NZPhotographer Issue 31, May 2020

nzphotographer

Whether you’re an enthusiastic weekend snapper or a beginner who wants to learn more about photography, New Zealand Photographer is the fun and informative e-magazine for all Kiwi camera owners. You can always read the latest issue for free or subscribe to the magazine and get unlimited access to all back issues. Find out more: www.nzphotographer.nz

ISSUE 31, May 2020

INTERVIEW WITH

PAMELA JOHNSTONE

FROM THE ROAD:

HONG KONG

BY SUSAN BLICK

NZ LANDSCAPES COMPETITION

WINNERS & BEST ENTRIES

INTRODUCTION TO

STYLE AND VISION

BY RICHARD YOUNG

May 2020 1


WELCOME TO ISSUE 31 OF

NZ PHOTOGRAPHER MAGAZINE

HELLO EVERYONE,

As we send out the second issue

produced during the Covid-19 lockdown

we hope you've been able to keep

clicking that shutter button over the

past month, finding both backyard and

indoor photo projects to keep yourself

occupied and the creativity flowing.

You're no doubt itching to get out

and about with your camera properly

but until restrictions are fully lifted and

borders reopened we invite you to lose

yourself in our pages as we embark on

a photographic journey to soak up New

Zealand's landscapes.

Brendon Gilchrist takes us on a

seascape sightseeing tour around Dunedin, we learn how Pamela

Johnstone found freedom through landscape photography, get

to know hobbyist photographer Jimmy Millar, and then take a

hop, skip, and a jump through some of the best North and South

Island landscapes as we reveal the winners of our NZ Landscape

Photography Competition.

If you're dreaming of getting further afield with your camera once borders

reopen then dive into Susan Blick's article as she takes us On The Road to

Singapore. Can you feel those bright city lights calling your name?!

With the location bucket list now filled, it's time to get back to reality and

put the focus on what we can photograph now - Raewyn Smith shows us

what she captured in her backyard in Behind The Shot, our Rising Star, 13

year old Cooper Madsen, discusses his bug project which might spark a

photo project idea of your own, and Richard Young inspires you to think

about your photographic style and vision.

OUR CONTRIBUTORS

Brendon Gilchrist

Brendon is the man behind

ESB Photography. He is an

avid tramper who treks

from sea to mountain, and

back again, capturing the

uniqueness of New Zealand’s

unforgiving landscape.

Emily Goodwin

Editor NZ Photographer

NZPhotographer Issue 31

May 2020

Cover Photo

Ohau Peace,

Matthew Davey

Publisher:

Foto Lifestyle Ltd

Website:

nzphotographer.nz

Graphic Design:

Maksim Topyrkin

Advertising Enquiries:

Email

hello@nzphotographer.nz

FOLLOW US

Richard Young

Richard is an award-winning

landscape and wildlife

photographer who teaches

photography workshops and

runs photography tours. He is

the founder of New Zealand

Photography Workshops.

© 2020 NZPhotographer Magazine

All rights reserved. Reproduction of any material appearing in this magazine in any form is forbidden without prior

consent of the publisher.

Disclaimer:

Opinions of contributing authors do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the magazine.

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NZPhotographer


CONTENTS

4

6

10

30

36

39

40

46

48

55

57

BEHIND THE SHOT

with Raewyn Smith

GETTING TO KNOW JIMMY MILLAR

MINI 4 SHOT PORTFOLIO

INTERVIEW WITH PAMELA JOHNSTONE

RISING STAR: COOPER MADSEN

INSIGHTS FROM

@EXCIO PHOTO COMMUNITY

EXCIO TOP 10

JOURNEYING HOME - THE QUEST

TO CAPTURE DUNEDIN

by Brendon Gilchrist

FROM THE ROAD: HONG KONG

By Susan Blick

INTRODUCTION TO STYLE AND VISION

by Richard Young

NZ LANDSCAPES COMPETITION

WINNERS & BEST ENTRIES

GETTING TO KNOW

JIMMY MILLAR

FROM THE ROAD: HONG KONG

BY SUSAN BLICK

INTRODUCTION

TO STYLE AND VISION

BY RICHARD YOUNG

6

48

55

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WHITE HIBISCUS

F4, 1/200s, ISO400, 90mm

Behind The Shot

with Raewyn Smith

RAEWYN, REMIND US ABOUT YOUR JOURNEY

WITH PHOTOGRAPHY…

I have always had a keen interest in photography

from the days of the Kodak Instamatic to an early

digital Kodak point and shoot. My first “real” digital

camera, a Canon 100D, still had me shooting in full

auto until I saw an advertisement for a Photography

for Beginners course at a local learning centre

approximately four years ago. I completed the

course and I was hooked, going on to complete an

intermediate level course some months later.

Photography continues to be a hobby which I fit in around

working full time and home and family commitments –

I have 4 grandchildren and a husband who is still recovering

after major spinal surgery eight months ago.

WHAT HAS CHANGED WITH YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY

SINCE WE INTERVIEWED YOU IN ISSUE 22?

I feel that I have learned to critique my own photos

quite well, I look at earlier photos and tell myself how

I could do things differently, for the better. I don't think

my style or preference has changed – my favourite

subject is still flowers and I guess this comes from my

other passion, gardening – but I understand much

more about the technical side of photography and

I experiment with different settings a lot more. It takes

fewer shots to get one I am happy with now!

TELL US ABOUT YOUR WHITE HIBISCUS SHOT…

I can see this Hibiscus shrub from my kitchen window.

It was damaged last year during a storm and looked

like it wouldn’t survive, taking quite a while to recover.

Then, a few flowers appeared and one morning

I looked out and there was this flower perfectly open

and just begging to be photographed.

The fence behind this shrub is painted black making a

nice dark background. It was early morning and it was

calm which is often unusual in Auckland.

I loved this shot immediately. I think I took 3 photos

and this was my favourite – I love the contrast of the


white flower against the dark background and the

little bit of colour in the stamens.

The beauty of this made me think about the lockdown

due to COVID‐19 – not everything happens the way we

want it to but there is still beauty to found wherever we

look.

WHAT HAVE YOU BEEN WORKING ON DURING

LOCKDOWN?

I had originally booked 3 weeks annual leave for around

this time, returning to work after Anzac day. I was rather

excited as we weren’t intending to go away so I thought

I could get out and do some landscape photography for

a change. Obviously that isn’t happening now but I’ve

watched a few tutorials to gain a bit more knowledge

and am participating in a 30 day photo challenge that’s

running on one of the photography Facebook pages

I follow. This has encouraged me to think differently about

everyday objects around my home, I am finding the

challenge extremely motivating and find myself looking

forward to the next day’s subject.

ANY TIPS FOR TAKING FLOWER PHOTOS THAT

YOU CAN SHARE WITH OUR READERS?

The best time for flower photography is early morning

or early evening. Cloudy days are also better and

calm conditions. Not all of my flower photos are

taken outside – I often put them in a vase and use a

lightbox – a good project when the weather is not

the best or if I have nothing interesting in the garden.

I prefer to use a macro lens but outside you can get

some stunning shots using a telephoto lens, some

I have taken with a 70–200mm zoom lens.

I find that red flowers are the hardest to photograph

due to capturing the colour accurately – experiment

with different white balance settings and then edit

your shots. I use Lightroom and always spend more

time editing if the subject is red.

