++BAY_Issue_24b-faw

janzconceptz

GOOD AND NATURAL JAMAICAN AGRICULTURE

TELL ME A LITTLE ABOUT THE

STEAM TEAM, THE IDEA AND

THE CONCEPT OF IT.

Well steam team is basically a

tradition. A tradition between

the elders and the upcoming

generation. So you find say

when we younger we used to

trod amongst the elder Nyabinghi

Rastafari. We used to sit in when

dem have di chantin’, the service

and certain vibrations. So by

doing that, we see some elders,

some that were burning a spliff,

some that were using a regular

chalice, and those who were

using some unusual bamboo

pipe. So out of curiosity, it’s I link

with the elders and they start

to show the way. You have a

choice, between the spliff, the

regular chalice and the steam

chalice. So we end up with the

steamaz. With the steamers you

get the best taste you get out

of the smallest amount of herbs.

It’s the healthiest way to take

in herbs, because it is not being

burned. The water purification

that happens when it is filtered

through and gives you the vape.

The whole essence of how it

operate, the system within the

chalice.

Sometimes the man

that plant the best

herb don’t even

smoke herb!

!

TELL ME ABOUT THE

MACHINERY, AND HOW THE

PROCESS OF STEAMING

HAPPENS.

All the elements come together

man. You have the fire on top,

which is the coconut charcoal,

you have the clay cutchie

which is earth, then you have

the water inside, and the air

which escapes as vape when

pulled. So everything natural

and from the earth. What we do

now is just modify the whole

thing because first time steam

chalice never used to have the

clay as the cutchie. They used a

bamboo as the cutchie, shaped

like the base, then they have

a metal pan on top of it. Yeah

original steam chalice. Over

the years now we see that

sometimes the bamboo would

catch fire or after a time we

see it start to burn as well. So

we got the clay, because the

clay can’t burn. So you get more

usage out of it. You have a few

names of elders like Bongo Wato,

Bongo Gabbi, who have been

steaming since 1963. They’re fit,

healthy everything.

WHAT DO YOU THINK OF

THE CURRENT POLITICAL

ATMOSPHERE SURROUNDING

MARIJUANA AND IT’S MOVE

TO LESS STRICT LAWS IN

JAMAICA?

Well you have the industry and

you have the indigenous, and the

industry only affect the industry.

Whatever they want to make

of it, the indigenous will always

have sacramental rights. But

everyone need the plant man,

the plant a di healin’. Whether

you smoke it, drink it, wear it, or

eat it. I don’t really go into the

whole politics of it. The business

man haffi do what him have to

do, and the bush man have to

do what the bush man have to

do. Probably the business man

a try to turn over his wealth,

but the maintenance of it and

quality-- sometimes the man that

plant the best herb don’t even

smoke herb.

BACKAYARD 18



BAY: feature: Featureswayne marshall

BACKAYARD 20


EARLY ACCESS

JANE

MACGIZMO

WORDS: AR PHOTOGRAPHS: jik reuben ILLUSTRATION: Phvrvoh

IT IS ALWAYS VERY

INTERESTING TO LEARN

WHAT EXACTLY INSPIRE

ARTISTES, IN TERMS OF

PERSONA AND MUSICAL

DIRECTION. CASE

IN POINT, YOU HAVE

DENIEZE ANDERSON.

THIS SONGBIRD FOUND

HER ALTER EGO IN ONE

OF THE MOST UNIQUE

WAYS.

“I was playing this online game and I had to

name my monkey on a game called ‘Monkey

Quest’. They set it up that you could choose the

first name and then you choose the syllables

of the last name. So I came up with Jane

Macgizmo, I was like this monkey has a dope

ass name I am taking this for something; I don’t

know yet but I am taking it.” She laughs.

A short time after, everywhere online that

Denieze Anderson once existed now had Jane

Macgizmo plastered all over; it was almost as if

it was in preparation of what was to come next.

Musical Notoriety!

But for Jane, she had to wait a bit before

revealing to the world her prowess fostering a

love that started while she was younger. “They

sent me to music class (in Mandeville) which

was originally for piano, but while I was there

I tried all sorts of instruments: flute, trumpet, I

played percussion in the band. I tried everything,

I even started vocal classes.” Jane explains.

Although Jane begun training her voice, she

didn’t fall in love with singing right away. Her

Adoration, at that time, was reserved for the

piano which she would play anytime she felt a

bit down and needed a quick pick me up. It was

from this foundation, Jane begun her musical

career in earnest With the piano being replaced

with a keyboard from which she started to

make her own beats. Unfortunately for her, one

doubt remained; her voice.

“As I said before, my voice was just so different

that to me I was NOT singing. Compared to

what most people singing voice sounded like,

I caan sing.”

Jane’s views on the matter changed, however,

after a fated trip to Turks & Caicos. Where a

musician friend of hers convinced Jane that

she was more than just a photographer/ graphic

designer, her profession at the time, she had

true musical talent. She decided once she

returned to Jamaica she would start to record

music in a proper studio. What was started as

a little hobby was now a serious endeavor.

Jane had to move quickly or risk wasting

precious time. The original plan was not start

singing right away but to write songs/compose

riddims for others, namely her cousin Denyque

(a local recording artist). Unfortunately that just

didn’t come together, so Jane decided to go

at it alone. She downloaded a track and wrote

‘Babylon’. Originally a song extolling the virtues

of the marijuana plant, ‘Babylon’ was changed

by Jane when she realized what she wanted

the world hear as her first release.

“That song was really just for me. I had

changed it to ‘Free from Babylon’ once I knew I

was putting out to the public. I don’t really want

my first song to be a marijuana song, so I made

it more metaphorical.” She explains.

“I had start writing a song called ‘Free From

Babylon’, so when I went to the studio. I

recorded just those parts again.” ‘Free From

Babylon’, which was eventually produced by

S.O.S, had been sent around several production

camps before finding the ear of the young hit

maker. One of the key reasons why S.O.S was

chosen was his experience working with Jane

namely on an unreleased ode to a former flame

of hers. S.O.S also allowed Jane to have the

freedom to actually collaborate on the direction

of the sound, a fact that is important to the

singer as she views her music as true art. So

much so that after the release of ‘Free From

Babylon’, Jane found herself suffering from

what she describes as studio anxiety from the

pressure fueled by listening public’s expectation

of her and her music.

