NZPhotographer Issue 32, June 2020

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Whether you’re an enthusiastic weekend snapper or a beginner who wants to learn more about photography, New Zealand Photographer is the fun and informative e-magazine for all Kiwi camera owners. You can always read the latest issue for free or subscribe to the magazine and get unlimited access to all back issues. Find out more: www.nzphotographer.nz

ISSUE 32, June 2020

INTERVIEW WITH

DAMON MARSHALL

HOW TO CAPTURE

THE NIGHT SKY

BY TONY ELKINS

EXPRESSIVE PROCESSING

BY RICHARD YOUNG

A NIGHT UNDER THE STARS

NEAR MOUNT HECTOR

BY PETER June LAURENSON

2020 1


WELCOME TO ISSUE 32 OF

NZ PHOTOGRAPHER MAGAZINE

HELLO EVERYONE,

Many of you managed to keep

photographing throughout lockdown

by participating in daily and weekly

photo challenges, whether capturing

items around the home as we see in

Behind The Shot and one of the 4x4

features, or getting out in the garden

and your local neighbourhood as we

see in the Backyard Beauty Readers'

Submissions. Our interviewee Damon

Marshall made a vow to create one

publishable image each day during

lockdown, we talk with him about

that creative process as well as how

photography and his diagnosis of

Young Onset Parkinson's Disease go

hand in hand.

Now that lockdown measures are lifting in NZ, we're sure many of

you are itching to get out and about with your camera so we're

eager to provide some homegrown inspiration. Peter Laurenson

is back with a new installment of Photographic Locations Worth

Sweating For, this time sharing his night under the stars near Mount

Hector, Brendon Gilchrist provides inspiration for capturing the

night sky with his Top 5 Night Shots and Tony Elkins provides us with

a How To guide for Astro Photography. Meanwhile, Richard Young

encourages us to practice Expressive Processing so there's plenty to

keep you busy this month!

Emily Goodwin

Editor NZ Photographer

NZPhotographer Issue 32

June 2020

Cover Photo

Rumble Strips,

Lee Waddell

Publisher:

Foto Lifestyle Ltd

Website:

nzphotographer.nz

Graphic Design:

Maksim Topyrkin

Advertising Enquiries:

Email

hello@nzphotographer.nz

FOLLOW US

OUR CONTRIBUTORS

Brendon Gilchrist

Brendon is the man behind

ESB Photography. He is an

avid tramper who treks

from sea to mountain, and

back again, capturing the

uniqueness of New Zealand’s

unforgiving landscape.

Richard Young

Richard is an award-winning

landscape and wildlife

photographer who teaches

photography workshops and

runs photography tours. He is

the founder of New Zealand

Photography Workshops.

© 2020 NZPhotographer Magazine

All rights reserved. Reproduction of any material appearing in this magazine in any form is forbidden without prior

consent of the publisher.

Disclaimer:

Opinions of contributing authors do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the magazine.

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NZPhotographer


CONTENTS

4

6

10

18

24

31

32

38

56

BEHIND THE SHOT

WITH KAREN MILLER

EXPRESSIVE PROCESSING

by Richard Young

INTERVIEW WITH DAMON MARSHALL

HOW TO CAPTURE THE NIGHT SKY

by Tony Elkins

MY TOP 5 NIGHT SHOTS

by Brendon Gilchrist

INSIGHTS FROM

@EXCIO PHOTO COMMUNITY

EXCIO TOP 10

MINI 4 SHOT PORTFOLIO

PHOTOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS

WORTH SWEATING FOR

by Peter Laurenson

59 PORTFOLIO

BEST READERS' SUBMISSIONS THIS MONTH

INTERVIEW WITH

DAMON MARSHALL

HOW TO CAPTURE THE

NIGHT SKY

BY TONY ELKINS

PHOTOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS

WORTH SWEATING FOR

BY PETER LAURENSON

10

18

56

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Frozen In Time

F25, 1/60s, ISO640

Behind The Shot

with Karen Miller

KAREN, TELL US ABOUT YOU AND YOUR

JOURNEY WITH PHOTOGRAPHY…

You might know me better by my online

username – Kizmet Winter, or Kizmet2019.

I grew up in a farming environment in the

Wairarapa, and I think it was from then, that

I developed my love of nature and wide open

spaces. Before photography came along, my

first love was horses, horse riding, and animals.

These days I live in Masterton and during the

week, excluding the lockdown period, I work in

an office so when the weekend comes, after

being stuck inside all week, I like to get outside

with my camera to have a play.

Over the years growing up, I had different

cheapy point and shoot cameras, not much

more than toys really. Back in the 70’s and

80’s when getting film developed wasn’t so

accessible, picture taking was more for special

get togethers and family holidays though even

on those occasions there weren’t a lot of photos

taken.

I bought my first digital camera, a Sony

Cybershot point and shoot in 2001 on a trip to

Australia. That is probably the moment when

I started getting the bug for photography. It was

great being able to take photos at the wildlife

parks, and of the scenery however, I was still


very involved with my first love of horse riding

back then which took up all my spare time with

photography still relegated to holidays and

special occasions.

Sadly I had to sell my horses in 2008, after

the doctor recommended I stop riding unless

I wanted to have back surgery in the future –

My back was starting to deteriorate – It must

have been too many falls as a kid.

When smartphones with cameras came

along, like everyone, I enjoyed playing with

the camera. I would go to horse shows to

support my friends, and I would spend my

time recording the occasion with my phone

camera. It’s a shame that back when I did

all my competing, cameras weren’t so

commonplace as I would like to have more

photos showing the neat places I rode, and the

things I did. That’s why these days, I really enjoy

being able to create memories for my friends.

In 2018, I went for a holiday on Stewart Island

and bought a zoom lens attachment for my

cell phone before I went. I thought it was pretty

cool though a little fiddly to use. I had a bit of

fun with it, with lots of practice on our friendly

resident kaka. However, my friends had to put

up with me sulking after I accidentally left the

lens back at the house when we went on a day

trip to Ulva Island to photograph the rare birds.

I think that was my turning point, I wasn’t going

to be caught without a camera again so on

the recommendation of friends, I purchased

a Nikon P900 which I loved for its great zoom

though after 6 months, I had worked out the

P900’s limitations hence the purchase of the

Nikon D7500.

TELL US HOW YOU CREATED ‘FROZEN IN

TIME’…

I took the photo using my Nikon D7500 with the

85mm macro lens. Handheld and on aperture

priority mode using manual focus on the zoom

to bring out the detail of the ice, I selected

F25 as I was trying to get a decent depth of

field so that the whole image was reasonably

sharp and in focus. I am not sure if the ISO was

automatic, but I think I chose it so that I could

get a fast enough shutter speed.

