MI

CONTRA BASSOON

Phelan Young

Ferndale, MI

HORN

Clinton Webb,

acting principal

Ann Arbor, MI

Luke Dickow

Commerce, MI

Dominic Hayes

Clinton, MI

Colleen Conway

Tecumseh, MI

Jahn White

Ypsilanti, MI

TRUMPET

Lori Bitz,

principal

Toledo, OH

Brian Bushong

Bowling Green, OH

Michael Barkett

Okemos, MI

Isaac Hopkins

East Lansing, MI

TROMBONE

Luis Rangel DaCosta,

principal

Ann Arbor, MI

Peter Deal

Toledo, OH

Scott Grupke

Marshall, MI

Scott Vanderbilt

Ann Arbor, MI

TUBA

Christopher Hall,

principal

Ann Arbor, MI

TIMPANI

David Endahl

Milan, MI

PERCUSSION

Jonathan Mashburn,

principal

Saline, MI

Dan Kesterke

Adrian, MI

Nigel Fernandez

Ann Arbor, MI

Anthony DeMartinis

Ann Arbor, MI

HARP

Brittany DeYoung,

principal

Ypsilanti, MI

Julie Buzzelli

Waterville, OH

PIANO

Elaine Moore

Perrysburg, OH

8


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12


The ASO is

your symphony

orchestra.

We want you to feel every note of music produced just for you.

The ASO designs concert seasons filled with great classical works,

electrifying pops concerts, and engaging youth education programs.

Our musicians and guest artists from the world’s stage are here to share

their talents and musical stories with you.

WE SIMPLY CANNOT DO IT ALONE.

Ticket sales alone do not cover all of the expenses that come with

producing a professional symphony orchestra concert. Through the generosity

of loyal donors, corporate partners, and foundations, the ASO is able to

bring you moments of musical excitement direct from our hearts to yours.

How you can help keep the music alive:

• Bring your friends to a concert and share the ASO experience.

• Sponsor a Musician Chair, from the Concertmaster to a Section Player,

every chair is imperative to the final product.

• Make a donation and become a part of musical excellence.

Every dollar has an impact!

Donating

is Easy!

SECURE ONLINE SITE

AdrianSymphony.org/donate

BY PHONE

(517) 264-3121

Even small donations

help make big experiences!

13


Adrian Symphony Orchestra

Annual Fund Donors

The Adrian Symphony Orchestra extends sincere appreciation to its many

donors. The generosity of individuals, foundations, and corporations makes

an extraordinary impact on the ASO’s mission. These donors give the gift of

live music to our community. The following is a list of patrons who contributed

or pledged their annual support through January 17, 2020. Thank you!

MAJOR SUPPORTER

($10,000 & UP)

BENEFACTOR

($1,000-$1,999)

PATRON

($500-$999)

CONTRIBUTOR

($250-$499)

Farver Foundation

Mary & Doug Kapnick*

Lenawee Community

Foundation

Michigan Council for Arts

and Cultural Affairs

National Endowment

for the Arts

Robert E. Price Trust

Sage Foundation

Hildreth H. Spencer Trust

Maurice & Dorothy Stubnitz

Foundation

E. Ruthruff Wilson Foundation

PHILANTHROPIST

($2,000-$9,999)

Bob & Muriel Bell*

Dave & Jean Ann Berlin

Mike & Michele Buku*

Jim & Becky Colman

Kappa Kappa Epsilon

Kiwanis Club of Adrian

Brian & Libby Watson*

Sally Watson

Arts Alliance

Frank & Brenda Baker

Larry & Pat Bogusz*

Pam & Gerry Burg*

Dr. Stan & Karen Caine*

Dr. Bill & Charlene DeMots*

Dr. & Mrs. Lawrence Desjarlais*

Frank & Shirley Dick*

Judith C. Francoeur*

Wendy & Paul Gietzen*

Patt & Mary Helen Hayes

F. Denver Hedge*

Mr. & Mrs. Denis F. Jodis

Dave and Brenda Knapp

Marcia & Guenther Legnick*

Joyce & Chris Miller*

Dave & Barb Mitzel

Chip & Cindy Moore

Tiffany & Michael Olsaver

PlaneWave Instruments

Victoria A. Powell*

Bob & Audrey Sack*

JoAnn Sanborn

Becky & Mark Schersten*

Leslie Shannon

Terence Sheehan &

Michelle Malarney

Dr. Steven & Anne Sherman

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Shirk*

Larry Stephan

Charlie & Marianne Steffens*

Jimmy Daniels

Sharronn & Dan Etter

Dr. Ray & Grace Garno

Dan & Mary Gilson

Michael & Nancy Herr/Adrian

Animal Clinic

Ann Hinsdale-Knisel

Hudson Pharmacy

Bob & Mary Kelly

Diane & Bill Kenyon

Michael & Betsy Lackey

Dr. James & Cheryll Leonard

Ruth Littleton

Terry & Carolyn Marr

John & Laurie Raymond

Tom & Molly Schnell

Irma Jean Sommer

Cyril Zilka

John & Carol Beeskow

Margaret & Lloyd Borsvold

Clift Buick GMC

Ronald & Kathleen Day

Cindy Farnham

Roger & Mary Fechner

First Federal Bank

Dr. Michele & Robert Gardner

Norm & Sally Glasser

Coralia Hamilton

Jack & Faye Lewis

Gary & Stephanie Lundy

Old National Bank

Kevin & Korinne Marti

Peter & Ann Paullin

Keith & Janet Perkins

George & Mary Beth Reasoner

Brenda Rigdon & Tim Robinson

Dr. Jun & Melissa Tsuji

Marcia Wright

14


ADVOCATE

($100-$249)

Mary Abbott

Adrian Insurance Agency

Michael Allen & Janice Whelan

Jim & Charlene Anderson

Kim & Linda Bauschka

Big Boy of Adrian

Dr. & Mrs. Richard Boff

Dennis & KZ Bolton

Kevin Blysma

Jim & Sandee Brielmaier

Michael & Anna Clegg

Betty Ellen Cummings

Dan Dubois

Linda Emerson

Patricia & Jerry Gaviglio

Richard & Carol Germond

Janet Goulart

Dr. Stephen & Mary Gregg

Cathleen Griffith & Dale Thielan

Mr. & Mrs. Dave Guldin

Dr. & Mrs. Robert Guy

Dr. Inad & Liliane Haddad

Jim & Deanna Hartley

Phil & Ann Hughes

Pat & Bronna Kahle

Don & Louise Kleinsmith

Mr. & Mrs. Art Liewert

Vince & Mary Ann Lysaght

Bob & Sonja Matajewski

Jan McCrady

Bill & Carol McNeil

John P. & Judy L. Mershon

Thomas & Jeanette Meyer

Tim & Julie Miller

Dr. & Mrs. Maher Mualla

Paula Osburn

Dana Periat

Jim & Debra Peters

Jim & Amy Philp

Arlie & Beverly Pickles

Ron & Millie Pruett

Kay Reeves

Lee Salazar

Nate & Kathy Smith

Lois Speed

Trevor & Kathryn Van

Valkenburg

John & Anne Walker

Brad Watson

Rev. Richard & Elaine Webb

FRIEND

($10-$99)

Jill Alverson

Judy Calamungi

Doug Cameron

Karen & Robert Collins

Betty Cummings

Tom & Marcia Faulhaber

Rod & Nancy Galbreath

Roy & Vera Gardner

Anne Hackett

Mary Haddad

Cindy Kopp

Rose R. Kuhnert

Trudy McSorley

Dane & Kristin Nelson

Lisa & Kevin Neuman

Catherine Sala

Don & Sharon Taylor

Charles S. Vollers

John & Anne Walker

The Adrian Symphony Orchestra

recognizes and appreciates

all of our donors. Every effort

has been made to ensure the

accuracy of our donor registry,

and we regret any errors that

may appear. Please contact us

at (517) 264-3121 to make any

corrections. To all donors, the

ASO expresses sincere thanks

and deep appreciation.