“If I can’t record another song. I might as well

focus on putting out a video for ‘Free From

Babylon’. I actually edited that video with tears

in my eyes.” Jane revealed.

The reception from that video actually was

therapeutic for Jane as it inspired her to work

on her craft more often as she actually had a

fan base now to serve. So Jane took her time

to deliver her next single ‘Too Late’ to the

airwaves. A process which certainly took a toll

on her.

“I almost went crazy, I wanted to put out

another song so bad. But something always

kept happening. I know now that God is just

sometimes telling you to wait and it is not the

right time yet.”

The accompanying visuals for ‘Too Late’, soon

followed despite some setbacks, however the

result confirmed to Jane that she has what it

takes to survive as an independent act, even

separate from the genre of reggae; the genre

which country of Jamaica is widely known

for. Jane Macgizmo certainly believes that her

fans will be happy to hear the path where her

music is going, what she describes as having

a Jamaican sound that is mainstream; a fresh

new sound that is Jamaican but almost a

separate genre as it were. An unbelievable claim

to be completely honest, however anybody who

have heard Jane speak about music and most

importantly heard her sing would know that the

last thing you would do is to bet against her. I

know I wouldn’t. B


STY-LEE

A GLIMPSE INTO THE STYLE STRATEGY OF

GRAMMY AWARD WINNING LABEL UIM RECORDS.

WORDS + STYLING caos

PHOTOGRAPHS raynor allen / caos

WARDROBE ZELA PANG OPEN KLOSET, MIXFITS STREETWEAR


YOUR IMAGE IS AN ESSENTIAL PART OF HOW YOU ARE PERCEIVED, AND YOUR STYLE

PLAYS A GREAT ROLE IN THAT PERCEPTION. IT CAN SAY ALOT ABOUT YOU WITHOUT YOU

EVER SAYING A WORD, AND THAT THEORY IS EVEN MORE AMPLIFIED WHEN YOU’RE

IN THE BUSINESS OF MUSIC. WE CAUGHT UP WITH ANDREW MYRIE A.K.A ANJU BLAXX

(SENIOR ENGINEER/PRODUCER) AND SHAWN MYRIE A.K.A BLAK DIAMON (ARTISTE/

PRODUCER) OF UIM (UNITY IN MOTION AND UPTEMPO INTERNATIONAL MUSIC) TO GET

THEIR THOUGHTS ON PERSONAL STYLE VS. ARTISTE STYLE IN MUSIC TODAY.

BLACK DIAMON

HOW WOULD YOU DEFINE

YOUR STYLE?

I consider my style to be

that of an out of this world

experience. I prefer custom

designs as it is hard to find

the designs that depict my

alien style. I gravitate towards

earth tone colours with a

touch of a bright accent

colour as well.

Leather adds class - Black nylon and leather biker jacket,

black crew neck graphic tee, black ripped denim jeans

paired with black leather high top sneakers

DO YOU FEEL THAT IMAGE

IS IMPORTANT TO A

SUCCESSFUL CAREER?

I believe that image adds to

about 50% of a musician’s

success, especially today,

where people’s attention

span to real good music has

somehow shortened. Your

image shows your personality

and how you feel, so all in

all, yes, I do think it is a very

important factor that goes

along with your sound and

lyrics.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE

AND LEAST FAVORITE PIECE

OF CLOTHING IN YOUR

WARDROBE?

Currently in my wardrobe, my

favorite every day [outfits]

are like grey or light-coloured

jeans with a white or black

tee and my sports jacket of

course. As it concerns my

least favorite, well I would

mostly skip over heavy

clothes; I am not a fan of

button ups or baggy jeans

either. I believe the fit is

important towards showing

great style.


STY-LEE

KADEEM UIM

WHAT DEFINES YOU AS

A PERSON AND WHAT

DEFINES YOUR STYLE?

I would say music really

defines me as a person, it’s

what I eat, sleep and breathe

ha ha, and my style is more

of a converse on a regular

day. I have like 10 pairs of

converse sneakers, but other

than that, jeans, t-shirt kind

of style.

DO YOU CONSIDER

YOURSELF TO BE STYLISH?

Funnily enough, I don’t

consider myself to be stylish,

but I do believe that image

is important to one’s’ career,

because without image, I

think the music itself would

be lost.

WHAT’S NEXT FOR KADEEM UIM?

Definitely more music, I have a

couple projects working on now

that I will soon be able to talk

about but yea, more music to

come. Oh and also more style ha

ha.

A touch of colour - Grey leather biker jacket, peach graphic

v-neck tee, ash grey denim jeans, with a classic style black

and grey LV sneakers


UIM RECORDS has produced music for - Vybz Kartel, Mavado, Bounty Killer, Capleton and Sizzla.

ANJU BLAXX OF UIM has also produced music on Grammy-Award winning album Stony Hill for Damian Marley.

DINEARO

WHAT DO YOU CONSIDER

IS YOUR SENSE OF STYLE?

I am actually a very simple

person, my style is more

basic tees and jeans.

ARE YOU A SNEAKERS OR

LOAFERS KIND GUY?

Actually, I like them both

(chuckles)

WHAT’S NEXT FOR

DINEARO?

I am a firm believer that

things are always evolving

and changing, you will be

seeing more of me and also

my music. My aim is always

to do better than I have

already done, to take it to

another level.

