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YOUR ULTIMATE RESOURCE FOR NATURAL LIVING<br />

MAY <strong>2020</strong> * betternutrition.com<br />

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no<br />

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40 Years of Hydrolyzing<br />

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COLLAGEN<br />

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References<br />

1<br />

Hays NP,<br />

collagen hydrolysate protein..., J Am Diet<br />

Assoc. 2009 109(6):1082-7.<br />

2<br />

Sundell MB, Oral protein supplementation<br />

alone improves anabolism..., J Ren<br />

Nutr. 2009 Sep;19(5):412-21.<br />

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CONTENTS<br />

<strong>May</strong> <strong>2020</strong> / Vol. 82 / No. 5<br />

13<br />

We’ve taken<br />

roasted veggies<br />

up a notch with<br />

our Cauliflower<br />

Steaks with<br />

Blood Orange<br />

& Vadouvan<br />

Spice.<br />

30<br />

36<br />

features<br />

Fix Your Period<br />

One of the biggest myths perpetrated on<br />

women today is that menstrual issues are not<br />

fixable. Whether you experience moodiness,<br />

brain fog, fatigue, fertility struggles, low libido,<br />

or other monthly issues, there are ways to<br />

revitalize your body and put these symptoms<br />

behind you, as Certified Women’s Health and<br />

Functional <strong>Nutrition</strong> Coach Nicole Jardim<br />

outlines in her latest book, Fix Your Period.<br />

The Salt Breakthrough<br />

For years, we’ve been told that a high-sodium diet<br />

leads to high blood pressure. But is that really the<br />

case? New research from the University of<br />

Virginia says, “no.” In fact, a high-sodium diet<br />

may actually lower blood pressure in some<br />

people. Here’s a look at the latest research on<br />

salt, plus tips on how to ensure that you’re<br />

getting just the right amount of sodium for you.<br />

departments<br />

8 NEWSBITES<br />

New Viruses<br />

How to protect yourself from<br />

harmful invaders.<br />

12 PASSION BEHIND THE PRODUCT<br />

Olive Oil Crush<br />

Fusion olive oil? Yes, please!<br />

14 IN THE SPOTLIGHT<br />

Mind Over Weight<br />

Dr. Ian K. Smith’s mental strategies<br />

for successful weight loss.<br />

16 HOT BUYS<br />

Come What <strong>May</strong><br />

New products we’re excited about.<br />

18 CHECK OUT<br />

Vitamin E Facts<br />

It’s more important than you think.<br />

22 ASK THE NATUROPATHIC DOCTOR<br />

The Cholesterol Question<br />

The plain truth about this natural fat.<br />

24 HERBAL WELLNESS<br />

Berberine Benefits<br />

This herbal extract boasts a wide<br />

range of medicinal uses.<br />

26 HEALTHY TRANSFORMATIONS<br />

The Ultimate Immunity Biohack<br />

How to restore leptin function and<br />

improve your resistance to illness.<br />

28 NATURAL BEAUTY<br />

Eyes on the Prize<br />

The best natural eye creams and gels.<br />

40 ASK THE NUTRITIONIST<br />

<strong>Better</strong> Butter<br />

Why grass-fed butter is the way to go.<br />

42 EATING4HEALTH<br />

Eating for Bone Health<br />

Feast on bone-building foods.<br />

46 RECIPE4HEALTH<br />

Sweet Rewards<br />

Our decadent, delicious Deep Dish<br />

Skillet Brownie is the stuff of dreams.<br />

48 COOK WITH SUPPLEMENTS<br />

Go for Protein<br />

A scoop of whey turns these snack<br />

bars into energy-boosting dynamos.<br />

CLICK ON<br />

THIS!<br />

Resources &<br />

References<br />

For links to studies<br />

cited in our articles<br />

and other helpful<br />

sites and books, visit<br />

betternutrition.com.<br />

8 Immune-Boosting<br />

Snacks<br />

Even moderately<br />

restricting calories<br />

can enhance your<br />

immune system<br />

activity, which<br />

makes small snacks<br />

the perfect choice<br />

for fortifying your<br />

defense against all<br />

type of illness. Go<br />

beyond string cheese,<br />

hard-boiled eggs,<br />

and apples with our<br />

fresh take on healthy<br />

snacking.<br />

recipes<br />

include:<br />

Broccoli with Brazil<br />

Nut Pesto<br />

*<br />

Papaya-Peach Salsa<br />

*<br />

Roasted Red Pepper<br />

& White Bean Dip<br />

*<br />

Turmeric-Parsley<br />

Popcorn<br />

*<br />

Cookie Dough<br />

Snack Bars<br />

New! Editors’ Blog<br />

We’re answering<br />

questions and sharing<br />

natural solutions for<br />

everyday wellness.<br />

Sign Up for Our<br />

Newsletter<br />

Receive timely<br />

articles, recipes, and<br />

exclusive giveaways in<br />

your inbox weekly<br />

with our newsletter<br />

Healthy Buzz.<br />

(top left) Pornchai Mittongtare; Styling: Robin Turk; Food styling: Claire Stancer<br />

4 • MAY <strong>2020</strong>


“Shinny and soft everytime<br />

I step out of the shower.”<br />

-Hannah


EDITOR’S LETTER<br />

Change What<br />

You Can<br />

As we finalize this issue for the printer,<br />

the coronavirus pandemic is at its height.<br />

Everyone on the <strong>Better</strong> <strong>Nutrition</strong> staff is<br />

working from home for the foreseeable<br />

future. It’s been an adjustment, but<br />

we’ve all pulled together to get it done.<br />

(A special thank you to my staff, who<br />

went above and beyond for this edition.)<br />

Like many, my emotions are a bit of<br />

a roller coaster right now—one minute,<br />

I’m in acceptance of the situation and<br />

appreciating the quiet time, and the<br />

next, I’m worrying about my family’s<br />

health and a million other things out<br />

of my control. And while there is a lot<br />

beyond our control, there is also a great<br />

deal that we can manage or change on<br />

our own, especially when it comes to<br />

food choices.<br />

Feeding your body with nourishing<br />

food is one of the best things you can do<br />

to stay healthy, not just physically but<br />

also mentally. Social isolation can lead<br />

to depression, anxiety, and other mental<br />

health issues. In addition to fortifying<br />

your immune system, a clean diet also<br />

begets mental clarity and positivity.<br />

This issue is filled with immune<br />

health advice, including “New Viruses:<br />

What You Need to Know for a Healthy<br />

Future,” p. 8, and “The Ultimate Immunity<br />

Biohack,” p. 26.<br />

For up-to-the-minute immune<br />

health articles, please sign up for<br />

our email newsletter Healthy Buzz<br />

(at betternutrition.com) and follow<br />

us on Facebook, Instagram, and<br />

Twitter. We are here to help you stay<br />

healthy and mentally strong during<br />

this challenging time!<br />

nbrechka@aimmedia.com<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

Our Writers<br />

Meet the passionate<br />

people behind this issue<br />

of <strong>Better</strong> <strong>Nutrition</strong>!<br />

Kat James, author of The Truth About<br />

Beauty and creator of Total Transformation<br />

Retreats, been featured on “Today,” Fox,<br />

and PBS, among others, for her pioneering<br />

dietary method. Listen to her Sirius XM radio<br />

show Saturdays on channel 131 (Family Talk).<br />

informedbeauty.com or 877-54-TOTAL<br />

Nicole Jardim, author of Fix Your Period, is a<br />

certified women's health coach, writer, speaker,<br />

and the creator of Fix Your Period, a series of<br />

programs that empowers women to reclaim their<br />

hormone health. She is the host of The Period<br />

Party podcast on iTunes. nicolejardim.com<br />

Emily A. Kane, ND, LAc, has a private<br />

practice in Juneau, Alaska, where she lives with<br />

her husband and daughter. She is the author of<br />

two books on natural health, including Managing<br />

Menopause Naturally. dremilykane.com<br />

Arman Liew is the recipe developer,<br />

photographer, and writer behind the popular<br />

blog, The Big Man's World. He is the author<br />

of Clean Sweets, and his healthy desserts<br />

have been featured on Buzzfeed, Delish!,<br />

and elsewhere. thebigmansworld.com<br />

Chris Mann is a California-based wellness<br />

writer and interviewer with 20 years’ experience<br />

in natural health publishing. He is also an<br />

entertainment author, journalist, and podcaster.<br />

ChrisMann.tv<br />

Melissa Diane Smith, Dipl. Nutr., is<br />

a holistic nutritionist who has 25 years<br />

of clinical experience and specializes in<br />

using food as medicine. She is the author<br />

of Going Against GMOs and other books.<br />

melissadianesmith.com<br />

Sherrie Strausfogel has been writing<br />

about natural beauty for more than 20 years.<br />

Based in Honolulu, she also writes about<br />

spas, wellness, and travel. She is the author<br />

of Hawaii’s Spa Experience.<br />

Lisa Turner is a chef, food writer, product<br />

developer, and nutrition coach in Boulder, Colo.<br />

She has more than 20 years of experience<br />

in researching and writing about nourishing<br />

foods. lisaturnercooks.com<br />

Vera Tweed has been writing about<br />

supplements, holistic nutrition, and fitness<br />

for more than 20 years. She is the editorial<br />

director at Natural Health Connections and<br />

the author of Hormone Harmony and other<br />

books. veratweed.com<br />

Neil Zevnik is a private chef specializing<br />

in healthy cuisine, with clients who have<br />

included Jennifer Garner, Charlize Theron,<br />

and the CEO of Disney. neilzevnik.com<br />

YOUR ULTIMATE GUIDE TO NATURAL LIVING<br />

Editor in Chief<br />

Creative Director<br />

Executive Editor<br />

Associate Editor<br />

Digital Editor<br />

Copy Editor<br />

Beauty Editor<br />

Contributing Editors Vera Tweed, Helen Gray<br />

Contributing Writers<br />

Print Ad Coordinator<br />

Prepress Manager<br />

Prepress Specialist<br />

Editorial Offices<br />

General Manager<br />

AIM Retail Group<br />

Integrated Media Sales Kevin Gillespie<br />

Director – Eastern U.S. kgillespie@aimmedia.com<br />

and Midwest<br />

Integrated Media Sales Candice Smith<br />

Director – Western U.S. csmith@aimmedia.com<br />

603-361-5762<br />

Retail Development Group<br />

Director of Retail Sales<br />

Marketing Designer<br />

Accounting & Billing<br />

Nicole Brechka<br />

Rachel Joyosa<br />

Jerry Shaver<br />

Elizabeth Fisher<br />

Maureen Farrar<br />

James Naples<br />

Sherrie Strausfogel<br />

Kat James, Nicole Jardim, Emily A.<br />

Kane, ND, LAc, Arman Liew, Chris<br />

Mann, Melissa Diane Smith, Lisa<br />

Turner, Neil Zevnik<br />

Kim Hoff<br />

Joy Kelley<br />

Idania Mentana<br />

512 Main Street, Suite 1<br />

El Segundo, CA 90245<br />

310-873-6952<br />

Rob Lutz<br />

rlutz@aimmedia.com<br />

970-291-9029<br />

2400 NE 65th Street, Ste. 623<br />

Fort Lauderdale, FL 33308<br />

800-443-4974, ext. 702<br />

Joshua Kelly<br />

jkelly@aimmedia.com<br />

800-443-4974, ext. 702<br />

Judith Nesnadny<br />

jnesnadny@aimmedia.com<br />

Yolanda Campanatto<br />

ycampanatto@aimmedia.com<br />

ACTIVE INTEREST MEDIA, INC.<br />

AND SUBSIDIARIES<br />

Chairman & CEO Andrew W. Clurman<br />

Senior Vice President, Treasurer, CFO, & COO Michael Henry<br />

Vice President, IT Nelson Saenz<br />

Vice President, Audience Development Pat Fox<br />

Vice President, Production and Manufacturing Barb Van Sickle<br />

Vice President, People & Places JoAnn Thomas<br />

AIM Board Chair Efrem Zimbalist III<br />

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BETTER NUTRITION, ISSN #0405-668X. Vol. 82, No. 5. Published monthly by Cruz Bay Publishing,<br />

an Active Interest Media company. 5720 Flatiron Parkway, Boulder, CO 80301; 303-253-6300;<br />

fax 303-443-9757. ©<strong>2020</strong> Cruz Bay Publishing. All rights reserved. Mechanical requirements and<br />

circulation listed in Standard Rate and Data Service. The opinions expressed by the columnists and<br />

contributors to BETTER NUTRITION are not necessarily those of the editor or publisher. Fraudulent<br />

or objectionable advertising is not knowingly accepted. Advertisers and advertising agencies assume<br />

liability for all content of advertising and for any claims arising therefrom. Articles appearing in<br />

BETTER NUTRITION may not be reproduced in whole or in part without the express permission of the<br />

publisher. BETTER NUTRITION does not endorse any form of medical treatment. The information<br />

presented here is not meant to diagnose or treat any medical condition. We urge you to see a<br />

physician or other medical professional before undertaking any form of medical treatment.<br />

