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Aftermath 2020 Publication

Aftermath 2020 explores the legacy of the Bauhaus through the practices of ten contemporary artists and ten new artworks. The project is an annual collaboration between Nottingham Contemporary and Nottingham Trent University Art and Design Masters students. This year the students responded to the gallery’s exhibition in 2019, Still Undead: Popular Culture in Britain Beyond the Bauhaus. Still Undead explored how Bauhaus ideas and teaching have lived on in Britain over the last hundred years. The exhibition incorporated artworks that fuelled the school’s lively culture of parties and festivals. It expanded on the experiments in light and sound, characteristic of Bauhaus students and teachers, by navigating the legacy of the school’s pioneers to illustrate their influence on pop culture and art schools. Aftermath 2020 traverses the themes of Still Undead and adds to it; a demonstration of how Bauhaus ideas continue to evolve and inspire artists and art teaching a century after the art school’s conception. Echoing the youth culture of the 1970s and 80s, the artists featured in Aftermath 2020 take inspiration from the ground-breaking innovations of this early 20th-century avant-garde. Students on the MFA Fine Art, Photography, Interior Architecture, Graphic Design & Illustration courses at Nottingham Trent University have collaborated to produce this public exhibition; an opportunity to make, share and connect both within and beyond the university. In response to the new context created by COVID-19, working in times of self-isolation and social-distancing, and supported by the Nottingham Contemporary team, the students have adapted and re-shaped their initial responses to deliver this exhibition digitally.

Aftermath 2020 explores the legacy of the Bauhaus through the practices of ten contemporary artists and ten new artworks. The project is an annual collaboration between Nottingham Contemporary and Nottingham Trent University Art and Design Masters students. This year the students responded to the gallery’s exhibition in 2019, Still Undead: Popular Culture in Britain Beyond the Bauhaus.
Still Undead explored how Bauhaus ideas and teaching have lived on in Britain over the last hundred years. The exhibition incorporated artworks that fuelled the school’s lively culture of parties and festivals. It expanded on the experiments in light and sound, characteristic of Bauhaus students and teachers, by navigating the legacy of the school’s pioneers to illustrate their influence on pop culture and art schools.
Aftermath 2020 traverses the themes of Still Undead and adds to it; a demonstration of how Bauhaus ideas continue to evolve and inspire artists and art teaching a century after the art school’s conception. Echoing the youth culture of the 1970s and 80s, the artists featured in Aftermath 2020 take inspiration from the ground-breaking innovations of this early 20th-century avant-garde.
Students on the MFA Fine Art, Photography, Interior Architecture, Graphic Design & Illustration courses at Nottingham Trent University have collaborated to produce this public exhibition; an opportunity to make, share and connect both within and beyond the university.
In response to the new context created by COVID-19, working in times of self-isolation and social-distancing, and supported by the Nottingham Contemporary team, the students have adapted and re-shaped their initial responses to deliver this exhibition digitally.

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Nottingham Trent University



4. . . . . . Foreword

8. . . . . . Still Undead

10. . . . . . RESTRICTIONS/INTUITION

Ryan Boultbee

16. . . . . . SIMPLE BUT COMPLEX

Emily Edmond

20. . . . . . IN MOVEMENT

Jessica Emsley

24. . . . . . THE OCEAN OF MEMORY

Kaidi Huang

30. . . . . . CIRCULAR NOISE

Manuela Sandoval

34. . . . . . SPRINGING FROM INNER SPIRIT

Misra Arabaci

38. . . . . . CIRCULAR REFERENCE

Jo Wheeler

44. . . . . . WALK...

Yara Zein

48. . . . . . THE DAY WHEN MATH IS DEAD

Jill Ng

52. . . . . . CONTINUANCE

Paul Liptrot

58. . . . . . A Collaborative Effort

60. . . . . . Acknowledgements


4

Foreword

Nicole Yip

Aftermath 2020 invokes the ideas and

spirit of the Bauhaus, the pioneering

and highly influential art and design

school established in Weimar in 1919.

A lively school that privileged intuition

over imitation, and creativity over

skill, the Bauhaus was a hotbed of

experimentation that spawned new

approaches not only to art and design,

but also to educational methods. These

ideas continue to live on today, as

can be seen in the work presented in

this exhibition as well as in its graphic

design.