Relaxed Fit - Light blue ripped denim jacket, aqua blue crew

neck, light blue fitted denim jeans, with a white studded

high top sneakers

ALL THE CREDITS

ZELA PANG OPEN KLOSET @zelapang_openkloset

MIXFITS STREETWEAR | Facebook: Mixfits Streetwear Instagram: @mixfitstreet


BAY: feature: Featureswayne

marshall

FOREVER YOUNG & GIFTED

KOFFEE

WORDS Gladstone Taylor

PHOTOGRAPHS jik reuben

Youth is one of those words in the english language that has multiple meanings, one

specific and another generic in nature. The Jamaican music space is no stranger to the

talent and prowess of young virtuosos. Afterall, with the most churches, Jamaica’s choir

programs have proven fertile grounds for nourishing undeveloped talents. As an audience

we celebrate young talent, we marvel at the spectacle of our prodigies. From the likes

of Beenie Man who began toasting at the early age of five, to the more contemporary

and popularly known Wayne J. The Jamaican audience has always been charmed by the

young and gifted. Perhaps it is the mystique of this elusive knowing, whether from the

stage presence, tone, content, voice, or all the above, we know. There’s a vitality, within

the artiste, a star quality, a substance that we know will age extremely well. Once you

hear her first single Burning, you’ll be convinced that Koffee is the embodiment of young

and gifted. Arriving on the scene little over a year ago at the tender age of 16, Koffee has

commanded attention with the light of her talent, and the hard work of her team.

Her ascent into the ranks of the music industry had us curious about

her headspace, so we chopped it up with the star girl briefly.



AT WHAT POINT WOULD YOU SAY YOU

STARTED TO USE YOUR VOICE AS AN

INSTRUMENT AND WHAT FEELING

MOTIVATED THE USE OF IT AT THE TIME?

I actually grew up in church, so my musical

journey began there and then I went on to

join the Ardenne High School choir while I

was enrolled at the school. Singing for me

has always been inspired by the feeling of

wanting to know and understand music and

delivery.

WHEN DID YOU DECIDE TO SERIOUSLY

CRAFT YOUR FIRST SONG AND WHAT

BECAME OF IT?

The first actual song I wrote was ‘Burning’,

and it was inspired by the awesome Ouiji

Riddim I was provided with by Upsetta

Records. Today, you can find it on YouTube,

SoundCloud, Spotify, Apple Music and all

those places

WHERE WOULD YOU SAY YOU GOT THE

MOST PRACTICE SINGING?

I would say I got the most singing practice in

the Ardenne High School Choir. Even though

I would sing hymns at church on Sabbaths, I

wasn’t really on the church choir for any long

period of time. But the Ardenne choir was like

daily voice training for me while I was a part

of it

YOU’VE SEEN A LOT OF SUCCESS

RECENTLY WITH YOUR LATEST SINGLE

‘BURNING’ AND YOUR PATH IS ON AN

INCLINE, WHEN DID YOU REALLY COME

FACE TO FACE WITH THE FACT THAT YEA,

THIS IS HAPPENING, THE PEOPLE ARE

LOVING WHAT I HAVE TO OFFER?

This experience for me is sort of a

reoccurring experience, whereas each time

I step on a stage and see the crowd being

moved, it helps me realize that the people are

loving the fiyah wah me come wid

DO YOU HAVE ANY UPCOMING PROJECTS?

IF SO HOW DID IT COME TOGETHER AND

WHEN CAN WE EXPECT IT?

Yes I do. It came together beautifully SOON!

YOU HAVE A BAND. WOULD YOU SAY IT’S

VITAL TO THE QUALITY OF MUSIC YOU

WANT TO MAKE?

Yes most definitely. Live music is a crucial

thing to me and in the music world and I think

the youths need it now more than anything

IT’S FAIRLY NEW BUT HOW IMPORTANT IS

YOUR BAND IN YOUR MUSICAL DECISIONS?

FOR INSTANCE WHEN COMPOSING A SONG

NOW, DOES YOUR ENSEMBLE WEIGH

HEAVILY IN THAT PROCESS?

Not so far, but as was said, it’s a little early

so as I grow as an artiste and start writing

different songs in different ways you know

my band will fully be in the mix (pun intended)

WHAT IS YOUR HEADSPACE LIKE

REGARDING YOUR CURRENT POISED

POSITION, AS ONE TO WATCH? ARE YOU

EXCITED OR ANXIOUS FOR THE FUTURE?

I’m actually trying to be more relaxed. Just

taking things step by step and knowing that

God is and will always be in control

WHAT DO YOU HAVE IN STORE FOR THE

WORLD OF MUSIC?

More music, lol B

WHEN YOU SAY “NUTN CYAA OUT MY

FLAME”, WHAT DO YOU MEAN?

It means that no matter what I will always

shine.. mi nah simmer and mi nah out. Burn!

IF YOU COULDN’T DO MUSIC ANYMORE AND

HAD TO CHOOSE ANOTHER CAREER WHAT

WOULD IT BE?

Maybe I would get back to working on

becoming a pharmacist like I was doing in

high school. Nothing out there really excites

me quite as much as music though so that

would be my last resort

AS A LISTENER, WHAT ARE SOME OF THE

ARTISTES THAT INFLUENCED YOUR IDEA OF

WHAT GOOD MUSIC IS WHEN GROWING UP?

Chronixx and Protoje for sure (from my era)

WHO DO YOU LISTEN TO NOW THAT

INSPIRES YOU TO EITHER KEEP DOING IT

OR DO IT BETTER?

I listen to almost everything, once it has

a vibe so it would be really hard for me to

properly list out everything.

WHAT NEXT CAN WE EXPECT FROM

KOFFEE?

Definitely have a musical project coming out

very soon, so more fiyah!


NO MATTER WHAT, I WILL ALWAYS SHINE!


BAY: feature: Featureswayne marshall

MORTIMER

AND

GOLDEN

THE

FORMULA

WORDS Gladstone Taylor

PHOTOGRAPHS warren Mckane

Mortimer’s idiosyncratic melodies ring out and spread over the atmosphere of any given

setting in which his music is played. From his singles like “Nice Up Di Scene,” “Warning,”

“This feeling” and even featured singles like Protoje’s “Protection,” or the more recent

and compelling, “Truths and Rights.” His voice is the kind you never mistake, and you

never forget as the blend of classic and contemporary melodies cascade over your ears,

impressing his own nuanced feelings and philosophies. When we finally converge with the

one fondly known as “the man with the golden voice,” he eventually concedes the

formula to said gold in our talk.