WHERE CAN WE FIND YOU ONLINE?

instagram.com/raewynjsmith

albums.excio.io/profile/Photoqueen

BEHIND THE SHOT IS PROUDLY

SUPPORTED BY

New Zealand

Photography Workshops

New Zealand photography tours with

New Zealand’s best landscape and

wildlife photographers. Join us on our

next adventure to help you to get the

most from your photography.

20 Day: South Island Highlights

20 Day: North Island Highlights

17 Day: Ultimate New Zealand

12 Day: New Zealand Icons

15 Day: New Zealand

Coastal Landscapes

15 Day: North Island Landscapes

7 Day: Wild South Island

7 Day: West Coast Wilderness

7 Day: South Island Beaches

& Bays

7 Day: Volcanic North Island

7 Day: Northland & Bay of Islands

4 Day: Fiordland

May 2020 5

www.photographyworkshops.co.nz info@photographyworkshops.co.nz 0064 21 0845 7322


Getting To Know Jimmy Millar

Jimmy (James) is a 26 year old whose passion for photography is purely a hobby,

an opportunity for him to be creative away from his day job as a geographic

information systems analyst (a modern day cartographer mixed with a data

analyst).

JIMMY, TELL US ABOUT YOUR JOURNEY WITH

PHOTOGRAPHY…

The first time I remember using a camera was an old

disposable Kodak which I used to take some holiday

snaps. A little later I was given my first digital camera

as a Christmas gift when I was about 10. I used it for

holidays and school trips and on the odd occasion,

I tried to get a little creative. I started to develop an

interest in the art of photography but I didn’t really try

to take it further until around 4 years ago when I got

my first DSLR and the world of photography really

opened up for me.

HAVE YOU TAKEN ANY PHOTOGRAPHIC

WORKSHOPS OR COURSES?

I am entirely self-taught, both with the camera and

editing in Lightroom. A few blogs and YouTube videos

can go a long way towards learning the basics of

photography and editing and provide inspiration to

get out there and put things into practice. Once you

understand the balance between settings and how

they can change an image and start developing an

eye for composition I’ve found the best way to learn

is to practice. Get out there take some shots and find

out what works for you and what doesn’t.

WHAT ARE YOU SHOOTING WITH?

Right now I’m still using an entry level DSLR, a Nikon

D3300 that I bought 4 years ago with an 18–55mm

lens and a 55–200mm lens. Photography can be an

expensive hobby and I wanted to ensure that it was a

hobby that would genuinely motivate and inspire me

before investing further. I also occasionally shoot with

a DJI Mavic Pro drone, I find the drone can provide

a unique perspective on photography and you can

accomplish things you simply can’t with a traditional

camera. After seeing the results I’ve gotten in the time

I’ve spent with the D3300 I’m planning to invest in a

new camera and more glass sometime soon.

OAK AVENUE

F5.6, 1/50s, ISO100

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NZPhotographer


HAVE YOU ALWAYS HAD A CREATIVE STREAK?

I believe that having some form of creative output

is important to living a healthy and balanced life,

whether that’s photography, painting, music, or

something else. I’ve dabbled in a number of different

creative outputs but photography has been the one

I’ve enjoyed the most and had the most success in.

I’m also fortunate that my profession allows for some

creative freedom on occasion.

HOW DOES PHOTOGRAPHY HELP YOU EXPRESS

YOURSELF?

Photography allows me to share my perspective of

the world, to capture a moment and try and bring out

the best of that moment and then share that moment

with friends and family. It’s a snapshot in that point

in time which is unique, no two shoots end up being

exactly the same, even at the same location.

WHAT GENRES OF PHOTOGRAPHY MOST

INTEREST YOU, WOULD YOU SAY YOU’VE

FOUND YOUR STYLE?

I primarily shoot landscape photography, there is a lot

of beauty in our surroundings both natural and manmade

plus it provides a great excuse to get out into

the world and see more of it, through photography

I’ve done plenty of hiking and I’ve become much

fitter! I don’t know if I could say I’ve found my style yet

though, I have found myself going through a number

of stages. I would really like to spend more time with

portrait photography.

TELL US ABOUT YOUR FAVOURITE IMAGE…

My favourite image so far is Rising Mountain, for a

number of reasons. Firstly I think it’s just a beautiful

photo, the lighting was great and it’s a unique shot of

Mt Taranaki – The clouds rolled in at the perfect time!

But more important to me is the story behind it…

This shot was taken on the walking track to the

Pouakai Tarns, which is a 3–4 hour hike up a steep

incline. I made the trip 3 times one summer hoping to

get a classic shot of Mt Taranaki reflected in the pools.

With the first 2 attempts, the conditions just weren’t

right, there was too much wind disturbing the pool,

and cloud kept obscuring the mountain. I decided to

make the climb again in the afternoon of New Year's

Day 2019 hoping to get that reflection, also a great

opportunity to reflect on the year that had been and

the year ahead. I reached the pool just in time for

sunset. I got some nice photos but the conditions still

weren’t quite right. It was beginning to get dark and

it was a lengthy walk back so I left feeling somewhat

disappointed. It was on the way back that I spotted

the opportunity to take the photo you see now, the

clouds rolled in at the perfect time obscuring the base

of the mountain and reflecting some of the pinkish

hues from the setting sun.

For me, this shot was a lesson in persistence. It’s a

reminder to make the most of the opportunities before

you and to accept that things might not always work

out as planned but that it doesn’t mean they won’t

work out in the end.

RISING MOUNTAIN

F5.6, 1/40s, ISO100

May 2020 7


WHERE IS YOUR FAVOURITE PHOTO

LOCATION?

Te Mata Peak in Hawke’s Bay is probably my

favourite photo location so far. It is near where I live

so I’m often up there either taking photos or getting

some exercise. It’s a beautiful location with stunning

views from the top of the peak itself but also the

Red Woods and other numerous places along the

walking tracks. I have spent a lot of time up there

exploring the different views and perspectives of the

peak.

WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR BIGGEST STRUGGLE

WITH PHOTOGRAPHY?

My biggest struggle is finding the time to get out with

my camera. I keep finding myself going back to the

same locations time and time again and while they

can often show something new it can be difficult to

find the motivation to go back. I think the key for me

is to keep trying new things and seeing new places to

keep things fresh.

WHAT LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS CAN

YOU SHARE WITH US?

I find there are a number of things that factor into

good landscape photography. It’s generally quite

important to have a focal point in your image, an

object in the foreground or the background that

draws the eye. Alternatively, you can use leading lines

to draw the eye deeper into the image.

Lighting plays an important role too and can make

a seemingly dull landscape dynamic and likewise,

lighting can make a beautiful landscape look flat in

a photo. Golden hour is usually best for getting that

strong contrast between your highlights and shadows

but cloud cover can also provide a lot of contrast

making for a more dynamic landscape.

WHAT ARE YOUR PLANS FOR THE FUTURE AND

HOW DO YOU SEE PHOTOGRAPHY PLAYING A

PART IN THAT?

I’m going to be sticking around in Hawke’s Bay for

the foreseeable future and will continue developing

my GIS career. I plan to continue developing my skills

in photography when the opportunities arise. I shot a

couple of events pre-lockdown and really enjoyed the

dynamic nature of those shoots. I will gladly take more

opportunities like that as well as exploring the beautiful

country that we live in.