I got the idea to try freezing flowers after seeing

someone do it on the Art of Birding Challenge

of which I’m a member. My friend and I talked

about how effective it was so we thought we

would have a go too. This shot was actually

my second attempt – the first time I used rose

petals and rose buds but for this ‘Frozen In

Time’ shot I used lavender, violas, and petals

of an alstroemeria. I put them in a plastic take

away container half filled with water, the

finished cube measuring about 8”x4” and 1”

thick.

The flowers tended to float so I had to poke

them down to try and get them waterlogged

and staying under the water whilst also trying

to arrange them in an attractive manner. Once

happy, I put the lid on the container then put

it in the freezer. After leaving it for a day to

freeze, I topped up the water so the flowers

were completely covered. Then I forgot about

them for a week!

On the first sunny day of the weekend, I took

the frozen block of flowers out of the plastic

container and placed it in the slightly open

window in my ranch slider. I had the ice sitting

in the groove at the bottom of the window, so

as it melted in the sun, the water ran down the

outside, not the inside of the window. I took

the photo from inside my lounge, kneeling on

the ground so I was straight on to the ice cube,

looking onto it with the sun shining in behind it.

It was really fascinating taking this photo.

Looking at it now, it almost looks three

dimensional, but it was a solid block of ice.

I put it down to the bright sunlight really

bringing out the bubbles and the colour

reflected in them. The water was clear, the

only colour from this image is from the sunlight

shining through the flower petals. I don’t know

why the bubbles came out in this shape,

but I suspect that maybe the lavender was

emitting a slight amount of oil as the rose petal

image I did first had bubbles of the usual round

nature, not like these.

WHAT DID YOU LEARN OR DISCOVER

FROM TAKING THIS SHOT?

I find macro photography enjoyable,

challenging, and surprising as you watch the

detail come out through the viewfinder. It

teaches you patience and makes you really

pay attention to what the camera is focusing

on, especially when you use a more wide open

F stop. One day I hope to learn how to merge

images so that I can do multiple focus points,

and get sharper images.

WHERE CAN WE FOLLOW YOU ONLINE?

albums.excio.io/profile/kizwiz2019

www.instagram.com/kizwiz2019


Expressive Processing

by Richard Young


When a student asks me how to process their image,

I always feel a little hesitant in directing them. I can

show them what tools to use, where to set each slider,

and how to crop the image - there is nothing wrong

with imparting such information but in doing so, I run

the risk of imposing my own expression and vision on

their work, rather than enabling them to find theirs. It’s

similar to arranging someone else’s shoot in the field:

if I set up their camera, show them where to point it,

and advise them on what lens and settings to use, the

photograph won’t express their own style and vision.

The first and most important step of processing is to

define your message; processing tools only have

purpose if we know what it is we want to express.

“Expressive processing” may be a more fitting title

than “post-processing”, since it’s not about learning

a straightforward set of skills. There are no definitive

“right” or “wrong” settings for your sliders; the trick is

in learning how to use the tools to express yourself.

What do you want the viewer to notice about the

image? About your experience? About you? What

do you want them to feel when looking at it? These

are the first questions we should ask ourselves when

processing an image. A photograph isn’t simply a

record of what’s in front of us: it’s an expression, a

piece of artwork, a way of communicating and as

such, Lightroom and Photoshop are not simply tools

to process a photograph, they are tools to express

ourselves, just as much as the camera is.

Of course, the journey of a photograph starts long

before the processing stage - it starts when we choose

a subject, compose it in the viewfinder, and capture

the image. These steps are vital to the telling of our

story. But don’t let this be where personal expression

stops. Enhancing (or altering) the message captured

during the shoot is a powerful step in its own right,

if we are processing with intent to express our own

personal Style & Vision.

This is not to say that you can’t seek help during the

processing stage; while it’s up to you to determine your

vision, it may be useful to seek input on how best to

convey it in a particular image. Just be careful to avoid

defaulting to someone else’s Lightroom settings. The

processing stage, just like the shoot itself, should not be

the product of a set of “rules” you have learned from an

outside source. Every time you make a processing choice,

ask yourself why you made this choice. What does it

change? How will it affect other choices? Remember,

your goal is to enhance your vision/message, define your

style, and present the subject in the photograph, so begin

with these three ideas—vision, style, and subject—in mind.

After determining your message, you can explore the

many variables that will help you to express it. For any

image, our vision should be the guiding factor as we


decide how much processing is necessary and when

we are finished.

BEFORE PROCESSING A PHOTOGRAPH, ASK

YOURSELF SOME QUESTIONS:

• What mood do I wish to convey, and how can I

enhance this mood in the photograph?

• What impact do I want the photograph to have,

and how can I enhance this?

• What is the flow pattern in the photograph, and how

can strengthen or alter?

The question is not, “how can I process this image?”

but rather, “how can I process this image to

express……..?”

WHAT DETRACTS FROM THE MESSAGE?

In story-writing, writers have to consider which

details add to their story and which are only a

distraction. If a writer is not careful, they might

leave readers lost searching for a subject.

Likewise, a good composition is determined by

what we leave out just as much as by what we

include.

Even subtle distractions, while not always

immediately obvious to the photographer or

viewer, can catch our eye or change the way we

read a photograph. For example, a stray blade

of grass poking into the bottom of the frame may

not demand much attention, but it can still pull

attention from the intended subject. If the colour,

luminosity, or detail of an object in the frame

stands out, no matter how subtly, it can draw our

gaze - so once we’ve defined our message, it

pays to consider what subtracts from it.

Good field craft involves recognising distractions

so as to remove them where possible during

capture. Processing may allow us to remove or

crop out that pesky blade of grass, but in most

cases it’s easier, and produces a better result, to

adjust our frame or even just push the grass out of

the way before taking the photograph.

ONLINE PORTFOLIO & PROCESSING MASTERCLASS - THIS ONLINE COURSE, GUIDES YOU

THROUGH THE PROCESS OF CREATING A PHOTOGRAPHY PORTFOLIO WHICH SHOWCASES

YOUR UNIQUE STYLE AND VISION. IT IS A COMPREHENSIVE AND COHESIVE COURSE WITH EACH

MODULE BUILDING ON THE LAST TO HONE AND DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS AND EXPAND YOUR

CREATIVITY AND PHOTOGRAPHIC KNOWLEDGE. CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE.


Fighting YOPD with Photography

Interview with Damon Marshall

encouraging community which kept me interested and

wanting to develop my skills. Before long I had a micro

Four Thirds DSLR and there was no looking back.

WHAT EQUIPMENT ARE YOU USING?

Since using a DSLR, I have always gone with Olympus.