Boldface indicates donors

who have made multi-year

pledges of support. Multi-year

gifts help sustain the future

of the ASO! Thank you!

*Indicates members of the

Musical Legacy Society, a group

of very special individuals and

foundations who have made a

significant commitment to the

ASO. Membership requires a

pledge of $1,000 or more each

year for at least five years.

2019-20 SEASON SPONSORS

These sponsors enable the Adrian Symphony

Orchestra to provide outstanding music and

musicians, world-renowned guest artists as

well as cultural education to our community.

MAJOR UNDERWRITER & HOST

Adrian College

SEASON SPONSOR

Sage Foundation

CLASSICAL SERIES SPONSOR

Gleaner Life Insurance

The Taylor Agency of Southern Michigan

POPS SERIES SPONSOR

Wacker Chemie AG

SITE SPONSORS

Adrian College

Siena Heights University

GUEST ARTIST UNDERWRITER

Maurice & Dorothy Stubnitz Foundation

CONCERT SPONSORS

Citizens Gas Fuel Company

County National Bank

D & P Communications

The Daily Telegram

First Federal Bank

Kapnick Insurance Group

Michigan Council for the Arts and Cultural Affairs

National Endowment for the Arts

PlaneWave Instruments

HOSPITALITY HOSTS

WLEN Radio

YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS

Elizabeth Ruthruff Wilson Foundation

Kappa Kappa Epsilon

Lenawee Youth Council

MEDIA PARTNERS

The Daily Telegram

WLEN

PRESENTATION BOUQUETS

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ABOVE: Sergeant Marty Bike of the

Cambridge Township Police Department

helps Austin Smith with his fingerprints.

BELOW: AJ Armstrong of the Cambridge

Township Fire Department shows Brady

Bellfy of Onsted how to use equipment to

cut through a car during Summer Safety

Camp Thursday at Onsted Elementary

School.

Pinckney ..............................31

Tecumseh...............................21

Sand Creek ..............................0

Reading ...............................36

Siena Heights University Fieldhouse is pictured Thursday

on the campus of Siena Heights University.

TELEGRAM PHOTO BY SYDNEY NIMETH

New students

welcomed to Siena

Heights University

School announces enrollment

figures, programs for coming year

By Daily Telegram staff

Ypsilanti Lincoln.................35

Adrian.......................................8

Morenci....................................0

Pittsford..............................28

ADRIAN — Siena

Heights University welcomed

nearly 400 first-time

and transfer undergraduate

students to its Adrian

campus for the 2018-19

academic year.

The university is expected

to enroll more than 680 students

this fall from its

post-traditional and graduate

programs. Classes start

ing

“We look forward to

another productive and

exciting academic year here

at Siena Heights,” Albert

said.

Wolf said the office of

undergraduate admissions

received more than 2,000

applications, a 4 percent

increase from the 2017-18

cycle. SHU’s new class

includes students from 10

states and six countries. In

addition, SHU’s Graduate

College saw a 27 percent

m

Your News However

You Want It.

For Home

Delivery

or Digital

Subscription

Call

517-265-5111


Marvel-ous

Heroes

Saturday, February 15, 2020

7:00 PM

Dawson Auditorium

Adrian College

Bruce Anthony Kiesling, conductor

Clinton Youth Honors Choir

Joyce Collins, director

The program will be announced from the stage.

GUEST ARTIST SPONSOR

ADDITIONAL SUPPORT

CONCERT SPONSORS

POPS SERIES SPONSOR

The Maurice

& Dorothy Stubnitz

Foundation

17


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the aso would like to say…

THANK YOU TO OUR VOLUNTEERS!

we wouldn’t be able to do what we do…without you!

Jill Alverson

Lora Arriaga

Bruce Banks

Joe & Pat Baker

Dennis & KZ Bolton

Judy Calamungi

Becky Colman

Kathy Day

Linda Desjarlais

John & Judy Drews

Gail Dunaway

Marge Earl

Diana Fallot

Cindy Farnham

Jan Francoeur

Dan & Mary Gilson

Norm & Sally Glasser

David Guldin

Mary Haddad

Jon & Debi Hale

Tyler Hinton

Cindy Kopp

Dennis & Chery Lee

Bertha Lopez

Mindy MacDonald

Bob & Sonja Matejewski

Marsha Miller

Carol Palms

Ashley Price

Ronald Rayba

Bev Richardson

John Saxton

Marty Schoonover

Lena Spiegel

Marianne Steffens

Aimee Tressler

Kim Van Camp

Tom & Jan Vern

Fran Wakefield

Leo & Barb Wesley

Patricia Williamson

Dave & Joan Wittkop

Robert & Julie Zeng

MEANINGFUL VOLUNTEER WORK WITH ENJOYABLE BENEFITS

On Concert Nights – In Office – Out in the Community

Call the ASO office to join our team of volunteers today! (517) 264-3121

18


In memory of Sherry Meyers-Bourland,

Assistant Principal Violin I and ASO member since 2003.

Sherry was a Ypsilanti, MI school district music educator

for 27 years. After retirement, she continued on as a

member of the Adrian, Ann Arbor, and Saginaw Bay

Symphony Orchestras. She will be deeply missed by

her husband Kent, family, fellow musicians, audience

members, and colleagues.

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SAVE THE DATE

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Friday, November 6, 2020

Adrian Tobias Center

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19


“Where words fail, music speaks.”

~ Hans Christian Andersen

ADRIAN ~ BLISSFIELD

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20


Mendelsshon

& Mozart

Friday, March 13, 2020 · 8:00 PM

Sister Kevin McLaughlin Music Hall

Siena Heights University

Bruce Anthony Kiesling, Conductor

Steven Lin, Piano

Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847)

Piano Concerto No. 1 in G minor, op. 25

Steven Lin, piano

I. Molto Allegro con fuoco

II. Andante

III. Presto - Molto allegro e vivace

INTERMISSION

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)

Symphony No. 41 in C major, K 551

I. Allegro vivace

II. Andante cantabile

III. Allegretto

IV. Molto allegro

ADDITIONAL SUPPORT

CONCERT SPONSORS

CLASSICAL SERIES SPONSORS

GUEST ARTIST SPONSOR: The Maurice & Dorothy Stubnitz Foundation

21


Program Notes

by Beryl McHenry

MENDELSSHON

& MOZART

MARCH 13

Concerto No. 1 for Piano and Orchestra in G Minor, Op. 25

Felix Mendelssohn (1809 -1847)

Mendelssohn’s First Piano Concerto was composed in 1831,

when he was just 22. He was enjoying a highly successful career

already. He had made his conducting debut in London in 1829,

then produced an operetta in Berlin, and completed his

Reformation Symphony. Late in 1830 he was working on the

Hebrides Overture in Germany and finishing up his Italian and

Scottish Symphonies while traveling in Italy. On his way back to

Germany he spent some time in Switzerland, finally arriving in

Munich in October. He was to conduct a concert of his music

and felt he needed just one more work to make the program

complete. The G Minor Concerto was written during that time to

fill out the program. It premiered October 17 in Munich, along

with several major works, and was such a success that

Mendelssohn routinely included it in his concerts from then on.