Aftermath 2020 represents a collaborative effort between

MFA Fine Art, Photography, Interior Architecture, Graphic

Design & Illustration students at Nottingham Trent University.

The conversation was initially prompted by the exhibition,

Still Undead: Popular Culture in Britain Beyond the Bauhaus,

presented at Nottingham Contemporary in 2019 to coincide

with the centenary of the art school.

Many of themes and artworks first encountered here – from

narratives of migration to experiments in colour, light and

movement – provided the germinal seed of inspiration for the

new works developed in response. Several artists connected

with the Bauhaus’ ideas about the unification of internal and

material impulses – or as Bauhaus master Johannes Itten

described, a ‘ready’ cooperation between ‘the corporeal,

sensual, spiritual and intellectual powers and abilities’ – while

others took cues from specific Bauhaus methodologies: from

experiments with ‘material experiences’ and new technologies,

to colour theory and typographic treatment. Importantly,

the Bauhaus’ spirit of experimentation seemed to provide a

liberating charge, especially while many artists were pressed

to reimagine their work for a digital sphere as a result of the

Covid-19 pandemic.


Nicole Yip

Aftermath 2020 is an annual collaboration

between Nottingham Contemporary and

Nottingham Trent University, forming part

of a decade-long partnership between

the two institutions. Over the course

of seven months, students selected

for the placement worked closely with

the team at Nottingham Contemporary

– led by Katy Culbard and myself – to

bring the project to fruition. We are

also grateful to Andy Batson, Head of

Audiences and Partnerships at Nottingham

Contemporary, and Andrew Brown,

Course Leader of the MFA Fine Art at NTU,

whose contributions to the project have

been invaluable.

Nicole Yip, Chief Curator and Acting Head of Public

Programmes & Research, Nottingham Contemporary


Graphic design by Bernardo Berga R.

Courtesy Nottingham Contemporary


8 Still Undead


Graphic design by Bernardo Berga R.

Courtesy Nottingham Contemporary


10 AFTERMATH

Ryan Boultbee

RESTRICTIONS/

INTUITION

Experimentation with materials is an exploration

of their limits and possibilities. I feel it requires

a hands-on approach, so the material and artist

can collaborate. It can be a playful process of

enquiry or collapse in frustration.

In the Bauhaus, students were encouraged to

experiment to gather ‘material experiences’.

Teachers provided guidance through design

exercises that would prompt students to engage

with materials and their context. Josef Albers, a

key Bauhaus teacher, warned that these prompts

were not a self-generative artistic methodology;

following them would not always create a work

of art. He felt that they were only starting points

– ways of engaging with an idea – and these

‘material experiences’ could provide a way to find

a visual language to communicate through.


Ryan Boultbee, close-up detail of the

final piece ‘Restrictions/Intuition’,

12.05.2020, paper and wax.

ryanboultbee.co.uk


Ryan Boultbee

I tried to follow Kandinsky’s

rules in my work, another

prominent Bauhaus teacher. He

approached the line like it was

a material, but I struggled to

use his language to create art.

Becoming frustrated, I threw out

his rules and trusted my intuition

to resolve the work. Initially, I

thought the artwork illustrated

these creative frustrations.

Looking again, I found the work

has absorbed my frustrations

of being restricted to the home

during the lockdown.


Ryan Boultbee, exploring the

material with folds and burns,

29.04.2020, paper and wax.


Ryan Boultbee, exploring the line

through folds in the material,

22.04.2020, paper and wax.

Ryan Boultbee


I wanted to create a physical object,

and explore the context of the digital

exhibition. I scanned the object with a

home-printer as it captured the form

and presented it in digital ‘space’; the

resulting piece sits between an object

and an image.

The exhibition has unlocked new

possibilities for my artwork: being

restricted to one place, I have

recognised how sensitive my practice

is to context and my experience of

spaces. I had never considered my

home as a possible artistic influence.

It has prompted me to explore more

site- and context-specific work within

my practice.


16

AFTERMATH

Emily Edmond

SIMPLE BUT

COMPLEX

Experimentation for me has always been a

playful process of trial and error – utilising the

outcomes, whether expected or not, to explore

new possibilities that I may not have considered

before. I often use something I know at least the

basics of to springboard off into new territory,

or to explore a different way of being in the

familiar. I have often utilised technology within my

practice; however, it has never been the sole tool

of creation and display. Creating for digital display

further created an interesting conflict between

ideas and actual ability.