I chose that brand because of their history of quality

gear and the many benefits developed from pioneering

the Micro 4/3 system and in-camera 5-axis image

stabilistaion. The camera bodies and lenses are

lightweight with a high quality half frame image sensor

which is perfect for me as I will often have issues handling

the camera should YOPD symptoms be present. I am

extremely grateful to have had an Olympus E-M1 Mark II

body and a M. Zuiko ED40–150mm f2.8 Pro lens donated

to me by Olympus AU/NZ. I also have a fixed 25mm lens

and some macro extension tubes. I use Photoshop Raw

and Photoshop for post-processing.

DAMON, TELL US ABOUT YOU!

I am 45, live in Hamilton, and am married to the lovely

Adele. We are proud parents of two teenage boys

and have a cute doggo called Jake. My working

career was as a graphic designer and WordPress web

developer however, at the age of 37, I was diagnosed

with Young Onset Parkinson’s Disease (YOPD – yes

that’s the Michael J. Fox one!) Since the end of 2019

I am a full beneficiary as my symptoms have become

too uncontrollable and severe to make me reliable.

HOW DID YOUR JOURNEY WITH

PHOTOGRAPHY BEGIN?

Interestingly my time living with YOPD goes hand in hand

with my developing interest in photography. Initially

one of my medication side effects was compulsive

behavior which had me out fishing on a regular basis.

Thanks to New Zealand fishing stocks my interest then

turned to taking photos with my phone and putting

them on Instagram. I find Instagram to be a friendly and

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR

PHOTOGRAPHY AND DO YOU THINK YOU'VE

FOUND YOUR OWN STYLE?

What a great question! I remember struggling with my

photographic style back in my earlier days of taking

pics. I was frustrated that others on Instagram had

successfully developed and refined their own unique

style. It is natural and perfectly OK that we look for

inspiration from others however, we must be original if

we want to stand out and I eventually discovered that

simply by remaining true to yourself (photographing

what you like, where, when, and how) your style is

defined by who you really are.

I feel that my style is environmental in terms of capturing

what is near me. As I am taking photographs in the back

of my mind I consider what is the story I am conveying

to my audience. A successful photo, I believe, should

be just like a movie or a book. It should have a strong

subject and that there should be contrasts to make

the subject a true protagonist. Contrasts come in many

forms with light providing a great platform (especially

backlighting I find) but also scale, composition distance,

colour tonal variation etc.

I am a morning person so dawn golden hour is a fairly

consistent light source throughout my work. I don’t

usually travel far to take my pictures, I just want

people to see that beauty is everywhere if you know

how to look at it.

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BAA BAA BAAD BREATH

NEVER LOOKED SO GOOD

F6.3, 1/160s, ISO200

June 2020 11


A WORSHIP TO GOLDEN HOUR

F6.3, 1/400s, ISO200

My aim has always been to avoid the cliche. I see no

point in taking a photo that looks like someone else’s.

For instance, in NZ there seems to be an obsession

with certain landscape locations. People calling

themselves photographers publish the same scene

we’ve seen over and over and over again. I’m talking

about all the photos of the Wanaka Tree, the Good

Shepard Church, and Nugget Point lighthouse along

with lone people standing at Roy’s Peak and so on…

seriously I just don’t get it. There are so many other

incredible scenes in NZ, let’s use our imagination and

go looking for them!

YOU WERE WORKING ON LOTS OF PHOTO

PROJECTS DURING LOCKDOWN, TELL US

ABOUT THAT…

The aim for the lockdown photo challenge I created

for myself was to produce a single publishable image

per day. I set no other rules as I figured in lockdown

level 4 we had enough rules already! Some pics

were related to lockdown life while others were just

for the sake of an opportunity to capture something

interesting. Very few of the images were planned –

that’s generally how I roll.

I would normally go about my morning business

and see what inspiration came to mind. One day

I was trimming a tree in my garden and noticed

a dilapidated bird nest. My mind started ticking

over… “Would putting eggs in the nest create some

kind of story?” I grabbed a carton of eggs from the

kitchen, and what a bonus – they each had a number

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stamped on them. I came up with the caption “Four

inmates with the same number”.

Another interesting lockdown photo was of a bubble

that I blew to land in the grass (without bursting!) in

the field across the road. My figure is seen walking

away in the distance with the positioning of the sun

my head and top of the bubble blown out. I created

the caption "Losing your head inside your bubble?" to

go with it.

You will have seen one of my lockdown images in

the Excio top 10 feature last month – This shot was

conceived after opening the ‘random drawer’ one

morning and some blood-shot eyeballs bouncing out

onto the kitchen floor. I soon had an eye staring up at

a world globe which I purposely flipped upside down

before miss-matching the equator. The caption read

“The world is looking a bit whacked right now don’t

you think?”.

Humour is a big part of my life as a coping mechanism

so my favourite lockdown image would have to be

the one where I am wearing a bright yellow LoL emoji

mask, a pink oven mitt, and holding a credit card. The

caption read “Face mask… check! Hand gloves…

check! Contactless payment… check! Let’s go

shopping!!”

I had no assistance with any of these images so a few

required the use of a tripod and setting a delayed

shutter where I programmed the camera to take ten

pics at one or two seconds intervals. It took much

patience and many frames to finally be happy with

the finished shots you see opposite.


Four Inmates - Same Number: F3.2, 1/320s, ISO1000

Inner Bubble Headloss: F4.5, 1/1000s, ISO64

Whacky World: F5.6, 1/250s, ISO320

Lockdown Shopping LoL: F2.5, 1/200s, ISO200


FUNGI IN THE SKY

F5.6, 1/250s, ISO64

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ANYTHING CAN HAPPEN

F7.1, 1/160s, ISO200

CONTROL NOTHING BEFORE

CONTROLLING YOURSELF

F6.3, 1/640s, ISO200

June 2020 15


WHO'S INSIDE YOUR BUBBLE?

F5.6, 1/200s, ISO200

MAKE YOUR FUTURE

CLIMATE CHOICES TODAY

F2.8, 1/6400s, ISO200

WHAT DID YOU DISCOVER ABOUT YOURSELF AND

YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY DURING LOCKDOWN?

I discovered that as well as just taking pretty pictures

I was capable of ad-libbing a certain amount of

creation from limited resources. I was thrilled with the

overall response and feedback received from my

followers, as they adapted to, appreciated, and stuck

with me during this temporary change of direction in my

photography. I also found macro photography a great

way to open the doors of exploration so that I was able

to improve my captivation of the unseen world.

TELL US HOW YOU PRACTICE

#PHOTOGRAPHYFORGOOD

Parkinson’s Disease is with you every single moment of

every single day. There are no days off. Photography

gives me the opportunity to momentarily take my

mind off myself and focus on a hobby that I truly

enjoy. Additionally, social media apps such as

Instagram have given me the opportunity to meet

many like minded, down-to-earth, cool people which

has been extremely soothing for the soul.