It also became part of every concert pianist’s repertoire for

decades after.

The work is in three movements, linked without pause to create

a sense of overall unity. The first movement, Molto allegro con

fuoco, is one of turbulence and fury, with the piano entering

almost immediately, and piano and orchestra alternating the

furious and lyrical subjects contributing to the whole. The second

movement, Andante, begins with a fanfare and develops into a

beautiful song, characteristically Mendelssohn, which ends on a

sustained E major chord, then moves at once to the final Presto

movement. Here another fanfare gives way to a brilliant Rondo

which displays the soloist’s virtuosity in a dazzling series of runs

and leads to the spectacular conclusion. Mendelssohn himself

performed the solo part at the highly successful premiere in

Munich and wrote to his father the next day, “My concerto met

with a long and vivid reception. The orchestra accompanied well

and the work itself was really quite wild.”

The concerto did, in fact, become a part of the repertoire of

many concert pianists, including Franz Liszt. Mendelssohn had

just met Liszt in Paris at the Erard piano showrooms. He placed

the barely legible score for his new concerto on one of the pianos

and was amazed to witness Liszt sight-read the work easily.

Mendelssohn declared it to be “a miracle” and a popular legend

has it that the piano itself became possessed and played the work

over and over without a pianist after that until it was destroyed!

Symphony No. 41 “Jupiter”

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)

At the time the Jupiter Symphony was written, most major works

were composed in response to a commission from a patron, for

the purpose of making a living. Mozart, however, had just moved

to Vienna and was determined to support himself and his family

through performance and composing. It might have been more

sensible to write smaller works which could readily be sold, but it

was during this uncertain period of time that Mozart composed

his three greatest - and last - symphonies. He certainly did not

know they would be his last. At his young age he must have

expected to live well into the nineteenth century. But something

drove him to write, and all three, the 39th, 40th and 41st, were

produced in about nine weeks during the summer of 1788. Each

is a complete work with four movements. According to one

program annotator this would have meant spending “5 days and a

few hours on the composition of each movement.” Additionally,

he was composing other pieces, giving piano lessons, caring for a

sick wife, grieving the loss of his 6-month-old daughter, moving

to a new home and worrying about his financial obligations. We

do not know when the work premiered, but there are in existence

notes to show that it was performed in Dresden, Leipzig and

Frankfurt in 1790.

The Symphony No. 41 is enormous in its emotional range and

expressive brilliance. It opens with a stately theme alternating

with a gently lyrical one. Second and third themes balance out

the opening mood, pointing toward the second movement of the

work. This begins with a simple four note theme reminiscent of

church music. It follows a strict sonata form and serves as a

perfect model of a dramatic symphonic movement. The third

movement is a minuet, the kind of music that would be heard in

an imperial ballroom. It contains a musical “joke” in that the

opening notes of each phrase sound like a concluding cadence,

while the notes that follow suggest an opening strain for that

conclusion. His friend Haydn had used this device in one of his

quartets a few months earlier. In the incredible finale movement,

Mozart weaves together five independent figures to create a

sense of excitement leading to a double fugue at the end.

The popular subtitle “Jupiter” was not applied by Mozart.

According to his son Franz, it originated in London around 1819

and was devised by Johann Salomon, a London impresario, as an

advertising device for the London performances that year. One

wonders what Mozart would have thought of this addition.

22


MENDELSSHON

& MOZART

MARCH 13

Guest Artist

Steven Lin

A top prize winner of the Arthur Rubinstein International

Piano Competition in Tel Aviv, Steven Lin made his first

performance with New York Philharmonic at the age of 12.

Recently made a sensational Carnegie debut playing the

Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto no. 1, and has been hailed by the

New York Times for playing that is “…immaculately voiced and

enhanced by admirable subtleties of shading and dynamics.”

Recent orchestral engagements include the Israel Philharmonic,

Baltimore Symphony, and National Symphony of Mexico. Highly

in demand for recitals worldwide, including Kennedy Center in

Washington, Carnegie Hall, Munich, Paris, Tokyo, and Shanghai.

A frequent performer with summer festivals, Steven Lin has

appeared in the Bravo! Vail Music Festival, Aspen Music Festival,

and La Jolla SummerFest. An active chamber musician, he has

collaborated with Gidon Kremer and Misha Maisky.

Steven Lin completed the prestigious Artist Diploma program

at the Curtis Institute of Music, and before that, he earned both

Bachelor’s and Master’s Degrees at The Juilliard School. When

not making music, Steven describes himself as an ‘NBA basketball

fanatic,’ a source of great pride and commitment which began

when he was eight years old.

PHOTO BY SOPHIE ZHAI

23


2019 - 2020 NATIONAL TOURING SEASON

JOHN LATINI | Saturday, November 2 | 7:30 pm

Award-winning musician and two-time Detroit Blues Champ, John

Latini personifies the best that Michigan’s rock history has to offer: an

honest, no-nonsense commitment to real songs about real people.

$25 Adults | $23 Seniors, Youth, Military

LEGENDS OF MI COMEDY | Sat., January 25 | 7:30 pm

The TCA is excited to host legendary comedians Dave Landau (Last Comic

Standing), Bryan McCree (MADtv), Bill Bushart (Detroit Comedian of the Year),

Norm Stulz (Comedy Central) & local favorite Steve Smargon (Bi-polar Marine)!

$30 Adults | $25 Seniors, Youth, Military

517.759.3191 • 2000 Curtis Road | lower level • Adrian

www.drdesjarlais.com

NY, NY DUELING PIANOS | Sat., February 15 | 7:30 pm

Drew and Kin are back! This comedy-based dueling piano show is always a

fun, high-energy party-in-a-box! Pianists sing and play everything from Jimmy

Buffet, Garth Brooks, and Tom Petty, to Elvis, Katy Perry, and Metallica.

$40 on-stage seating | $30 Adults | $25 Seniors, Youth, Military

Gross, Puckey, Gruel & Roof, P.C.

LE CIRQUE ESPRIT | Sat., March 7 | 4:00 pm

Featuring New York City’s renowned ABCirque and live orchestrations by the

contemporary group CORDIS, Le Cirque Esprit presents its latest creation,

“Spirit of the Machine.” Based on the Greek mythological tale of Talos.

$30 Adults | $25 Seniors, Youth, Military

Brian Nofzinger, CPA

John Gruel, CPA

Thomas G Boldt, CPA

Drew Gietzen

Jennifer Buechele

Millie Pruett, ASO Treasurer

Best wishes to the ASO during this exciting season.

PHASE 5 | Sat., April 25 | 7:30 pm

Voted #1 R&B Vocal Group in Detroit in 2016, Phase 5 brings their

authentic recreation of Motown’s greatest hits to the TCA stage. Phase

5’s smooth jazz mixed with Hip Hop and R&B will leave you wanting more.

