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<strong>Marina</strong><br />

www.marinaworld.com<br />

<strong>World</strong><br />

<strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong><br />

Issue 119<br />

Essential reading for marina and waterfront developers, planners and operators


SIZE<br />

DOESN’T<br />

MATTER<br />

EXCEPT WHEN IT COMES<br />

TO PONTOONS<br />

SF <strong>Marina</strong> is a world-renowned expert in the development of new or<br />

existing premium marinas. We provide state-of-the-art floating breakwaters<br />

and concrete pontoons to anyone, anywhere, who is planning to<br />

build a marina. And who wants it to still be there after the storm.<br />

Contact Michael Sigvardsson +46 (0)733 50 70 99<br />

W W W . S F M A R I N A . C O M


<strong>Marina</strong><br />

<strong>World</strong><br />

<strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong> Vol.20, No.5<br />

18<br />

CONTENTS<br />

<strong>World</strong> News 7<br />

Lindley Group: 90 Years 18<br />

Crisis Management:<br />

Feedback from <strong>Marina</strong> Groups 21<br />

Thoughts on the Day After: Oscar Siches 25<br />

Italy: Moving Forward 27<br />

21<br />

New Zealand: Open for Boating 34<br />

Intelligent <strong>Marina</strong> Systems:<br />

Technology in a Post-Pandemic <strong>World</strong>: Iaian Archibald 36<br />

Working Smarter Rather than Harder: Vance Young 41<br />

36<br />

When to Revamp your MMS: Chris Thomas 43<br />

Working from Home with <strong>Marina</strong> Master 44<br />

Using Technology to Boost Safety: Kresimir Zic 47<br />

Delivering to <strong>Marina</strong>s and Customers: Nick Gill 49<br />

Will Coronavirus Drive Digital Transformation? Idan Cohen 51<br />

Products, Services & People 53<br />

On the cover: In a confident signal<br />

that there is no let up in marina<br />

acquisitions for large marina<br />

groups in the USA, Safe Harbor<br />

<strong>Marina</strong>s purchased three additional<br />

properties in the first quarter<br />

of <strong>2020</strong>. One of these, Mears<br />

Point <strong>Marina</strong> on Chesapeake<br />

Bay, Maryland, has approvals for<br />

development into a resort-style<br />

marina community. Read more p.15<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong> 3


BUILDING<br />

BLOCKS<br />

As our product range has evolved, it now has many applications. Together<br />

with our clients, we have the luxury of choosing the right pontoon, in the right<br />

materials, for the right job. By developing the heavy-duty end of our portfolio to<br />

always be a step stronger, we’ve also become experts in floating breakwaters,<br />

able to incorporate the strongest of building blocks when designing and<br />

engineering a marina that will withstand the test of time. Marinetek.net


<strong>Marina</strong><br />

<strong>World</strong><br />

FROM THE EDITOR<br />

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Printed in the UK by Stephens & George<br />

Creative<br />

destruction<br />

Our world has changed. Every country continues to weave its own way<br />

through the COVID-19 pandemic that has caused such pain and grief, upturned<br />

our priorities, and run amok with our livelihoods and economies.<br />

Boating and the impact on boating facilities continues to vary wildly on a regional<br />

not just national basis, and policy change tends to be swift. As this issue of <strong>Marina</strong><br />

<strong>World</strong> goes live, the bulk of marinas are either open for business or are expecting<br />

to open before the end of the month. There will, however, continue to be restrictions<br />

regarding social spaces that will impact on revenues and every marina’s social<br />

and destination appeal. None of us knows how matters will progress if serious<br />

subsequent outbreaks of the virus occur.<br />

As of early <strong>June</strong>, many marinas in the USA that were officially closed are<br />

cautiously opening up; marinas on the west coast of Canada that were never closed<br />

are preparing for a busy summer season; boating is back in England; Sweden,<br />

which never imposed a full lockdown, expects boating to resume as the summer<br />

progresses; and restrictions have been lifted in countries like Finland, Germany,<br />

Greece and Portugal*. In northern Italy where the virus hit hard and early, marinas<br />

are now open and, in New Zealand, which was swift to impose lockdown measures,<br />

opening up social spaces is ahead of the global curve.<br />

Fortunes are not, however, necessarily linked directly to the virus. In Croatia,<br />

for example, where COVID-19 had only minimal impact, the knock-on effect of<br />

a depressed charter market is likely to cause serious economic difficulty as it<br />

represents a very high percentage of boating activity.<br />

But are we looking at short term loss and long term gain? Some economists<br />

argue that a recession can make economies more productive in the long term.<br />

Although, sadly, some good businesses fail during the process, many of the most<br />

efficient survive and new companies are also formed with precise goals to meet<br />

new needs. The Austrian political economist Joseph Schumpeter called this ‘creative<br />

destruction’.<br />

I believe the marina industry is in a strong position when it comes to creativity.<br />