We are living in a time where an immense volume

of media is now produced by the same people that

consume it at merely the press of a button. Yet it

amazes me that a single image still has the power to

stop people scrolling and take notice. Even better

they may read what you’ve got say along with

it. Better still they may take the time to comment.

Occasionally I will slip something in about living life

with YOPD, not for attention or sympathy, but to raise

awareness about this complicated condition.

WHAT WOULD YOU SUGGEST TO

PHOTOGRAPHERS WHO ARE LOOKING TO GET

THEIR WORK OUT INTO THE WORLD…

I find Excio to be a well organised community

run by sensible and qualified people that gives

photographers at any level, the opportunity for

valuable feedback and reputable exposure.

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WHERE WOULD YOU LIKE YOUR

PHOTOGRAPHY TO LEAD YOU IN THE FUTURE?

I was really hoping to extend the commercial photography

opportunities that have come my way into more of a

regular thing, but sadly YOPD is making me more and

more unreliable, not knowing if I’ll be well during a shoot, or

even be able to show up in the first place. Business is serious

business and it can take a lot of time, people, and effort to

organise a shoot and nobody wants to be in a position of

continuously letting people down.

So now I would just dearly love to be able to make

a difference especially from a climate crisis point of

view. Life on planet Earth is a privilege, not a right, yet

mostly all of us continue to abuse Mother Nature every

day. If my photography is able to do this in some way

it would make me extremely happy.

ANY WORDS OF WISDOM TO LEAVE US WITH?

It’s your image, your portfolio, your feed… if you like it –

then publish it! Avoid getting hung up on what others

think, as well as numbers and stats otherwise you won’t

enjoy photography anymore. Proceed in a manner

that works for you. Personally I have never felt the

need to complete a photography course, as I believe

institutionalisation stymies creativity. However, I do

believe that a solid understanding of the Shutter speed/

Aperture/ISO triangle is not to be overlooked as this is

enough knowledge to achieve many photographic

challenges. Additionally, YouTube is full of tutorials by

other hobbyist photographers if you get stuck for ideas.

WHERE CAN WE FIND YOU ONLINE?

albums.excio.io/profile/damojo

www.instagram.com/da.mo.jo

www.facebook.com/DaMoJo.co

www.damojo.co

West Coast

15th - 21st September 2020

7-Day West Coast Wilderness Photo Tour

Join Ken Wright and Shaun Barnett on this exceptional seven-day photography

tour of the South Island’s wild west coast. Timed at the end of winter, when

the light is crisp and low, the West Coast Photography Tour offers excellent

opportunities to capture the area’s wild beaches, forests and waterfalls, and the

snow-covered Southern Alps.

www.photographyworkshops.co.nz

info@photographyworkshops.co.nz

021 0845 7322


OPIKI 18 BRIDGE, NZPhotographer PALMERSTON NORTH: 25 EXPOSURES; F2, 180s, ISO500, 20mm


How To Capture The Night Sky

by Tony Elkins

June 2020 19


HOME

F1.8, 20s, ISO2500, 20mm

My passion in life is photography as there are

so many ways that you can express yourself

with a camera. I have always been an artistic

person and though I wanted to be a graphic designer

when I left school, I ended up following in my Father’s

footsteps and became a mechanic. Fast forward

through the years to the age of 47 and I have my own

automotive workshop in Palmerston North, 2 beautiful

girls, and an amazing partner.

One of my favorite genre’s of photography is Astro.

Having been introduced to this by a friend of mine

and the basics of what settings to use, I soon found

myself trying and trying to get shots of the Milky Way

and from there developing my photos to include

interesting subjects in the foreground and getting up

at all sorts of times to be able to capture the Milky

Way in certain parts of the sky.

This started to become an obsession, and as you can

imagine one thing lead to another. I started to travel

around the Mid Central Plateau of New Zealand

looking for locations to photograph the Milky Way.

Of course, light pollution is a big factor so I always try

and find locations that are as dark as possible for the

best results. I hope my own processes of trial and error

will help you with finally getting those night sky images

you’ve always wanted to get!

GEAR

After spending a reasonable amount of time using

the gear I had, a Canon 80D, I found myself looking

to upgrade it. Now, while there is no need to have the

best gear available to get great photos of the stars

(entry level cameras and kit lenses can produce some

beautiful results), it was something I felt the need to

do to be able to get the quality of image I wanted so

after much research I purchased a Canon EOSR and

a Sigma Art f1.4 20mm lens.

The speed of the lens is one of the most important

things to consider when shooting the stars. In other

words, a lens that has a very wide open aperture. For

example f2.8, f1.8, f1.4… These lenses allow for the

most amount of light to come through them which is

very important when out shooting at night.

The next piece of equipment you’re going to need is,

in my mind, one of the most important items required

for successful Astro Photography – A tripod. Your tripod

needs to be of decent quality and very sturdy, what

you don’t want is trailing or blurry stars because the

tripod was not able to support the weight of your

camera and lens properly. My main tripod for Astro

is a Manfrotto 190XPROB with a Manfrotto MHXPRO-

BHQZ Ball head.

Using a shutter release cable or, if you don’t have

one, your 2 second timer helps hugely with getting

focused clear images. I use my 2 second timer all the

time as it stops any camera shake when hitting the

shutter button.

Lastly, using a phone app like Photopills is a great

asset when shooting the night sky. It gives all aspects

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of the sun and moon, depth of field charts, exposure

tables, night augmented realities and so much

more… It’s the ‘Photographers Bible’ in an app and

for shooting the Milky Way is extremely helpful as it

help with location, time frames of when the Milky

Way will rise and when the core will be visible plus,

with the Night Augmented Reality feature you can

look at the screen of your phone and see the Milky

Way at certain times of the day so you can plan your

shot. I find it is worth its weight in gold but it does have

many different parts to it and does take some getting

used to so allow plenty of time to learn how it all works

before heading out!

SETTINGS

So, now you’ve got your gear sorted, the question of

“What settings do I use?” looms.

As with all types of photography, settings are

controlled by many different things. Sure there are

some rules, but once you become familiar with the

basics you’ll find yourself experimenting just as I did

and developing your own taste.

The easiest place to start is with something called

the “500 rule”. There are a few things to take into

consideration here.

Is your camera a Full Frame body or Crop Sensor

Body?

What focal length lens are you using?

With my own gear, I have a full frame Canon EOSR

and a crop sensor Canon 80D (crop factor of 1.6) and

as mentioned, a 20mm Sigma Art f1.4 lens.

Using the 500 rule you take 500 and divide it by the

focal length of the lens you are using. This gives you a

base for your shutter speed to prevent star trailing in

your images. This is something to experiment with as

different cameras and lenses perform differently so

start with the base setting and experiment from there.