BACKAYARD 30



BACKAYARD 32


LIFE IS

COMPLICATED AND

SO INTENTIONS

FUNCTION ON

BOTH SHALLOW

AND DEEPER

LEVELS. MORE

SHALLOW LEVELS

OF INTENTION

WOULD BE THE

MORE OBVIOUS

THINGS THAT

GENERALLY

MOTIVATE

PEOPLE TO DO

THINGS, AND

DEEPER LEVELS

WOULD BE LIKE

MORE INTERNAL

MOTIVATIONS

THAT ARE PERSON

SPECIFIC.

YOUR PARTICULAR SOUND IS VERY

SOULFUL, IS THAT INTENTIONAL AND IF SO,

WHAT INSPIRES IT?

[Chuckle] Ahhm, it intentional, but I don’t know

if it intentional because the word makes it

sound like I put deliberate effort, but it’s just

life happenings bro, that’s all it is…just life

happenings, experiences and all dem ting deh.

SO YOU USE YOUR MUSIC TO TRANSLATE

YOUR FEELINGS TOWARDS THINGS, IN A

WAY?

Yea, and a lot of what I’ve written so far hasn’t

reflected much of that in actual words, but in

feeling, yea. Definitely, I use that to express

myself because music is therapy. Mi a tell yuh

bro.

WHAT ARTISTS WOULD YOU SAY CARVED

YOUR APPRECIATION FOR MUSIC IN YOUR

FORMATIVE YEARS?

I like Donny Hathaway, Bobby Womack and

all dem people deh. New age people like Mali

music, John Legend, just because of--like the

passion that they have for it. You can see and

feel the love. It’s just that, it’s just the passion

bro.

SPEAK IN DETAIL ABOUT YOUR MUSICAL

HISTORY. HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN

SINGING, AND WHERE WOULD YOU SAY IT

STARTED?

I’ve been singing from mi likkle still. Yeah, on

the choir. I was on the school choir, I was

on the church choir, children’s choir, youth

choir, every choir. Then I grew, contemporary

gospel gave me euphony. [Chuckle] Life is

complicated and so intentions function on

both shallow and deeper levels. More shallow

levels of intention would be the more obvious

things that generally motivate

people to do things, and deeper levels would

be like more internal motivations that are

person specific.

WHAT WOULD YOU SAY ARE YOUR DEEPEST

INTENTIONS FOR YOUR MUSIC?

Well I just wah reach people in a positive way

bro. Honestly. Like, what’s my contribution?

And then if we’re talking contribution, it

definitely has to be on a positive level because

that is what mankind need right now. So that,

on the deeper level is just it really. To touch

hearts and minds, change some eventually.

Yeah, we’ll see. Music is a very powerful thing

y’know bro? Mi have this likkle thing that I’ve

been saying, I was talking to a friend and I said

to him “Soul is gold.” Like anything soul is gold.

As long as it come from the soul, is gold, you

good to go.

WORKING WITH PROTOJE HAS HELPED

TO PROPEL YOUR SOUND, WHAT HAS

WORKING WITH HIM BEEN LIKE?

Good, I’ve never really thought about it much.

Honestly, it is a thing that is exciting because

when I was younger my sister and I would

we would be in the mirror all the time just

imagining what it would be like to do a song

with Protoje. We used to do a lot of that, we

used to sing his songs, only to be working

with him now. It was very exciting. It’s like it

just perfect to, it happened very organic, right

people, right place, right time. It just happened

like that. I was doing some work with Paris, he

played Winta and Protoje some of the songs

and they really liked them so from there we

just start to link. You take your time releasing

music which speaks to the meticulous nature

of the process.

TELL US WHAT YOU’VE BEEN WORKING ON,

WHAT WE CAN EXPECT AND HOW SOON.

First of all, meticulous for me would come after

like a deliberate act. [Chuckle] If it was me

alone, I would release more music, I probably

would release music for every time I feel a

way. When I write something, I’m in this mood

and I need people to know that this is how I

feel. This is what I’m going through, listen to it.

That’s if I had it my way. But yuh done know,

everything in a timely fashion and so from

a business point of view it’s always best to

control the output.

WHAT DOES “TRUTHS AND RIGHTS” MEAN

FOR YOU? THE ACTUAL STATEMENT AND

THE SONG.

Well it means exactly what it says; the rights

of the people and the truth being [said]. The

truth taught, told and not hidden. The rights

of the people being seen and heard, and

people are given fair treatment and a fair shot

in life. That’s just it for me still. For the song,

well you know me and Winta work together,

he sent across an idea to me and then we

just flesh it out from there and it turned into

this glorious thing. Yo, the world is filled with

things that people want, so I feel like is just

time to give them what they need. That’s why

I’m so appreciative of where reggae music

is going now. I don’t believe in like a reggae

revival because reggae was never dead, but

it was quiet for a time. So I’m really happy for

this new wave of consciousness. Because I’m

seeing too, sometimes on the TV, sometimes

on Instagram, there’s a shift happening. Even

though the world mash up, there’s a shift

happening, everybody a do this roots ting.

Even if it starts as a style, it has to start

somewhere and when I say roots I don’t just

mean music, I mean what people a wear, what

they’re eating and talking about. B


BAY: feature: Featureswayne marshall

THE

CONQUERING

CHRONIXX

At the time we were parked outside Chronixx’s skyline abode,

he had not yet made history with his sold out Caribbean tour.

As I write this now, I think back to the look on his face when he

emerged from the house, and I’m convinced he was already aware,

at that moment, of exactly what he had in store for Jamaica.

Despite the fact that his career has steadily been on the incline

since his breakout single “Behind Curtain”, Chronixx continues to

exceed expectations with his achievements. Even with such crowd

favorites as the “Start a Fiyah” mixtape, “Dread and Terrible”, or

the more recent “Roots and Chalice”, it didnt become evident to

the world that his caliber of music could become greater still. Not

until “Chronology” hit the streets, both digitally and physically on

July 7th, 2017, that it became evident to the world, his caliber of

music could be greater still.