$25 Adult | $23 Seniors, Youth, Military

Visit our website to see our full lineup of events!

www.gpgrcpa.com

4196 West Maple Avenue

Adrian, Michigan 49221

517-263-5788

400 N. Maumee St. Tecumseh, MI

517.423.6617 | www.TheTCA.org

24


Picture It!

Friday, May 1, 2020 · 8:00 PM

Dawson Auditorium, Adrian College

Bruce Anthony Kiesling, Conductor

Andrew Tyson, Piano

Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990)

Symphony No. 2 (The Age of Anxiety)

Andrew Tyson, piano

Part I

The Prologue

The Seven Ages

The Seven Stages

Part II

The Dirge

The Masque

The Epilogue

INTERMISSION

Modest Mussorgsky (1839-1881)

Pictures at an Exhibition (arr. Maurice Ravel)

Promenade

1. Gnomus

Promenade

2. The Old Castle

Promenade

3. Tuileries

4. Bydlo

Promenade

5. Ballet of the Chicks

in Their Shells

6. Samuel Goldenberg

and Schmuyle

7. Limoges

8. Catacombs

Cum mortuis in lingua mortua

9. The Hut on Fowl’s Legs

ADDITIONAL SUPPORT

CONCERT SPONSOR

CLASSICAL SERIES SPONSORS

GUEST ARTIST SPONSOR: The Maurice & Dorothy Stubnitz Foundation

25


Program Notes

by Beryl McHenry

PICTURE IT!

MAY 1

Symphony No. 2 “The Age of Anxiety”

Leonard Bernstein (1918–1990)

Leonard Bernstein earned his initial fame as a conductor. In 1943

he stepped in to conduct the New York Philharmonic when

Bruno Walter was ill, and he so impressed the music director,

Artur Rodzinski that he was appointed assistant conductor. He

went on to a distinguished career as a conductor, but also became

an active composer, with some of his best work coming out of

that decade. He wrote, among other works, his first symphony,

and then his second, before going on to write musicals for the

broadway stage in the 50s. His second symphony, subtitled “The

Age of Anxiety” was composed in 1949 and was inspired by a

book-length poem by W. H. Auden. Auden’s The Age of Anxiety

was written in 1947 and focused on the spiritual angst and

cultural condition of the mid-twentieth century. It got terrible

reviews. The Times Literary Supplement called it “his one dull

book, his one failure.” T. S. Elliot, however, called it “Auden’s best

work to date”, and it won a Pulitzer Prize in 1948. Bernstein

called it “one of the most shattering examples of pure virtuosity in

the history of English poetry.” He became obsessed with the idea

of writing a symphony based on it.

The work was commissioned by Bernstein’s long-time mentor

Serge Koussevitsky and it premiered on April 8, 1949, with

Koussevitsky conducting and Bernstein playing the piano solo.

The story depicts an encounter between four individuals in New

York City during wartime. They meet in a bar in the “Prologue,”

converse about the metaphysical world and the human condition

in “The Seven Ages” and “The Seven Stages” of man, lament the

loss of a guiding father figure (apparently FDR who had died in

1945) in the “Dirge”, head to a party in “Masque” and then take

leave of each other in the “Epilogue,” each returning to their

everyday lives. The music sounds at times like English pastoral

themes and at other times like American urban music - jazz,

be-bop, and blues. Bernstein apparently saw himself in the poem

and described himself as an “autobiographical protagonist” while

he presented Auden’s story.

In his own program note, Bernstein says, “I was merely writing

a symphony inspired by a poem and following the general form of

that poem. Yet, when each section was finished I discovered, upon

re-reading, detail after detail of programmatic relation to the

poem - details that had ‘written themselves’, wholly unplanned

and unconscious…” He later said that, apart from the poem, “the

Symphony has acquired a life of its own.” and declared himself

satisfied with the work in its final form.

Pictures at an Exhibition

Modest Mussorgsky (1839–1881)

Mussorgsky composed Pictures at an Exhibition in 1874 to

commemorate a very close friend, Victor Hartmann, who died at

age 39, causing Mussorgsky profound grief. He struggled with a

way to honor his friend, and when he attended an exhibition of

400 pieces of Hartmann’s work, he was deeply moved. In a few

weeks he had written a suite of ten piano pieces dedicated to

Hartmann and to the organizers of the exhibit.

The ten pictures Mussorgsky chose for his suite included a

gnome-shaped nutcracker, a bard singing near an ancient castle,

children playing and quarreling in the park, a lumbering wooden

oxcart, peeping chicks emerging from their shells, two Polish Jews

arguing, the women and vendors in a marketplace, the gloom of

the catacombs beneath Paris, the grotesque witch Baba Yaga of

Russian Folklore, and an architectural design for the gate of Kiev,

never actually built. The pictures are interspersed with a

“promenade” theme suggesting the walking gait of a viewer

strolling through a museum, stopping to study the details of each

picture. Mussorgsky appears to have chosen the works because of

the variety of moods suggested and the opportunity to make use

of a variety of musical styles.

Mussorgsky died at age 42, his life shortened by alcoholism

and depression, and his suite was not published until 1886, five

years after his death. His original suite did not generate much

interest among pianists of the day, but several attempts were

made to orchestrate it. In 1922 Maurice Ravel took the suite to

Serge Koussevitsky, music director of the Boston Symphony, who

commissioned him to orchestrate it. The world premiere of

Ravel’s orchestration, with Koussevitsky conducting, took place in

Paris in October of 1922. Ravel’s orchestration seems to bring the

piano works to life, underscoring the mood of each section by

using appropriate instruments. For example, the chirping chicks

are well represented by the woodwinds. The dark mood of the

catacombs is evoked by reverent brass, and percussion brings out

the nastiness of the witch. The finale, featuring the great gate of

Kiev, is presented with full brass and pealing carillons.

The work has subsequently been arranged for many kinds of

ensemble, and many attempts have been made to recapture the

mood of the original keyboard work. Each version serves to

remind the listener that the work was always a masterpiece in its

own right, lending itself to a world of possibilities for individual

interpretation.

26


PICTURE IT!

MAY 1

Guest Artist

Andrew Tyson

Hailed by BBC Radio 3 as “a real poet of the piano,” American

pianist Andrew Tyson is emerging as a distinctive and important

new musical voice. In summer 2015, he was awarded First Prize at

the Géza Anda Competition in Zürich, as well as the Mozart and

Audience Prizes. These victories have resulted in numerous

performances throughout Europe under the auspices of the Géza

Anda Foundation.

Tyson is also a laureate of the Leeds International Piano

Competition where he won the new Terence Judd-Hallé Orchestra

Prize, awarded by the orchestra and conductor Sir Mark Elder with

whom he enjoys an ongoing relationship. With concerto

performances taking him across North America, Europe and

further afield, Tyson has performed with orchestras from North

Carolina Symphony, Colorado Symphony, Kansas City Symphony

and Orchestra of St. Luke’s at Alice Tully Hall, to Osaka

Symphony, SWR Symphony Orchestra Stuttgart, Musikkollegium

Winterthur and National Orchestra of Belgium. Highlights this

season include a return to the Hallé and Bournemouth Symphony

Orchestras as well as his debut with Flanders Symphony Orchestra.

Recital appearances include major cities across the U.S. and

Europe at venues such as Brussels’ Palais des Beaux-Arts, New

York’s Carnegie Hall and the Zürich Tonhalle. Following last

season’s recitals in Shanghai, Vancouver, St. Petersburg, Tokyo and a

return to London’s Wigmore Hall, this season sees Tyson giving

recitals in Taiwan for the first time as well as a tour in Switzerland.