6 •<br />

MAY <strong>2020</strong>


Everything.<br />

#MyBestMom<br />

drbvitamins.com


NEWS*BITES<br />

BY VERA TWEED<br />

New Viruses:<br />

What You Need to Know for a Healthy Future<br />

Until recently, infectious diseases had<br />

disappeared from the list of today’s major<br />

health threats, but the outbreak of the<br />

COVID-19 coronavirus has demonstrated<br />

a troubling fact: Harmful new viruses, for<br />

which we have never built up immunity,<br />

can emerge and quickly spread.<br />

Social distancing, quarantines,<br />

frequent hand washing, and disinfectants<br />

are all essential to help stop such a<br />

spread. But there’s another, equally vital<br />

component to staying well: a healthy<br />

immune system.<br />

A stronger immune system means<br />

infection is less likely—and if you do<br />

get sick, symptoms should be milder,<br />

and recovery easier. While there’s no<br />

magic herbal cure or nutritional bullet for<br />

COVID-19, here are some things you can<br />

do to bolster your immune system in the<br />

face of a viral outbreak.<br />

Go easy on sugar. A study of more<br />

than 73,000 Americans, published in<br />

the Annals of Epidemiology,<br />

found that<br />

low consumption of<br />

sugar seems to protect<br />

against respiratory<br />

infections. Instead<br />

of sugary foods and<br />

drinks, eat plenty of<br />

whole foods, especially<br />

a variety of in-season<br />

vegetables and fruits,<br />

and take a multivitamin for insurance.<br />

Take vitamin D: More than a dozen<br />

studies have found that low levels of<br />

vitamin D correlate with higher odds of<br />

both viral and bacterial infections of the<br />

respiratory tract, according to a review<br />

of research published in BMJ (formerly<br />

+<br />

did you know ...<br />

A study of twins at the<br />

University of Washington<br />

in Seattle found that a<br />

chronic lack of sleep can<br />

shut down the immune<br />

system.<br />

the British Medical<br />

Journal). Getting<br />

vitamin D levels tested,<br />

and supplementing<br />

accordingly, is your<br />

best bet.<br />

Take supplements<br />

that enhance<br />

resistance. Studies<br />

have found that Epicor<br />

and Wellmune, two different patented<br />

derivatives of baker’s yeast, enhance<br />

resistance to viral infections. Each<br />

works differently, so they can be taken<br />

together for a synergistic effect. Other<br />

resistance-enhancing supplements<br />

include andrographis, larch, mushrooms,<br />

and olive leaf extract.<br />

WHERE TO LEARN MORE<br />

Visit betternutrition.com to download a free copy of our latest eBook,<br />

Natural Immunity.<br />

Photos: adobestock.com<br />

8 • MAY <strong>2020</strong>


BioSil® gives you everything you want in a collagen<br />

generator and nothing you don’t.<br />

With BioSil, you regain lost collagen, add new collagen, and protect<br />

your existing collagen. Plus, you increase vital elastin and keratin. †<br />

All through your body’s natural pathways! And isn’t it nice to know<br />

that BioSil is clinically proven and produced under today’s strict<br />

ethically-minded standards? For you, it all adds up to beauty with a<br />

conscience.<br />

Clinically Proven Results<br />

Reduces fine lines and wrinkles †<br />

Increases skin elasticity †<br />

Increases hair shaft diameter †<br />

Increases hair strength †<br />

Strengthens nails<br />

†<br />

NEW<br />

Liquid Capsules<br />

NON-GMO<br />

SUSTAINABLY SOURCED<br />

BioSilUSA.com<br />

©<strong>2020</strong> Bio Minerals NV. Manufactured by Bio Minerals NV, Belgium. BioSil is a registered trademark of Bio Minerals NV.<br />

†<br />

This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.<br />

For healthy and beautiful<br />

Wickett R.R., Kossmann E., Barel A., et al. (2007). Effect of oral intake of choline-stabilized orthosilicic acid on hair tensile strength and morphology in women with fine hair. Arch Dermatol Res, 299: 499-505.<br />

Barel A., Calomme M., Timchenko A., et al. (2005). Effect of oral intake of choline-stabilized orthosilicic acid on skin, nails and hair in women with photodamaged skin. Arch Dermatol Res, 297: 147-153. Results may vary. hair, skin, and nails


FISH COLLAGEN<br />

HELPS HEAL SUN DAMAGE<br />

Researchers in Thailand tested a collagen supplement in<br />

postmenopausal women to see if it improved skin elasticity. In<br />

a group of 36 women, half took 5 grams daily of a fish collagen<br />

supplement for 4 weeks, while the other half took a placebo, and<br />

tests were done on sun-damaged cheeks and underarm skin that<br />

had not been exposed to sun. At the end of the trial, elasticity in<br />

sun-damaged cheeks improved by 10 percent and the improvement<br />

lasted for 4 weeks after the women stopped taking the supplement,<br />

but there was no difference in the underarm skin. The study was<br />

published in The Journal of Dermatological Treatment.<br />

NEWS*BITES<br />

America’s TOP 10<br />

Seafood Choices<br />

On average, Americans eat about 16 lbs. of seafood per<br />

year, according to the National Fisheries Institute—and<br />

86 percent of it comes from these top 10 varieties:<br />

❶ Shrimp ❺ Alaska Pollock ❼ Cod<br />

❷ Salmon ❻ Pangasius ❽ Catfish<br />

❸ Tuna<br />

(a big Asian ❾ Crab<br />

❹ Tilapia<br />

catfish) ❿ Clams<br />

Sardines, mackerel, and<br />

herring aren’t as popular,<br />

but are often recommended<br />

by health experts<br />

because they’re<br />

rich in healthy<br />

omega-3 fats<br />

and low in<br />

mercury.<br />

10 • MAY <strong>2020</strong><br />

PING-PONG<br />

Helps Parkinson’s<br />

Patients<br />

Playing ping-pong improves symptoms of<br />

Parkinson’s, according to a Japanese study<br />

of 12 people suffering from the disease<br />

for an average of 7 years. After playing the<br />

game once a week for three months, subjects<br />

experienced significant improvements in<br />

speech, handwriting, and a variety of<br />

daily activities including dressing, getting<br />

out of bed, and walking. Each session<br />

included stretching, instruction from a<br />

ping-pong professional, and playing the<br />

game. The findings were presented at the<br />

American Academy of Neurology’s 72nd<br />

Annual Meeting in Toronto.<br />

In healthy people, ping-pong has been<br />

shown to improve hand-eye coordination,<br />

sharpen reflexes, and stimulate the brain.<br />

1 Week of Fast Food = Bigger Appetite<br />

Australian researchers have found a big reason why so many people can’t stop eating<br />

fast food. A study that was published in Royal Society Open Science tracked a total of<br />

110 college students who were healthy, lean, and normally ate a diet of whole foods.<br />

During the study, half the students maintained their normal diet, while the other half<br />

switched to fast food.<br />

After just one week, the researchers found that the fast-food diet led to changes in<br />

a brain area that influences appetite, which made it harder to control appetite and led to overeating. Fortunately, after<br />

the fast-food eaters went back to their normal, healthier diets, their brains and appetites returned to normal.<br />

Photos: adobestock.com


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companies fostering personal & global well-being<br />

Olive Oil Crush<br />

Greg Hinson of O Olive Oils takes organic olives and combines them<br />

with California citrus, and the result is pure magic BY NEIL ZEVNIK<br />

In Italy, locally produced olive oil has<br />

always been a social mainstay to be<br />

revered, guarded, and shared. It is<br />

a singular offering that expresses the<br />

character of its region and even of the<br />

family that harvested and milled it. By<br />

the same token, attitudes toward how it<br />

should be rendered and described have<br />

remained the same for centuries—<br />

rather strict and specific. No messing<br />

about with tradition!<br />

Then along came Greg Hinson,<br />

an American wanderer taking his<br />

infant daughter on day trips about<br />

the Italian countryside. “I was<br />

discovering the magic of extra<br />

virgin olive oil and the social<br />

bonds between families,<br />

their passion for olive oil, and<br />

how they traded oil between<br />

themselves. And I learned<br />

that there were so many<br />

styles of olive oil that were<br />

specific to types of dishes.<br />

I found that fascinating and<br />

wanted to learn more.”<br />

What especially intrigued<br />

him was something almost<br />

invisible to the Italians—they<br />

were using whole fresh lemons<br />

as an astringent to clean the<br />

granite milling wheels at the<br />

end of the harvest, and then<br />

discarding the resulting liquor.<br />

That’s when the light bulb went<br />

on for Hinson.<br />

So he returned to California a year<br />

later, rented an old olive oil press,<br />

and began his experiment of crushing<br />

whole organic Meyer lemons with<br />

foraged Mission olives. And that was<br />

the beginning of this new irreverent<br />

category of citrus-crushed olive oil.<br />

His first growers were organic<br />

pioneers who used solar, biodynamic,<br />

“I’ve been a vocal advocate for organic farming beginning with my first<br />

olive oil crush in 1995,” says O founder Greg Hinson. “My farmers had an<br />

old-school reverence for the land that was in their bones.”<br />

and fish emulsion feeding<br />

programs before they were<br />

cool or widely practiced.<br />

“We grew together,” he says.<br />

“They planted more trees,<br />

and I made more olive oil.<br />

I was connected suddenly<br />

to passionate farmers who<br />

taught me that the health<br />

of the soil, water, and air<br />

is key to growing nutritious,<br />

healthy food.”<br />

The road, of course, was not always<br />

smooth. Initially rejected by olive oil<br />

festivals in California as being “not real<br />

olive oil,” Greg persevered. “I thought,<br />

this is the same reaction as in Italy, but<br />

this is California, and we don’t have to<br />

repeat the same narrow interpretation<br />

as the Old World, right?”<br />

Through it all, his focus has always<br />

been on the purity of the product and<br />

the process. “This product’s simplicity<br />

is what still amazes me. It is two perfect<br />

foods combined and crushed together.<br />

That’s it.<br />

“I’ve been a vocal advocate for<br />

organic farming beginning with my<br />

first olive oil crush in 1995. My farmers<br />

had an old-school reverence for the<br />

land that was in their bones and in the<br />

way they lived their lives. We are now<br />

planting over 1,700 new acres of organic<br />

olives and converting conventional<br />

orchards to organic with another 500<br />

acres. What I’ve learned is that if you<br />

create a market and pay a sustainable<br />

price to your farming partners, they<br />

will walk together with you.” And that is<br />

definitely a walk worth taking.<br />

12 • MAY <strong>2020</strong>


make it!<br />

Cauliflower Steaks with Blood<br />

Orange & Vadouvan Spice<br />

To keep with an orange theme, we chose<br />

vitamin A-packed orange cauliflower for<br />

this recipe, but you can easily use regular<br />

cauliflower. If you really want to get<br />

adventurous, try Romanesco broccoli.<br />

Serves 4<br />

2 blood oranges<br />

1/4 cup O Blood Orange Olive Oil<br />

2 Tbs. organic olive oil<br />

1 large head orange<br />

cauliflower, cut into four<br />

thick slices<br />

1 Tbs. Whole Spice<br />

Vadouvan Crushed<br />

Spice Mix<br />

Salt & pepper to taste<br />

2 Tbs. chopped fresh<br />

cilantro<br />

1 Tbs. chopped fresh<br />

mint leaves<br />

1. Preheat oven to 400°F.<br />

Zest blood oranges,<br />

then peel and cut out<br />

segments.<br />

Photo: (bottom right) Pornchai Mittongtare; Styling: Robin Turk; Food Stylist: Claire Stancer<br />

2. Line large sheet pan with<br />

heavy-duty foil. Combine<br />

blood orange olive oil and<br />

plain olive oil. Place the<br />

cauliflower slices on pan, and<br />

drizzle oil over both sides of<br />

slices. Sprinkle tops with<br />

Vadouvan spice, blood orange<br />

zest, and salt & pepper to taste.<br />

3. Roast until cooked through but not<br />

mushy, about 30–35 minutes (an<br />

inserted knife should penetrate<br />

easily).<br />

4. Stir together blood orange<br />

segments, cilantro, and mint.<br />

Distribute over cauliflower steaks,<br />

and serve.<br />

Per serving: 270 cal; 5g prot; 21g total fat<br />

(3g sat fat); 18g carb; 0mg chol; 65mg sod;<br />

6g fiber; 10g sugar<br />

MAY <strong>2020</strong> • 13


IN THE SPOTLIGHT *<br />

He changed the way people<br />

ate and transformed their<br />

bodies with his nutritionminded<br />

and sustainable<br />

diet books Clean and<br />

Lean, The Clean 20, and his<br />

SHRED series. Now New York<br />

Times bestselling author Ian K.<br />

Smith, MD—known as “Dr. Ian” to<br />

TV viewers—is putting a focus on the<br />

mind’s role in healthy slimdowns.<br />

“For years I’ve wanted to write a book<br />

that deals exclusively with developing<br />

BN: What role does diet<br />

history play in determining<br />

the right plan?<br />

IS: Diet history is critical<br />

in that it informs us on so<br />

many levels. It tells us what<br />

has and hasn’t worked.<br />

It gives us direction in<br />

determining what type of<br />

plan is sustainable for our<br />

unique goals and characteristics.<br />

When you understand<br />

your past, you can better<br />

formulate an effective plan<br />

for now and the future.<br />

BN: What are some key<br />

ways to get motivated<br />

after failure?<br />

IS: One, find a location or<br />

environment that stimulates<br />

and motivates you to reach<br />

your goals. Two, celebrate<br />

your success. Regardless of<br />

how big or small, savor and<br />

appreciate your victories.<br />

And three, adjust your<br />

focus. What you’re focusing<br />

14 • MAY <strong>2020</strong><br />

stay-healthy secrets from leading experts<br />

Mind Over Weight<br />

Bestselling author Dr. Ian K. Smith prescribes<br />

mental strategies for successful weight loss<br />

on can impact your drive to<br />

accomplish your goals.<br />

BN: How are “incremental<br />

milestones” vital to<br />

weight-loss success?<br />

IS: It’s important to focus<br />

on the small goals, as they<br />

lead to the bigger goals.<br />

When you achieve some<br />

success, you’re more<br />

likely to keep going to<br />

achieve more. Incremental<br />

milestones give you a<br />

measuring stick to track<br />

progress. The old-fashioned<br />

saying that “success<br />

begets success” really can<br />

apply when it comes to<br />

weight loss.<br />

BN: How do visualization<br />

and confidence mantras<br />

facilitate weight loss?<br />

IS: Visualizing success can<br />

be critical in conditioning<br />

the mind for weight-loss<br />

strategies and techniques.<br />

BY CHRIS MANN<br />

mental strategies to win the<br />

weight-loss battle,” says<br />

Smith. “I’ve said for a long<br />

time that successful weight<br />

loss starts in the mind.<br />

Regardless of how great the<br />

plan, if your mind isn’t right,<br />

then your chances for success<br />

are greatly diminished, and it’s going to<br />

inevitably be a steep uphill fight.”<br />

In Mind over Weight: Curb Cravings,<br />

Find Motivation and Hit Your Number in<br />

7 Simple Steps, the good doctor offers<br />

Try to see yourself looking<br />

smaller, wearing new clothes,<br />

being happy with your<br />

transformation. Confidence<br />

can be a valuable fuel to<br />

power you through the<br />

process, especially when it<br />

becomes challenging.<br />

BN: What are three<br />

strategies for checking<br />

emotional eating?<br />

IS: One, avoid boredom.<br />

When people are bored,<br />

they tend not to give much<br />

thought about what or why<br />

they’re eating. Keep yourself<br />

occupied mentally and/<br />

or physically. Two, remove<br />

temptation. If you can’t<br />

access foods or beverages<br />

you’re not supposed to<br />

eat, you are more likely to<br />

avoid them. And three, find<br />

alternative stress relievers.<br />

Watch a movie, listen to<br />

music, or read a book.<br />

Stress leads many of us to<br />

valuable tips, tools, and inspiration to<br />

help readers develop the mental edge to<br />

drop and keep off extra pounds—even<br />

when past weight-loss<br />

failures (hello, New<br />

Year’s resolutions!)<br />

have held them back.<br />

Win a copy of Mind over<br />

Weight. We have 15 copies<br />

up for grabs. Email your<br />

name and address to<br />

betternutritionfreebie@gmail.com. Put “Mind<br />

over Weight” in the subject line. Good luck!<br />

make poor dietary choices.<br />

Finding ways outside of<br />

food to relieve it is very<br />

strategic and beneficial.<br />

BN: How can brewing<br />

tea and filling up on<br />

chromium help us outwit<br />

our food cravings?<br />

IS: Chromium is a trace<br />

element that can enhance<br />

the effect of insulin and<br />

help lower blood glucose<br />

levels, causing them to<br />

remain stable. This can help<br />

curb and prevent cravings.<br />

Brewing tea can be used<br />

as a distraction. By going<br />

through the calming, stepby-step<br />

process of brewing<br />

tea, sometimes you can<br />

outlast the craving and<br />

avoid giving in to the urge<br />

to eat or drink something<br />

you’re not supposed to.<br />

Follow Dr. Ian...<br />

Instagram: @DoctorIanSmith<br />

Twitter: @DoctorIanSmith


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CoQ10 is a foundational<br />