Although the limitations of my knowledge of

software may impinge on my ability to produce

the ideas I have, it is not necessarily bad. Whilst

this may seem like a drawback, heading into this

project with a spirit for adventure and openness

to new mediums resulted in pleasant surprises. I

learnt that there were effects that I could try that

I would not have even thought possible; which

was innovative and refreshing.


Emily Edmond, Alphabet circle

test sheet, 24.02.2020, Digital -

InDesign

emilyedmond.co.uk

@eedmond.art


Emily Edmond

This process caused me to begin

to contemplate ways in which

I could incorporate animation

and the idea of looping video

imagery with physical material

usage within my practice. The

possibilities before me are

intriguing. Would these new

combinations complement

each other or just result in

dissonance? Whether useful or

unworkable, I am excited to start

exploring them.


Emily Edmond, Simple but Complex

(Gif together), 26.05.2020, Digital

Emily Edmond, Simple but Complex

(Gif expanded), 26.05.2020, Digital


20 AFTERMATH

Jessica Emsley

IN MOVEMENT

As an artist who works primarily with nature and

place, seeking out meaningful experiences in

wilder places, the Bauhaus represents a very

different starting point to work with. I found I had

to think in quite a different way in my approach

to the exhibition, finding more organic ways in. I

picked up on the theme of migration, seeing the

physical movement of the Bauhaus school within

a more holistic understanding of migration which

incorporates the organic and invisible migrations

of ideas and behaviours. This thought process itself

represents a very experimental way of thinking

for me, whereas I would ordinarily rely more

on intuitive reaction to experience as a starting

point for art making.

Following this initial thought process I found that,

once again, my means of working was challenged

as I no longer had a physical space to work with

and instead had to find a way of presenting in the

digital realm.


Jessica Emsley, imagefrom

photographic sequence, In

Movement, 2020, photograph

jessicaemsley.com


Usually I would avoid anything

digital within my practice and find

that a digital means of working

can undermine the intentions of

my work. Instead, I had to take

a more adaptive approach and

think back to the experimental

nature of the Bauhaus school

itself. Photography seemed to

provide the answer as there

was no adequate translation of

a handmade drawing or object

into a digital form – the photo

remains a photo whether printed

or presented online.


Nottingham Contemporary, photo

from Still Undead exhibition, 2019

As a result, I combined the digital with

the organic in taking experimental photos

of seeds blown by the wind and writing

in response to this. The resulting images

track the seeds’ subjectivity to external

forces and present this otherwise invisible

migration. This seemed to provide a

balance for me in that the movement of the

seeds was totally beyond my control whilst

the camera was under my full direction,

and the writing an organic thought process

channelled into words.


24

AFTERMATH

Kaidi Huang

THE OCEAN OF

MEMORY

Experimentation is a kind of repeated behavior.

For me, it means abandoning a lot and learning

a lot again and again. Moreover, it is difficult

when I enter a brand new area. But I think it’s

worth it, especially since it led me to try new

software and entity tools in the process. On the

other hand, I gradually realised that in this fastpaced

environment, artists must keep up with

current developments and try new art forms

and tools. Therefore, every experimentation is to

accumulate and light a lamp for the future.

In my works, the sketch comes from my initial

painting, which is a very interesting way to split

and reorganise previous works. Rational thinking

from the Bauhaus and reflection promote my

experimental creation and I spend a lot of time

on colour management and modeling as well.

At the same time, there is a choice of materials,

which is an exciting process.


The Ocean of Memory. 2020. Digital.

uchihaoscarhkd@gmail.com

@oscarhkd


Kaidi Huang

Just like the Bauhaus encouraged

students to make bold choices

in materials and Moholy-Nagy’s

unremitting exploration of

materials provided a lot of ideas

in this spirit of the Bauhaus, in

my works, I tried using glass and

metal, which I had never used

in real space in the past. The

perfect light conditions and

materials produced a strong and

subtle response in the virtual

space I built. This relationship has

new changes with the movement

of angles in space. Therefore, for

me, it is interesting that light and

colour bring new thinking to visual

stimulation.


The Ocean of Memory. 2020. Draft

of drawing on paper.


The Ocean of Memory. 2020. The

process of Animation rendering.