No stranger to the festival scene, Tyson’s previous performances

include Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Lincoln Center’s

Mostly Mozart Festival, Lucerne Piano Festival, Pacific Music

Festival in Japan and the Musica Viva festival in Sydney for a

mixture of solo and chamber performances. An active chamber

musician, Tyson regularly appears in recital with violinist Benjamin

Beilman; this season they join up again for performances in the U.S.

Tyson’s three recital discs apppear on the Alpha Classics label.

His debut disc comprises the complete Chopin Preludes while his

second album released in March 2017 features works by Scriabin

and Ravel. His latest disc, Landscapes, released in September 2019,

features works by Mompou, Albéniz, Scarlatti and Schubert and is

described by Tyson as a program which “synthesizes my love of

Spanish music, my love of nature and my fascination with the

coloristic aspects of piano playing.” The album title takes its name

from Federico Mompou’s Paisajes, which are “landscapes of the

mind as much as intimate, yet vivid depictions of Spain.”

aAs winner of the Young Concert Artists International auditions

in 2011, Tyson was awarded YCA’s Paul A. Fish Memorial Prize

and the John Browning Memorial Prize. An Avery Fisher Career

Grant soon followed. After early studies with Thomas Otten he

attended The Curtis Institute of Music where he worked with

Claude Frank. Tyson later studied with Robert McDonald earning

his Master’s degree and Artist Diploma at The Juilliard School,

winning the Gina Bachauer Piano Competition and receiving the

Arthur Rubinstein Prize in Piano.

PHOTO BY SOPHIE ZHAI

27


Providing physical comfort,

emotional well-being and spiritual peace.

Because we cannot hear the planets

evolving, the sun ascending,

the seasons blurring…

...because these and a billion

other sights have no sound,

music was born.

You Are

Our Community

We Are

Your Hospice

Creating art through beautiful smiles!

615 Bent Oak Ave., Adrian

Telephone: (517) 263-1563

517-263-2323 hospiceoflenawee.org

www.AdrianOrtho.com

.

Some things are just

Jim Williams, EVP

Northern Market

Area Executive

Dawn Bales, VP

Private Banker

Jennifer Scroggs, VP

Senior Trust

Fiduciary Officer*

Chris Egli

Investment Advisor*

*Non-Bank Products are: Not FDIC Insured. Not a Deposit. May

Lose Value. Not Guaranteed by the Bank. Not Insured by any

Federal Government Agency.

When you open your personal or business account, you get

access to products that fit your needs and services like mobile

deposit, that bring added convenience. That’s what it means

to be better together.

CHIAROSCURO

COMMUNITY M E N ’ S C H O R U S

A MALE CHORUS OF

EXCELLENCE, WE WELCOME

NEW MEMBERS IN SEPTEMBER,

JANUARY AND JUNE.

Representing a diverse

community of brothers-insong

committed to singing

men’s choral music in a

way that touches the hearts

and minds of the listener.

300 N. Main St., Adrian | 517-266-5008

1701 W. Maumee St., Adrian | 517-266-5009

First-Fed.com

See our website for

upcoming concerts,

open rehearsals

and auditions.

www.chiaroscuromenschorus.org

28


29


COMMUNITY CHORUS

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2020 • 4PM

Joshua VanCampen, Artistic Director & Conductor

Linda Pratt, Pianist & Rehearsal Assistant

Herrick Chapel / Adrian College

Tickets $15 (students and kids free)

GUIDE

to the

INSIDE...

Obituaries — 3

Opinion — 4

Church Notes — 7

Sports — 9-12

Weather — 13

Rest of the Stories — 14

Community Clips — 14

Classifieds — 15

B

WEDNESDAY

APRIL 19, 2017

16 Pages, 1 Section

Volume 144, No. 5

© 2017 A l content copyrighted. No

reproduction without permission

75¢

lack Swamp

A L M A N A C

April 20, 1967

News

• The top-10 Blissfield High

School senior students in

scholastic achievement

included Mary Eisenmann,

Karen Kuechenmeister,

John La Sotta, Janice Hartman,

Paul Taylor, Rosemary

Krix, Vivian Wood,

Patricia Saylor, Ruth Kafer

and Wayne Knoblauch.

• April 17 marked the 50-

year anniversary of the

Michigan State Police. The

force was originally created

as the Michigan State

Troopers during World War

I. Col. Fredrick E. David

was the director in 1967.

Sports

• Blissfield baseball little

league tryout dates and

times were set for April 22

and 29 at Bachmayer Park.

• In Blissfield’s varsity track

and field first meet of the

season, the Royals defeated

heavily favored Grosse

Ile of the Huron League, by

a score of 66-52. The Royals

claimed eight decisions

out of 14 events, including

first place in the two mile

run, the one mile run and

three dashes.

Sales

• Circle M Supermarket did

not want shoppers to “Settle

for Less” at other markets

when they could save

a lot at Circle M, including

89-cent half gallon Sealtest

ice cream.

MAY 2

BOB BECKEY DAY

Honoring fallen outdoorsman — 12

SPORTS

Soccer, golf

get underway

locally — 9

Building a firm community news foundation ... one story at a time

DECISIONS

BD seeks two mills

for sinking-fund

levy over five years

It has been an uphill

battle to educate the public

on the state of the Britton

Deerfield Schools

financial situation and the

reasons for asking for the

two-mi l, five-year sinking

fund levy. Interim Superintendent

Stacy Johnson

said false rumors of the

school closing and some

misunderstanding about

school financing have

sometimes distracted people

from seeing the true

picture of the rural school

district that combines

Lenawee County’s two

easternmost villages and

surrounding agricultural

and rural areas.

“We are trying to do a

really good job here,”

Johnson said.

Her message i simple.

“Briton Deerfield is not

going anywhere.”

One of the things the

district is doing is to

ensure that is to ask the

voters for a sinking fund

for the next five years.

This is a rendering of the proposed new Blissfield Village Pool.

WEDNESDAY

May 3, 2017

16 Pages, 1 Section

Volume 144, No. 7

© 2017 A l content copyrighted. No

reproduction without permission.

BLISSFIELD HONORS

3rd Marking period rolls inside – 13

SPORTS

75¢ Building a firm community news foundation ... one story at a time 75¢

B lack Swamp

75¢

A L M A N A C

May 4, 1988

News

Blissfield village asks two mills

to develop new pool complex

The village of Blissfield is asking residents

to cast a ba lot on May 2 for a twomi

l 20-year levy for the purpose of building

a new municipal outdoor swimming

pool complex and related site improvements.

Over the life of the millage, it

would generate enough money to pay back

the principal sum of up to $2.1 mi lion.

“It’s a lot of money,” vi lage Administrator

James Wonacott said, no matter what

How

many

Easter

eggs?

Micah Jennings,2,

counts the eggs

he co lected during

a weekend

Easter egg hunt at

St. Michael’s

Lutheran Church

in Ottawa Lake.

For more photos

from Easter egg

hunts in the local

area, please see

Page 8.

Bliss Twp. board delays ambulance decision

BY MELISSA BURNOR

Advance Reporter

A majority of the Blissfield

Township board members said

they were not ready to act on an

ambulance purchase request

brough to them by the fire department

a the April 11 meeting.