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aging, and heart and<br />

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Terry Naturally introduces<br />

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A New Look to Inspire<br />

the New You<br />

The <strong>Better</strong> <strong>Nutrition</strong><br />

team sat down with<br />

Gale Bensussen,<br />

President & CEO of<br />

Doctor’s Best, for<br />

a chat about the<br />

company’s new look<br />

and its dedication to<br />

science, quality, and<br />

innovation.<br />

Meet Gale Bensussen, President<br />

& CEO of Doctor’s Best.<br />

Q: You have a His favorite product? “I can’t<br />

new look! Tell get enough of our Vitamin C<br />

us all about it. Gummies. They are delicious!”<br />

Well, after 30 years of<br />

the same “look,” it’s time to change our packaging.<br />

Consumers told us it was time to refresh ourselves,<br />

lighten up a bit, and make Doctor’s Best more<br />

appealing, but to hold onto what makes us timeless—our<br />

science. What we put in our bottle remains<br />

the best: our ingredients, formulations, quality processes,<br />

and good manufacturing practices. We’ve<br />

kept it all in place, and with a new look!<br />

Q: What sets Doctor’s Best<br />

products apart from others?<br />

Our products are manufactured in the U.S. under<br />

strict standards. We source the best ingredients<br />

from the best manufacturers around the world.<br />

And we display the origin of our branded ingredients<br />

by putting the logo of the active ingredient<br />

manufacturer on our label. This is your assurance<br />

that the same ingredient, from the same manufacturer,<br />

is in every bottle and every pill or capsule.<br />

Complete transparency, complete consistency.<br />

Q: What drives you as a company?<br />

Doctor’s Best is dedicated to improving people’s<br />

lives through quality, affordable, science-based<br />

nutrition. We are educators and innovators<br />

committed to working with passion, integrity, and<br />

transparency. This is the foundation of who we<br />

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readers to know most about Doctor’s<br />

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Vitamin E is an antioxidant and a<br />

component of all cell membranes,<br />

so when it’s in short supply, all cells<br />

can suffer. Yet it’s estimated that at<br />

least 90 percent of Americans don’t<br />

get a minimum of 15 mg daily—the<br />

amount considered adequate for<br />

most people—from food alone.<br />

Severe deficiency is rare and<br />

usually stems from a genetic defect<br />

that impairs normal absorption and<br />

metabolism of vitamin E. Symptoms<br />

can include loss of muscle control,<br />

nerve damage, muscle weakness,<br />

and damage to the retina of the eye.<br />

More common, subtle deficiencies can<br />

contribute to faster skin aging, joint<br />

degeneration, heart disease, loss of<br />

memory and other mental faculties in<br />

later years, vision deterioration, and<br />

higher risk for some cancers.<br />

18 • MAY <strong>2020</strong><br />

guide to cutting-edge supplements<br />

Vitamin E Facts<br />

This essential nutrient isn’t the most popular supplement<br />

on store shelves—but maybe it should be<br />

BY VERA TWEED<br />

Some studies have shown clear<br />

benefits of vitamin E supplements<br />

while other have not. But as more<br />

is learned, some reasons for these<br />

conflicting results are emerging.<br />

Individual Differences in Metabolism<br />

A German study published in Nature<br />

Communications has discovered that<br />

vitamin E may produce benefits in<br />

an indirect way. After a person takes<br />

vitamin E, the liver produces alphacarboxychromanol,<br />

a metabolite that<br />

has anti-inflammatory and other<br />

beneficial effects. But the amount<br />

produced varies significantly from<br />

one person to another.<br />

“If the effect of vitamin E depends<br />

on how much of the bioactive metabolite<br />

is produced, this explains very well why<br />

the same amount of vitamin E has<br />

a particular effect in one person<br />

and perhaps a much more limited<br />

effect in another,” says lead researcher<br />

Oliver Werz, PhD.<br />

Forms of Vitamin E<br />

Vitamin E in nature exists in eight<br />

forms: alpha-, beta-, gamma-, and<br />

delta-tocopherol, and alpha-, beta-,<br />

gamma-, and delta-tocotrienol. But<br />

major studies have focused on only<br />

one: alpha-tocopherol, the only form<br />

that is found in human blood where<br />

its levels can be measured. Other<br />

forms are found in tissues where<br />

there’s no way to measure levels.<br />

When studies have looked at other<br />

forms of vitamin E, researchers<br />

Photo: adobestock.com


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which may be described as “complete,”<br />

“mixed,” or a vitamin E “complex.”<br />

The measurements of vitamin E<br />

listed on supplement labels are in a<br />

transition period, from international<br />

units (IU) to milligrams (mg). This is<br />

part of a larger overhaul of food and<br />

supplement labels by the FDA.<br />

In <strong>2020</strong>, you’re likely to see some<br />

companies using the new measurements<br />

while others use the old. This is because<br />

the FDA required large companies to<br />

start using new labels by the beginning<br />

of <strong>2020</strong>, but smaller companies were<br />

given an extra year to comply.<br />

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popular vitamin E capsules translate:<br />

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found that they can reduce risk for<br />

diabetes, heart disease, and cancer,<br />

and may help to relieve digestive,<br />

skin, and joint problems.<br />

In supplements and fortified foods,<br />

alpha tocopherol can come in two<br />

forms: d-alpha tocopherol, a natural<br />

form; and dl-alpha tocopherol,<br />

a synthetic form. When ingested, the<br />

natural form is more readily absorbed,<br />

so you need smaller amounts. Today,<br />

established supplement brands<br />

usually contain natural vitamin E.<br />

What to Look for in Supplements<br />

Holistic health professionals often<br />

recommend taking a supplement with<br />

multiple forms of vitamin E rather than<br />

isolated alpha-tocopherol. Such combinations<br />

can be found in some multivitamins<br />

and standalone vitamin E products,<br />

20 • MAY <strong>2020</strong><br />

NATURAL VITAMIN E (d-alpha tocopherol)<br />

100 IU = 67 mg<br />

400 IU = 268 mg<br />

SYNTHETIC VITAMIN E (dl-alpha tocopherol)<br />

100 IU = 90 mg<br />

400 IU = 360 mg<br />

The amount of vitamin E considered<br />

adequate for most people—the recommended<br />

daily allowance (RDA)—is 15 mg<br />

of alpha-tocopherol for teens and adults.<br />

There are no set recommended amounts<br />

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ASK THE NATUROPATHIC DOCTOR *<br />

answers to your health questions<br />

The Cholesterol Question<br />

Is this naturally occurring fat really as bad as we’ve been led to<br />

believe? The answer may surprise you<br />

BY EMILY A. KANE, ND, LAC<br />

QIt seems like so many people<br />

over 40, or sometimes even<br />

younger, are taking statin<br />

drugs. What is that all about? Will they<br />

make me healthier?<br />

While pharmaceuticals can be lifesaving,<br />

they rarely promote health.<br />

In emergency situations, prescription<br />

medication can save lives, but because<br />

they are powerful and change your<br />

body’s physiology (meaning the way the<br />

systems work together), they eventually<br />

create unwanted side effects, which<br />

often leads to prescribing more drugs,<br />

and slowly but surely weakening our<br />

innate health.<br />

I’m grateful for emergency medicine,<br />

which plays an important role in modern<br />

society. But we seem to have lost track<br />

of what it takes to actually maintain<br />

health—or to promote a return to health<br />

if we have neglected our own selfhealing<br />

potential. It’s exciting to follow<br />

the health news where “lifestyle” choices<br />

are trending, but it’s kind of silly that<br />

this is framed as a new concept that<br />

needs more “studies.” We really don’t<br />

need studies to prove that getting<br />

enough sleep, drinking enough water,<br />

and making good food choices are the<br />

foundations for good health. That’s just<br />

common sense.<br />

Photo: adobestock.com<br />

22 • MAY <strong>2020</strong>


Lifestyle Science<br />

It may seem like common sense to you and me, but science is slowly discovering that a healthy lifestyle can do more<br />

for your well-being than any pharmaceutical drug. In January <strong>2020</strong>, the British Medical Journal published findings from<br />

a long-term analysis showing that a “healthful” lifestyle (never smoking, normal body-mass index, moderate-to-vigorous<br />

physical activity, moderate alcohol intake, and high-quality diet) adds 10.7 years of disease-free life to women and<br />

7.6 disease-free years to men.<br />

Last year, the prestigious journal Circulation published a large study—following nearly 120,000 people for over<br />

10 years—showing that the intake of sugary beverages significantly increased mortality from cardiovascular disease<br />

and cancer. Artificially sweetened beverages were also associated with increased overall mortality and heart disease,<br />

but not necessarily cancer death. The takeaway? Avoid juices, sodas, sports drinks, and any other liquid loaded with<br />