After being in his presence for a while, one could get a sense

of why this was the case. There was just something about him

which inferred that this man was constantly on the cusp of his

best self, not unlike the philosophy of his king. By the time we

finally sat down to talk about his debut full-length album, Chronixx

was already fired up from the insightful conversations during the

shoot. It made for an easy transition into

shop talk for “Chronology.”

WORDS Gladstone Taylor

PHOTOGRAPHS jik reuben


BACKAYARD 35


BAY: feature: Featureswayne marshall

THE ALBUM, “CHRONOLOGY,” I HEAR IT WAS

SUPPOSED TO BE RELEASED EARLIER THAN

IT WAS. I KNOW WITH BODIES OF WORK

THAT ARE FULL LENGTH DEBUTS A LOT

MORE CONSIDERATION GOES INTO IT. TELL

ME A LITTLE ABOUT THAT.

Well, the album itself, as a body of work has

been in the making for a while within my

consciousness. We really start; we commence

the final levels of the production, I would say

mid-2016, because I was working on it with

“Dread and Terrible,” and simultaneously with

“Roots and Chalice,” so it just been in the making

for a while. Then now when we commence in

2016, start to link up all the people that I know;

musicians. Great musicians worked on it: Glen

Brown Shia core, Namdi Robinson, Evan (which

is Yellow); people like Welch, play bass on it,

Picard brothers from France, Special Delivery

from France. Special Delivery now, I’ve been

working with all throughout, they produced

“Beat and Mic,” “Eternal Fire,” “Rastaman Wheel

Out.” So a like mi bredrin dem mi make di

album with still, nah tell yuh no lie. Stephen

McGregor, him play bass on it too, so he was

a musician and also a producer on the album.

Myself produce on it, and sing. Hector Lewis

play percussion and sing. Nambo Robinson,

Dean Fraser, Rudimentals - they produced

Loneliness with Picard brothers. So many of

them, from local and abroad.

A LOT OF MUSICIANS, WHEN THEY DO THEIR

FIRST FULL-LENGTH PROJECT THEY TEND

TO TRY TO GO IT ALONE. EVEN THOUGH

THE QUALITY OF YOUR MUSIC IS DIFFERENT

BECAUSE IT IS MADE WITH PERFORMANCE

AND A LIVE ENSEMBLE IN MIND. YOU TOOK

A DIFFERENT ROUTE TO MOST BY WORKING

WITH SO MANY OTHER MUSICIANS AND

CREATIVES.

Yeah because I feel like now we are charged

with the work of continuing Reggae music.

Because Reggae music is a work music, it’s

not just popular music. Every now and then

you will have from it, but Reggae music is

predominantly a works ting. It’s centered

around the work that the human community

have to do. So I feel like our generation, our

work is to somehow continue. Primarily to

continue, but also to write our testament of

the same spirituality from creation. Which is

the spirituality that suits humanity the best;

not necessarily best, as in one is superior to

the other, but best for the human being to

be able to experience some level of balance

within them lifetime. For instance, having

proper things to feed your body with, them

ting deh crucial. Our generation charged with

primarily continuing the work and to write

our testament of how humanity can move

forward. So, that is the primary approach

that I take to music still, from an ideological

perspective. Other than that now music is a

[thing] that you can never touch. You run it

down all your life and you’ll never touch it. It

touch you, all your life it a touch you and you

a try touch it back, but you can’t touch it. It

won’t allow it, because it is a spirit.

SO WHEN WOULD YOU SAY YOU CAME

CLOSEST TO IT, OR THE SOURCE OF MUSIC?

Yoooo, a just we lifestyle. The life that we live

make we get a taste of it. Life is just a taste.

The lifestyle we live, and to how we cooperate

with creation, creation just cooperate with

us too. Because we not trying to fight down

anything, we nah try fi tear down nothing. We

a try to build up. Because all that is to be torn

down will tear down it own self. Everything

that is to be torn down will tear down it’s

own self. So we just deal with creation, we

cooperate with it, and creation say up, if it say

down, a down. Yeah.

FROM YOUR MUSIC I CAN TELL THAT

LIFESTYLE IS VERY IMPORTANT TO YOU, OR

FAITH AS SOME PEOPLE WOULD PUT IT. TO

SOME PEOPLE IT DOESN’T MATTER IF THEY

CAN IDENTIFY THEMSELVES IN THE GOD

THEY WORSHIP, BUT FOR YOU IT’S VERY

KEY.

Well, alright. His Majesty is the King of Kings.

There are many kings and lords, but his

majesty is the lord of lords, King of Kings,

conquering lion of the tribe of Judah, elect of

himself, light of the world, Rastafari. Negus the

Negast, all these different words and titles

and descriptions of his majesty. During the

world war when they invaded Ethiopia, yuh

think dem Neva know say it was the light

of the world dem a invade? Dem know say

a Di light of the world dem did a violate. To

the point where he could go to the League

of Nations and tell them straight, “the match

strike in Ethiopia, but the flame shall burn

in Ethiopia.” A world war started after that,

because a world war is what they wanted.

They were trying to disrupt progress, so

they attacked the light of the world. Anytime

they want to stop progress, they attack the

light directly. Yuh try fi cover up the light

for a while. It never worked. It’s never ever

worked. In every universe where they try

those things it’s never worked because when

the balance of things is restored, it is certain

that everything is good. You’re only certain of

that when love conquer everything. But every

other time is uncertainty, so they’re always

trying to increase the times of uncertainty.

Because in the times of uncertainty you

can manipulate mankind on various levels.

You can program mankind easily during the

time of indecisiveness and confusion, when

they’re driven by fears. The human being

when driven by fear, does some crazy things.

So when you hear that they invade and want

to capture certain places and disrupt certain

consciousness- because remember y’know,

is the same king this that they invaded, and

BACKAYARD 36


“ANYTHING YOU SAY YOU WANT TO DO, JUST DO

THAT, THAT’S WHAT RASTAFARI REALLY IS.