A committee of firefighters

including Chief Gary Crist, Asst.

Chief Rodney Lippens, Capt. Dale

Fruchey and Joe Gallo attended

the meeting and presented three

packages for ambulances with

spec sheets and prices. The vehicle

the the group said they thought

was the best fit was a Demers

ambulance built on a 2017 Ford

BY MELISSA BURNOR

Advance Reporter

(Please See BD, Page 14)

F450 chassis for $184,897. It

comes with a 6.7-liter diesel

engine. The quote was provided

by Crossroads Ambulance Sales

and Services, Middlebury, Ind. It

was the least expensive of the

three ambulance options, according

to Crist. The quotes a l included

a power-cot option. This option

on the Demers ambulance was

$18,000.

The fire department wants to

replace the the 2004 Horton

ambulance the township uses now

because of reliability and repair

issues. A 1998 Tramahawk ambulance

would be retained as part of

the department fleet under the

plan.

BY MELISSA BURNOR

Advance Reporter

ADVANCE/

Brad Heineman

The township board was not

ready to act on the request so

quickly.

Fire officials said the unit they

were looking at was on the line

and would need to be painted

soon. With an answer within a

week or so, the company would

have painted the ambulance red

to match the others in the township

fleet. The stock color of the

line is white and it would cost an

additional $12,000 to make the

changes later. It may not be available

for purchase if the township

did not act on it quickly.

Fire department members

(See AMBULANCE, Page 14)

the vi lage would decide to do to repair or

replace the current 60-year old Gail Giles

Community Pool located in Ellis Park.

Due to flood damage mainly to the water

pumps and a potentially compromised

structure, the pool has been closed to the

public since late 2015.

The last flood occurred during the operating

season of the pool, which was a rare

occurrence. However the fast-moving

waters of the River Raisin in late June of

Canines to

‘Pawrade’

to dog park

BY MELISSA BURNOR

Advance Reporter

Grab your furry friends and

head down to Lane Street Saturday

morning for the Blissfield

Parks and Recreation Dog

Pawrade.

To celebrate the beginning of

the first fu l season of the Blissfield

Dog Park. a parade of canines and

their owners wi l promenade from

the Schultz-Holmes Memorial

Library on South Lane Stree to

the dog park located in E lis Park

just south of the Washington Street

entrance.

The grand opening for the facility

took place late last fa l. The

park enclosed by fence offers a

place for owners to enjoy their

dogs where the dog can run and

exercise in the vi lage without having

to be on a leash. There i seating

available for individuals.

Area residents and their dogs

are encouraged to take part in the

parade to the park. Lineup wi l

begin at 10:30 a.m. in front of the

library and step off at 11 a.m. to

the park with a police escort. The

parade wi l take Lane Street west

to Jefferson Stree then move to

Washington Street and into the

park.

Parks and Rec Director Eric

May said the dogs and owners wi l

be able to use the dog park regardless

of whether they are a regis-

(Please See PAWRADE, Page 14)

(Please See POOL, Page 14)

• New events scheduled

for the fifth River Raisin

Festival included a 24-

hour marathon softball

tournament and the

Chamber of Commerce

Sidewalk Sale. Picnic in

the Park sponsored by

the Blissfield Council of

Churches included family

friendly activities. Also

on tap for the festivities

was the Kiwanis Club

hole-in-one contest and

miniature golf, Rotary

Club’s auction, Knights of

Columbus Bingo, Tug of

War across the river, unboat

races, three-on-three

basketball and a 5k run.

• Blissfield village councilman

Jim Gilson and

Blissfield Township supervisor

Lew Bowman had a

meeting in which Gilson

brought a 13-point list with

suggestions on how the

fire department should be

funded and operated solely

by the township rather

than by both entities.

Sports

• The Blissfield Royals

were 3-0 in the LCAA with

an 18-12 win over Addison.

Eric Pavelka was

the winning pitcher. Carl

Slomski was 4-4 at the

plate.

Advertising

• Sue’s Pizza was offering

two 9” cheese pizzas for

$3.50. Two 14” two item

pizzas were $10.95.

GUIDE

to the

INSIDE...

Obituaries – 3

Opinion – 4

Calendar – 5

6 Things Are Different – 6

Sports – 9-12

Honor Roll – 13

Rest of the Stories – 14

Classifieds – 15

Quilter’s fabric stash will cover

those in need

An avid quilter’s legacy of giving lives on thanks to a quilting bee

organized by her sister.

When Blissfield resident Kathy Sheldon died unexpectedly November

9, 2016, she left many grieving family members and friends as

well as a fabric stash she collected and saved to make quilts.

The late Mrs. Sheldon was an avid quilter who enjoyed using

every scrap of fabric to create quilts. Most of the quilts she made

were given to friends for special occasions and to those who needed

the comfort of a warm blanket.

Her sister, Susan Gilmore of Tecumseh, spent several months wondering

how to honor her sister’s unselfish nature, her love of organizing

friends to participate in her pet projects and her creative genius.

However, she also had to address fabric-packed totes.

Finally the idea of a quilting bee began buzzing and with the help

of friends who are also quilters, the event became a reality.

Sixteen friends and family members who had quilted with Mrs.

Sheldon met on Saturday, April 22 a the Tecumseh United Methodist

Church to transform that saved

Local Prom

Royal Duos

(Please see QUILT, Page 8)

New counselors

want to connect to

Blissfield

BY MELISSA BURNOR

Advance Reporter

Christian Care Connection a

professional counseling service

has found a second home in Blissfield

where a licensed counselor

is available to help people work

through difficul times in their lives

or perhaps to work through things

before a situation becomes unbearable.

Dr. Jeannie Miller-Clarkson a

psychologist has had an office

in Lambertville for more than 15

years has opened up the new office

Submitted photo

Senior Bobcats Emerson Aitson and Conner Hoogendoorn,

left, were crowned as Whiteford Agricultural Schools’ prom

queen and king Saturday night. At right, Alexa Blohm and

Alex Garcia were crowned queen and king of the Madison

High School prom Saturday.

that is housed in the bottom floor of

St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, 306 E.

Jefferson St. Licensed Professional

Counselor Gloria Morrison will

be available to meet with clients on

Mondays and by appointments.

The office is housed in the church

but is not affiliated with the church.

St. Paul’s Lutheran Church has

other community offerings including

the community food pantry and

a preschool on their campus.

“This is just another opportunity

for the whole community,” Pastor

Gary Leking said.

(Please see BUSINESS, Page 14)

Local track

teams run like

the wind – 11

Submi ted photo

This quilt was completed at a quilting bee that

celebrated the legacy of the late Kathy Sheldon. The quilts

created from her collection of fabric will be donated to

Lenawee County organizations and individuals.

Blissfield Village to focus

on zoning and code

violation enforcement

BY MELISSA BURNOR

Advance Reporter

The Blissfield village council

authorized a stricter policy

toward enforcing violations on

zoning and codes in an effort to

take a closer look at properties.

The village seeks voluntary

compliance with all ordinances

which officials say is the responsibility

of each property owner.

Though there are no new ordinances,

the initiative focuses on

compliance of existing building

and maintenance codes and

nuisance ordinances.

The police department has

been tasked with aiding the

building inspector and zoning

administrator in gaining compliance,

said Blissfield Police

Chief Dale Greenleaf.

He sent a news release to

The Advance on April 27 to

outline the initiative that could

lead to enforcement action.