sugar or chemicals, and drink water instead.<br />

Our consumer society has been<br />

brainwashed into thinking we can eat<br />

and drink whatever we want, and later<br />

take a pill for the bellyaches, heartburn,<br />

constipation, poor sleep, headaches,<br />

and other resulting issues. Now that is<br />

certainly not common sense.<br />

The Problem With Statins<br />

The reason statins are one of the most<br />

prescribed categories of drugs has an<br />

interesting history. In the 1950s, in a<br />

little town in Massachusetts called Framingham,<br />

a physician researcher thought<br />

he saw a trend of folks with higher total<br />

cholesterol levels having more cardiovascular<br />

disease. He set up a clinical trial<br />

and followed people with higher levels of<br />

cholesterol against otherwise matched<br />

controls with lower levels of cholesterol.<br />

His data barely reached statistical significance,<br />

but he was able to show a trend<br />

correlating higher cholesterol with more<br />

cardiovascular disease.<br />

But correlation is definitely not<br />

causation. In fact, about 20 years ago,<br />

the original data was re-analyzed with<br />

a much more sophisticated tool than<br />

was available in the 1950s, and the<br />

correspondence of cholesterol levels<br />

with cardiovascular disease no longer<br />

achieved statistical significance.<br />

This is a little-known fact that has<br />

been conveniently buried by the drug<br />

manufacturers—for easily understood<br />

reasons. Based in large part on the<br />

erroneous conclusions of the original<br />

study, Lipitor, an early statin, became<br />

the first “blockbuster” drug that helped<br />

start a whole new era of publicly traded<br />

pharmaceutical companies with huge<br />

profit margins and unimaginable CEO<br />

compensation.<br />

The Truth About Cholesterol<br />

Cholesterol is the most important natural<br />

fat in the body. Your brain is largely made<br />

of cholesterol, which is why statins are<br />

affiliated with cognitive decline and<br />

memory loss. (Check out astronaut Duane<br />

Graveline’s book Lipitor: Thief of Memory.)<br />

Besides allowing for nervous system<br />

repair, cholesterol is the precursor to<br />

all steroidal hormones (progesterone,<br />

testosterone, estrogen, cortisol). Your<br />

body cannot build testosterone (or any<br />

other steroidal hormone for that matter)<br />

without cholesterol. It’s also crucial<br />

for the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins<br />

such as vitamins A, D, E, and K.<br />

There are two major sources of<br />

cholesterol: Your liver makes exactly the<br />

correct amount of cholesterol your body<br />

needs to build hormones, keep the nervous<br />

system intact, and perform cell<br />

repair. You can also ingest cholesterol<br />

from animal foods such as meat, dairy,<br />

and eggs. But eggs also contain high<br />

amounts of lecithin, which emulsifies<br />

the cholesterol and cancels out any<br />

possibility of excess buildup.<br />

What about the so-called “bad” LDL<br />

cholesterol? It isn’t really bad, it just<br />

delivers cholesterol from the liver to<br />

the cells, which need it. The so-called<br />

“good” HDL cholesterol brings fat back<br />

to the liver for re-processing. So they<br />

both have important roles to play in<br />

overall health. Meanwhile, the pharmaceutical<br />

industry has persuaded the FDA<br />

to set “target” LDL cholesterol levels at<br />

100. But my clinical experience of nearly<br />

30 years as a primary care provider is<br />

that it is virtually impossible to achieve<br />

LDL levels of 100 without drugs, and<br />

this recommendation is pernicious.<br />

The only reason for short-term<br />

(6 months) statin use is to treat ultrasound-proven<br />

atherosclerotic plaque,<br />

which narrows the arteries and causes<br />

high blood pressure and increased risk<br />

for stroke. It’s true that plaque is made<br />

of calcium, bacteria, and cholesterol, but<br />

the cholesterol is like a liquid bandage<br />

that tries to heal arteries that have been<br />

damaged by years of careless diet. Unfortunately,<br />

calcium and bacteria begin to<br />

adhere to the helpful cholesterol, which<br />

becomes a problem that requires treating,<br />

sometimes with short-term statin use.<br />

A better solution is to ingest healing<br />

nutrients, especially antioxidant-packed<br />

polyphenols—organic pigments from<br />

foods such as berries; spices including<br />

clove, cinnamon, and turmeric; cacao;<br />

green tea; legumes; nuts; and dark leafy<br />

greens. Using a drug with rampant side<br />

effects (the most notorious statin side<br />

effect is muscle wasting) is frankly a<br />

bad strategy for improving cardiovascular<br />

health—especially when simply<br />

reducing (or cutting out) meat in your<br />

diet and eating more berries can mostly<br />

do the trick.<br />

MAY <strong>2020</strong> • 23


HERBAL WELLNESS *<br />

Berberine is a plant alkaloid with<br />

a long history of medicinal use in<br />

Western, Ayurvedic, and Chinese<br />

herbal traditions. It can be found in<br />

the roots, rhizomes, and stem bark<br />

of goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis),<br />

goldthread or coptis (Coptis chinensis),<br />

Oregon grape (Mahonia aquifolium),<br />

barberry (Berberis vulgaris), Amur cork<br />

tree (Phellodendron amurense), and<br />

tree turmeric (Berberis aristata).<br />

While it has long been used to treat<br />

bacterial diarrhea, intestinal parasite<br />

infections, and eye infections, berberine<br />

has become a hot research topic over<br />

the past few years, with more than<br />

5,600 scientific studies published in<br />

the scientific literature highlighting its<br />

ability to lower blood sugar, promote<br />

weight loss, and improve heart health.<br />

One of the foremost actions of<br />

berberine is to activate an enzyme<br />

inside cells called activated protein<br />

kinase (AMP or AMPK), which<br />

is sometimes referred to as a<br />

“metabolic master switch.” AMP is<br />

found in the cells of the heart, brain,<br />

muscle, kidney, and liver, and it plays<br />

a key role in regulating metabolism. It<br />

may also affect how genes function.<br />

Blood Sugar Benefits<br />

Diabetes, blood fats, hypertension, and<br />

obesity are a deadly combo that plagues<br />

our society. And berberine helps all of<br />

them. In fact, many studies show that<br />

berberine dramatically reduces blood<br />

sugar levels in type 2 diabetes, with an<br />

effectiveness comparable to the popular<br />

diabetes drug metformin.<br />

24 • MAY <strong>2020</strong><br />

healing botanicals for your body and mind<br />

Berberine Benefits<br />

Found in goldenseal and other plants, berberine has a long history<br />

of use as a natural antibiotic and anti-fungal treatment—and newer<br />

research shows that it may also help with healthy aging, blood<br />

sugar balance, and more<br />

BY KARTA PURKH SINGH KHALSA, DN-C, RH<br />

Unlike prescription drugs, berberine<br />

seems to act through multiple mechanisms.<br />

It cuts insulin resistance, increases<br />

glycolysis, drops sugar<br />

production in the liver,<br />

slows carbohydrate<br />

breakdown in the gut,<br />

and bumps up beneficial<br />

bacteria in the gut.<br />

In one study, 1 gram<br />

of berberine per day<br />

decreased fasting blood<br />

sugar by 20 percent—<br />

from diabetic to<br />

normal levels—and<br />

lowered hemoglobin<br />

A1c by 12 percent.<br />

did you know ...<br />

Despite the success of<br />

isolated berberine, one<br />

of the benefits of herbal<br />

remedies is synergy—the<br />

combined action of multiple<br />

chemical components in<br />

the plant—so consider<br />

using whole herbs that<br />

contain berberine.<br />

Research shows that berberine<br />

also lowers total and LDL cholesterol,<br />

raises HDL cholesterol, and reduces<br />

triglycerides. Plus, this<br />

plant chemical can<br />

promote weight loss.<br />

A dose of 1,500 mg<br />

per day over 12 weeks<br />

produced an average<br />

5-pound reduction.<br />

Inhibiting Infections<br />

Berberine-containing<br />

herbs are generally<br />

anti-fungal and can<br />

be used to treat yeast<br />

infections. An Italian<br />

study established that<br />

berberine inhibited the ability, at least<br />

in a test tube, of infectious yeast to<br />

produce an enzyme it needed to colonize<br />

the skin and mucosal surfaces.<br />

To treat a persistent yeast infection, try<br />

8 grams of medicinal-quality goldenseal<br />

for at least one month to wipe out the<br />

tenacious infection.<br />

Berberine may also hold the key<br />

to antibiotic resistance. Combined<br />

with antibiotics, berberine inactivates<br />

certain types of Staphylococcus<br />

aureus, bacteria responsible<br />

for staph infections that are<br />

frequently spread in hospitals.<br />

Chemists from the Department of<br />

Chemistry at Colorado State University<br />

in Fort Collins are excited about<br />

a “two-pronged attack” that barberry<br />

brings to fighting bacterial infection.<br />

Plants that contain berberine have a<br />

long history of use as antibacterials. But<br />

Photo: adobestock.com


erberine alone is not very active because<br />

bacteria have evolved mechanisms to pump<br />

it out of their systems (transmembrane<br />

proteins that eject the berberine). But<br />

scientists have found that 5’-Methoxyhydnocarpin<br />

(5’-MHC) isolated from the<br />

barberry plant, which has no antibacterial<br />

activity on its own, efficiently inhibits<br />

the pump. The level of bacterial cellular<br />

berberine accumulation was increased<br />

strongly in the presence of 5’-MHC,<br />

demonstrating that this plant compound<br />

effectively disabled the bacterial resistance<br />

mechanism against the antimicrobial<br />

berberine. Acting synergistically<br />

with berberine and a number of other<br />

antibiotics, 5’-MHC inactivates resistant<br />

strains of staph.<br />

Berberine has also been shown<br />

scientifically to fight tooth infections,<br />

and a <strong>2020</strong> study found that adding<br />

berberine to standard therapy speeds<br />

up eradication and accelerates healing<br />

of stomach ulcers. And speaking of the<br />

digestive tract, berberine showed, in<br />

a <strong>2020</strong> study, that it protected cells in<br />

ulcerative colitis.<br />

More Uses & Indications<br />

In general, berberine-containing herbs<br />

are powerful inflammation fighters,<br />

and the consensus among experts is<br />

that inflammation is at the root of most<br />

chronic diseases. Recent research, for<br />

example, finds that berberine helps<br />

depression and other mood disorders,<br />

probably because of its anti-inflammatory<br />

effect in the brain.<br />

Fatty liver is getting more and more<br />

attention as a major hidden disease.<br />

Berberine can reduce fat build-up in the<br />

liver, which likely would help protect<br />

Curcumin:<br />

The Ultimate Anti-Diabetes Spice?<br />

If you’re looking to add another blood sugar-balancing herb to your regimen<br />

(in addition to berberine), consider curcumin. Best known as the active<br />

component in the curry spice turmeric, curcumin is a powerful ally in the<br />

fight against diabetes. Studies show that it can favorably impact the key facets<br />

of diabetes, including insulin resistance, chronically high blood sugar levels,<br />

and high cholesterol, while also helping to prevent complications resulting<br />

from diabetic nerve damage. This golden spice might also help prevent the<br />

initial development of diabetes: in a study that appeared in the journal<br />

Diabetes Care, 240 people with prediabetes were given either curcumin or a<br />

placebo daily for nine months. At the end of the study, more than 16 percent<br />

of those in the placebo group were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, while<br />

none of the participants taking the curcumin showed any signs of the disease.<br />

There’s one problem: curcumin is notoriously hard for the body to<br />

absorb and utilize. Fortunately, there are a handful of branded ingredients<br />

that offer better bioavailability (and the science to back up that claim).<br />

Look for names such as Meriva, Curcumin C3 Complex, TheraCurmin,<br />

and CuraMed on labels.<br />

Add more turmeric and/or curry to you diet too. Turmeric’s earthy taste<br />

tempers the stronger spices in curry powder; it also enhances pastas and<br />

grains, soups, stews, and leafy green sautés. Sprinkle turmeric over open-faced<br />

cheese sandwiches before broiling, add a pinch to an omelet or tofu scramble,<br />

and increase the curcumin quotient in each teaspoon of curry powder by<br />

adding an extra ¼ teaspoon of turmeric.<br />

Photo: adobestock.com<br />

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against non-alcoholic fatty liver disease<br />