WHERE CAN WE SEE YOUR WORK ONLINE?

www.instagram.com/jmphotographynz

www.facebook.com/jmphotographynz

albums.excio.io/profile/jmphotography

HERETAUNGA PLAINS

F5.6, 1/200s, ISO200

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Photo Community

What is PFG?

Discover the amazing #PhotographyForGood stories

behind some of the photos published on Excio.

FIND OUT MORE

www.excio.io

Photographs shown (left to right): Maria LIgaya, Vicky O'Connor, Fairlie Atkinson, Kim Free,

Lynn Fothergill, Damon Marshall, Marina de Wit, Brendon Gilchrist, Ann Wheatley


Mini 4 Shot Portfolio

Our 4x4 feature showcases 4 mini portfolio’s of both

professional and up and coming New Zealand

photographers. The 4 images are linked in some way,

allowing you to get an understanding of what each

photographer is most passionate about capturing.

For a change to get your own 4x4 feature in a future

issue of the magazine, become a subscriber of the

magazine here.

GARY REID

Wildlife Characteristics

GRAHAM JONES

The Birds Eye View

SARAH CALDWELL

Reflected Architecture

SARAH K SMITH

Ebbs and Flows


GARY REID

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NZPhotographer


Growing up in South Africa, my interest in wildlife

started in my early school years when game

rangers would visit our school and show us wildlife

movies. My interest in photography started in my

teens and it was a natural progression to marry my

love of wildlife and photography together. Being

surrounded by wildlife game reserves gave me

plenty of opportunity to photograph

and learn about nature.

www.gazza.photography

WILDLIFE CHARACTERISTICS

I find wildlife fascinating and enjoy being on a

constant learning curve and honing my skills as a

wildlife photographer. Each species has its own

characteristics and individual personalities. The

difficulty is capturing these traits in an image.

The pictures of the rhino and kudu show how each

uses mud for different reasons. The kudu uses it to

make its horns to look larger and more intimidating

to other males whilst the rhino uses mud to keep

cool and ward off parasites. In my other two

pictures, the lion is bold, strong and intimidating,

afraid of very little whereas the leopard is secretive

and cunning.

The more you know about your subject, the

easier it is to anticipate the shot. Even with good

forethought though, it often takes hundreds of

shots before you get the one you want.

May 2020 13


GRAHAM JONES

16

NZPhotographer


Photography for me has been a 3 year path of discovery.

In the beginning I only snapped landscapes but soon after,

I became interested in other genres such as birds, long

exposure, and macro. Currently I am discovering the variety

of perspectives that aerial or drone photography has to offer

across New Zealand's coasts and highlands. A good day for

me is a backpack, camera with couple of lenses or drone,

and the anticipation of what I shall find

around the next headland…

@graham.jones.790693

THE BIRDS EYE VIEW

Aerial or drone photography is a new path for me. I

was fascinated by the variety of perspectives and the

thought of a birds eye view. Like all new things it takes

time and practise to learn the skills, firstly how to fly

and second how to compose a photo. I am currently

shooting with a ND16 Polarising filter and 3 shot exposure

stack always in RAW. The average drone battery gives

me 15 minutes in the air so the challenge is always

what height and where to position the drone so I can

compose the photo. My 4 shots attempt to show the

diversity of aerial photography.

'Cruise Ship Departing Tauranga' is the classic drone

shot – I'm always apprehensive flying over water but the

results can be amazing. 'The Tennis Court' shot caught a

new perspective for me… Sunrise brings shadows of light

poles and lines.

I had 'Self Portrait' in mind long before it was taken. The

composition was the challenge as was positioning the

drone in time to capture myself and the rising sun.

'The Track' shows a birds eye view of a walking track as it

winds its way to the summit of the Papamoa Hills.

May 2020 17


SARAH CALDWELL

20

NZPhotographer


I have found a passion in photographing

architectural lines, shapes and symmetry,

often in a creative manner, and this passion

is what I try to communicate in my work.

My career as an airline pilot, albeit recently

retired, has afforded me the opportunity to

capture wonderful architecture overseas,

and with retirement I am now exploring

more of what we have here in NZ.

@sarah_e_caldwell

REFLECTED ARCHITECTURE

My love of lines and symmetry is fully expressed in

capturing reflections of architecture.

These 4 images are from New Zealand, the cityscape

ones are by Shed 6 on Wellington’s waterfront, and

the two single shots of a building are from the Wynyard

Quarter in Auckland.

The challenge with natural puddle reflections is that one

has to make do with what is found, and sometimes the

angle or distance is not ideal. I get great satisfaction out

of making them in camera and shoot with a wide angle

lens either a 12mm or, sometimes, a 16mm lens.

One of the things I love about reflections is that often

a different overall shape is created, giving the image

greater depth. I do spend quite a bit of time post

processing them to clean up the reflection

May 2020 21


SARAH K SMITH

24

NZPhotographer


Photography is a meditation for me. Immersing myself in

the natural landscape brings me to the present moment.

It encourages me to focus on what is in front of me and

the feelings and emotions I experience. In my formative

years, I recall being disappointed with my photos - they

didn’t capture the feelings I had about what I was seeing.

My ongoing quest is to hone my craft to a point where

I can satisfyingly convey, visually and

creatively, the emotional experiences I

have when in the landscape.

www.souldelightphoto.co.nz

EBBS AND FLOWS

Long exposure photography aligns neatly with

the meditative approach I bring to my landscape

photography. You have to slow down, you have to be

patient and you have to be present in the moment to

adjust to the constantly changing light. The technique

allows scenes to be simplified and unnecessary details

to be smoothed out, leaving only those elements the

photographer wants to remain.

Over the last year, I have been exploring the creative

possibilities of ND filters in my long exposure landscape

photography. These images are a selection from that

journey so far. Using the local coastline as a subject

matter provided ample opportunity to work out the

mechanics of the exposure triangle (a mathematical

conundrum - thank goodness for phone apps!) and

to explore a range of creative effects. All the images

were created at sunrise and speak to me about the

ebbs and flows of life, hope, direction, optimism,

beauty, serenity, calm and peace. We are so lucky

in New Zealand to have the diverse and magnificent

landscape environments that we do. It is a great place

to rebalance and it is good for your soul!

May 2020 25


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Finding Freedom with Landscape Photography

Interview with Pamela Johnstone

PAMELA, TELL US ABOUT YOU AND YOUR

JOURNEY WITH PHOTOGRAPHY…

I am that person who loves to think outside the box

and gets excited over colourful skies, coffee, and

road trips. I love art, music, photography, and doing

things on the spur of the moment!

I was born in Invercargill but from the age of 12,

throughout my teenage years, moved to a variety of

different places around the South Island. I have two

children who are now adults, my son is the youngest

at 19 and my daughter is 20.

I live in Christchurch now, after relocating from

Blenheim in December 2019 due to my daughters

visual impairments – she has a condition called

nystagmus which is sometimes known as dancing eye

syndrome and also has a few other visual impairments

but she is my go to person for the voice of reason

every time.

I work as a checkout person at a local supermarket,

I love interacting with the customers and believe that

it is important to try and brighten someone’s day even

if it’s just with a smile and a friendly hello as you never

know who needs to offload for a few minutes.