“Curbside inspections have

been conducted of structures

and properties in the village,”

the release said.

Approximately 25 to 30

properties have been identified

as being noncompliant, village

administrator James Wonacott

said.

“We are primarily focusing on

property maintenance issues,”

Wonacott said. Roofs, exterior

paint, garbage and refuse are

priorities.

Letters were to be given to

the property owners regarding

alleged violations. At least one

letter was served as of Thursday.

(Please see ZONING, Page 14)

GUIDE

to the

INSIDE...

A the Library — 2A

Obituaries — 3A

Opinion — 4A

Church — 6A

Sports — 10-12A

Rest of the Stories — 14A

Classifieds — 15A

Sports Preview — B

B

ADVANCE/Melissa Burnor

Dr. Jeannie Miller-Clarkson and counselor Gloria Morrison are

available in their new office at their Blissfield office of Christian

Care Connection.

WEDNESDAY

AUGUST 23, 2017

40 Pages, 2 Sections

Volume 144, No. 123

© 2017 All content copyrighted. No

reproduction without permission

75¢

lack Swamp

A L M A N A C

August 24, 2011

News

• A petition circulated by a

pro-wind energy Riga resident

gathered more than

twice the number of signatures

required to put an

issue on the Nov. 8 ba lot

asking residents to keep or

rescind a recent zoning ordinance

amendment regarding

wind turbines.

• Bids to upgrade the Blissfield

water treatment plant

came in at least $600,000

over the original $1.8 mi lion

project budget that was

amended to $2.2 mi lion.

With no recommendation to

the council on approving the

bids, the council also was

looking at Verwater Environmental

a recent addition to

the Blissfield Industrial Park

to possibly aid in the project.

Sports

• Blissfield varsity vo leyba l

opened the season winning

the silver division Jackson

County Western Panther

Tune-Up Tournament. They

defeated Northwest, Manchester

and Onsted. Kelsey

Suiter led the Royals with

15 ki ls, two blocks, 20 digs

and 40 points served including

seven aces.

Ads

• Gilson’s Do It Best Hardware

was advertising the

sale of a Lenawee County

Limited Historical Edition

rifle on sale for one week

only. Cost was $499.99.

Fire and rescue

crews freed a man from

a grain bin filled with at

least eight feet of corn

at Blissfield Michigan

Agricultural Commodities

Thursday morning.

According to Blissfield

Township Fire

Chief Gary Crist, the

worker had gotten into

the grain bin as workers

were emptying and

vacuuming out the last

several feet in the bin

that was estimated to

be 50-60 feet tall.

Rescue training of

employees, local rescue

crews and a specialized

county crew resulted in

the rescue.

Crist said it appeared

Building a firm community news foundation ... one story at a time

Colorful street

Art at Your Feet turned Lane Street into a colorful palette of artwork

Saturday. Beginning early in the morning, the works took

FALL SPORTS PREVIEW

It’s inside this paper today! — B

Bridge fix a go as bids beat budget

By early next summer the

pedestrian bridge connecting the

village parks on each side of the

River Raisin should be open for

TRAPPED!

Crews free

man in bin

Bluegrass weekend

New County Grass was one of the featured

bands at Blissfield Bluegrass on

foot traffic.

A second round of bids were

opened Thursday and it appears

several could be financed by the

proceeds of the bond that was

financed through a millage

approved by village voters last year

WEDNESDAY

DECEMBER 6, 2017

The athletes

are already

in action — 10A

40 Pages, 2 Sections

Volume 144, No. 38

© 2017 A l content copyrighted. No

reproduction without permission

75¢

B

Building a firm community news foundation ... one story at a time

lack Swamp

A L M A N A C

Dec. 11, 2001

News

shape from the artists’ unique imaginations. For more photos,

please see Page 9A.

to repair the bridge and add handicap

accessible ramps to the amenity

in the park.

The bridge has been closed for

nearly two years due to extensive

ADVANCE/Brad Heineman

ADVANCE/Ashliegh Bruneau

Tractors

to cruise

in; Riga

to party

Even though the

summer season may

be winding down,

some fun outdoor

activities are slated

this weekend, Friday

in Blissfield and Saturday

in Riga, which

are both sure to keep

the summer tradition

alive.

Kicking off the

weekend Friday wi l

be the Downtown

Blissfield Tractor

Cruise-In event,

which is part of the

Blissfield Main Street

programs.

The cruise-in wi l

Missing man found after alert text, email sent

Advance Reporter

BY MELISSA BURNOR

Blissfield police sent out a text and

email alert Sunday morning after a

the River Saturday in Bachmayer Park.

For more photos, please see Page 8A..

74-year-old Palmyra man went missing

after the service at the Blissfield

First United Methodist Church about

10:15 a.m.

Police gave a description of the

(Please See BRIDGE, Page 14A)

75¢

• There were nearly 50

floats entered into the third

annual Parade of Lights.

There was to be a drawing

for Yuletide prizes totaling

$2,000 beginning at 6:15

p.m.

• Immanuel Lutheran

Church and its congregation

captured the spirit of

Christmas with its “Journey

Through Bethlehem,” a living

experience of the birth

of Christ. Groups touring

the ancient city became

family groups who took a

tour with a guide like Jerry

Hayes.

• Deerfield Elementary students

presented “Christmas

at the OK Corral” where

Bubble Gum Bart (aka

Austin Mi ler) tried to keep

Santa Claus, played by Lee

Keinath, from coming to

town.

Sports

• Junior Whiteford middle

linebacker Nick Wohlfafth

earned himself a spot on

the AP Class C a l-state

footbal team. He had a

team-high 121 tackles.

• Jesse Sieler, Brandyn

Jones and Bob Love won

their individual weight class

at the Blissfield Wrestling

Invitational.

GUIDE

to the

INSIDE...

Obituaires — 2-3A

Correction — 2A

Opinion — 4A

Anniversary — 5A

A the Library — 5A

Sports— 9-12A

Police, Etc. — 12-A

Weather — 13A

Rest of the Stories — 14A

Classifieds — 15A

Winter Sports — B

WINTER SPORTS PREVIEW

Meet the local teams — Section B

Deerfield aglow

This lighted poinsettia leaf is just one of the

many hanging lighted Christmas holiday decorations

that can be seen along Carey Street in

Downtown Deerfield. In the background of the

photo is the decorated Village of Deerfield

ADVANCE/Brad Heineman

75¢

Area activities raise Christmas spirit

BY MELISSA BURNOR

Advance Reporter

Several activities and events in

the area give plenty of opportunity

to get into the Christma spiri this

weekend. The biggest events take

place in downtown Blissfield Friday

and Saturday evenings.

Wassail Fest - Dec. 8

Wassail mugs were flying out of

the Blissfield Vi lage Office Monday

the first day they were on sale

for the Friday event. The Blissfield

Rotary Club i sponsoring the seventh

annual event presented by

the Blissfield Main Street/Downtown

Development Authority.

Wassailers can taste a dozen wassails

created and served by downtown

merchants and organizations

and then get a chance to vote on

which one is the best. The winner

is the Wassailmeister of Blissfield

for the coming year.

Particpants must be 21 years of

age and show proof of age. Mugs

can be purchased for $12 a the

Blissfield Vi lage Office, 130 S.