ONCE YOU DON’T HAVE POVERTY, YOU WON’T

HAVE A LOT OF OTHER THINGS.”


BAY: feature: Featureswayne marshall

that England placed a weapons embargo on. But…they knew, and then

they came to see the same king everywhere they went in the form

of a consciousness. That’s when they start to say maybe this is the

real light of the world, because we can’t kill him, can’t stop him, can’t

nothing. And the consciousness about to get deeper. Some youths,

you should hear what they talk about. Just wait man, a mad ting. Dem

ting deh make yuh good, make yuh don’t over praise your flesh. You

start to understand that life is not a thing that is governed based on

the presence and absence of flesh. That is where your fear comes

from, when you start to feel like life is so much about the presence and

absence of flesh. So much that you want to cling on to your flesh and

you dread the day, your flesh will diminish. That’s a sad day for you. And

a dem ting deh make humanity flex the way how dem flex. That’s why

men work so hard, because they don’t want to die. They love it, they

love the feeling of it nuh care how it rough. Sometimes it’s very rough

on some people and they still hold out, because they love this and don’t

want to lose it. Then they always want to keep you there, they don’t

understand that life itself is a work. And this is not a break from your

work, it is just a phase of your work. Continue with your work, even

now, continue what you say you’re doing. Anything you say you want

to do, just do that, that’s what Rastafari really is. Him also propose

a new way for people to govern themselves. When that manifests

now bredda, is a great thing, we won’t have certain things again. We

probably won’t have poverty, if they allow it to fully manifest. Once you

don’t have poverty, you won’t have a lot of other things.

THAT BRINGS UP THE NEXT QUESTION. THE MEDIA TENDS TO

EXPLORE THE ISSUE OF CRIME AS A THING THAT’S SEPARATE FROM

THE ECONOMIC STRAIN AND POVERTY, WHICH SEEM TO ME, THE

ROOT CAUSE OF ALL THIS.

It’s a depopulation, and crime, crime is just institution in society, that’s

why you have law, because without crime you don’t need laws. A nuh

natural law dem a deal wid enuh bredda. Because if it was natural laws,

they wouldn’t build certain factories, it wouldn’t be legal. So crime is a

faculty within society itself where it has to be managed. It manages

a lot of things and it is managed by a lot of things. Society teaches

us about crime and its definition very young, because it is a part of

society. They have an institution now that can take you out of crime

and put you into different institutions. Like religion. A lot of people that

come out of the institution of crime, normally transfer over, through

the institution of correction and send you into a different institution to

work. That’s just work for society. If you a deal with real creation works,

you never end up in prison. You never end up there. You won’t end

up in any institution of churches or that kind of thing. That way you

don’t have to say you’re a Christian either. Because once you have to

say that you’re a Christian, and once you have to say you are a Rasta

often- why? Does the dog walk and tell you that he is a dog, but once

you see the dog you know. The lion don’t have to tell you that he is a

lion, all he has to do is roar and do what a lion does. That’s why now we

just do we thing, we do the work. Because it’s greater than every other

thing, greater than acknowledgment of the work. Acknowledgement of

the work is not as important as the work. It’s not even as sweet. The

work itself, there’s so much pleasure in it, acknowledgment don’t give

you that. Which Grammy a man can give yuh that’s sweeter than when

you steam all some herbs and a song come to you? That’s the feeling,

because you hooked, from you feel that one time you want it back. B


“WHICH GRAMMY A MAN CAN GIVE YUH THAT’S

SWEETER THAN WHEN YOU STEAM ALL SOME

HERBS AND A SONG COME TO YOU?”


GET A FREE GIFT WHEN YOU USE

THE PROMO CODE:#BACKAYARD


REGGAE FOREVER

ETANA

Rating:

Possessing one of the more recognizable voices in reggae music, Etana certainly

has her fair share of memorable hits. From her debut “Wrong Address” and

“Roots” to the more recent “I Rise,” the singer, also known as Shauna Mckenzie, has

cornered the market on a specific type of sound (the powerful almost belting octave

levels her voice reaches). With her fifth album, “Reggae Forever,” Etana succeeds in

delivering 14 songs that are guaranteed to please any longstanding fans. For those

picking up this album out of sheer curiosity, we have pinpointed four songs off of

“Reggae Forever” guaranteed to catch the ear. “Free” pt II, and “You’re The One,”

produced by FreeMind Music (Etana’s personal imprint), “My Man,” produced by

DJ Frass and “6 Mins :21 secs,” producing by Kirk Bennett, are the songs that have

the highest replay value. However, all listeners should do themselves a favour and

listen to the album straight through. - AR

Photo: @ joeyclaystudio

BACKAYARD 41


s

BAY : REVIEWS

SURVIVAL

EARTHKRY

RATING

Rating:

This is the debut album from this talented group of musicians – Phillip McFarlane, Kamardo

Blake, Aldayne Haughton, Kieron Cunningham – who comprise the group Earthkry. Hailing

from different parts of Jamaica, they have put their musical talents together to create this

authentic Reggae sound. I thoroughly enjoyed each track; I can hear the influence of the

foundation of Reggae in each artist on each track. This is one of the few albums in which

every track is my favourite. “Survival System” – the title track, is the perfect start for this

set. Every track a testament of the social issue of daily living. Without any backing from

any major labels, Earthkry continues to showcase their musical talents to the world and I

was really impressed with the quality of the production, which was done entirely by them.

I enjoyed this album from start to finish. I was spiritually uplifted without skipping tracks:

“Philosophy,” “Move On,” “Wake Up and Live,” “Live Good,” “Wild Fire,” “Liberation

Time,” “Table Turn,” “New Leaf,” “Do What You Got To Do Praise Jah,” “Keep Dreaming.”