When it comes to hobbies, aside from photography,

I love camping and to me there is nothing better than

jumping in a car with lots of music and going on a

road trip with no real destination – you can discover so

much about yourself, life, and everything in between.

My journey into photography started with my phone

camera when I moved to Australia for about a year –

I used to put my phone photos up on social media

as a way to stay connected with those I loved whilst

showing them some of the great places around me.

I then moved back to New Zealand and continued

taking photos with my phone whilst out on walks,

this being back when I didn’t drive. Then one day a

friends mum told me there was a cheap $50 second

hand Fuji Finepix camera going in a garage sale so

I grabbed it. From that moment on I was taking photos

every time I went out whether for a walk or on a

random drive to the beach with my friend – every time

she asked if I wanted to go for a drive or go for a walk

up the wither hills I would jump at the opportunity –

I never used to think about where my photos would

take me, it was just something I loved to do.

I had some people tell me my photos were great

and I should post more of them online so I created a

Facebook page but it wasn’t until a lady who I did

not know personally asked me what gear I used and

then asked if I would like to do a photo shoot for a

birthday party to gain some extra exposure as she

thought I had a natural talent (she herself being into

photography) that I began to realise I might be onto

something.

I am very much my own worst critic, so with this photo

shoot offer I thought my goodness I really should

get a better camera. The Fuji I was using just had

rechargeable AA batteries and I was having to put a

rubber band around the closure to stop the batteries

from falling out, it was a very well loved camera!! So,

after a few weeks of pondering, I purchased a Canon.

Due to getting very sick I was unable to do that

birthday photo shoot but it was that invite that made

me take my passion for photography more seriously.

My Facebook page is a little over a year old now and

at the time of writing this, has 1060 followers. I am very

grateful for my friends and family giving me the push

to get out there and believe in myself.

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SUMNER

F3.5, 1/600, ISO100,18mm

May 2020 31


LIGHT AND FLUFFY

F6.3, 1/100s, ISO100, 42mm

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ROCKY SHORES

F4, 1/250s, ISO100, 20mm

SHAG ROCK

F3.5,1/1600s, ISO100, 18mm

May 2020 33


HEAVEN AND HIDING

F20, 1/200s, ISO800,18mm

WOULD YOU SAY YOU HAVE FOUND YOUR

PHOTOGRAPHIC STYLE?

Although I’m still very much new to photography,

I mostly lean towards taking landscape photos. I

love vibrant colours, the honesty of cracks in the

land, ripples of the sea, moody skies, and calm days,

especially at sunset as it reminds me to be grateful for

another day on this earth.

WHAT ARE YOU SHOOTING WITH NOW?

I have a Canon 3000D with a standard kit lens as well

as a 50mm lens that I play around with. I have a tripod

but I haven’t really used it as I lost a part to it that

I haven’t replaced!

WHY IS PHOTOGRAPHY IMPORTANT TO YOU?

To me, photography means pure freedom, this is why

I love landscape photography so much. After leaving

a bad relationship 10 years ago I was on a journey to

find myself again.

Up until 3 years ago I did not drive so now when I am

out and about, standing at some of the beautiful

places I have found, I just take in the beauty and

the peacefulness that I am so fortunate to see. Not

everybody can see in colour, and not everybody can

see clearly but we all can feel tranquillity when we

calm our minds and take in nature.

WHAT PHOTOGRAPHY CHALLENGES DO YOU

STRUGGLE WITH THE MOST?

Probably learning all of the technical terms. I am self

taught and to be honest there is no method to my

photos, I literally point and shoot and hope for the

best! When I am at a beautiful location I feel so free

that I do not think too much about what is happening

with my camera as I am too busy being amazed by

the beauty of what I see!

I would love to do a photography course at some

stage to gain more knowledge but there are quite a

few fantastic people I watch and learn from on social

media.

HOW DO YOU PARTICIPATE IN

#PHOTOGRAPHYFORGOOD?

I like to share my photos as much as I can, aiming to

help people with their mental health as well as helping

to raise disability awareness, two issues that are very

important to me. I have been told by a couple of

34

NZPhotographer


people that they find my photos very calming which

is the best feedback I could ask for especially as I do

photography purely because I love it.

I made a video last year called solitude, it features

a variety of photos taken at Monkey Bay and

Marlborough, a favourite place of mine and a friend

who sadly took his own life. He loved the beach

especially Rarangi and had travelled all over the

world, I think perhaps wanting to find his place, but

sadly he was in a dark place. By making and sharing

the video, I wanted to remind everybody on this earth

that they are loved and that they do matter. That

they should not resort to a permanent action for a

temporary problem as they are never alone under a

sky full of stars and beaches full of sand.

WHAT ARE YOUR DREAMS AND GOALS FOR

THE FUTURE?

I would love to tap into some groups to help promote

mental health and disabilities. I would also love to

travel to as many places as I can, to meet as many

different and unique people as I can, and to learn

about different cultures as everybody has a story and

every place a story too.

ANY INSPIRATIONAL WORDS TO LEAVE US

WITH?

When out taking landscape photos, be sure to feel

the moment, take in the magic of the environment,

and enjoy the freedom you have in nature whether

you’re on the beach, in the bush, or somewhere else –

Just feel it, breathe it, and calm your mind from your

everyday busy life even if it’s just for 10 minutes.

WHERE CAN WE FIND YOU ONLINE?

albums.excio.io/profile/pamela johnstone

pamelajohnstone.smugmug.com

PamelaJohnstonePhotographyHouse

SIDE VISION

F3.5, 1/80s, ISO160

May 2020 35


Rising Star: Cooper Madsen

Cooper is a 13 year old who is passionate about photography, creating abstract

art, and cycling/bikepacking. Living in Ohakune, Cooper is home schooled

which gives him the time to focus on the things he loves.

COOPER, WHEN DID YOU FIRST PICK UP A

CAMERA AND WHAT GOT YOU INTERESTED

IN PHOTOGRAPHY IN THE FIRST PLACE?

When I was little I was given an old Minolta SLR to

play with, then at the age of 9, I sold all my Lego

and purchased my first DSLR which was a Nikon

D3300 with an 18–55mm, 40mm micro lens, and a

cheap ring flash.

I guess my Dad has been a huge influence in my

photography as he is a photographer and also runs

photography courses here in the Ruapehu region.

WHAT CAMERA GEAR DO YOU HAVE NOW?

Currently I have a Fujifilm X-Pro1 with a Fujinon

35mm F2. Just recently I purchased a 7artisan 35mm

F1.2 which has quickly become my favourite lens.

I really enjoy manual focus and the shallow depth

at F1.2 is awesome. Although it is the same focal

length as the Fuji, the 7artisan has its own character

/ quirks, which I really like. Paired with the X-Pro1 it

has a film like result but nothing really compares to

the real thing.

HOW HAVE YOU DEVELOPED YOUR SKILLS IN

PHOTOGRAPHY?

Having a Dad like mine, I don’t need to do any

photography courses, I can just ask him but I also

have a good library of books. I find that studying the

greats is the best way to learn, not reading “How

To” books. One of my favourite books is Seeing

Things by Joel Meyerowitz.

I have also learned a lot from shooting film rather

than digital, this including learning to process my

own black and white films which I really enjoyed.

HOW DOES PHOTOGRAPHY HELP YOU

EXPRESS YOURSELF?