Here are the equations:

Full frame: 500 divide by 20mm = 25 secs

Crop Sensor (1.6 crop factor): 20mm x 1.6 (crop) =

32… 500 divide by 32 = 15.6 so 15 sec

Using these equations and just applying your camera

and focal length will give you the basic setting for your

shutter speed.

For aperture, usually you will want your lens to be

as wide open as possible. Again this is something to

experiment with but I personally stop my lens down a

little bit from f1.4 to f1.8-f2.8 depending on what I’m

shooting. This also helps to get your stars as sharp as

possible. A lens wide open will usually be a little soft

so stopping down the lens helps with this and also

helps with something called “Coma” which is quite

noticeable at the outer edges of the frame.

Next is ISO. Again, camera and lens combinations

react differently so experiment to know what works

best for you, your set up, and how you want your

images to look. With my camera and lens combo

I personally start at ISO 1600, using a f1.8 or f2.8

aperture and a 25 sec shutter speed. I will then

check the image in the viewfinder and make any

adjustments I feel are needed at the time. Again there

is no wrong or right here… Just try it and find what

you’re happy with.

SETTING FOCUS

Another big question is “How do I focus so I end up

with nice sharp stars and not bokeh balls?” There are

a few different methods to cover this, here are the

most popular.

If your lens has the infinity symbol on it, use manual

focus. Turn your focus ring to line up the infinity symbol

with the mark on the lens and it should be pretty

good. However, the infinity symbol is not always exact

so sometimes you may end up with slightly blurry stars.

If your lens has no markings, go out during the day

and put some tape on your focus ring and lens body.

Focus on something a decent distance away and

mark the tape on the focus ring and lens body. This

will focus your lens at infinity. Then, when you go out

at night, switch your lens to Manual focus, line up the

marks and you should have a nice sharp image.

Lastly, the live view method which I use as I find it is

the most accurate and have never had any issue with

out of focus images at night. Once you’re all set up

at location, switch your camera to live view mode,

set your lens to manual focus, use the digital zoom on

the live screen (I have 5x and 10x digital zoom) get a

bright star in your viewfinder (you may have to crank

up your ISO to 6400 for this) open your aperture right

up and set you shutter speed to say 30secs (just to do

this). Once you have the bright star in the viewfinder

go to 10x digital zoom if possible, then using your focus

ring, adjust focus until the star becomes as small as

possible and boom… you now have perfect focus. Go

back to your normal full screen view, set the settings

you actually require as previously mentioned, hit that

shutter button and see what you get. I’m sure it will be

awesome!

Please feel free to ask me any questions

@tonyelkinsphotography and I will do my best to help.

In the meantime, I wish you “Happy Hunting and Clear

Skies”.

albums.excio.io/profile/tony@aepnz

June 2020 21


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June 2020 23


My Top 5 Night Shots

by Brendon Gilchrist

AURORA AUSTRALIS

F4, 1/200s, ISO400, 90mm

My absolute favorite subject to shoot is the Aurora Australis. I had a goal to shoot it with the sunset

and I was fortunate enough for a friend to message me one evening saying ‘there’s a huge Aurora

going on at the moment’. I was shooting towards Christchurch City at the time, capturing Castle

Rocks over Ferrymead towards Pegasus Bay. I decided to turn around and take a few snaps to see

what was happening in the sky, it was still a bit light with the sun still setting but I was lucky to have

gained a bit of height which allowed me to have a nice composition where I was standing. This

Aurora was more than what I ever imagined… I set up a frame and took a lot of images so I could

turn it into a time-lapse later. As it got darker you could see the Aurora dancing in the sky, it was so

bright with the full moon behind us, just above Christchurch City. It was the best Aurora I have ever

captured and a moment I will never forget – I’m so thankful for friends who messaged me about it!

24

NZPhotographer


SOUTH BAY KAIKOURA SHOOTING STAR

F2.8, 20s, ISO10000

Kaikoura is a location many don’t think is a dark sky area, but it has some of the best dark skies and

I would say is even better than the Tekapo area. I had always had a vision of taking a photo of a

small bay with the Milky Way arched over the bay, but I had no idea what was going to happen on

this night in Kaikoura when I was out camping. At around 1am I got up out of my sleeping bag to

capture the Milky Way in the right position over this bay. As I was shooting at 24mm and in portrait/

vertical frames I was lucky to capture this perfect shooting star which lights up the whole sky. There

were a lot of opportunities to miss this shot but I was fortunate enough to have had the camera in

the right position. As soon as the frame had finished I had a look at my screen and was excited I

had managed to capture it. Now all I had to do was finish the panorama and hope it all stitched

together. I finished the frames, was happy with what I had, so went back to my sleeping bag and

went back to sleep before getting up for sunrise the next day.

June 2020 25


GALACTIC DIGGER

F4, 20s, ISO6400

This image represents the beginning of hunting out machines to showcase against the Milky way. I

was new to astrophotography at this point, in 2014, and I had a new camera, the Canon 6D. I was

out shooting on the beach with friends but on the way back from what we were doing I saw this

digger and I was like ‘hold on guys, I need to photograph this, give me 10 minutes and I’ll be back at

the car’. I remember this moment like yesterday, the digger was perfectly lined up to the Milky Way

and I instantly had a vision of the finished photo in my mind with the Milky Way coming out of the

bucket of the digger to create ‘Galactic Digger’. I must have walked past the digger as we were

heading to the beach but totally missed it then, I’m so glad that on the return to the car I saw it. 6

years later I am still on the hunt for new machines to photograph against the amazing Milky Way!

26

NZPhotographer


OLD TRACTOR

F2, 20s, ISO10000

I have a thing for old rusty machines with the Milky Way in the background. I find it gives a scene of

earthliness while adding a sense of how little we are in the Universe. I saw an image of this tractor

and I knew instantly I needed to go there and photograph it. Luckily it was close to home, facing

East, and accessible via a short walk over farmland on a Christchurch City Council track. On my first

attempt, I camped here, but it was a failure as it turned out cloudy. On my second attempt, the

sky was clear and everything was looking promising. On arrival at location, the Milky Way was just

starting to rise, it was around 1am when I arrived with friends so plenty of time to have a bite to eat,

set the cameras up, and enjoy the stars before we started shooting the infamous tractor. This second

attempt was a success, everything was really good and I managed to capture what I wanted

including a selfie on the tractor while the Milky Way was in the background, a perfect opportunity to

have a bit of fun on location.

June 2020 27


HAMNER ASTRO

F3.2, 15s, ISO4000

This small alpine village nestled in North Canterbury is well known for its hot pools and for being a

retreat for residents of Christchurch but is little known for being a good Astrophotography location.