Lane St., through Friday. Mugs

may sti l be available Friday

evening a the registration table at

Transcend Physical Therapy

where wassailers need pick up a

punch card and map of the

locaitons to the wassail that

includes 11 alcoholic and one nonalcoholic

choices by 6 p.m. The

event runs from 6-8:30 p.m.

Hot-Cha-Cha Mug Run - Dec. 8

The Miss River Raisin Scholarship

Pageant commitee presents

this festive 5K run through the

streets of Blissfield Friday evening.

Borchardt Brothers Market is the

pageant sponsor.

Runners can run in holiday

attire or costume. The event

SPORTS

Winter

sports

begin — 9A

Submi ted Photo

Blissfield Girl Scouts Abigail Filiere and Sadie Kimple preview

their Blissfield Parade of Lights costumes. The troop

will have one of the floats in the parade and the scouts will

pass out Christmas candy to parade-watchers

attracts runners from six to 86 and

from a levels to the serious competitors

to walkers. One runner is

coming from as far away as Idaho.

A symphony of local news, mixing all the news of Blissfield, Riga, Deerfield,

Ottawa Lake, Ogden, Palmyra and the most complete sports coverage available of the

Blissfield Royals, Madison Trojans, Britton Deerfield Patriots and the Whiteford Bobcats!

(TRAPPED, Page 14A)

BY MELISSA BURNOR

(EVENTS, Page 14A)

man and said he may have been lost

or confused when he walked away

from the church a the corner of Pearl

(Please See WALKAWAY, Page 14A)

• Also full-service printing from brochures and business cards to folders

and envelopes - with everything in between. Free quotes!

Adult registration is $25 and

includes a mug for the wassail.

Those not wishing to particpate in

the Wassail Fest or are under 21

years of age can get a mug of hot

chocolate. Kids can register for

$15 and get a special mug of hot

chocolate. Family registration is

$60 for four people including two

adults from the same household.

For more information email

advance@cass.net o register at

active.com.

Parade of Lights - Dec. 9

Municipal Hall. The Christmas season was officia

ly welcomed in to Deerfield Sunday during

the vi lage’s fifth annual Christmas Tree Lighting

Ceremony. For additional photos of the

event please see page 8A.

Call 517-486-2400 to subsCribe or ask for a free quote today!

121 Newspaper street, blissfield

BY MELISSA

BURNOR

Advance Reporter

Advance Reporter

SPORTS

BY BRAD

HEINEMAN

Advance Reporter

The 18th annual Blissfield

Parade of Lights, sponsored by

Blissfield State Bank and presented

by the Blissfield Main

Street/Downtown Development

Authority, begins at 7 p.m. Saturday.

This year Mark Dobronski,

president of the Adrian and Blissfield

Rail Road Co. is the grand

marshal. Several groups, businesses

and individuals have signed

up to particpate. The deadline to

register a float or a unit has been

extended to noon Thursday. The

only requirement is the float or

unit be decorated with holiday

lights.

K of C Baskets — Dec. 8-10

Dec 8-10 , the Light of Christ

Knights of Columbus wi l pack and

deliver Christmas baskets throughou

the community. While the revelry

is taking place downtown,

many volunteers wi l be a the

Light of Christ Parish St. Peter’s

Church on South Lane Street

preparing baskets to be delivered

on Sunday. The packing goes on

(Please See EVENTS, Page 14A)

Blissfield

principal

resigns

BY BRAD HEINEMAN

Advance Reporter

Friday, will mark Steve Gfell’s last

day as a Blissfield Royal.

The Blissfield High School Principal,

who has been with the district

since the summer of 2015, recently

announced his

intentions to

resign from his

position at Blissfield

Schools.

A former 13-

year principal at

Swanton Schools

in Ohio, Gfell said

his decision to

resign from his

position in Blissfield

was solely

based upon a family

matter.

“The long and short of it is that I

Steve

Gfell

want to be home and more involved

with my family,” he said.

Along with his wife and his three

children, now ages of 10, eight and

five, Gfell lives in the Sylvania

(Please See GFELL, Page 14A)

30


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Old Friends

The Concert in Central Park

Simon and Garfunkel Tribute

Friday, June 5, 2020

8:00 PM

Dawson Auditorium

Adrian College

GUEST ARTIST SPONSOR

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& Dorothy Stubnitz

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34

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OLD FRIENDS

JUNE 5

Guest Artists

Old Friends

1981: THE CONCERT is a stunning recreation of Simon & Garfunkel’s 1981

Concert in Central Park. Simon & Garfunkel’s Concert in Central Park was one of

the largest and most beloved concerts of all time. Although it was attended by over

500,000 people, most of us didn’t have the opportunity to attend this amazing show.

This upbeat 90 minute show will take the audience back in time to that cool

September night in New York City when Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel reunited

for a free concert.

Mrs. Robinson, Homeward Bound, Bridge Over Troubled Water, The Boxer,

Scarborough Fair, The Sounds of Silence…these are just a few of the featured songs

that have made Simon & Garfunkel one of the most successful and beloved artists of

all time.

1981: THE CONCERT recreate this awe inspiring show with attention to every

detail. They pay ultimate homage to this amazing American duo and stay true to the

beauty of their timeless songs. Complete with a full 9 piece back up band, the warm

blending harmonies and crisp guitar work recreate the sound, look and feel of this

legendary duo in their most famous performance ever… THE CONCERT IN

CENTRAL PARK

35


2019-2020 ADVERTISERS

The Adrian Symphony Orchestra is grateful to our advertisers. Please patronize

these establishments and tell them where you saw their ad.

Adrian Animal Clinic

Adrian Area Chamber

of Commerce

Adrian College

Adrian Dominican Sisters

Adrian Dry Cleaners

Adrian Insurance Agency

Barrett’s Showplace Garden’s

& Flower Shop

Bell Automotive

Black Raven Architects

Blissfield State Bank

Chaloner’s Cigar House

Chiaroscuro Men’s Chorus

Citizens Gas

Clift Buick GMC

Cooper & Bender P.A.

County National Bank

D&P Communications

Dan’s Repair Shop

Desjarlais Aesthetic Center

Dominos Pizza

First Federal Bank

Flowers & Such

Garno Chiropractic

Gillin Eye Care

Gleaner Life Insurance

Gross, Puckey, Gruel, Roof

Gurdjian Insurance Group

Habitat for Humanity

Hathaway House

Henry Ford Allegiance Health

Hospice of Lenawee

Josephine C. Weeden, DDS, MS

Kapnick Insurance

Lally Group LLC.

Lemle Piano Services

Lenawee Community Chorus

Lenawee Lifelong Learning

LISD

Love Family Dental

Mechanical Extremes

Heating & Cooling

Old National Bank

Sauce Italian Grill

Shar Music

Sieler’s Water Systems

The Taylor Agency

of Southern Michigan

Tecumseh Center for the Arts

The Advance

The Croswell

The Daily Telegram

The Image Center

The Wagley Group

Visit Lenawee

Wacker Chemical

Wagley Funeral Home

West Pointe Party Shoppe

WLEN

Woodstock Wine & Cheese

125

1894 - 2019

YEARS

of securing families

EXPLORE

SUPPORT

Learn more about our first 125 years at

www.gleanerlife.org

5200 West U.S. Highway 223

Adrian, Michigan 49221

p 800.992.1894 | f 517.265.7745

INSPIRE

Empowering learners and

creating opportunities

for success.

www.lisd.us

36



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