Photography is just drawing with light, so for me it’s

just the same as my canvas art or digital abstract

work. I have been taught to shoot how it feels not

how it looks so all of my photos are a reflection of

me in some way. Recently I was diagnosed with

Tourettes which can be a little chaotic and I see

that come through in my pictures.

WHAT GENRES OF PHOTOGRAPHY MOST

INTEREST YOU?

I don’t really do the typical pretty sunsets LOL,

I prefer abstract, portraits, and documentary style

like my “Buggered” project where I photographed

all the dead bugs around my house for about a

year. Right now I’m really loving black and white

though.

WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR BIGGEST STRUGGLE

WITH PHOTOGRAPHY AND HOW DID YOU

OVERCOME THAT?

In the beginning it was probably getting my

exposures right as I have only ever used the camera

on full manual exposure. I learned to slow down

(no longer shooting like it was a machine gun!),

read my meter, and then expose for what I want to

create, and not just follow my light meter – learning

to read light basically. Film photography helped me

a lot.

WHAT ARE YOUR PLANS FOR THE FUTURE AND

HOW DO YOU SEE PHOTOGRAPHY PLAYING

A PART IN THAT?

I know that being an artist is what I want to be, I am

sure that photography will always play a major part

in my future.

WHERE CAN WE SEE YOUR WORK ONLINE?

www.instagram.com/cooper_madsen

albums.excio.io/profile/cooper_madsen

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NZPhotographer


BUGGERED 1

F7.1, 1/640s, ISO400

FLOWER

F2.8,1/2000s, ISO200

BUGGERED 61

F9, 1/125s, ISO1600

FLOWER 2

F1.4

May 2020 37


38

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INSIGHTS FROM

@excio photo community

WHAT IS YOUR FIRST

THOUGHT WHEN YOU HEAR

#PHOTOGRAPHYFORGOOD?

Many people associate it with

photographers doing charity work,

giving their photos away for free, or

donating a percentage of their print

sales to a charity. Although helping

others and giving photos or prints

away for free when you know it is

needed and appreciated is truly

great, the #PhotographyForGood

movement is different. It is a much

broader term we use that involves

making good to the society, to

yourself (the photographer) and to

those who see your photos.

As a result of our collective

efforts to encourage

#PhotographyForGood we see

photographs emerging that

have a deeper meaning and our

members having better intentions

when pressing the shutter button

rather than just taking photos of

what is popular right now.

Over the last few weeks while

we were all staying at home,

it was great to see increased

activity in the Excio community

with more photos and collections

uploaded, more people joining us,

and members taking part in our

mystery challenges which you can

find out more about on our Blog

and Facebook page. We have

also seen some amazing examples

from Excio members that embody

the #PhotographyForGood

philosophy - The following pages

showing just a tiny fragment of the

stories our members are sharing

across the Excio platform.

Each image and description shows

that since we are all different

so are our goals, intentions and

motivations behind taking photos,

but as you will also see that every

photo has helped or has the

potential to help photographers,

viewers, and society as a whole.

#PhotographyForGood has

power, it can transform lives,

brings inspiration and raises

awareness. This is our ultimate

mission at Excio - to join forces and

spread the #PhotographyForGood

movement, proving to the world

that photography is not about

selfies, likes or influencers.

Have a look at the recently

featured photos on the Excio

app if you haven’t yet and

don’t forget to read through the

stories behind the photographs

and photographers’ profiles.

You will definitely find something

interesting, learn something new

and I’m sure will feel the power of

#PhotographyforGood.

We have an exciting array of

events planned for May as well

as some important deadlines and

activities, so don’t forget to check

our events calendar or subscribe

to our free newsletter. Let’s do

good together.

Ana Lyubich

Co-founder of Excio,

Ana's photography

journey started many

years ago with one of the

first Kodak film cameras.

She loves exploring the

unseen macro world

and capturing people's

genuine emotions.

@excionz

www.excio.io

May 2020

39


Excio Top 10

CAROLE GARSIDE

CHIMPANZEE

“A chimpanzee watching me, watching him.

He's got such a beautiful face.”

excio.io/yorkshirekiwi

ISAAC KHASAWNEH

DROP WATER PHOTOGRAPHY

"I decided to have a go at water drop

photography and am very happy with the

outcome."

excio.io/isaac

40 NZPhotographer


ROY CERNOHORSKY

MOSS SEED

“Another in the moss series taken over the years

from a large collection.”

excio.io/heiny

FAIRLIE ATKINSON

PORTRAIT OF A GIRL

“Based on Gortzius Geldorp’s Portrait of a Lady but

set in the time of the Covid 19 lockdown.”

excio.io/fairlie

May 2020

41


VICKI FINLAY

LOOKING UP

“A recent visit to Austalia

Zoo found us stranded on

Bindi's Island in the middle

of a downpour. We shared

our shelter with a couple of

the lemurs who roam free

over the island. This one

wasn't too keen to share

with the human species,

and spent most of its time

looking skyward for a

break in the weather when

hopefully it could escape

being in such close quarters.

Luckily for me, I had my 100-

400mm lens that allowed an

appropriate distance so as

not to cause any stress to

the lemur.”

excio.io/vickifinz

HELEN KNIGHT

MOONLIGHT SONATA

“As night descends and the

moon rises the waves crash

gently on the shore. The sound

of crickets and the cry of a

morepork can be heard from

behind. As a cold soft wind

wafts across your face you sit

and wait as the tide comes in,

its gentle breeze guiding the

waves as they lap against the

shoreline. Insects scuttle in the

sand, the sound of mosquitoes

buzz around your face as you

slap them away. Nighttime

quiet, and serene not another

soul around, no need to fear no

need to hide.”

excio.io/knightfire

42 NZPhotographer


HAYDN PARKES

SUNRISE

“Lensball shot, taken down in the morning at

the end of a sunrise catching the final few

rays of orange glow in the sky.”

excio.io/wanderingwolf

KELLY PETTITT

SCOOBY

“Scooby is my 16.5 year old

miniature fox terrier. She lives

with Casey and Fury, ex racing

greyhounds.”

excio.io/kelly

May 2020

43


CHARLOTTE E. JOHNSON

THE DEVIL’S ROSE

“Collaboration with model, makeup artist and

costume designer. Inspired by the work of the

artist 'Brom'.”

excio.io/cejphoto

DAMON JOHN MARSHALL

DAY EIGHTEEN: WACKY WORLD

“The world is looking a bit whacked during the

COVID-19 lockdown 2020, don't you think??”

excio.io/damojo

44 NZPhotographer


BACKYARD

BEAUTY

READERS' SUBMISSIONS

Submit your photos by 15 May

for a chance to be featured in the

next issue of NZPhotographer.


Journeying Home - The Quest to

Capture Dunedin

by Brendon Gilchrist

SAINT CLAIR

F11, 1s, ISO 64

Dunedin is an amazing city, if I do say so myself,

having been born here and still having a close

connection to what I’m proud to call my

home city.

It’s a base for many different outdoor activities, most

of which are free to enjoy, whether you seek the

rugged beaches, the calm of the harbor, the wildlife,

or some of New Zealand’s top surfing spots. This city is

a place where you could spend a few weeks and still

not cover all of the iconic locations that are within its

proximity.