Kaidi Huang


In the current situation, my main creative

place is in my room, and the screen gives

me a stable experimental space. Meanwhile,

I repeatedly think about whether virtual

space can bring a good experience to

audiences. Artists like the creator in this

process so that light, objects, and motion

all force me to try many times. Moreover,

what is inconceivable is that my model is

about 10m in length, width, and height

according to their proportions in this space,

which I can’t imagine and make in the real

world. However, each final rendering takes

about 12 hours.

Due to the limitations of Covid-19, the

online project is not only giving me more

unusual ideas for image-making and

immersive experience, but also encouraging

me to think about how to allow audiences

to feel more in the virtual space, rather

than a high-definition picture.


30

AFTERMATH

Manuela Sandoval

CIRCULAR

NOISE

Painting and moving image are the mediums I

have usually approached to create my artwork. In

the past few years, I have grasped digital ways of

making art and ever since I have been intrigued

by it. I consider the Bauhaus’ guiding principle

of a ‘new unity’ between art and technology to

be related to my work in the way I have used a

coding language as a medium to set a relation

between what I wanted to do and how I might

want viewers to feel in response to my work. I

personally enjoy when an artwork is more than an

object, moving image or performance to observe.

It rather triggers my curiosity and makes me want

to come closer and look with more attention to

figure out how it works, and perhaps interact with

it.

Trainsition IIII (1954), an oil painting by Richard

Hamilton, was my main inspiration from the Still

Undead exhibition. And when my research began,

I felt I needed to create an interactive piece that

changed according to the spectator’s point of

view.


Manuela Sandoval, Circular Noise -

Left button, 2020, Still image from

‘P5 js’ sketch

m.marinsandoval@hotmail.com


I think this desire to make

art that involves the viewers’

attention and interaction, and

is embedded in their daily

image consumption, is how I

imagine new ways of seeing and

making art being enabled. It is

particularly ambitious, as having

more multimedia in our everyday

lives over the past 30 years has

meant it is a challenge to get

someone’s attention for more

than a minute.

Manuela Sandoval


Manuela Sandoval, Circular Noise -

Code, 2020, Still image from ‘P5 js’

sketch

Manuela Sandoval, Circular Noise -

Right button, 2020, Still image from

‘P5 js’ sketch


34

AFTERMATH

Mısra Arabacı

SPRINGING FROM

INNER SPIRIT

As an artist whose main interest is portrait

photography, the primary goals of my practice

are to develop a portraiture style in which I

can reflect the feelings of the figure and the

surrounding environment by combining different

mediums or applying different ideas during the

shooting or editing process.

Whilst creating this work, I was highly inspired by

the book Concerning the Spiritual in Art, written

by Wassily Kandinsky, one of the masters who had

a considerable impact on the Bauhaus education.

In the book, he associates colours with different

emotions and asserts that they have some

potential energy, which causes a movement

approaching or receding from the viewer. In

addition, he claims that in order to find pure

artistic expression, artists should not use colour

and form as tools to imitate nature. Conversely,

they should investigate their inner meanings and

learn how to use them.


Mısra Arabacı, Model: Jill Ng,

Springing From Inner Spirit, 2020,

misra.arabaci0@gmail.com


In my work, I tried to apply these

notions and find my own artistic

expression through the inner

meanings of colours and their

relations with forms, as defined

by Kandinsky. At the same time,

I used a human figure in my

collages to keep a corporeal

element in my work and prevent

it from becoming a wholly

abstract piece separated from

nature.


Mısra Arabacı, Model: Jill Ng,

Springing From Inner Spirit, 2020,

The concept of the inner meanings of

colour can be associated with colour

psychology, which is used in various

fields such as branding, website

design, architecture and so on. Within

contemporary photography, many artists

are on a journey of experimentation

through photography to find an unusual

approach to portraiture rather than just

aiming to capture the moment. I think

these are the elements I used in my work

which are relevant in today’s context.


38

AFTERMATH

Jo Wheeler

CIRCULAR

REFERENCE

I’ve recently been experimenting with video,

testing how my experience with photography

translates to moving image. Moholy-Nagy’s

experiments with film were an obvious starting

point for me. His investigations into architectural

forms and new lens-based technologies led

to visionary work. This included his light prop

sculptures and the series of films he made with

them; ‘light-play’ as a performance of ‘spacetime’.

Moholy-Nagy worked closely with another

Bauhaus master, Oskar Schlemmer, whose dance

works also play with ideas that upend the fixed

and inert nature of architecture, imagining the

building as a fluid stage. They were seeking an

architecture ‘less bound by the forces of gravity’ 1

– a performative architecture.