(NAFLD).<br />

Over the past few years, evidence has<br />

been accumulating that berberine might<br />

be valuable in the treatment of cancer.<br />

A study from The University School of<br />

Medicine, in Ube, Japan, indicates that<br />

coptis, an herb rich in berberine, might<br />

benefit esophageal cancer. A similar<br />

study in Taiwan revealed that berberine<br />

inhibited human colon tumor cells.<br />

For general use, take 500 mg, 3 times<br />

per day, with food. Berberine has a half-life<br />

of just a few hours, so spread your dosage<br />

over the day to achieve steady blood<br />

levels. Berberine is very safe. The main<br />

side effects are digestive, including mild<br />

constipation or loose stools.<br />

MAY <strong>2020</strong> • 25


HEALTHY TRANSFORMATIONS *<br />

inspirational & off-the-beaten-path advice<br />

The Ultimate Immunity<br />

Biohack<br />

Improving your body’s leptin function is a little-known—and<br />

powerful—way to enhance your immune function<br />

BY KAT JAMES<br />

In a very short time, the average person<br />

—and not just here in America—has<br />

learned a lot about self-protection to<br />

stay well. Social distancing, washing<br />

hands, and even self-isolation when we’re<br />

sick all play key roles in preventing the<br />

spread of novel diseases. And because<br />

you read this magazine, I’m guessing<br />

you’re pretty well-versed in the supplements<br />

and herbs that can bolster your<br />

immunity, such as vitamins C and D,<br />

zinc, and medicinal mushrooms.<br />

But are you also optimizing your<br />

immunity with your food choices? If<br />

you carry extra pounds, are diabetic,<br />

or deal with cravings, energy swings,<br />

or insomnia—in spite of all that you<br />

do to stay healthy—you may need to<br />

address another issue that dramatically<br />

impacts immunity: leptin resistance.<br />

Leptin is a hormone produced by fat<br />

cells. It’s also found in smaller amounts<br />

in the brain (hypothalamus, pituitary),<br />

stomach and intestines, skeletal muscle,<br />

breast tissue, cartilage and bone cells,<br />

placenta, and immune cells.<br />

Why Leptin Is so Important<br />

Leptin is the “master hormone” that<br />

regulates immune function, activating<br />

our neutrophils and natural killer (NK)<br />

cells, according to research. Poor leptin<br />

function, or “leptin resistance,” can<br />

hamper proper immune response,<br />

contributing to both inadequate and<br />

overactive (autoimmune) immune<br />

function. Even more amazing, all of this<br />

is mostly regulated by the metabolic<br />

effects of the foods you eat.<br />

My own experience with this<br />

happened 30 years ago, before leptin<br />

was even discovered. I had several<br />

serious autoimmune issues affecting<br />

my skin, gut, and liver. I also had<br />

thyroid problems and, as a result,<br />

was overweight. By restoring leptin’s<br />

function through years of dietary<br />

experimentation, I was able to correct<br />

my immune response and resolve<br />

inflammation throughout my body.<br />

Regaining proper leptin function<br />

not only ended my 12-year bingeeating<br />

disorder and obesity, but it also<br />

healed my gut and microbiome (read:<br />

immunity), liver, underactive thyroid,<br />

and rash-ravaged skin—all by giving<br />

up the high-sugar (including starches,<br />

juices, and sweet fruits) and fat-phobic<br />

food choices that had caused leptin<br />

Photo: adobestock.com<br />

26 • MAY <strong>2020</strong>


It’s important to note that it’s<br />

not the elevation of leptin that is good.<br />

Quite the contrary: it’s the lowering<br />

of leptin—just like the lowering<br />

of insulin—that helps us regain<br />

sensitivity to it.<br />

resistance in the first place. For more<br />

on leptin and how I—and many<br />

others—have harnessed its power,<br />

please read “Transforming Our View<br />

of Fat” at betternutrition.com.<br />

Thymus Function & Immunity<br />

As we know, the elderly, have increased<br />

vulnerability to infectious diseases.<br />

Part of the reason is that thymus gland<br />

shrinks and becomes less active with<br />

age, producing fewer T-cells that fight<br />

novel pathogens. Zinc has been shown<br />

to prevent some of that lost function.<br />

But optimizing and reestablishing leptin<br />

sensitivity, according to research, is<br />

truly a game-changer when it comes to<br />

bolstering thymus function.<br />

Activating Stem Cells<br />

Another fascinating consideration is<br />

the current observational reports of<br />

stem cell treatments reducing lung<br />

inflammation and assisting virus<br />

sufferers in regaining lung function.<br />

Interestingly, proper leptin function has<br />

been shown to reduce body-wide inflammation<br />

and activate mesenchymal stem<br />

cells in humans. Leptin’s function has<br />

also been shown to affect lung function.<br />

Dietary Dos & Don’ts<br />

Consistent and life-long achievement<br />

and maintenance of proper leptin<br />

function—affecting virtually all<br />

systems of the body—is something<br />

that should be pursued carefully, since<br />

it involves shifting the body into its<br />

intended fat-burning state, often with<br />

some transitional discomfort due to<br />

yeast die-off and energy interruption.<br />

It takes me at least 12 hours to teach<br />

folks how to adapt their own lifestyle<br />

to this profound dietary change<br />

(biologically, logistically, culturally,<br />

culinarily), even after 30 years of<br />

firsthand experience and practical<br />

honing. All online guidelines I’ve<br />

seen include many foods or loopholes<br />

(even in protein amounts) that can<br />

preclude success.<br />

Because everyone’s leptin-optimizing<br />

fat, carb, and protein ratios will be<br />

slightly different, the best way to go<br />

about it on your own is to very gradually<br />

cut carbs and increase a wide variety<br />

of quality plant and animal fats (always<br />

grass-fed) until you experience<br />

classic symptoms of leptin sensitivity<br />

—decreased appetite, loss of excess<br />

(inflammation-related) fluid, clearing<br />

of brain fog, better sleep, and enhanced,<br />

balanced energy.<br />

Of course you must not eat any<br />

processed foods. Dark greens are your<br />

best plant foods (even too many cooked<br />

vegetables can throw you off here). It<br />

took me almost 2 years before a quantum<br />

“leap” into leptin sensitivity took place.<br />

And when it happens, those symptoms<br />

I just mentioned will only be the beginning<br />

of a new era affecting every aspect<br />

of your health. You can elevate your own<br />

radiant potential—including your mood<br />

and ability to cope with stressful and<br />

changing circumstances—in one of the<br />

most powerful ways possible.<br />

MAY <strong>2020</strong> • 27


NATURAL BEAUTY *<br />

The fragile skin of the eye area needs<br />

extra care—it’s the first place on your<br />

face to show stress, fatigue, and aging.<br />

The visible effects are dark circles,<br />

puffiness, fine lines, crow’s feet, and<br />

sagging skin. Eye creams and gels,<br />

just like face moisturizers and<br />

sunscreens, are essential for prevention<br />

and damage control for the young as<br />

well as the aging eye.<br />

On average, you blink over<br />

100,000 times per day, and every<br />

time you smile or frown you place<br />

a demand on the delicate skin<br />

around the eyes. This skin is<br />

actually 5–10 times thinner than<br />

the skin on the rest of the face,<br />

and it contains a small amount<br />

of subcutaneous fat and absolutely<br />

no oil glands. Effective<br />

eye creams can imitate the<br />

function of oil glands, providing<br />

the necessary hydration.<br />

“The thin eyelid skin can<br />

be one of the first places to<br />

show irritation and allergy,”<br />

says Jennifer MacGregor,<br />

MD, certified dermatologist<br />

at Union Square Laser<br />

Dermatology in New York.<br />

“And the eyelid skin is<br />

very dynamic—it moves<br />

with facial expression—<br />

so it tends to be the first<br />

area of the face to show<br />

skin aging.”<br />

28 • MAY <strong>2020</strong><br />

pure ingredients for skin & body<br />

Eyes on the Prize<br />

The best natural eye creams and gels<br />

BY SHERRIE STRAUSFOGEL<br />

Eye creams and gels are specially<br />

formulated to tackle a variety of<br />

concerns. They can stimulate circulation,<br />

which helps reduce dark circles and<br />

puffiness. They can improve the<br />

skin’s elasticity, which prevents the<br />

crinkled look and diminishes crow’s<br />

feet. And they can also plump up fine<br />

lines so they look less pronounced.<br />

Choose the eye cream or gel that<br />

addresses your biggest concern.<br />

To prevent or repair wrinkles,<br />

sagging skin, and dryness around the<br />

eyes, MacGregor suggests choosing<br />

eye creams and gels that contain<br />

hyaluronic acid and ceramides to<br />

hydrate and restore moisture, vitamin<br />

C for its antioxidant properties, and<br />

caffeine to constrict blood vessels and<br />

brighten. She also likes peptides for<br />

repair and protection of aging skin. She<br />

cautions against stronger anti-aging<br />

ingredients, such as retinoids and alpha<br />

hydroxy acids, which may be too<br />

irritating for the delicate eye area.<br />

What shouldn’t be in eye creams<br />

and gels is just as important as what<br />

should. Check the label on your eye<br />

creams and gels for ingredients<br />

that may cause red, irritated,<br />

itchy, or dry eyes. Preservatives<br />

are the worse offenders.<br />

Parabens (methylparaben,<br />

ethylparaben, propylparaben,<br />

and butylparaben)<br />

and formaldehyde—even<br />

in very<br />

small concentrations—<br />

can cause redness and<br />

itching. Parabens can also<br />

clog the oil glands that line<br />

the eyelid, preventing tears<br />

from evaporating, which<br />

can lead to dry eyes.<br />

Photo: adobestock.com


❹<br />

❶<br />

❸<br />

❷<br />

❶ Awaken your eyes<br />

with DeVita Revitalizing<br />

Eye Crème. Organic aloe,<br />

hyaluronic acid, and<br />

green tea in this light<br />

eye treatment hydrate<br />

tired skin. Hydrolyzed<br />

Manihot esculenta<br />

tuber extract (cassava)<br />

smoothes wrinkles, improves<br />

skin’s natural elasticity, and<br />

reduces sagging. Albizia<br />

julibrissin bark extract (Persian<br />

silk tree) helps produce<br />

melatonin to reduce the<br />

appearance of discoloration.<br />

And Darutoside, an extract<br />

of St. Paul’s Wort and gotu<br />

kola, helps improve the<br />

appearance of puffy eyes<br />

and dark circles.<br />

❷ Refresh stressed eyearea<br />

skin with Avalon Organics<br />

Intense Defense with Vitamin C<br />

Eye Cream. Antioxidant-rich<br />

vitamin C, lemon bioflavonoids,<br />

and white tea help<br />

neutralize free radicals from<br />

sun and environmental<br />

damage, while stimulating<br />

cellular renewal to help boost<br />

collagen and elastin production.<br />

Aloe, jojoba, and borage<br />

seed oils, and calendula<br />

extract hydrate and soothe<br />

dry, irritated skin.<br />

❸ Brighten and hydrate<br />

the delicate skin around<br />

your eyes with Earth Science<br />

Active Age Defense i-Cream<br />

Nourishing Eye Care. Evening<br />

primrose oil and calendula<br />

extract soothe tired skin,<br />

antioxidant vitamin E and<br />

coenzyme Q-10 help protect,<br />

moisturizing aloe and<br />

hyaluronic acid plump dry<br />

skin, while extracts of licorice<br />

root and honeysuckle help<br />

brighten the area.<br />

❹ Soothe and smooth the<br />

extra-sensitive skin around<br />

the eyes with Annemarie<br />

Börlind ZZ Sensitive Regenerative<br />

Eye Cream. Golden orchid<br />

and magnolia bark extract<br />

strengthen the skin and<br />

protect against free radicals.<br />

Meadowfoam seed oil<br />

moisturizes, rejuvenates, and<br />

helps prevent moisture loss.<br />

Shea butter and inulin keep<br />

skin hydrated and soft.<br />

➎ Look younger in the<br />

wink of an eye with<br />

Derma•E Advanced Peptides<br />

& Collagen Eye Cream. This<br />

double-action eye cream<br />

visibly smooths the look<br />

of wrinkles and crow’s feet<br />

for more youthful eyes.<br />

Powerful anti-aging peptides,<br />

Matrixyl synthe’6 and<br />

Argireline, help support<br />

collagen to smooth the<br />

appearance of fine lines and<br />

wrinkles. Antioxidant-rich<br />

Pycnogenol, green tea, and<br />

vitamins A, C, and E protect<br />

and moisturize the delicate<br />

skin around the eyes.<br />

❺<br />

MAY <strong>2020</strong> • 29


EXCLUSIVE<br />

BOOK EXCERPT:<br />

FIX YOUR PERIOD<br />

BY NICOLE JARDIM<br />

(HARPER WAVE,<br />

<strong>2020</strong>).<br />

fix your<br />

PERIOD<br />

ARE YOU READY TO<br />

COMPLETELY REVITALIZE<br />

YOUR BODY AND HORMONES<br />

AND PUT YOUR PMS<br />

SYMPTOMS IN THE<br />

REARVIEW MIRROR?<br />

BY NICOLE JARDIM<br />

When it comes to all things menstrual cyclerelated,<br />

medical professionals often tell<br />

us that our symptoms—moodiness, brain<br />

fog, fatigue, fertility struggles, and low<br />

libido—are normal, or are a natural response to getting<br />

older. Nothing to worry about.<br />

One of the biggest myths perpetrated on women<br />

today is that our menstrual issues are not fixable. They<br />

are. Each month, your body tries to tell you something<br />

about your health. PMS, a heavy period, no period—<br />

whatever you’re experiencing isn’t the result of your body<br />

randomly rebelling against you. Rather, these issues are<br />

your body’s way of communicating with you—your period<br />

problems are a sign of your body needing attention. Your<br />

body is always working for you, not against you.<br />

30 • MAY <strong>2020</strong>


Photo: adobestock.com<br />

Feed Your Hormones *<br />

The foods we eat play a big role in<br />

how our hormones behave. In fact,<br />

*<br />

the number one cause of hormonal<br />

*<br />

imbalances, period problems, and<br />

*<br />

fertility issues is a lack of the right<br />

nutrients in our diets. If you don’t<br />

have the nutrients you need to<br />

produce hormones properly or the<br />

understanding of how different foods<br />

affect your body, you won’t have a<br />

sturdy enough foundation to build on.<br />

It’s important to understand that a<br />

one-size-fits-all approach to food is not<br />

possible. That’s why I’ve incorporated<br />

various elements from a couple of<br />

different dietary theories to create the<br />

Fix Your Period way of eating and living.<br />

Carbohydrates<br />

*<br />

Not all carbs are created equal. I can’t<br />

stress enough that the best choices<br />

in carbohydrates are those found in<br />

whole foods. Simple or refined carbs<br />

such as white sugar, white flour, and<br />

the products made from them, such<br />

as pasta and baked goods, are typically<br />

the worst-quality carbs to consume.<br />

On the other end of the spectrum,<br />

vegetables are the shining star of the<br />

carbohydrate world.<br />

Leafy Greens<br />

Leafy greens are the most nutrientdense<br />

foods on the planet, yet are<br />

*<br />

totally underrated—and missing from<br />

most people’s daily diet. It’s time to<br />

up-level your greens intake.<br />

There are many different types of<br />

leafy greens, and each of them contains<br />

an array of nutrients that not only<br />

impact your overall health but also<br />

*<br />

have a pretty profound effect on the health<br />

of your reproductive organs—and<br />

all are essential for optimal hormone<br />

production and regulation:<br />

*<br />

* Arugula<br />

Beet greens<br />

*<br />

Broccoli rabe<br />

*<br />

* Collard greens<br />

Dandelion greens<br />

* Kale<br />

Mustard greens<br />

Red/green leaf lettuce<br />

Romaine lettuce<br />

* Spinach<br />

Swiss chard<br />

*<br />

Just as the rainforest cleans the air,<br />

the abundance of nutrients found in<br />

leafy greens (chlorophyll in particular)<br />

helps remove potentially harmful<br />

toxins from your blood, makes new<br />

red blood cells, improves circulation,<br />

strengthens the immune system, and<br />

reduces inflammation. Indeed, when it<br />

comes to period problems, the nutrients<br />

in greens are gold:<br />

Calcium. This mineral can be a big<br />

help in reducing PMS symptoms<br />

such as anxiety, depression, fatigue,<br />

and pain. In fact, low levels of calcium<br />

in the luteal phase have been found<br />

to cause or worsen PMS. Estrogen<br />

supports intestinal absorption<br />

of calcium, so having sufficient<br />

estrogen in your body is necessary<br />

for the integrity of your bones.<br />

It’s crucial for women with<br />

amenorrhea or low estrogen to<br />

make sure they are getting adequate<br />

calcium through food and possibly<br />

supplementation.<br />

Magnesium. This essential mineral<br />

has been shown to reduce bloating<br />

and breast tenderness and also<br />

helps to build progesterone. It<br />

reduces PMS-related anxiety and<br />

sleeplessness and works amazingly<br />

well for period pain and migraines.<br />

Iron. This contributes to healthy egg<br />

production, stable energy levels, and<br />

healthy menstrual blood flow. (Hint:<br />

too-heavy or too-light periods can be<br />

a sign of insufficient iron levels.)<br />

Potassium. This powerhouse<br />

mineral and electrolyte allows<br />

your body to make energy from the<br />

foods you eat, reduce bloat, and<br />

relieve menstrual cramps.<br />

MAY <strong>2020</strong> • 31


*<br />

Vitamin A. This vitamin helps<br />

maintain healthy, acne-free skin and<br />

may even help reduce heavy periods.<br />

* Folate. Vitamin B , or folate, acts as<br />

9<br />

a mild antidepressant by indirectly<br />

helping to produce serotonin and<br />

dopamine. Folate has also been<br />

shown to increase progesterone<br />

in premenopausal women, protect<br />

cervical cells, and even reverse<br />

cervical dysplasia.<br />

Vitamin C. This vitamin helps to<br />

*<br />

increase iron absorption, which can<br />

help a missing period return and<br />

also may reduce anemia caused by<br />

heavy bleeding. It is the only vitamin<br />

shown to raise progesterone levels.<br />

In addition, it helps protect your<br />

eggs and the cells of the cervix,<br />