I was hopeful while walking up Conical Hill that there would be an opening in the trees that

overlooked the town, high enough to be able to balance the light of the town and the Milky Way

arching above. As I continued twisting and turning up the track my hopes weren't too high but then I

saw a track leading to the left so I jumped onto that and walked a few hundred meters to a vantage

point that was perfect for what I wanted. It was still very bright and I was thinking, is it worth it, should

I bother taking some photos? I decided to take one photo to see what happened and then took

some more to balance out the light and the stars a bit better. That’s when I saw the potential so I set

up properly and got the best possible balance of light and dark that I could in one frame... not the

easiest thing to achieve!

Even though this shot is not perfect, it’s one of my best sellers from 2019 and one I am very happy

with. I get a lot of questions on how I managed this in one frame but the short answer is that you

need to play around with your settings, having an f stop higher than normal with a shorter shutter

speed and lower ISO. It’s hard to pinpoint the right setting exactly but if you understand the light and

balance act you will be able to achieve these kinds of shots.

28

NZPhotographer


Astro Masterclass

Workshop – Mt Cook

4-Day Photography Workshop 15-18th August

Our Astro Masterclass Workshop is based in Twizel within

the Aoraki Mackenzie International Dark Sky Reserve,

the world’s second-best area for viewing the night sky.

With highly acclaimed astrophotographer Mark Gee along with

Richard Young as your tutors. Designed to extend your skills

in both Astro and timelapse photography, the workshop

dates have been picked to ensure a new moon and

winter offers the best conditions astrophotography.

During the workshop we will visit New Zealand’s

premier astronomical research centre,

the Mount John Observatory, to learn more

about the night sky and photograph

the constellations.

www.photographyworkshops.co.nz

info@photographyworkshops.co.nz

(0064) 21 0845 322

June 2020 29


Photo Community

#Good Challenges

As an Excio member you will always know why

you are taking part in the challenge and how the

photos you take can help others.

FIND OUT MORE

www.excio.io

Photographs shown (left to right): Peter Laurenson, Keith Beck, Heather Maree Owens, Vicky

30 NZPhotographer FIND OUT MORE

O'Connor, Diane Beguely, Paula Vigus, Carole Garside, Roy Cernohorsky, Anita Ruggle


INSIGHTS FROM

@excio photo community

While there is never a shortage of

interesting photographs and stories on

Excio, this month we were really excited

to bring new weekly #Good Challenges

to our community along with weekly

hand-picked Inspiration Boards for our

members, and a brand new #Good

Library.

You see, as a photographer myself, I

couldn’t help but notice the increase

in pressure and lack of motivation I

felt when looking at most of the online

photography challenge groups. One

question I couldn’t find an answer to

was 'What next'? What happened to

your photos when the challenge was

over? Was there and most importantly,

could there be, something more than

just recognition?

At Excio we feel that challenges,

while helping you to develop your

photography skills and in addition to

personal satisfaction should also have

some sort of end goal or result. With

#PhotographyForGood we believe

you should know why are you taking

part in a particular challenge and have

a choice whether you want to or not

(does it speak to you, challenge you?)

and, secondly, that you should know

the impact that your photographs

are going to have on the viewer. The

moment you start feeling pressured to

take a shot just because you have to (to

keep up with others in the group etc) or

the moment you start doubting whether

your photos will be good enough is a

‘turning point’ that the photographer

should not go beyond. If you don't know

why you're taking part in the challenge,

what it stands for, or you don't feel

motivated to give it your all, switch your

camera off, relax, and consider why you

are taking photos.

If you've ever gone outside and taken

a perfect photo of a yellow flower, for

example, with all the details exactly as

you want them, have you ever stopped

to think how the colour yellow actually

makes you feel? What we see evokes

certain emotions in us – a red rose can

evoke passion, romance, love whilst a

red frog can make us think caution and

danger. Now imagine the rose and the

frog in black and white... would you

feel the same emotions? Probably not.

That's why our challenges go beyond

'the norm' to make you think about the

feelings that happen subconsciously

when you see a photograph. Take for

example our recent patterns challenge

- Did you know that human eyes

are naturally ‘calibrated’ to detect

patterns? This means that if you manage

to capture a pattern or a patterned

element in your shot it will not just be

visually pleasing for your viewer, but will

also greatly enhance your photos by

making them more interesting.

Our motivation to 'go further' didn't end

with the #Good Challenges as we have

also launched, and indeed are still filling,

our #Good Library which is an online

photo encyclopedia that celebrates

the concept of visual storytelling whilst

helping people to learn through photos.

Excio is known for having a vast array of

wonderful photographs and thousands

of interesting and informative stories, so

giving the photos of our members a new

channel and a chance to be displayed

online via a fully protected, searchable,

and securely shareable visual database

was an obvious move.

Although I expect you'll be busy getting

back to your new normal now that

lockdown restrictions have been eased,

I do hope you will find a moment to

check out our challenges and library

and find inspiration. If you feel we are

from the same pack and you love the

idea of #PhotographyForGood – we

would love to see you in our community.

You can join us at www.excio.io/

membership.

Ana Lyubich

Co-founder of Excio,

Ana's photography

journey started many

years ago with one of the

first Kodak film cameras.

She loves exploring the

unseen macro world

and capturing people's

genuine emotions.

@excionz

www.excio.io

31 June 2020


Excio Top 10

KELLY PETTITT

RIPPLES

A young gorilla plays at the waters edge at

Taronga Zoo in Sydney, Australia.

excio.gallery/kelly

32 NZPhotographer


JACQUI SCOTT

WEST WANAKA

Morning light. Just a short drive from our home, my

intention was to get a photo of the lake but I had seen

the light on the trees and decided that will do nicely.

excio.gallery/jacqui

KIM FREE

AFRICAN WILD DOGS

A beautiful African wild dog pack watching on

intently at activity in the distance.

excio.gallery/kimfree

June 2020

33


SARA PETERCOKELEYSON

MAKARA

Makara Beach in 2019.

excio.gallery/petercokeleyson

RINA JARDIN-THOMPSON

GANNETT

Captured at the Murawai Gannet colony in Auckland.

excio.gallery/rina

34 NZPhotographer


JARED BUCKLEY

AIRBORNE

The group of boys take it in turns performing flips

into the river in Kolkata, India.

excio.gallery/jaredbuckley

LIA PRIEMUS

THE WEIGHT OF THE WORLD

It's overbearing and he feels like the weight

of the world is on his shoulders.

excio.gallery/priemusphotography

June 2020

35


DIANE BEGUELY

KORU

The koru (Māori for '"loop or coil"') is a spiral shape based on the appearance

of a new unfurling silver fern frond. It is an integral symbol in Māori art,

carving, and tattooing where it symbolises new life, growth, strength, and

peace. Its shape "conveys the idea of perpetual movement," while the inner

coil "suggests returning to the point of origin".

excio.gallery/thrumylennz

36 NZPhotographer


LEX RUDD

REFLECTIONS ON

HARDWARE

Hardware Lane in

Melbourne is a popular

area for Al Fresco Dining.

excio.gallery/unique

DEAN MCLEOD

LA BASILIQUE DU SACRÉ

CŒUR DE MONTMARTRE

Black then white are all I see in my

infancy. Red and yellow then came to

be, reaching out to me. Lets me see. As

below, so above and beyond, I imagine

drawn beyond the lines of reason. Push

the envelope. Watch it bend. Over

thinking, over analysing separates the

body from the mind. Withering my

intuition, missing opportunities, I must feed

my will to feel my moment drawing way

outside the lines...

excio.gallery/sixtyseven

June 2020

37


Mini 4 Shot Portfolio

Our 4x4 feature showcases 4 mini portfolio’s of both

professional and up and coming New Zealand

photographers. The 4 images are linked in some way,

allowing you to get an understanding of what each

photographer is most passionate about capturing.