Last year I took myself on a personal self-guided

holiday hoping to get some picture postcard images

of the iconic locations around the South Island. I was

mostly successful with my quest, only at a few places

was I unlucky in not getting the shots I wanted (whilst

also breaking my favourite circular polarizer!) but at

other places I was completely blessed beyond words.

I’ll be writing about Dunedin more in other issues but

for now, let me take you around some of the most

iconic beaches...

The easiest beach in Dunedin to reach is also the

most famous surfing beach, Saint Clair. It’s your classic

Dunedin beach – In one direction it has sand dunes,

in the other direction a massive seawall with cafe’s

located along the esplanade. The famous Hot Salt

Water Pool is found here, on the Southern end of the

beach, along with access to Second Beach (the other

Saint Clair beach) and the iconic Saint Clair Poles.

This iconic photo location is a very short 3 minute walk

from either Forbury Road or the Esplanade – Just keep

walking, you can’t miss them. The jetty, which was

actually a groyne, was first installed in 1903. It was

designed to capture sand to stop erosion on the sand

dunes but it soon became clear that the ocean was

more powerful than humans and the battle of the

ocean power could not be won with residents and

the surf club argued that the groins were a hazard by

the 1930’s.

There are not many of the poles left now so if you are

wanting to capture something of this iconic location

(including lining up White Island in the frame) it is

better to go sooner then later before they are all

gone. I remember as a child there being rows and

rows of them but now there are around 10, some are

still the same height, albeit some a bit bent, whilst

others are broken.

Moving along on my trip, I visited Tunnel Beach ready

for some sunrise shots. Having awoken at 5am, I made

the 9 minute drive to Tunnel Beach car park. I could

see the sky starting to erupt with hints of red and

orange and I felt good, like something spectacular

was going to happen, that my Tunnel Beach bucket

list image was going to get ticked off my list.

I parked up, jumped out of the car, threw on my

camera bag, grabbed my tripod, and headed

down the steep hill to this iconic location. The walk

down only took me 10 minutes as I was in a hurry, not

46

NZPhotographer


wanting to miss any of what was shaping up to be an

amazing sunrise. Once I got into position, I noticed

that I’d forgotten my filters - all I needed was my grad

filter which helps balance the skylight, enhancing the

colour while making it a tad darker but it was too late

now and I had to work with what I’d got (or in this

case not got!). I was shooting for at least 20 minutes

as the colour kept coming and the clouds kept

changing. I waited as each set of waves smashed

up against the walls of the tunnel so that I could get

something that was rugged to go with the amazing

sky.

I knew I had my bucket list photo before the sun came

over the horizon yet I also knew that without my grad

filter I was not getting the same image as I would have

captured with it, having to shoot a short long exposure

to blur the waters crashing into the wall. Anyhow, I was

not disappointed, the sky was on fire, and the images I

had on my camera were epic, the day starting with a

bucket list image ticked off my list.

Walking back to the car, I was in no hurry, if you know

this beach at all you know it’s a steep walk back up to

the car - the track descends sharply from 150 meters

above sea level to where I stood at roughly 60 meters

above sea level.

Sitting in my car I wondered what I should do for the

rest of the day since the sun sets in the other direction

so sunset shots weren’t an option and I wasn’t likely to

ever beat the sunrise photo I’d just captured. I thought

the Catlins were calling but first up, I deserved a treat

– a McDonald’s breakfast!

Little was I to know at that moment in time that later in

the day my roof rack would fail causing my kayak to

fall off and damage my car, delaying my journey.

3 TIPS FOR SEASCAPE PHOTOGRAPHY

• A wide-angle lens is recommended for the 2

locations I have talked about here. Anything from

14mm up to 35mm would be a good range to

have.

• I’m not usually a fan of sticking to the rule of thirds

but for seascapes, it works – Make sure you have

a third water, third land or subject, and a third

sky. Even a 50/50 rule works well as long as your

subject is known.

• Capturing movement with seascapes is not the

easiest, having a shorter 1 second to 1/4 of a

second can add a sense of art as well as a sense

of movement.

TUNNEL BEACH

F16, 1.3s, IS064

May 2020 47


From the Road: Hong Kong

BY SUSAN BLICK

STORMY NIGHT FROM VICTORIA PEAK

F2.8, 1/50s, ISO2500, 70mm

48

NZPhotographer


May 2020 49


Hong Kong is surely one of the world’s most exciting

cities! From the moment you land you get the

feeling you’re in for something special.

Hong Kong became a British colony at the end of the

First Opium War in 1842 when the Qing Empire ceded

Hong Kong Island on a 99 year lease. That lease expired

in 1997 and Hong Kong was formally returned to China.

However, as a gesture of goodwill China allowed Hong

Kong to remain mostly autonomous calling it a special

administrative zone “one country, two systems” until 2047

to ease it back into the China-fold.

There is lots to discover in Hong Kong, and no shortage of

photographic opportunities. Besides fabulous cityscapes,

some of the best photography hot spots are found in the

many differing neighbourhoods.

Take for example, Mong Kok which has the highest

population density in the world, lots of street traffic

24 hours a day, and neon signs lit brightly after dark.

Slow your shutter speed down here to emphasise the

movement of the crowds along the streets and through

the intersections. If you’re unsure about your camera’s

settings, try putting your camera on shutter priority and

dial in a shutter speed of around 1/15th of a second, this

will give you some creative license and will permit your

camera to decide on the appropriate aperture setting to

expose your image correctly. By trying your hand at some

impressionism you will allow the blur of your image to tell

the story.

Next, if you’re after that most famous Instagram location

in Honkers, jump on the MRT to Quarry Bay; alight at

Tai Koo Station, use exit B, and head West along Kings

Road until you reach Yick Cheong Building. It can take

a little searching to find it, but you’ll know once you

have as the queue to take pictures can get quite long

later in the day. Here you can wonder in amazement at

the residential compactness of thousands of ten metre

square apartments reaching skyward all around you.

Probably the most famous of all Hong Kong photography

locations is Victoria Peak. There are two popular ways of

getting to the Peak. If you want to ride the 100 year-old

tram up the mountainside I suggest taking a taxi to the

Lower Peak Terminus; otherwise it’s a reasonable walk

from Central MRT using exit J2. However, it’s much easier

and quicker to take a taxi all the way to the top of the

Peak. Ask your driver for Victoria Peak Garden on Mount

Austin Road, the car park is beside the lookout. Making

a time-lapse of the city over golden hour into blue hour

is something to try your hand at. The Peak is a fantastic

location to do this from as the view is stupendous. Once

you’ve finished shooting your cityscapes, walk some of

the trails along the mountain top and consider walking

back down. It is a long walk, but it’s all downhill and there

are many fabulous photo spots that will give you unique

images of the city’s skyline.

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NZPhotographer


INSIDER’S PHOTO TIP LOCATION:

Hong Kong is blessed with markets galore catering to

all kinds of tastes, usually categorised by the items

they sell - a fish market, a meat market, fruit and

vegetable markets, houseware markets, and so on.

If crowded markets aren’t usually your thing, but

you go to just one, make it the Temple Street Market

which is situated in Kowloon, a short walk from Jordan

Road Station (use exit A). Once the sun starts to go

down stall owners lay out their wares for the coming

shoppers. Every counterfeit designer product you

can think of can be found on Temple Street. Lots of

souvenirs, t-shirts, and other knickknacks that tourists

often buy are also available.