thus reducing the risk of cervical<br />

dysplasia and cervical cancer.<br />

Vitamin E. A powerful antioxidant,<br />

*<br />

vitamin E has been shown to reduce<br />

chronic pelvic pain in women with<br />

endometriosis and may reduce<br />

menstrual pain caused by primary<br />

dysmenorrhea.<br />

Vitamin K. An important nutrient for<br />

*<br />

proper clotting of the blood, in some<br />

cases vitamin K may be used to slow<br />

or stop excessive bleeding.<br />

Fiber. When the liver breaks down<br />

*<br />

estrogens, those metabolites are<br />

sent to the colon for removal. Eating<br />

more fiber encourages regular bowel<br />

movements, ensuring that those<br />

estrogen metabolites are removed<br />

from the body and do not recirculate<br />

and wreak hormonal havoc.<br />

Cruciferous Veggies<br />

Cruciferous vegetables, including<br />

broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, and<br />

Brussels sprouts, contain a compound<br />

called indole-3-carbinol (I3C), which<br />

dramatically enhances the body’s<br />

ability to neutralize carcinogens and<br />

promote a healthier pathway for<br />

breaking down estrogen in the body,<br />

thus protecting against various forms<br />

of cancer. [Editor’s note: Both I3C and<br />

its metabolite DIM are available in<br />

supplement form.]<br />

Sulforaphane, a super antiinflammatory<br />

compound found<br />

in cruciferous veggies, changes<br />

the way your liver metabolizes<br />

estrogen. It massively reduces<br />

PMS-related symptoms, acne ...<br />

and a host of issues related to<br />

estrogen dominance.<br />

Broccoli Sprouts<br />

These germinated seeds have an<br />

extremely high concentration of the<br />

compound sulforaphane, which has<br />

super-anti-inflammatory powers.<br />

Also found in other cruciferous veggies,<br />

sulforaphane changes the way your<br />

liver metabolizes estrogen, redirecting<br />

it to a healthier pathway. Sulforaphane<br />

massively reduces or eliminates<br />

PMS-related symptoms, acne, ovulation<br />

bloating and pain, and a host of issues<br />

related to estrogen dominance.<br />

Microgreens<br />

The next growth stage after sprouts,<br />

microgreens are tiny leaves that appear<br />

on the plant. They can be grown from a<br />

variety of seeds such as cabbage, spinach,<br />

broccoli, arugula, and Swiss chard.<br />

A few studies have found microgreens to<br />

contain higher concentrations of nutrients<br />

than their grown-up counterparts.<br />

Sweet Veggies<br />

Add these veggies into your regular food<br />

rotation—especially during the week<br />

before your period, as their natural<br />

starch content helps produce serotonin,<br />

the happy neurotransmitter that offsets<br />

anxiety and tension. They are full of<br />

fiber and contain a lot of menstruationsupportive<br />

nutrients such as calcium,<br />

magnesium, and vitamins A, C, and a<br />

number of the B vitamins.<br />

You’d be amazed at how easily a side<br />

of beets or sweet potato can stop cravings<br />

in their tracks. Other good choices<br />

include squash (butternut, acorn,<br />

spaghetti, kabocha), cassava, jicama,<br />

carrots, yucca, plantains, and pumpkin.<br />

Beans (and the B Vitamins)<br />

The B in beans could stand for “B<br />

vitamins.” That’s great, as every woman<br />

should make it her mission to get<br />

adequate B-complex vitamins at all<br />

stages of her life, but especially B 6<br />

and<br />

B 9<br />

(folate), which play an important<br />

role in menstrual cycle support. Beans<br />

contain B 1<br />

, B 2<br />

, B 3<br />

, B 5<br />

, and B 6<br />

. Vitamin<br />

B 6<br />

in its active form, pyridoxal-5-<br />

phosphate, has been shown to help<br />

reduce the symptoms associated with<br />

PMS, including premenstrual depression.<br />

B 6<br />

is also involved with the production<br />

of serotonin, which controls mood,<br />

appetite, and sleep patterns.<br />

Gluten-Free Whole Grains<br />

While some people swear by a strict<br />

adherence to a grain-free diet, I’ve found<br />

that, for most women, avoiding grains is<br />

neither desirable nor practical, and often<br />

not even necessary.<br />

When it comes to grains, whole<br />

grains are the good grains, nutritious<br />

little gems that contain fiber, B-complex<br />

vitamins, essential fatty acids, and<br />

a wide range of minerals. They also<br />

contain strong antioxidant properties,<br />

which protect your body and your<br />

reproductive organs from damage by<br />

free radicals.<br />

I recommend only gluten-free whole<br />

grains (e.g., amaranth, rice, buckwheat,<br />

32 • MAY <strong>2020</strong>


millet, and quinoa). Gluten, a protein<br />

found in grains such as wheat, barley,<br />

rye, kamut, spelt, and farro, makes<br />

these grains difficult for many people<br />

to digest.<br />

In addition to gluten, pay attention to<br />

the way ingesting corn makes you feel,<br />

and avoid it if you experience gut issues.<br />

Corn contains a type of gluten known as<br />

zein. While it’s not exactly the same as<br />

wheat gluten, there are similarities that<br />

can cause cross-reactive symptoms in<br />

people who are gluten-intolerant or who<br />

have celiac disease.<br />

Fruit<br />

I want you to focus on fruits low in<br />

fructose. Fruits with more than 4 grams<br />

of fructose per serving are considered<br />

high-fructose foods. I suggest limiting<br />

your consumption of these fruits, especially<br />

if you have a fructose intolerance,<br />

blood sugar issues (e.g., high or low blood<br />

sugar), insulin resistance, diabetes, or<br />

polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).<br />

Low-fructose fruits include berries<br />

(raspberries, strawberries, blackberries),<br />

grapefruit, apricots, oranges, watermelon,<br />

and peaches; apples, cherries,<br />

grapes, kiwi, and pears are examples of<br />

high-fructose fruits.<br />

Eat fruit whole, keeping the fiber and<br />

micronutrients intact.<br />

Fat<br />

Women have roughly 10 percent more<br />

body fat than men on average because—<br />

wait for it—we make babies, and our<br />

bodies are always trying to get us pregnant.<br />

We require a certain amount of<br />

dietary fat to function at our best.<br />

Dietary fat supports your menstrual<br />

cycle and fertility, and our livers use<br />

healthy fats to make cholesterol, a building<br />

block for some of our most important<br />

sex hormones, such as progesterone,<br />

estrogen, and testosterone.<br />

Most of the women I see in my<br />

practice are not eating enough fat, or<br />

enough of the right fats. So, for your<br />

menstrual and reproductive health,<br />

add healthy fat to each meal to facilitate<br />

increased absorption of critical<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

Most Common Period Problems<br />

PMS and PMDD (you’re saying and doing unreasonable things,<br />

but you can’t stop)<br />

Period pain (truly, you have my utmost sympathy)<br />

Mid-cycle, or ovulatory, pain (ouch!)<br />

Heavy periods (enough, already!)<br />

Light or short periods (like, was that even a period?)<br />

Short cycles, or too-frequent periods (bleeding more often than<br />

should be legal)<br />

Infrequent, or irregular, periods (you have no idea when she’s making<br />

an appearance)<br />

Missing periods (you haven’t seen it in months)<br />

Spotting or bleeding in between periods (can’t stop, won’t stop bleeding)<br />

Vaginal infections (itchy much?)<br />

PCOS (more symptoms than you can count)<br />

Endometriosis (this much pain should be illegal)<br />

Most Common PMS Symptoms<br />

Bloating and fluid retention<br />

* Cramping<br />

Lower-back pain<br />

*<br />

* Acne<br />

Change in appetite, especially a big increase in hunger or food binges and<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

increased cravings for salt or sugar (hello, chips and chocolate!)<br />

Stomach upset, nausea, or vomiting<br />

Sleep problems (usually insomnia) and often excessive fatigue<br />

Headaches and menstrual migraines<br />

Breast tenderness or pain<br />

Lowered libido (sex or ice cream? Hmm, let me think about that)<br />

Anxiety (can this period just show up already?)<br />

Irritability, anger, or rage (your partner never knows if happy you or angry<br />

you will walk in the door)<br />

Feeling down and not like yourself<br />

Brain fog or forgetfulness (where did I put my keys again?)<br />

MAY <strong>2020</strong> • 33


fat-soluble vitamins such as A, D, E,<br />

and K, the star players in hormone<br />

regulation and fertility.<br />

Here are signs your body needs<br />

more fat:<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

You get headaches and brain fog and<br />

are plagued by indecision.<br />

About 30 to 60 minutes after meals<br />

you experience tiredness or sleepiness<br />

and want to take a nap.<br />

Your period has its own agenda.<br />

Either it’s missing (for three months<br />

or more) or is extremely irregular,<br />

showing up every 35 to 90 days.<br />

You could eat and eat some more,<br />

and are never full. Often, you’re<br />

starving again one to two hours after<br />

your meals.<br />

You have intense cravings for sugar.<br />

(“It’s 3 p.m. Pass the M&Ms!”)<br />

Your hands and feet are always cold,<br />

your hair is frizzy, and your skin<br />

feels like it’s perpetually parched.<br />

The 411 on Fats<br />

Saturated fat, found in animal meat,<br />

full-fat dairy, butter, coconut, and lard,<br />

helps your body absorb fat-soluble<br />

vitamins. It protects your liver from<br />

damage by free radicals, and specific<br />

types of saturated fats strengthen your<br />

immune system, support metabolism,<br />

and provide some of the best materials<br />

for building steroid hormones.<br />

Monounsaturated fats are highest in<br />

foods such as avocados and olive oil.<br />

Omega-3 fatty acids can help<br />

reduce menstrual cramping and<br />

PMS symptoms. The brain is high in<br />

omega-3 fatty acids, which have been<br />

shown to help it cope better with stress<br />

and to reduce the negative effects of<br />

chronic stress.<br />

Omega-6 fatty acids are not all created<br />

equal. Some are great for you, while<br />

others aren’t. For instance, the natural<br />

forms found in coconuts, seeds, and<br />

nuts are what you want to be eating.<br />

Meanwhile, highly refined and processed<br />

peanut and canola oil are extremely high<br />

in omega-6 fats and likely oxidized and<br />

damaged by the processing; this could<br />

trigger an inflammatory response and<br />

lead to hormonal havoc.<br />

Nuts and Seeds<br />

These nutrient powerhouses are filled<br />

with healthy fatty acids, minerals, and<br />

protein. Each type of nut and seed has<br />

a different nutritional profile, but generally<br />

speaking, nuts and seeds contain<br />

various B vitamins, copper, vitamin E,<br />

iron, manganese, magnesium, phosphorus,<br />

selenium, and zinc. Just be<br />

cognizant of actual serving sizes for<br />

these foods.<br />

Brazil nuts are super high in selenium,<br />

a superstar mineral for your<br />

*<br />

menstrual cycle. Selenium is found<br />

in large quantities in healthy egg follicles<br />

and plays a critical role in the<br />

later stages of follicle development.<br />

So, I Can’t Take a Pill for That?<br />

Like me, you may have been prescribed the birth control pill<br />

to “fix” your period problems. You’re not alone: 58 percent of<br />

American women who are on the pill started for this reason.<br />

Why? In the mid-1980s, when direct-to-consumer marketing<br />

of prescription medication became legal, pharmaceutical companies<br />

started promoting their contraceptives as more than<br />

birth control. They became so-called lifestyle drugs, marketed<br />

to improve a person’s quality of life by treating conditions<br />

that were not as serious as preventing pregnancy. Something<br />

I hear a lot is that the pill can be used for “period<br />

regulation.” This drives me crazy. The pill<br />

most definitely does not regulate a<br />

period. And this goes for other forms<br />

of hormonal contraceptives too (the<br />

patch, IUD, vaginal ring, implant, and<br />

Depo-Provera shot).<br />

Here’s what the pill and these other<br />

forms of hormonal birth control actually<br />

do: they stop you from ovulating.<br />

No ovulation, no natural hormone<br />

changes, no more period problems.<br />

But there’s a catch: because your body is no longer going<br />

through its natural monthly cycle of hormone production,<br />

you are no longer producing sufficient amounts of sex hormones,<br />

which support your mood, libido, vaginal lubrication,<br />

and bone health. As you can see, these natural hormones<br />

control many of our body’s major systems; no wonder the<br />

side effects of hormonal birth control are so wide-ranging:<br />

from migraines, acne, and mood swings to irregular bleeding,<br />

weight gain, low libido, and depression.<br />

The straight truth is that the pill and other<br />

hormonal birth control methods override<br />

your body’s natural processes<br />

and merely mask any underlying<br />

hormonal imbalance. While on the<br />

pill, no woman’s body is capable of<br />

functioning at its optimal level. I encourage<br />

you to consider whether it is the<br />

right choice for you. I know going off<br />

the pill is a big decision. Only you<br />

can decide the best way to support<br />

your health.<br />

34 • MAY <strong>2020</strong>


*<br />

*<br />

Walnuts are the queens of plant-based<br />

omega-3s, providing more omega-3<br />

fatty acids than any other nut.<br />

Pumpkin seeds contain copper, iron,<br />

manganese, magnesium, phosphorous,<br />

and zinc. While all these nutrients<br />

are crucial, I want to give a shoutout<br />

to zinc, which helps the follicles in<br />

the ovaries mature each month. It also<br />

improves PCOS-related issues such as<br />

insulin resistance and high testosterone.<br />

Additionally, zinc supports<br />

thyroid hormone production, and because<br />

of its anti-inflammatory effect,<br />

it helps lessen period pain.<br />

MOTHER’S DAY<br />

GIVEAWAY<br />

In honor of mothers and women of all ages,<br />

we are giving away 5 beautiful baskets filled<br />

with these high-quality health and natural<br />

beauty products!<br />

Protein<br />

Protein is a real hustler. In addition to<br />

creating your organs, muscles, nails, and<br />

hair, protein helps your cells communicate<br />

and facilitates muscle contraction<br />

and the transmission of nerve signals.<br />

Protein also makes up immune molecules,<br />

blood cells, hormones, and<br />

enzymes, and even assists your cells<br />

in making new proteins. And it is an<br />

essential structural component of all<br />

hormones, which means you’ve got to<br />

consume protein to make hormones.<br />

The type and quality of the protein<br />

makes a difference. Higher-quality<br />

proteins such as grass-fed meats,<br />

pasture-raised eggs, wild-caught fish,<br />

and organic vegetables facilitate better<br />

hormone function.<br />

Not enough protein or a low-protein<br />

diet (about 50 grams or less per day)<br />

messes with levels of growth hormone,<br />

thyroid hormones, and insulin—and<br />

drives the body toward fat storage,<br />

increasing both body fat and fatty liver.<br />

Also, keep in mind that the only natural<br />

source of vitamin B 12<br />

is animal protein,<br />

so if you’re plant-based or vegan,<br />

you should be supplementing. B 12<br />

plays<br />

many critical roles in the body, such as<br />

facilitating estrogen detoxification and<br />

thyroid hormone production. These two<br />

mechanisms alone have far-reaching<br />

effects, including keeping our moods in<br />

check, normalizing our estrogen levels,<br />

and lessening persistent fatigue.<br />

$50<br />

gift card<br />

Enter online at betternutrition.com/mothers-day-giveaway.<br />

You can also register to win through our Facebook page on<br />

Mother’s Day (<strong>May</strong> 10th).<br />

And from your friends at <strong>Better</strong> <strong>Nutrition</strong>,<br />

Happy Mother’s Day!<br />

WHERE TO LEARN MORE<br />

+<br />

For more information about Nicole Jardim and Fix Your Period, visit nicolejardim.com.<br />

Jardim’s wonderful book features a six-week plan for banishing bloating, conquering<br />

cramps, managing moodiness, and igniting lasting hormone balance.<br />

Article reprinted with permission from Fix Your Period by Nicole Jardim (Harper<br />

Wave, <strong>2020</strong>).<br />

MAY <strong>2020</strong> • 35


salt<br />

THE<br />

BREAKTHROUGH<br />

HOW MUCH SALT IS<br />

TOO MUCH? AND CAN<br />

TOO LITTLE RAISE YOUR<br />

BLOOD PRESSURE?<br />

BY VERA TWEED<br />

Salt has a bad rap for raising blood<br />

pressure and risk for heart disease and<br />

stroke, but some studies have questioned<br />

the low-salt mantra. For example,<br />

the Framingham Offspring Study followed<br />

more than 2,600 men and women for 16 years<br />

and found that those who consumed less than<br />

2,500 mg of sodium daily had higher blood<br />

pressure than those who consumed more.<br />

This flies in the face of limits recommended<br />

by the American Heart Association of 2,300<br />

mg of sodium daily, and ideally no more than<br />

1,500 mg daily for most older people. It’s become<br />

a muddled issue.<br />

Enter the Salt Sensitivity Study (saltstudy.com)<br />

at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville.<br />

An NIH-funded research project that’s been<br />

going on for the past 10 years, it’s shedding<br />

some new light on the salt scene.<br />

36 • MAY <strong>2020</strong>


MAY <strong>2020</strong> • 37


The Breakthrough<br />

“A low-salt diet may not be beneficial to<br />

everyone and may paradoxically increase<br />

blood pressure in some individuals,” says<br />

the study’s principal investigator, Robin<br />

Felder, PhD. Bottom line: Each of us has a<br />

unique sweet spot for salt intake, called a<br />

“personal salt index” by the researchers,<br />

and your health risks will be lowest if you<br />

eat the right amount—not much more or<br />

less than your optimum amount.<br />

How likely are you to need more or less<br />

salt? Initial testing in the Salt Study has<br />

found three categories of reactions to salt:<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