László Moholy-Nagy, Xanti

Schawinsky on a Bauhaus

balcony, late 1920s. Photograph.

jo-wheeler.com


Jo Wheeler

Aftermath presented an opportunity

to think about Nottingham

Contemporary’s inheritance of

Bauhaus principles and design; the

use of glass, concrete and steel

that make possible the clean lines,

smooth surfaces and generous

spaces. I often work in collaboration

with others to make site-specific

work about our relationships to

place. The experience of making

this film felt like a collaboration

with the place itself; my camera

in conversation with the gallery

building. I enjoyed being playful and

allowing the features to lead me,

tracing their lines and forms into

a kind of choreography created

through the continuous moving

image and the rhythm of the edit.


Jo Wheeler, Still from Circular

Reference, 2020. Video.


László Moholy-Nagy, A Lightplay:

Black White Gray c. 1926.

Photograph.

Jo Wheeler


The Light Prop turns; it is seen from above,

below, frontwards, backwards; in normal,

accelerate, retarded, reversed motion.

Close up of details…

Positive, negative pictures, fades, prisms;

dissolving.

Movements, queerly shifting grills.

“Drunken” screens, lattices.

Views through small openings; through

automatically changing diaphragms

– Excerpt from the script for Light Display,

Black White and Gray. 2

1. László Moholy-Nagy, Vision in Motion (third

edition) (Chicago: Paul Theobald, 1947), 102

2. Ibid, 289.


44

AFTERMATH

Yara Zein

WALK...

Experimentation has always been an

essential part of my practice, resulting in new

methodologies that I work with. I work with a

space by introducing different materials like

sound, light, moving image and painting, which

work with each other to create a sensory

experience for the viewer. The viewer is invited

into the space and their movements, interactions

and emotions within this environment also form

part of the work. However, experimentation is not

just with elements and materials, but also with the

way I stage the work within a space.

The Covid-19 pandemic hasn’t restricted my

current practice, but rather forced me to enter a

different type of experimentation using only what

was available to me – just like at the Bauhaus,

when they were in a time of depression coming

out of World War I and had no money, so they

had to make use of what was available to them.


Yara Zein, Walk..., 2020, Still image

taken from the video ‘Walk...’

yarahaddocks@gmail.com

yarahelviti


Yara Zein

Since the project has been

relocated online, I had to find

a different way to construct

an experience of movement

visually around a structure I

created that requires movement

to be understood and cannot

be seen from one single angle.

Showing my work online gave

me the opportunity to create a

space that can be experienced

virtually, giving a feeling of

the megalithic, loneliness and

mystery.


Yara Zein, Walk..., 2020, Still image

taken from the video ‘Walk...’


48

AFTERMATH

Jill Ng

THE DAY WHEN

MATH IS DEAD

One of the effects of aligning art and industry

is that art has become more accessible to

more people through reproduced images and

more accessible technology. There is no way

to diminish the experience of encountering an

artwork in person or to question why it is revered

and adored, but when I see famous paintings

turned into memes, it makes me think about the

changing dynamic between artwork and audience.

Mobile phone technology and social media also

heighten this changing dynamic, as people can

receive information on a more selective and

private basis, and niches will evolve from the way

we understand it.

Using moving image, whether digital or film,

always carries with it notions of mass media in

our current times. This is relevant to the context

of my work because, like many people of my

generation, watching TV was a family activity while

I was growing up. The collective experience of

people gathering for film, television or radio is

one of the ‘mass’ experiences of mass media,

until the development of digital streaming on

individual devices changed that dynamic.


Jill Ng (mr.Kedi), Stills from “The

Day When Math is Dead”, (05+1)

2020, Screen Capture


Jill Ng

On the other hand, various

programmes and platforms

have made publishing video

easier than before, so video

production has grown at an

exponential rate. I think this ties

into the union between art and

industry where methods of art

production can be accessed

and enjoyed by the general

public due to its industrialisation

and mass production.


Jill Ng (mr.Kedi), Stills from “The

Day When Math is Dead”, (05+1)

2020, Screen Capture


52

AFTERMATH

Paul Liptrot

CONTINUANCE

My practice is concerned with ‘places of

sanctuary’ and considers how I might create

sanctuary for audiences. At the start of my

journey on the MFA, my interpretation of this

concept was focussed on the idea of creating

physical places of sanctuary; spaces where

people could spend time geared around

calmness and engagement with visual and aural

sensations.