All deserve an outstanding applause. This is truly a collector’s item. - MUSICPHIL

REGGAE/DANCEHALL

CLASSIC

RAISED THE BAR

AIGHT

NOT SPECIAL

POP DOWN

REBEL

WISE

ANAIKON

Rating:

Anaicon, formally known as Oshaine Devaine

Anderson, debuted his first album, “Rebel Wise,” from

Osujah Records, which has been in the making for

some time now. “Rebel Wise” describes his musical

journey from being in Magnum Kings and Queens in

2003, to the present; its starts with my favourite track,

“Mount Zion (True Identity).” This was the first song

I heard and I was impressed with his style, delivery

and lyrical content. I have seen where this artiste has

grown not only to be a singer/songwriter, but a devout

Rastafarian. His beliefs, directions and struggles are

all expressed in songs such as “Overcome,” “Rebel

Wise,” “Could A Never,” “Sensi High,” “All About

You” and “This Is Me.” These are just a few tracks

from this album which describes Anaicon. In due time,

he will be a voice to be reckoned with as a positive

influence for Reggae music globally.. - MUSICPHIL

LOVE AND LIFE

I-OCTANE

Rating:

Known more for his dancehall ditties about disloyalty, whether it be within a friendship or

relationship, I-Octane has had quite the impact since getting his break in the music scene

in 2007. Now in 2018, I-Octane is set to pivot again with release of his third album “Love

& Life.” As what the title says, the themes of this release is about romantic relationships

and life advice. A smooth collection of 17 main tracks plus 2 bonus tracks, “Love & Life”

is certainly an easy listen with highlights such as “Let Me Love You,” “Success (T.I.M.E),”

“Nothing In Common,” “Up to We,” “Love Life” and “One Chance” feat. Ginjah. “Love

&Life” straddles the fine line between dancehall and pop music and definitely does not

sound or feel like I-Octane has moved away from roots, only built on them. “Love & Life”

was produced by Conquer The Globe Productions and is distributed by IDC (Independent

Distribution Collective). - AW

YOU THINK YOUR

ALBUM OR

JAH

RIDDIM

MELODY

IS WORTHY

‘ITHIOPIA’ TO GO UNDER THE

‘LOVE GUILLOTINE? CRAZY’

RICHIE E-MAIL SPICE IT TO US:

‘LET’S JA@BACKAYARD.COM

GO’

77 KLASH

‘BROOKLYN ANTHEM’

‘CODE FOR THE STREETS’

LUCIANO

‘WISH YOU WERE MINE’

BACKAYARD 42


SHOWTIME SOCA

DJ NARITY

Rating:

This had to be one of the most diverse Soca seasons on

record. The difference from years previous is the range

of musical references used by producers this year. Jazz,

Afrobeats, Dancehall and EDM among other influences

give the Soca arena a completely different feel in

2018. DJ Narity shows his expertise in the genre with

his “Showtime Soca 2018” released to coincide with

the culmination of the Jamaican Soca season. Be that as

it may, this mixtape is so good that when the ‘tabanaca’

kicks in, which it most definitely will, “Showtime Soca

2018” will help the listener to remember the good times

and set the foundation for the new season in 2019.

- AW

DANCEHALL MIXTAPE

VOLUME 5 | DJ WAYNE

Rating:

I am not sure what is more impressive, the list of

songs on this CD or the way it has been put together.

“Dancehall Mixtape Vol. 5” boasts quite the list of

featured artistes: Dexta Daps, Aidonia, Alkaline,

Mavado and Vybz Kartel. But it was not the list of

DJs on this compilation that made it unique; it was

way it was mixed by dancehall laureate, DJ Wayne.

“Dancehall Mixtape Vol. 5” sounds exactly like a live

party set would sound; no breaks, no drop in energy,

straight excitement from start to finish. Impossible to skip

tracks no matter wherever you choose start to listen. Do

yourself a favour and pick this up. - AR

WALK A MILE

KHAGO

Rating:

Khago is a fascinating example of a supremely talented

artiste who has had to resort to many different methods

in order to get and remain relevant in the Jamaican

music industry. Khago got his break as a Rastafarian

act and slowly moved away from that message as

the years went by. However, by sheer will and some

skill, Khago has once again been on the radar of most

dancehall observers culminating with the release of his

latest album “Walk A Mile.” Unfortunately, there are no

stand out hit tracks on this album, but songs like “Born

To Win” feat Sky Bad, “Die For Your Love” and the title

track “Walk A Mile” are there to hold your attention,

albeit briefly. - AW

LOVE SICK

ROMAIN VIRGO

Rating:

Growth; one of the important things for any artiste is to exhibit is the potential to grow.

The art form demands it, the fan base requests it, and if artistes and their management

team, were smart then they would seek ways to show it. Romain Virgo has shown over

the years, not only that he has one of the best voices in the business, but the unerring

ability to adapt a pre-existing song to his style. However, what Romaine hasn’t really

done over the years is have a consistent run of original songs with an aim to capture the

attention of music lovers the world over. With the release “LoveSick,” Romain Virgo has

provided the material that many feel puts his career a couple steps forward towards his,

seemingly inevitable, path towards superstardom. Featuring production by Lifeline Music,

Sting International and Vikings Production, “LoveSick” has 16 tracks of pure lover’s rock

mixed with elements of dub music topped off with good old Reggae. “Face to Face,”

“Sweet Liar,” “Still”, Romain’s version of the Sam Smith hit “Stay With Me,” “Now” and

“Day In and Day Out” are my personal highlights from the album, however anybody

listening could easily find their own list filled with a completely different set. “LoveSick”

is a solid album which should help consolidate Romain Virgo as one of the go-to voices

of Jamaican music. - AR

RUN IT VOL. 3

DJ RHUSH

Rating:

The mixtape is often overlooked as a critical part of the

Jamaican music industry and somewhat of a lost art.

But for an aspiring DJ every mix released can help to

build your name and thus, lead to bookings. For this

particular mixtape, DJ Rhush aims to show not only

his vast musical and topical knowledge, but also his

sheer skill. He definitely succeeds and he has shown

how a mixtape can be even topical, as there are plenty

of internet memes and tropes to use to complement the

music. In any case, give this mix a good listen and I am

sure you will agree. - AW

BACKAYARD 43


GLAD BAG RIDDIM

VARIOUS ARTISTES

Rating:

Being a part of a musical family can be daunting,

however those who have managed to, would most

likely have had to work hard to create a unique

persona and legacy. That is the fate of Craig

‘Leftside’ Parks. Son to Jamaican music stalwart Lloyd

Parks, of We the People Band, Leftside has carved

his own niche within the dancehall community.