Sodium doesn’t affect blood pressure<br />

in 72 percent of people, described by<br />

researchers as “salt-resistant.”<br />

A high-sodium diet raises blood<br />

pressure in 17 percent of people,<br />

described as “salt-sensitive,” and<br />

a low-sodium diet will lower their<br />

blood pressure.<br />

For 11 percent of people, described as<br />

“inverse salt-sensitive,” a low-sodium<br />

38 • MAY <strong>2020</strong><br />

diet will actually raise blood<br />

pressure. Increasing sodium will<br />

lower blood pressure.<br />

Which Type Are You?<br />

There isn’t any medical test to find your<br />

personal salt index, but you can do this:<br />

eat a low-sodium diet for a week, and<br />

then a high-sodium diet for another week<br />

and measure your blood pressure along<br />

the way. For test purposes, low-sodium is<br />

no more than 400 mg daily and highsodium<br />

is 1,800–2,000 mg of sodium daily.<br />

Here are some other clues from<br />

Felder: At a football game where people<br />

load up on beer and salty hot dogs and<br />

snacks at the start, the inverse saltsensitive<br />

will be the first wave of people<br />

to go to the bathroom because they<br />

quickly eliminate water and salt. The<br />

salt-resistant will go later in the game.<br />

And the salt-sensitive may not go at all<br />

until they get home.<br />

If you eat an unusually salty meal<br />

and feel really bloated the next morning<br />

or notice a gain of a few pounds on the<br />

bathroom scale, it’s water retention.<br />

You’re likely salt-sensitive.<br />

How the Right Amount of<br />

Salt Keeps You Healthy<br />

Elevated blood pressure readings during<br />

the daytime are only one possible sign<br />

of too much or too little sodium. Eating<br />

the right amount also plays a vital role<br />

in repairing arteries while you sleep,<br />

helping to prevent atherosclerosis,<br />

diabetes, and stroke.<br />

“At night, our blood pressure is<br />

programmed genetically to drop about<br />

10 percent and then come back up in the<br />

morning,” says Felder. “That 10-percent<br />

drop is the time when your body is<br />

repairing capillaries.”<br />

By tracking blood pressure while<br />

people slept, the Salt Study found that the<br />

wrong amount of salt is harmful because<br />

it interferes with the normal nighttime<br />

drop. “At night,” says Felder, “if you<br />

aren’t dipping, you aren’t repairing.”


Sodium Tracking Tips<br />

If you want to try low- and high-sodium diets to see how your body reacts, you need to track your daily sodium intake.<br />

Whether you use an app such as MyFitnessPal.com, or track sodium manually, these are some things to keep in mind:<br />

*<br />

When eating packaged foods, check Coarsely ground salts, such as Kosher salt<br />

the sodium content of each food on and some Himalayan and sea salts, are<br />

the label, multiply the per-serving made up of larger crystals. These contain<br />

amount by the number of servings slightly less sodium by volume because<br />

you’re eating, and add it to your when you take a teaspoon of larger crystals,<br />

daily total.<br />

fewer crystals fit on the spoon. Although<br />

some salts contain other minerals, these<br />

For fast food, other restaurant food, are trace amounts that don’t occupy<br />

*<br />

or takeout from supermarkets or enough space to significantly change the<br />

natural food stores, get the sodium sodium content. The sodium content<br />

information from the company’s of coarse salts should be listed on the<br />

website or in the store or restaurant. package. Here’s an example for Morton<br />