For a change to get your own 4x4 feature in a future

issue of the magazine, become a subscriber of the

magazine here.

MICHELLE DENNISTON

Isolated Moments

PETER MAIDEN

Taputeranga – Keeping

An Eye On Me

TERESA ANGELL

Sled Dog Racing In New Zealand

WENDY PEMBERTON

Reflections

38

NZPhotographer


MICHELLE DENNISTON

40

NZPhotographer


Photography for me has to do with my perception of

time. The first day I picked up a camera I discovered

that being completely immersed and connected to

a scene seemed to slow time. There is something very

spiritual about this connection for me, and it is what

I love about photography. The focus of my work is

to create images that convey this feeling of being

connected to a moment, completely

and without external distraction.

mcdphotos.squarespace.com

ISOLATED MOMENTS

As an American from Louisiana living in NZ I am

often overwhelmed with the sheer beauty that

surrounds me. I find myself routinely drawn to the

West coast beaches of Auckland and the towering

grandeur of National Parks Mountains. The

geography here in NZ is very different from back in

Louisiana with its bayou’s and flat landscapes.

My sense of awe and wonder is what drives my

passion for photography. I use different focal

lengths and filters depending on the feeling I

visualise in that scene. My standard ‘go to lens’

is a 16mm for my landscapes, and for isolating

subjects I use a 55-200mm. I will sometimes use

ND filters to amplify the emotion and sensation I

feel in the subject. In the case of mountains, the

magnificence and impact of presence are laid out

before you already and just requires patience and

timing to watch nature's palette unfold before you.

June 2020 41


PETER MAIDEN

44

NZPhotographer


All my life I’ve appreciated great photographs but my

wonky vision made it almost impossible for me to take even

a half decent photo. That changed a few years ago when

my daughter lent me her DSLR – Amazingly I discovered

that I could take photos and since then a camera has been

my constant companion. Photography has created an

added purpose to my life, I’m always watching out for what

could make a good photo and there

are no lack of opportunities around me.

@indiecar

TAPUTERANGA – KEEPING

AN EYE ON ME

Taputeranga Island is located in Island Bay,

Wellington. It forms a natural breakwater and

provides a sheltered anchorage for the local

fishing boats. I’ve lived out this way for many years

and still love walking along the beach and around

the rugged coastline. The views of the island are

always changing depending on the time of day

or the weather. That’s what makes it such a great

place to explore, a photographers paradise.

My 4x4 selection shows what the bay looks like

in the early morning, on a sunny afternoon, on a

stormy day with the waves breaking over the island

and with the bay bathed in sunshine with ominous

black clouds approaching from the south.

Whatever the day brings I know that Taputeranga

is always there in all its beauty. It’s almost like it’s

keeping a close eye on me.

June 2020 45


TERESA ANGELL

48

NZPhotographer


I have a love for nature and the outdoors so my passion is bird,

wildlife, and dog photography. I particularly enoy capturing

action, those small moments in time, frozen so we get to glimpse

the energy, power, and grace of the animal. The last 3 years

have seen me pursuing a personal project, photographing the

vibrant and passionate Siberian Husky and Sled Dog Racing

community in New Zealand from the top of snowy mountains

to the middle of forests at dawn and

everywhere in between.

www.teresaangell.co.nz

SLED DOG RACING IN NZ

My love for the Siberian Husky and a keen interest in

Sled Dog Racing comes from owning our own husky

who was with us for nearly 16 years. By combining

this love and my love for photography I have, over

the last 3+ years, attended and photographed 16

weekend events, living and breathing the racing and

community environment.

It has been so much fun as well as challenging,

exciting, and exhausting all at the same time. I really

love the connection that I get with the people and

dogs, the emotion, energy, and drive they all have.

The challenging environments of forest and snow

have helped me learn and grow in all aspects of

my photography. Early, cold winter mornings, out on

the trails in all weathers is where I find the precious

moments that allow me to capture the energy,

excitement and joy the dogs experience.

My end goal is to publish my photographs in a book

Sled Dog Racing in New Zealand: From Siberian Husky

Beginnings to All Breeds Today documenting the

origins of the breed and sport in New Zealand.

June 2020 49


WENDY PEMBERTON

52

NZPhotographer


I'm an amateur photographer whose passion for photography

started with an Instamatic film camera. I've had a DSLR for about

5 years now, shooting the first 3 years on auto and gaining enough

confidence to use the manual settings after joining my local camera

club. Living between 2 properties, 1 in rural Waikato, the other on the

beautiful Coromandel Peninsular, gives me the opportunity to practice

landscape and long exposure photography. I also enjoy macro

and portrait and am always trying to

capture that perfect bird shot!

@wendypembo

REFLECTIONS

Inspired by a photography challenge I took part in

through the Covid19 lockdown where we posted

an image daily, working through the alphabet, I

learned to appreciate ordinary everyday things in

a different way, things that would not normally be

given a second look.

I’ve called this collection Reflections as lockdown

would have provided a time of reflection for many

people. Time out from the busyness of life, time to

reflect on their own individual journey, to put things

in perspective, and hopefully think on successes

achieved big or small.

Without lockdown, the feather (shed from one

of our chickens) most likely would have been

trodden into the ground, blown away in the wind,

or perhaps picked up by a bird to build a nest but,

as you'll see, macro photography has given that

discarded feather another life.

June 2020 53


Photographic Locations Worth Sweating For:

A Night Under The Stars Near Mount Hector

by Peter Laurenson

As photographers we all love the magic hour

right – dawn and dusk. But how do you get

an angle not covered by lots of others? If

you’re willing to put your tramping boots on and are

prepared to do some sweating and shivering, then a

spot high above the bushline in the Tararua Range is a

great bet.