Now here’s the tip - for the best photo location head

to the northern end of the market across Kansu

Road, there you’ll find a car park. Enter the building,

remembering to smile nicely at the security guard,

and take the lift to the upper floors. From here you’ll

have a great view looking down the length of the

market. It’s best shot at blue hour just as the city’s

lights come on - don’t forget your tripod for better

low-light results.

GEAR GUIDE:

Hong Kong screams street photography so any lens

that gets you in close yet pushes back for wider shots

in markets will suit you well. When I’m not sure what

I’ll find on the streets I take my 24-105mm F/4, it allows

me to shoot tight when needed and to get the whole

story in the frame if I’m in a more crowded part of the

city.

Lenses with better low-light capabilities can also be

incredibly handy, for instance F/2.8 can work really

well, adding some nice bokeh when trying to make

something in your frame stand out against a busy

background. A low-light lens can also save your

image if you’re in a fairly dark and crowded location

like an MRT station. Naturally, for cityscapes a wide

angle lens is king. Always travel with a tripod and pack

a few filters, a 6 and/or 10 stop for any long exposures,

and a soft-graduated 4 stop for sunset shots.

Photo's: Top to bottom page 42:

Mong Kok Buzz Of The Streets - F2.8, 1/15s, ISO160, 16mm| Mong Kok Buzz Of The Streets - F2.8, 1/15s, ISO160, 16mm|MongKok Street -

F3.2, 1/160s, ISO500, 25mm|Yick Cheong Building - F2.8, 1/100s, ISO100, 21mm

Page 43:

Vegetable Market Quarry Bay - F2.8, 1/160s, ISO1000, 35mm


Introduction to Style and Vision

by Richard Young

“How do we find our unique expression of the world, and how can we convey this

to the viewer?”


Achieving competence in photography is

easy enough; with some basic technical

understanding, almost anybody can create

a good photograph. In the age of digital

photography and smartphones, this is truer than

ever. However, this ease of accessibility also makes

photography one of the most difficult art forms in

terms of developing a signature style and clear

personal vision.

Style and vision are personal: reflections of our unique

expression of the world and how we wish to convey

this to the viewer. Copying a favourite photographer’s

style (using the same locations and the same

approach) does not constitute a personal vision.

While we can, of course, learn from the way others

approach image-making, our style must emerge from

our own creativity. Creating an original body of work,

one that is consistent with one’s own vision and stands

out from that of other photographers, is the most

difficult challenge facing any photographer.

Working with a subject you understand (one that

excites you) will lead to work that is most true to your

view of the world. This is what we call your vision.

To be a great visual storyteller, you must know your

subject. You may decide the photography you enjoy

most is wildlife, street, or wedding photography.

Perhaps you’re thinking of a location from your past,

a story you have to tell, or a subject you have great

knowledge about. Just be careful not to let outside

influences guide your journey; be true to yourself and

your vision, and let this decide your path. Above all,

remember one thing: photography should be fun!

Why spend time (and money!) pursuing this passion if

you are not enjoying yourself?

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NZPhotographer


Before we can approach the individual subjects

of style and vision, we must understand what

differentiates the two.

Vision refers to how we see the world and the

message we wish to express through all our images.

Style emerges from the choices we make or the

tools we use to express our vision, giving our work

consistency when viewed as a collection.

ESTABLISHING A STYLE

“Style is a product of the choices we make or the

tools we use to express our vision. It gives our work

consistency when viewed together as a collection.”

Keeping consistency of style throughout all stages

of work (capture, selection and processing) will give

your photography a signature look. A photographer’s

style should not be static. It should evolve as you grow

as a photographer and as a person, your expression

informed by new technical expertise and inspiration.

While establishing your own style is important, it is

equally important to remain open to new ways of

expressing yourself. Without experimentation, there

can be no growth. There is so much joy to be found

in the learning and mastering of new equipment and

techniques and along the way, you may discover a

strategy to incorporate into your style, or a new tool to

help express your vision.

There are many elements that make up a

photographer’s style. Some elements will be

consistent across all images, while others may be

used selectively; we don’t want each image to look

exactly the same. Throughout the process of creating

a photograph, we must view it through multiple lenses:

as an individual piece in its own regard, as a part

of its collection, and as an expression of our overall

vision. Although the choices we make for an individual

photograph may not carry over to the others, we must

take care that these choices do not subtract from

what we are trying to achieve within the collection or

from our overall style.

FINDING YOUR VISION

“Vision refers to how we see the world and the

message we wish to express through all our images.”

Our artistic vision is the message we strive to express

through our photography. Between vision and

style, vision is the more difficult concept to grasp,

as it cannot simply be broken down to a number of

elements. Vision is also the more elusive of the two:

we could consider it the “holy grail” of photography

– a goal we continue to seek throughout our entire

journey as a photographer.

Attempting to copy another artist’s vision will lead

to weak and ingenuine work; your vision must come

from within. Because it is a reflection of how you see

the world, your vision will evolve naturally over time,

shaped by your own personal growth and experience.

This evolution often takes place alongside stylistic

evolution, as we learn and adapt our approach to

the image-making process to fit our changing vision.

In following your vision, be prepared for the possibility

that your work may not always be understood or

appreciated by your viewers. Photography that is very

personal and full of meaning to the creator might not

express that to the viewer, but this in no way equates

to failure. It is all part of the artistic experience, as

many famous artists throughout history would tell you.

For beginning photographers, those still experimenting

with style and working to master the camera,

developing an artistic vision can be a particularly

daunting task. It’s natural to be strongly influenced

by the images of others during the early stages of

your photography journey, but this makes it difficult

to approach the subject with a truly open mind

and express a personal vision. If you feel you are at

this stage, don’t rush; continue to master the basics

first. There will be plenty of time to build your vision

once your artistic energies are freed up. After all, the

process is a marathon, not a sprint.

Ultimately, developing your vision will give purpose

to your image-making. It will present a goal you can

constantly work towards. It will keep you engaged

with your own photography. Your vision will help guide

you to create works that are original and meaningful.

Once it starts to unfold, your vision will also help you

to define your style, as style is the voice through

which your vision speaks. If you feel your vision is still

a mystery, don’t worry: many photographers feel the

same, and finding your vision is more of a journey than

a destination.

ONLINE PORTFOLIO & PROCESSING MASTERCLASS - THIS ONLINE COURSE GUIDES YOU THROUGH

THE PROCESS OF CREATING A PHOTOGRAPHY PORTFOLIO WHICH SHOWCASES YOUR UNIQUE STYLE

AND VISION. IT IS A COMPREHENSIVE AND COHESIVE COURSE WITH EACH MODULE BUILDING ON

THE LAST TO HONE AND DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS AND EXPAND YOUR CREATIVITY AND PHOTOGRAPHIC

KNOWLEDGE. CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE AND JOIN.

May 2020 55


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NZPhotographer


NZ Landscapes Competition

Winners & Best Entries

1ST PLACE

MATTHEW DAVEY "OHAU PEACE"

2ND PLACE

SARAH SMITH "MITRE MAJESTY"

3RD PLACE

LYNNE ROBERTS "WINTER SUNRISE"

HIGHLY COMMENDED:

Matthew Davey with "Sunset Lake Benmore"

Kim Free with "Castle Hill"

Ainsley Watson with "A Leap of Faith"

Youn Ja Kim with "Blue Lake"

COMPETITION SPONSORS:


OHAU PEACE

While walking around Lake Ohau I was looking at capturing a shot of Ben Ohau

however, I was practicing some ICM photography and found the combination of

the colors and the movement in this photo gave it a peaceful vibe.