This isn’t always available, or it may Coarse Kosher Salt:<br />

be difficult to get an accurate count<br />

for your serving size. When testing 1 tsp.: 1,920 mg<br />

*<br />

your own sensitivity to salt, it may<br />

be best to steer clear of foods<br />

²⁄3 tsp.: 1,280 mg<br />

*<br />

without clear sodium labeling for<br />

your high- and low-salt test periods. ½ tsp.: 960 mg sodium<br />

*<br />

When you’re preparing fresh ingredients<br />

at home, most of the sodium<br />

¼ tsp.: 480 mg sodium<br />

* *<br />

will come from seasonings, sauces, Most people consume about 3,400 mg<br />

or marinades. Anything packaged of sodium daily, mostly from processed<br />

or bottled will list sodium, and you’ll food in cans or packages or from<br />

need to precisely measure your restaurant food. Fresh foods generally<br />

serving size to get an accurate count. contain little sodium. For example:<br />

When using salt in your kitchen or at 3 oz. fresh fish or seafood without<br />

*<br />

the table, here’s how to eyeball sodium added seasoning: Less than 100 mg<br />

amounts in regular table salt or sea salt sodium.<br />

that has similar consistency:<br />

3 oz. canned fish or seafood with<br />

*<br />

1 tsp.: 2,300 mg (the generally<br />

added salt: Varies, but may range<br />

*<br />

recommended daily maximum for from 300 to 800 mg.<br />

healthy adults)<br />

3 oz. fresh meat cooked without<br />

*<br />

²⁄3 tsp.: 1,500 mg (recommended as salt: Less than 100 mg sodium.<br />

*<br />

a daily maximum by the American<br />

Heart Association)<br />

½ tsp.: 1,150 mg sodium<br />

*<br />

* ¼ tsp.: 575 mg sodium<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

*<br />

However, a cheeseburger with<br />

condiments or a 3-oz. serving of<br />

processed or canned meat can<br />

contain more than 1,100 mg sodium.<br />

Fresh fruit: Ranges from zero to a<br />

few milligrams of sodium per piece<br />

or typical serving.<br />

Salad dressings: Oil and vinegar<br />

contain no sodium, but sodium<br />

content of bottled dressings varies<br />

and can be quite high.<br />

Grains: Without any seasoning or<br />

additives, grains contain only a trace<br />

of sodium or none; baked foods,<br />

cereals, and other packaged grain<br />

products vary.<br />

Fresh vegetables (without any<br />

added salt): Milligrams of sodium<br />

per cup of most fresh vegetables are<br />

in the single or low-double digits.<br />

These are some with higher sodium<br />

content: beets (131 mg), beet greens<br />

(347 mg), and celery (104 mg).<br />

Nuts: Without any added salt, they<br />

contain negligible sodium.<br />

Condiments and sides: One<br />

tablespoon can add significant<br />

sodium from soy sauce (914 mg)<br />

or teriyaki (689 mg). So can 1 dill<br />

pickle (833 mg). Lower-sodium<br />

options include (per tablespoon):<br />

ketchup (178 mg) or sweet pickle<br />

relish (122 mg).<br />

MAY <strong>2020</strong> • 39


ASK THE NUTRITIONIST *<br />

Q<br />

To me, there’s nothing<br />

better than mushrooms<br />

sautéed in butter,<br />

or buttered broccoli, or<br />

butter melted on a muffin! However,<br />

I’ve repeatedly heard that we should<br />

avoid saturated fats like butter.<br />

Should butter be avoided or not?<br />

We all grew up hearing that<br />

butter should be avoided because<br />

it’s a saturated fat that isn’t good<br />

for heart health. However, the<br />

saturated fat myth has been<br />

thoroughly debunked in recent<br />

years: two massive review<br />

studies showed there is no<br />

association between saturated<br />

fat consumption and heart disease.<br />

(This is especially true if the<br />

saturated fat you eat doesn’t go<br />

hand-in-hand with sugar and<br />

refined grains.)<br />

But bear in mind that all butter<br />

isn’t created equal. Just as grass-fed<br />

beef has a much stronger nutritional<br />

profile and offers more health benefits<br />

than conventional beef from cattle<br />

that are fed grains, the same is true<br />

of grass-fed butter. This is the type<br />

of butter that comes from the milk<br />

of cows that graze on grass their<br />

entire lives.<br />

The Benefits of Grass-Fed Butter<br />

Grass-fed butter was a historically<br />

used fat. It was part of the diets of<br />

many traditional cultures, and in<br />

many ways, it was considered a<br />

superfood. We now know that it’s<br />

rich in numerous hard-to-obtain<br />

and not so well-known nutrients<br />

and healthful fats—a key reason<br />

40 • MAY <strong>2020</strong><br />

answers to your food questions<br />

<strong>Better</strong> Butter<br />

Want to enjoy your favorite spread without<br />

the guilt? Grass-fed is the way to go<br />

BY MELISSA DIANE SMITH<br />

why some people, such as keto<br />

diet followers, are now adding it to<br />

their coffee. Here’s a rundown of<br />

the nutrients found in this creamy,<br />

golden favorite.<br />

CLA—Grass-fed butter is a rich<br />

source of conjugated linoleic acid<br />

(CLA): It actually contains five times<br />

more CLA than butter from grain-fed<br />

cows. CLA is a beneficial fatty acid<br />

that has anti-inflammatory properties<br />

and is linked to fighting cancer and<br />

helping your body build muscle<br />

rather than store fat.<br />

CLA also seems<br />

to promote cardiovascular<br />

health. One<br />

study conducted in<br />

Costa Rica, where most<br />

dairy farms are still<br />

pasture-based, found<br />

that people with higher CLA levels in<br />

their bodies also had less risk of heart<br />

attacks. Those with the highest levels<br />

of CLA had a 36 percent lower risk of<br />

heart attack compared to those with<br />

the lowest levels.<br />

Photo: adobestock.com


Photo: adobestock.com<br />

“Activator X”/Vitamin K2—In the 1930s,<br />

researcher Weston A. Price documented<br />

the diets of traditional cultures with<br />

little degenerative disease and very low<br />

rates of tooth decay and cavities. Price<br />

discovered that butter was an important<br />

food for bone and dental health and he<br />

deduced that it had something he called<br />

“Activator X” that helps the body use<br />

other vitamins to strengthen bones and<br />

teeth. Today many nutrition professionals<br />

think Activator X is Vitamin K 2<br />

, which is<br />

found in grass-fed butter.<br />

Vitamin K 2<br />

plays a key role<br />

in bone and heart<br />

health by regulating<br />

calcium levels.<br />

Vitamin K 2<br />

helps<br />

remove excess<br />

calcium from<br />

your bloodstream,<br />

which may help<br />

prevent harmful<br />

calcium deposits<br />

and plaque from<br />

building up in your<br />

blood vessels. The<br />

nutrient also helps<br />

your bones properly<br />

use vitamins A and<br />

D. Vitamin K 2<br />

is<br />

mainly found in<br />

fermented foods and animal products,<br />

including grass-fed butter. Our gut flora<br />

can make Vitamin K 2<br />

from Vitamin K 1<br />

,<br />

which is found in vegetables. But cows<br />

that eat grass rich in K 1<br />

are much more<br />

efficient converting it to Vitamin K 2<br />

,<br />

and the K 2<br />

is present in their milk and<br />

concentrated in butter made from the milk.<br />

Omega-3 Fatty Acids—Compared to<br />

butter from grain-fed cows, grass-fed<br />

butter is a good source of omega-3 fatty<br />

acids such as DHA and EPA. One analysis<br />

found that grass-fed butter provides<br />

about 26 percent more omega-3 fatty<br />

acids than regular butter, on average.<br />

Omega-3s are an integral part of cell<br />

membranes throughout your body and<br />

a building block for hormones. They<br />

also have anti-inflammatory functions,<br />

How to Find Grass-Fed Butter<br />

Several imported brands of butter that are grass-fed<br />

or mostly grass-fed can be found in natural food<br />

stores. These include Anchor (from New Zealand),<br />

Kerrygold (from Ireland), Allgau (from Germany), and<br />

Smjor (from Iceland).<br />

One nationally available brand of grass-fed butter<br />

that is USDA Organic (meaning the cows are not given<br />

feed that is genetically modified or sprayed with synthetic<br />

chemical pesticides, and they are not given antibiotics<br />

and hormones) is Organic Valley Pasture Butter. This<br />

butter, which comes in a distinctive green package, is<br />

produced from <strong>May</strong> to September when pastures are<br />

green and lush and account for 99 percent of the cow’s<br />

feed. Fortunately, you usually can find the product<br />

year-round in many health food stores.<br />

which are important in controlling<br />

inflammatory health conditions such as<br />

arthritis and eczema and in protecting<br />

heart and brain function.<br />

If Dairy Bothers You …<br />

Many people who are lactose-intolerant or sensitive to the proteins in<br />

milk products often can tolerate small amounts of grass-fed butter in<br />

their diet. That’s because grass-fed butter is mostly fat, with very low<br />

levels of the milk sugar and milk proteins that make other dairy foods<br />

problematic for some people.<br />

However, we all are biochemically unique. If you are sensitive to butter,<br />

try grass-fed ghee, also called clarified butter. Ghee is made by heating<br />

butter at a very low heat until the water evaporates and then skimming<br />

off the proteins that float on top to get almost pure fat with even fewer<br />

milk sugars and proteins. Being almost pure fat, it has a higher smoke<br />

point than butter. Brands of<br />

grass-fed ghee to look for include<br />

Butyrate—Grass-fed butter contains<br />

butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid that<br />

has anti-inflammatory, metabolismboosting,<br />

and possibly weight-controlling<br />

benefits. In studies using mice, butyrate<br />

improved insulin sensitivity, reduced<br />

cholesterol, and increased fat burning<br />

and mitochondrial activity. Mitochondria<br />

power every cell in your body, helping<br />

turn the foods you eat into cellular<br />

energy. According to a study in World<br />

Journal of Gastrointestinal Pathophysiology,<br />

butyrate can help control weight<br />

by enhancing the hormone leptin, which<br />

can suppress appetite. Butyrate also has<br />

Bulletproof Grass-Fed Ghee, Pure<br />

Indian Foods Grass-Fed Cultured<br />

Ghee, and Organic Valley Organic<br />

Ghee Clarified Butter.<br />

If you don’t tolerate ghee, or if<br />

you avoid animal products, switch<br />

to coconut oil. It does not have the<br />

same nutritional profile as grass-fed<br />

butter, but coconut oil serves as<br />

a handy vegan<br />

substitute for<br />

butter in cooking<br />

and baking.<br />

anti-inflammatory benefits in the gut,<br />

and it may help prevent colon cancer.<br />

Vitamins A, D, E, and Beta-Carotene—<br />

Grass-fed butter is rich in vitamins A, D,<br />

and E, which are necessary for immune<br />

function, reproduction, and vision. These<br />

nutrients are also involved in maintaining<br />

healthy teeth, bones, and skin.<br />

Additionally, grass-fed butter contains<br />

higher amounts of beta carotene<br />

than regular butter. Beta carotene is a<br />

potent antioxidant that has been linked<br />

to a reduced risk of several chronic<br />

diseases and the body converts it to<br />

vitamin A as needed.<br />

In sum, grass-fed butter is a nutritional<br />

powerhouse. So, go ahead and enjoy<br />

butter, but make sure you upgrade it.<br />

MAY <strong>2020</strong> • 41


EATING 4 HEALTH *<br />

You know that calcium is critical<br />

to strengthen teeth and prevent<br />

osteoporosis—but it’s not the only<br />

nutrient that you need for healthy<br />

teeth and bones. Magnesium, vitamin<br />

C, vitamin D, vitamin K, copper, zinc,<br />

and other nutrients play a crucial role<br />

in maintaining bone density.<br />

Protein is also important—while<br />

it was once thought that a high-protein<br />

diet caused the body to lose calcium,<br />

more recent research suggests that<br />

a high intake of protein actually boosts<br />

intestinal calcium absorption. Several<br />

studies also point to a link between<br />

protein intake and improved bone<br />

mineral density.<br />

Plenty of plant foods are rich sources<br />

of calcium and other supportive nutrients<br />

for vegan or dairy-free diets. Keep your<br />

skeleton healthy and strong with these<br />

seven bone-building foods.<br />

42 • MAY <strong>2020</strong><br />

foods & meals that heal<br />

Eating for Bone Health<br />

The best food sources of calcium and other nutrients for strong bones<br />

BY LISA TURNER<br />

1Collard greens. Especially<br />

important for people who don’t<br />

eat dairy, collard greens are an<br />

excellent source of calcium, with about<br />

270 mg per cup of cooked collards.<br />

They’re also high in magnesium, vitamin<br />

C, vitamin K, and other nutrients<br />

needed for bone health. Turnip greens,<br />

mustard greens, beet greens, and kale<br />

are also great sources of calcium and<br />

other bone-building nutrients. While<br />

spinach is rich in calcium, it’s also high<br />

in oxalates, compounds that are thought<br />

to inhibit calcium absorption, though<br />

studies are mixed.<br />

Recipe Tips: Simmer chopped collards<br />

in broth with diced sweet potatoes,<br />

onions, and white beans; combine<br />

shredded collards, carrots, green apples<br />

and red cabbage with a tahini-honey<br />

dressing for a colorful slaw; toss torn<br />

collard leaves with olive oil and garlic<br />

salt, roast until crispy, then sprinkle<br />

with grated Parmesan cheese.<br />

2Cottage cheese. This unsung<br />

hero of the dairy world is rich in<br />

calcium—one cup has 138 mg,<br />

or about 14 percent of the RDI. Cottage<br />

cheese is extremely high in protein<br />

(25 grams per cup) and selenium, which<br />

may play a part in bone health. Some<br />

studies suggest that calcium from dairy<br />

is more efficiently absorbed by the body<br />

than calcium from other foods.<br />

Recipe Tips: Blend cottage cheese<br />

with a splash of milk until creamy, then<br />

simmer with minced garlic and grated<br />

cheese for a healthy Alfredo sauce; mash<br />

cottage cheese with avocado, then spread<br />

on toast and top with chopped olives<br />

and tomatoes; purée cottage cheese,<br />

honey, and cardamom, stir in chopped<br />

pistachios, and spoon into Medjool dates.<br />

Photo: adobestock.com


make it!<br />

Egg Foo Yung<br />

Makes 20 pancakes<br />

To properly cook<br />

these Asian pancakes,<br />

be sure the<br />

griddle or skillet is<br />

preheated so they<br />

set immediately.<br />

Recipe from our<br />

sister publication,<br />

CuisineatHome.com.<br />

²/3 cup small-curd cottage cheese<br />

(about 6 oz.)<br />

6 eggs, beaten<br />

1 cup chopped fresh mung bean<br />

sprouts<br />

3/4 cup minced celery<br />

1/4 cup grated Parmesan<br />

2 Tbs. minced scallions, plus more for<br />

garnish (optional)<br />

2 Tbs. low-sodium soy sauce<br />

Salt and black pepper<br />

1. Mash cottage cheese in medium bowl.<br />

Stir in eggs, sprouts, celery, Parmesan,<br />

2 Tbs. scallions, and soy sauce. Season<br />

with salt and pepper.<br />

2. Brush griddle or nonstick skillet with<br />

oil or spray with nonstick cooking<br />

spray, and heat over medium-low heat.<br />

When hot, scoop 2 Tbs. batter onto<br />

griddle and cook until light brown,<br />

2–3 minutes per side. Repeat with<br />

remaining batter. Garnish pancakes<br />

with scallions, if using, and serve with<br />

soy sauce.<br />

Per serving: 35 cal; 3g prot; 2g total fat (0.5g<br />

sat fat); 1g carb; 60mg chol; 125mg sod; 0g<br />

fiber; 1g sugar<br />

Photo: Pornchai Mittongtare; Styling: Robin Turk; Food Stylist: Claire Stancer<br />

MAY <strong>2020</strong> • 43


EATING 4 HEALTH<br />

3Tahini. Made from ground<br />

sesame seeds, this traditional<br />

Middle Eastern ingredient is packed<br />

with calcium—126 mg in 2 tablespoons—<br />

and it’s also rich in magnesium and<br />

copper. Sesame seeds, poppy seeds,<br />

and chia seeds are also good sources of<br />

calcium, magnesium, and copper.<br />

Recipe Tips: Roast eggplant, onions,<br />

and garlic, then purée with tahini, cumin,<br />

and cilantro for a Middle Eastern dip;<br />

combine tahini, coconut milk, and honey<br />

or agave, stir in black sesame seeds, and<br />

freeze in popsicle molds; cook carrots,<br />

onions, and ginger in broth, then purée<br />

with tahini and white miso until creamy.<br />

4Bone-in sardines. They’re<br />

packed with calcium: one can (3.75<br />

ounces) of bone-in sardines has<br />

351 mg. Sardines are also loaded with<br />

protein and vitamin D, with about 100<br />

percent of the RDI in a one-can serving.<br />

They’re also rich in omega-3 fatty acids,<br />

which play a part in bone health, and<br />

they’re lower in mercury and other<br />

toxins than larger fatty fish. Canned<br />

bone-in salmon is another good source;<br />

look for water-packed varieties of both.<br />

Recipe Tips: Simmer sardines with<br />

tomato sauce, shallots, and saffron,<br />

then garnish with parsley; sauté sardines<br />

in olive oil with onions, cherry<br />

tomatoes, black olives, and chopped<br />

kale; grill escarole and radicchio until<br />

tender, then top with warm sardines<br />

and grated Parmesan cheese.<br />

5Tofu. One of the best ways to<br />

get calcium on a vegan diet is with<br />

tofu, which has as much as 850 mg<br />

in a half-cup serving, depending on the<br />

coagulant used to bind the proteins. Studies<br />

suggest that calcium absorption from<br />

tofu is comparable to that from cow’s<br />

milk. Tofu is also high in protein and is<br />

an excellent source of bone-supportive<br />

magnesium, copper, and zinc. Look for<br />

firm varieties made with calcium sulfate,<br />

the most commonly used coagulant.<br />

Recipe Tips: Mix crumbled tofu with<br />

chopped scallions, chives, vegan or<br />

regular mayo, and a pinch of turmeric<br />

for “egg” salad; thread tofu on skewers<br />

with mushrooms, tomatoes, and green<br />

peppers, brush with olive oil and<br />

grill; marinate cubed tofu in sesame<br />

oil, tamari, and garlic powder, toss in<br />

cornstarch, and bake until crispy.<br />

6Parmesan cheese. All<br />

cheeses have calcium, but hard,<br />

aged cheeses have significantly<br />

more. One ounce of Parmesan cheese<br />

contains 331 mg of calcium, and hard<br />

goat, Romano, and Gruyere cheeses<br />

range from 250 to 300 mg per ounce.<br />

Edam, part-skim mozzarella, Swiss,<br />

Muenster, and provolone range from<br />

150 to 225 mg per ounce. Softer cheese<br />

such as Brie, Neufchâtel, and soft goat<br />

cheese are much lower, with about 50<br />

mg per ounce. Parmesan cheese is also<br />

a great source of selenium.<br />

Recipe Tips: Mix grated Parmesan<br />

with garlic powder and dried rosemary,<br />

drop by tablespoons onto a baking<br />

sheet, and bake until crispy for<br />

grain-free crackers; toss roasted<br />

Brussels sprouts, delicata squash, and<br />

red onions with balsamic glaze, then<br />

shower with shaved Parmesan or<br />

Romano; arrange thick slices of<br />

tomatoes on a baking sheet, top with<br />

grated Parmesan, bake until melted,<br />

and top with minced basil.<br />

7White beans. Most beans<br />

have decent amounts of calcium,<br />

but white beans top the list with<br />

161 mg in a one-cup serving. They’re<br />

also rich in magnesium, copper, zinc,<br />

and protein. Because beans also contain<br />

phytates, compounds that interfere with<br />

the absorption of calcium, soak dried<br />

beans in water for 6 hours, then drain<br />

and rinse before cooking to reduce the<br />

content of phytates. Make a big batch,<br />

then freeze one- or two-cup servings in<br />

quart-sized freezer bags.<br />

Recipe Tips: Sauté white beans in<br />

olive oil with sardines, shredded<br />

collards, and Kalamata olives, then toss<br />

with penne pasta and Romano cheese;<br />

make a hummus with white beans,<br />

tahini, garlic, lemon juice, and roasted<br />

red peppers; mash white beans with<br />

cooked sweet potatoes for a highcalcium<br />

twist on mashed potatoes.<br />

Photo: adobestock.com<br />

44 •<br />

MAY <strong>2020</strong>


RECIPE 4 HEALTH *<br />

Dessert lover Arman<br />

Liew, author of Clean<br />

Sweets (The Countryman<br />

Press, <strong>2020</strong>)<br />

and the blog The Big<br />

Man’s World, believes that, when<br />

it comes to sweets, healthy substitutions<br />

cannot sacrifice taste. Ever.<br />

“After extensively experimenting<br />

with recipes, I have a firm grasp<br />

on what works and what doesn’t<br />

in healthy dessert adaptations,”<br />

he says. Here’s one of his favorites,<br />

excerpted from Clean Sweets.<br />

Deep Dish Skillet Brownie<br />

Serves 1<br />

This mini-skillet brownie can be a<br />

savior any time the sweet tooth strikes.<br />

It uses easy on-hand ingredients and,<br />

as it doesn’t contain any eggs, is perfect<br />

when just undercooked.<br />

2 Tbs. plus 2 tsp. almond flour<br />

1 Tbs. plus 2 tsp. cocoa powder<br />

½ tsp. baking powder<br />

1 Tbs. granulated sweetener of choice<br />

(we used NOW Organic Monk Fruit<br />

Extract Powder)<br />

1 Tbs. plus 1 tsp. ground flax<br />

(or substitute 1 large egg)<br />

1 Tbs. oil of choice<br />

2 Tbs. milk of choice<br />

*Chocolate chips for topping, optional<br />

1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Lightly grease<br />

mini-skillet or ramekin, and set aside.<br />

2. In small mixing bowl, add dry ingredients<br />

and mix well. Add in oil and milk, and<br />

stir until batter is formed. Top the batter<br />

with chocolate chips, if using, and bake<br />

10–12 minutes, or until just cooked in<br />

center and chocolate chips have melted.<br />

Per loaf: 320 cal; 8g prot; 29g total fat<br />

(4g sat fat); 15g carb; 0mg chol; 270mg sod;<br />

8g fiber; 3g sugar<br />

*USE A SUGAR-FREE BRAND LIKE LILY’S SWEETS<br />

TO MAKE RECIPE PALEO- AND KETO-FRIENDLY.<br />

46 • MAY <strong>2020</strong><br />

eating clean made easy<br />

Sweet Rewards<br />

Say hello to the dessert of your dreams! This ooey-gooey brownie is<br />

super easy to make—perfect when a chocolate craving hits<br />

make it!<br />

Photo: Pornchai Mittongtare; Styling: Robin Turk; Food Stylist: Claire Stancer


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MAY <strong>2020</strong> • 47


COOK WITH SUPPLEMENTS *<br />

Cherry-Chia and Pistachio Breakfast Bars<br />

Makes 12 bars<br />

These dense-and-chewy breakfast bars are fortified<br />

with protein-rich whey for extended energy on the go.<br />

Dried cherries add extra flavor and a powerful dose of<br />

antioxidants. We used chia seeds and pistachios for added<br />

protein and fiber, plus a healthy dose of omega-3 fats. You<br />

can swap out the pistachios for almonds, macadamias, or<br />

cashews, or use pumpkin seeds for a nut-free version.<br />

48 • MAY <strong>2020</strong><br />

easy ways to boost your nutrition<br />

Go for Protein<br />

Tired of the same old bacon and sausage? Get your morning dose<br />

of protein with these whey-infused breakfast bars.<br />

Garden of Life Organic<br />

Grass Fed Whey Protein<br />

1 cup milk<br />

2 eggs<br />

2 tsp. vanilla extract<br />

3 Tbs. chia seeds<br />

2 cups rolled oats<br />

½ cup vanilla-flavored whey protein<br />

powder<br />

2 Tbs. monk fruit or erythritol<br />

(optional)<br />

1 tsp. baking powder<br />

½ tsp. salt<br />

¼ cup dried cherries<br />

¼ cup pistachios<br />

1. Preheat oven to 375°F. Lightly spray or<br />

coat an 8x8-inch glass baking dish with<br />

vegetable or coconut oil.<br />

2. In medium bowl, whisk together milk,<br />

eggs, and vanilla extract. Whisk in chia<br />

seeds and set aside.<br />

3. In large bowl, combine oats, whey protein<br />

powder, sweetener (if using), baking<br />

powder, and salt. Stir wet ingredients<br />

into dry, mixing until well combined.<br />

Stir in cherries and pistachios.<br />

4. Spread batter evenly into prepared<br />

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until firm and golden. Remove from<br />

oven and let cool completely. Cut into<br />

12 bars, and serve.<br />

Per serving: 190 cal; 10g prot; 5g total fat<br />

(1g sat fat); 24g carb; 40mg chol; 180mg sod;<br />

4g fiber; 3g sugar<br />

Recipe photo: Pornchai Mittongtare; Styling: Robin Turk; Food Styling: Claire Stancer


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