This was focussed on the material, on a direct

engagement with space. As I have developed

these ideas, my thinking has changed to see

sanctuary as something that can be both internal

and external. It is driven by the mind, and is about

the need for space that comes from living in the

time that we live in, amplified in recent months

by the coronavirus pandemic.


Paul Liptrot, Continuance. 2020.

Photograph of petri dish, ink & latex.

paulliptrotartist.com

paulliptrotartist


This understanding of what a

sanctuary might be, and how

it might be engaged with, has

had a profound effect on my

thinking. I have responded by

seeing my practice not simply

as an artistic intervention, but

as something more personal,

driven by my own need for

sanctuary, for quiet, for time to

allow my mind to wander.


Holme lock Sanctuary. 17th April

2020. Photo by Paul Liptrot

Framing my practice in this personal

way, gives me a baseline with which to

consider how I create spaces that are

meaningful for others. The definition

of what a sanctuary is has broadened:

it’s not simply a physical space, but

one concerned with ways in which

an individual might find comfort and

time out in their day, forming sensory

connections between mind, body and

the spirit.


Paul Liptrot

This might manifest digitally as

with Continuance, the video

created for Aftermath, its

companion book showing the

many iterations created when

breaking a single image into

increasingly small segments;

in a book of words and images

relating to the places in the

landscape where I find sanctuary;

or when I create my next

installation once life returns to

normal.


Paul Liptrot, Continuance, 4 image

series. 2020. Digital.


58 A Collaborative Effort

PHOTOGRAPHY

Still Undead: Popular Culture in Britain beyond the Bauhaus represents

a notable highlight of our arrival in the UK last year, as it was the first

art exhibition we attended in the build-up to our photography masters

programme at NTU. This expressly informed the enthusiasm with which

we jumped on the opportunity to be part of this collaboration, and so

far, it has been an immense good fortune for us.

We were charged with the responsibility of photographically

documenting the progress of the project, furnishing the team with

visual materials to support the exhibition design and for promotion

on designated media platforms. The weekly meetings, studio visits,

deliberations, photographing, and the guidance of the insightful

Nottingham Contemporary team, all combined to produce a vibrant

unit that propelled the success of this project. Our original brief was

impacted by the social distancing guidelines posed by the global

pandemic, but everyone rallied round to deploy new ways of ensuring

that the deliverables remained unbroken. Worthy of note is the way

the exhibiting artists turned their cameras to themselves and produced

brilliant clips, which we put together to create a project teaser as well

as a video with full interviews. Everyone’s contribution made our job

quite fascinating and effective, and we feel exceedingly proud to have

been part of this excellent opportunity!

Anna Teodoro, Nnaemezie Asogwa


Within an art exhibition, the role of an architectural designer is one

of spatial transformation; visualising the space through transformative

designs which will aid the artist to display their artwork as well as

support conveying the ideas within the work.

Given the situation we find ourselves in, my role has been translated

onto a virtual platform, which has allowed me to collaborate in the

effort to provide our online visitors with a worthwhile experience

– one which aids in the exploration of the beauty of art, and the

intentions of each represented artist. Furthermore, helpful website

links, along with the artists’ wider list of reference catalogues/

publications have been cited.

Mai Thuy Pham

INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE

GRAPHIC DESIGN

Aftermath 2020 offered us many unparalleled opportunities and

experiences.Whilst our contribution altered significantly throughout

the project, we were able to explore new ways of working to produce

designs that are connective and accessible at a time when exhibitions

feel less so. We sought to bring Nottingham Contemporary to the

public in a different way, through utilising the gallery’s internal

structures and materials that often reflect Bauhaus principles. Equally,

in referencing the grid system and the space in which our exhibition

would have been held, our visual identity was able to digitally

reimagine the initial exhibition. We are grateful to have been able

to continue with our placement during this time, and are extremely

thankful to the Contemporary’s staff for all their help and support.

Natasha Heaps, Aimee Jackson


60 Acknowledgements


The students involved in Aftermath 2020 would like

to thank Nottingham Contemporary for the help they

have provided in facilitating this placement, particularly

given the change in circumstances brought about by

covid19. We would particularly like to thank Katy Culbard,

Nicole Yip and Andy Batson for their continued support

through the process.

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