One such spot is at the southern end of the Range,

very near the summit of Mount Hector. It can

be accessed in less than two hours from central

Wellington with a choice of an easier or harder route.

The less hard way is via the trail up from Otaki Forks on

the western side, but this is a very well trodden route

used by countless trampers. The way I chose on one

recent trip was from the eastern side starting at the

Waiohine carpark, heading to Cone Hut first, then up

to Cone Saddle, then Cone (1,080m). That took three

hours. The next section was the hardest bit, ascending

Neill Ridge, which involved constant ups and downs,

all through goblin forest. As I sweated buckets, I had

to concentrate to stay on route until I finally cleared

the bushline beneath Winchcombe Peak (1,261m)

about six hours on from Cone.

By then it was mid afternoon and a light breeze

cooled things down – certainly better than the humid

closeness of the goblin forest. But the going remained

focussing, with several steep exposed sections to pass

before I eventually reached a nice flat spot at 1,500

metres, just ten minutes east of Mount Hector. I hadn’t

56

NZPhotographer


seen another person during the ten or so hours it took

me to get there.

It was cloudy on the tops, so I settled in for a long

night in my bivvy bag, perched on top of springy

tussock. During the night, cloud continued to swirl. At

times I got beautiful glimpses of the night sky, but I had

no great expectations for the dawn.

Splot! A drop of water from one of the blades of

tussock that had been tickling me throughout the

night hit me in the eye. I checked my watch – 5am,

then looked around me to see a glorious scene.

Sections of tops poked out of a sunken cloud blanket

cloaking the lower slopes. The horizon showed the first

crimson signs of the new day approaching.

For the next two and a half hours I captured the

unfolding sunrise in pixels. The landscape was

spectacular, the light luxuriant and the immediate

foreground coated in white alpine flowers. I felt

rewarded many times over for the hard slog of the

day before.

At 7.45am I was taking more pictures from the summit

of Mount Hector beside the memorial cross, erected

by the Wellington Tramping Club in memory of

trampers and climbers killed in the Second World War.

To return to my parked car, for the next three hours

I trod familiar ground around to Alpha Hut. On that

clear morning I’ve never seen this section in better

conditions – perfect for photography and still no-one

else to be seen.

From Alpha Hut I carried on to Bull Mound, then

dropped directly down to Tauherenikau River and

Cone Hut on its east bank. At 5pm back at my car,

it felt good to get my boots off. Seven toe nails

were blackening in true Tararua fashion, but the

photographs made it worth it.

June 2020 57


READERS

SUBMISSIONS

Submit at www.nzphotographer.nz

W I N T E R

Submit your photos by 15 June for a chance to be

featured in the next issue of NZPhotographer.

58

NZPhotographer

SUBMIT NOW


PORTFOLIO

BEST READERS' SUBMISSIONS THIS MONTH

'BACKYARD BEAUTY'

ISO MOON

I shot this from my backyard in Cambridge during lockdown.

Luke Eason

June 2020 59


SPIDEY VS WASP

I was in my backyard trying to capture macro shots of the last remaining

flowers in our garden when I heard a lot of buzzing. I looked up and saw

this wasp caught in a web. It was fascinating to watch the speed of

the spider, and that even though it was a third of the size of the wasp, it

managed to over power it. Watching the fight was amazing and creepy

all at the same time.

Dionne Solly

60

NZPhotographer


BEAUTY OF A YELLOW ROSE

During the Covid-19 Lockdown period I would wander my backyard

looking for opportunities to be active with my camera. One day I spotted

my potted rose starting to bloom with this one flower bud open in the

centre. I used a 50mm lens at f1.8 to create the bokeh effect.

Teresa Angell

June 2020 61


LADY BUG IN LOCKDOWN

F4, 1/150s, ISO400

Out in the garden during lockdown with a lady balancing on the edge.

Garett Vincent

62

NZPhotographer


CATAPILLER CHILL

F5, 1/100s, ISO200

A catapiller chilling on a beautiful flower bed.

Garett Vincent

June 2020 63


BEES IN PINK

F4, 1/400s, ISO400

Bees hard at work with the pink workbenches.

Garett Vincent

64

NZPhotographer


BACKYARD BEE

F4, 1/3200s, ISO200, 90mm

Our young citrus trees have been a bee magnet this year. Every time

I walk past them and see a bee I have to rush back inside to grab my

camera.

Leanne Silver

June 2020 65


REFLECTIONS IN THE BIRD BATH

Sitting in my ‘office’ chair under the trees looking at the reflections in

the bird bath occupies a bit of lock down time. I need to build a hide to

catch the birds bathing though.

Peter Maiden

66

NZPhotographer


A PROMISE OF SUMMER

F6.3, 1/400s, ISO800, 90mm

First time growing a grape vine this year, and this was the first bunch

emerging as it started the process of becoming a delicious black bundle

of summer flavour.

Leanne Silver

June 2020 67


CURIOUS PRAYING MANTIS

F11, 1/800s, ISO1600

I was busy pulling weeds in the garden when this little guy hopped out of

the foliage. Quietly I popped inside to grab my camera with my 100mm

macro lens to captured him before he scampered off across the deck to

hide in a yuka plant.

Teresa Angell

68

NZPhotographer


REBIRTH

This year the swan plants have been full of caterpillars changing to

chrysalis and finally monarch butterflies. Lockdown and staying home

has given me the chance to photograph this amazing event. I sat

watching this chrysalis for over an hour with my macro lens on the

camera mounted on a tripod together with my shutter release. The

rebirth took but a few seconds... well worth the wait.

Graham Jones

June 2020 69


GUMS

F22, 1s, ISO64, 35mm

When I went exploring, looking for photo opportunities in my backyard,

I noticed there was nice light coming through the very tall gum trees on

our south boundary - this is what resulted.

Ann Kilpatrick

70

NZPhotographer


HOHERIA

F13, 6s, 35mm

I took this in my backyard, on a good Wellington day when I was trying

out some new techniques.

Ann Kilpatrick

June 2020 71


WAXEYE FEEDING ON FIGS

F5.6, 1/160s, ISO800, 250mm

This time of year is a busy time in my garden with

the fig tree fruiting. I get plenty of bird photography

practice and the waxeyes get to enjoy the figs.

Tanya Rowe

72

NZPhotographer


RUMBLE STRIPS

F4.5, 1/200s, ISO400, 100mm

A dead leaf showing off its beauty and the textures

within textures taken on one of my daily walks around the

neighborhood. I love the long elongated lines which are

contrasted with the "rumble strips" running perpendicular to

that. Converting the image to black and white just enhances

the textures as the background is much darker than the subject.

Lee Waddell

June 2020 73


"THE INSTRUMENT

IS NOT THE

CAMERA, BUT THE

PHOTOGRAPHER."

EVE ARNOLD

74

NZPhotographer

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