Matthew Davey

58

NZPhotographer


1st Place

May 2020 59


2ND PLACE

MITRE MAJESTY

With the devastation to the tracks and Milford Road in Fiordland earlier this year due to rain events,

I had adjusted my hopes of visiting Milford Sound on our trip south. However, I thought a drive down

the road as far as Marians Corner would still be worth it. Setting off in the afternoon, we were surprised

when we didn’t encounter any road barriers and by 6pm found ourselves in a quiet and desolate

Milford Sound. The sun was beginning to dip behind the mountains in the west and Mitre Peak stood

proud over the fiord. A well-photographed peak, I tried to create an image with a little bit of a

difference.

Sarah K Smith

60

NZPhotographer


3RD PLACE

WINTER SUNRISE

F16, 20s, ISO50 with ND filters

A group of 4 of us arrived at Tunnel Beach just south of Dunedin, for sunrise, on a freezing cold morning

in June. Arriving in the dark, it was so cold and windy we were reluctant to get out of the car. I had

never been there before and was amazed by the rugged landscape and formations.

Lynne Roberts

May 2020 61


HIGHLY

COMMENDED

SUNSET LAKE BENMORE

F11, 1/125s, ISO200

I had planned to capture a sunset shot from the Lake Benmore lookout for several

weeks. Once I arrived I had a wide composition set up but as I was watching the

sun drop I saw a more intimate composition and captured this image.

Matthew Davey

62

NZPhotographer


HIGHLY

COMMENDED

CASTLE HILL

F11, 1/160s, 35mm

“A spiritual centre of the universe” is what the Dalai Lama named Castle Hill when he visited this beautiful

place here in New Zealand. If anyone has been here themselves, they know why he called it this.

Homeward bound after a weekend road trip, we drove up to Castle Hill and I was immediately struck

by the beauty of the scene before me. The overcast sky creating perfect lighting and really highlighting

the colour of the grass, the recent snowfall adding interest to the impressiveness of the ancient limestone

rocks with the sheep grazing in the distance and the fence dividing the paddocks all adding together

to create a scene of New Zealand that I wanted to capture to show just how beautiful this country is.

Photographers come here and make their way to the rocks to photograph them up close, but I wanted

to shoot something different so used them as the backdrop for this photo instead of making them the

main subject.

Kim Free

May 2020 63


HIGHLY

COMMENDED

A LEAP OF FAITH

F16, 50s, ISO200, 14mm

The firmness of the diving board allows us to

leap into the unknown with a safer certainty

Ainsley Watson

64

NZPhotographer


HIGHLY

COMMENDED

BLUE LAKE

On my fifth visit, I caught this miraculous reflection of the Blue Lake.

Youn Ja Kim

May 2020 65


SUNSET SYMPHONY

To me this is one of the best views New Zealand has to offer, the beautiful town of Mount Maunganui

located in the Bay of Plenty. The 'Mount' to us locals is consistently voted one of New Zealand best

beaches known for its sun, surf and iconic mountain. I'm fortunate enough to call the Mount home so

my vision was to create an image that show cases these key elements from a unique perspective. After

weeks of failed attempts to get good light, one summer evening my persistence paid off and I was finally

rewarded with the conditions I had envisioned.

Getting far off the beaten track I rock hopped to a secluded spot along the opposing island and

was instantly drawn to an area where large waves were crashing against the rocks. I perched myself

precariously on a rock getting as close to the waves as I safely could. Once satisfied with my composition

I took what seemed like hundreds of shots to capture the wave movement in the foreground. I wanted

to find the perfect shutter speed where I could create a calming effect to the image but still maintain

texture in the water to convey the power of the waves. For a time it seemed like the light wasn't going to

develop but just as the sun set below the horizon a stream of golden light cast through the image bringing

interest to the rock structures and waves guiding the viewers eye through the frame. I frantically continued

to shoot as the sky erupted in colour, desperately trying to protect my camera from each wave that

threatened to drown my equipment. What was a chaotic moment in time became a symphony of visual

elements creating an image that I feel perfectly represents the landscape New Zealand is so blessed with.

Brennan Barnett-Mullan

66

NZPhotographer


BATTLING THE POLLUTION

With this single shot image I just don't know where to start... when I went out to the end

of my garden I didn't think a shot like this would be possible so close to home. I thought

the light pollution would be too strong, but I thought with this lockdown I needed to

make the best of a bad situation and to be honest it came out better than I could

ever have imagined.

Haydn Parkes

May 2020 67


LAKE HAWEA PANORAMA

F22, 1/40s, ISO64, 35mm

In the NZ Summer we drove from Queenstown to Haast as part of a South

Island road trip experiencing beautiful, hot, sunny days until we got closer

to the West Coast. This photograph was taken at one of the stopping points

along the way. One has to be patient and share the spot with bus loads

of tourists and other photographers. As kiwis I think we tend to forget how

special our landscape is.

Ann Kilpatrick

68

NZPhotographer


May 2020 69


REFLECTION

The perfect reflection of Maori Lake on a fine Winter's day.

Youn Ja Kim

70

NZPhotographer


SUNRISE, HAUMOANA

F3, 1/125s, 23mm

This was taken on a walk along Haumoana beach just as the sun

was rising. The light and colours are always changing so quickly

at this time of day.

Gail Orgias

May 2020 71


A FENCE DIVIDES WARM AND COLD

F16, 0.4s, ISO100, 18mm

As the day takes over from the night, so does the sun brighten what has

been dark and cold. Taken at South Ridge Road off the Pahiatua Track.

Ainsley Watson

72

NZPhotographer


MUD HUT, SOUTHLAND

I stayed in this sod hut back in 2011, located on a friends farm just outside

Garston. Originally built by the Chinese Gold Miners during the construction

of the water race in the 1890's and reconstructed in 1990, The Mud Hut is the

only building of its type that may be stayed in overnight.

Aaron Bryant

May 2020 73


MACKENZIE WELCOME

F11, 1/100s, ISO400, 105mm

Welcome to Mackenzie Country. This is the scene that greets visitors as they crest the

hill above Fairlie in New Zealand's South Island - beautiful colours and layers of the

countryside, the green of pastures, the yellow of fields of canola flowers, the hills of the

Albury Range and snows on the Two Thumb Range in the back. The panoramic format

conveys the expansiveness of the landscape.

Peter Haworth

74

NZPhotographer


May 2020 75


CALM BEFORE THE STORM

F6.3, 1/60s, ISO125, 24mm

Dusk photography while camping beside Ariels Tarn (1,350m), near

Harman Pass with Whitehorn Pass left of centre. A stitch of 5 portrait shots.

Peter Laurenson

76

NZPhotographer


MOTURIKI SPLASH

F10, 1/3s, ISO200, 19mm

Taken from Moturiki Island in Mt Maunganui. After I found the leading lines from

the pattern in the rocks, I wanted to show movement in the wave along with

the trails cause by the splash of the water over the rocks.

Rob Gale

May 2020 77


"BUT OUT OF

LIMITATIONS

COMES

CREATIVITY."

DEBBIE ALLEN

78

NZPhotographer

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