A trained instrumentalist under the tutelage of his

father and a part of the performing/production duo

Leftside & Esco, Leftside has prepared himself for life

as a solo entity as an overall entertainer. His latest

riddim release, “Glad Bag,” under his personal

imprint, Keep Left Records, shows that despite his

years away from spotlight, it won’t be long before

his talents are universally lauded once again within

the genre. Notable songs on the riddim are “WiFi”

- Wayne Marshall, “Talk For Little” - Amanyea feat.

Jordan Patrice, “God Inna Heart” - Beenie Man and

“Happy” - Stacious feat. Leftside. - AR

JUDGEMENTAL RIDDIM

VARIOUS ARTISTES

Rating:

So much of music is about feeling. How you feel

before you start listening a song and how you feel

directly after, could be two completely different

mindsets. That, in essence is the power of the

medium. Now, how I felt after listening the entire

release of “Judgemental Riddim” is a testament to

the influence I explained in the opening; Charged

Up!! “Judgemental riddim” features songs such as

“BraveHeart” - Beenie Man, “Gun Thief” - D’Judge

and “Walking Mill” - Shane O, but the entire set

could be a part of DJ’s juggling playlist. In fact, the

only thing missing from this selection is that one true

‘hit’ without which, “Judgemental” will slide away

from memory. - AW

STRENGTH RIDDIM

VARIOUS ARTISTES

Rating:

Mus-Sel Productions/Jah Ova Evil has certainly

delivered quite the riddim track to the masses. Not

many producers can say they have recorded Beenie

Man, Wyclef Jean and Capleton all on the same

riddim. And while all did their thing, somewhat, it

was the lesser lights that to me showed their ‘strength’.

Shane O “Never Believe”, Charlie Charley “Dem Fi

Know” and Tony Joi “When You’re Blessed,” all took

their piece of the riddim with Bugle and Mr. G setting

the pace as well. Unfortunately, I’m not sure there is

a catchy enough tune currently present on the riddim

to guarantee long-term replay ability. - AR



REGGAE CHART

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

WEH DI FIRE GONE

BURNED

DON’T MAKE ME WAIT

I CAN

FEEL GOOD

BEAUTIFUL

WALK A MILE

KAUGHT UP

BURNING

10 LEAVE YOU ALONE

11 LEAVE PEOPLE BUSINESS C. MARTIN & ROMAIN VIRGO

12 HALLELUJAH

13 BOUT NOON

14 YOU ARE GOD

15 NAH GO ARGUE

BUBBLERS

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

GLORY BE TO GOD

STRUGGLES

REBEL ON THE RUN

TOO MUCH HEAVEN

IF YOU WERE HERE

FAMILY

YABBA DABBA DO

THEY DON’T KNOW

MIL FE SHARE

LEBEH LEBEH

STAY SO

BREEZE

BAWL OUT

I’M SANCTIFY

10 SIMPLY BLESSINGS

11 FLAIRY

12 SUAVE

13 KREMLIN

14 INVIOLABLE

15 UNDERWATER

DUH BETTER THAN THIS

WALKING TROPHY

BAKED BEAN

ONE GUH

MusicPhill

Reggae Chart

DANCEHALL CHART

BUBBLERS

STOP THE VIOLENCE

I-OCTANE

ETANA

SHAGGY FEAT. STING

CHRONIXX

JAH 9

KONSHENS

KHAGO

KABAKA PYRAMID

KOFFEE

IKAYA FEAT. JESSIE ROYAL

T. CURTIS + C. BLACKS

PROTOJE

GEORGE NOOKS

YEZA

WAYNE MARSHALL

NKOSI

YEZA

TWIGGI

ANDREW ROBINSON

POPCAAN

VYBZ KARTEL

MASICKA

SHANE O

DING DONG

BUSY SIGNAL

AIDONIA FEAT. GOVANA

DOVEY MAGNUM

SEAN PAUL /MAVADO

TARRUS RILEY /KONSHENS

DING DONG

ALKALINE

VYBZ KARTEL

POPCAAN

VYBZ KARTEL

BOUNTY KILLER

HOOD CELEBRITY

GOVANA

POWER MAN / JIGGY RAS

M-GEE

Young Pow Records

Free Mind

Interscope Records

Soul Circle

VP

21st Hapilos

Steaming Hub Inc

Ghetto Yutes International

Upsetta

VP

Young Blood Records

Truckback Records

Mr Bongo Music

Tads

Calibud

Natural High Music

Ireland Records

Supanova / Jah Over Evil

352 Record Label

Billy Joel Media

Pure Music Production

Purple Skunk

TMG Productions

Kswizz Music

Romiech Entertainment

Warriors Muzik

4th Genna/JOP

Journey Music

Troytan Music

Chimney Records

James Ave

Chimney Records

Head Concussion

Markus Records

TJ Records

Misik Music

KSR Group

Quantanium Records

Don Richie

Spring

Edition

GS Music Entertainment

THE INFORMATION PROVIDED IN THIS CHART IS BASED ON WAH GWAN

IN THE STREETS AND ON THE RADIO. NO BIAS, JUS DI REAL TING!

MusicPhill Reggae Show can be heard on Wednesdays 5-6pm on 96.1

Roots FM (Jamaica).



BAY : WWW

WWW?

WHERE.WHEN.WHO

Hempress Sativa at Skyline (Kingston, Jamaica) | Photos: CAB Concepts + HIMAGES

New Wave (Kingston, Jamaica) | Photos: Jik Reuben

BACKAYARD 48


WWW?

WHERE.WHEN.WHO

Wickie Wackie Festival (St. Thomas, Jamaica) | Photos: Jik Reuben

The Link Up (Kingston, Jamaica) | Photos: Jik Reuben


BACKAYARD 50


BACKAYARD 51


BACKAYARD 52

Similar magazines