This virus is most probably here to haunt us and boating offers a bubble of social<br />

distancing – in the open air. Current boat owners will want to capitalise on their<br />

assets and spend more time afloat and at the marina. Charter may dip now but<br />

perhaps has a bigger future than ever before as a ‘safe’ and ‘unconstrained’ way to<br />

take a holiday. We should build on our boat club concepts and, when circumstances<br />

allow, work harder than ever to woo new boaters with ‘cost’ as a critical factor. If we<br />

market boating participation as ‘affordable’ as well as ‘safe’, people who may well of<br />

necessity be adopting a thriftier approach to their leisure spend could come aboard<br />

and become part of our outdoors-based community for life.<br />

We are absorbing change: hugs and kisses on hold; bumping elbows instead of<br />

shaking hands; signing off with ‘stay safe’ instead of ‘best regards’. And if we are<br />

creative with change we can turn the ‘new normal’ to our advantage, encouraging<br />

more people than ever before to enjoy being on and near the water.<br />

© <strong>2020</strong> Loud & Clear Publishing Ltd<br />

Views expressed by individual contributors in this issue<br />

are not necessarily those of Loud & Clear Publishing<br />

Ltd. Equally, the inclusion of advertisements in this<br />

magazine does not constitute endorsement of the<br />

companies, products and services concerned by Loud &<br />

Clear Publishing Ltd. The publisher reserves the right to<br />

refuse advertising.<br />

Carol Fulford<br />

Editor<br />

* International Council of Marine Industry Association (ICOMIA) Coronavirus Update<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong> 5


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WORLD NEWS<br />

IGY wins contract to run SKD<br />

UK: Island Global Yachting (IGY <strong>Marina</strong>s) has been awarded a contract to<br />

operate, market and brand the 185-berth St Katharine Docks <strong>Marina</strong> (SKD<br />

<strong>Marina</strong>) in London, England. The facility is owned by property funds managed<br />

by Blackstone, one of the world’s leading investment firms.<br />

IGY CEO Thomas Mukamal<br />

welcomes the boost to the IGY<br />

portfolio. “IGY is honoured to have<br />

been selected to manage and flag<br />

the St Katharine Docks <strong>Marina</strong>,” he<br />

said. “This is a thrilling opportunity<br />

for IGY to showcase our industryleading<br />

marina operations and global<br />

marketing platform for which IGY has<br />

become well known.”<br />

SKD is the only marina in central<br />

IBEX and COVID-19<br />

USA: Organisers of the International BoatBuilders’ Exhibition and Conference<br />

(IBEX) are optimistic the show will open as planned on Tuesday 29th<br />

September <strong>2020</strong>.<br />

The show organisers report that they<br />

are closely monitoring Florida’s ‘Three<br />

Phases of Re-Opening Guidelines’ and<br />

the state’s progress, as well as working<br />

with the Tampa Convention Center and<br />

Visit Tampa Bay to develop health and<br />

safety protocols to protect exhibitors,<br />

sponsors and visitors.<br />

“We are optimistic that by September<br />

the state of Florida will be open for<br />

large events to take place and that<br />

public confidence will have been<br />

restored and IBEX will open on<br />

schedule,” said IBEX show director<br />

Anne Dunbar. “We will continue to<br />

monitor announcements by local<br />

government officials and the guidelines<br />

Drystack plan at St Joe <strong>Marina</strong><br />

USA: The St Joe Company plans to construct a dry boat storage facility at Port<br />

St Joe <strong>Marina</strong> in Port St Joe, Florida. The marina, which is owned by St Joe and<br />

sits alongside St Joseph’s Bay with quick access to the Gulf of Mexico and the<br />

Intracoastal Waterway, was damaged by Hurricane Michael in October 2018.<br />

Plans call for the new drystack to be<br />

approximately 63,200ft² (5,870m²) and<br />

have 252 dry boat slips. The largest will<br />

be designed to accommodate boats of<br />

up to 45ft (14m) in length.<br />

“As we were planning this project, it<br />

was important that we not only rebuild<br />

what was there previously, but create a<br />

space that the people of Port St Joe and<br />

the boating community could be proud<br />

of,” explained Patrick Murphy, senior vice<br />

president of operations for St Joe. “We<br />

are thrilled to be through the planning<br />

London and is located 40nm up the<br />

River Thames. It is adjacent to the<br />

historic Tower of London and close<br />

to many of the city’s most famous<br />

tourist attractions. The asset was<br />

recently renovated by Blackstone and<br />

has evolved into a thriving waterside<br />

community, featuring a mix of<br />

commercial, residential, retail, food and<br />

beverage amenities that surround the<br />

marina.<br />

of the CDC. During the past 30 IBEX<br />

shows we have weathered three new<br />

host cities, several hurricane threats,<br />

one great recession, and now together<br />

we will manage the coronavirus<br />

challenges.”<br />

“If, with an abundance of caution and<br />

complete focus on the health and safety<br />

of our exhibitors, sponsors and visitors,<br />

we are required to alter the format of<br />

IBEX, we will make an announcement<br />

accordingly. It is our hope that IBEX will<br />

spark much needed business for the<br />

marine industry and be the beginning<br />

of a strong recovery season for us all,”<br />

she added.<br />

www.ibexshow.com<br />

and permitting phase of this project and<br />

ready to kick off construction.”<br />

Planning and permitting is underway<br />

for additional phases of the marina with<br />

plans to include around 48 wet slips,<br />

a ship’s store and other amenities.<br />

“Boating is central to the lifestyle in Port<br />

St Joe for so many,” said Port St Joe<br />

mayor, Rex Buzzett. “The marina serves<br />

as such an important gathering spot<br />

for our residents and visitors. Getting it<br />

closer to opening is something that we<br />

have been looking forward to.”<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong> 7<br />

Successful<br />

Waterfront<br />

Development<br />

Starts with<br />

Lasting<br />

Infrastructure.<br />

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AND MARINE CONTRACTOR<br />

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WORLD NEWS<br />

Later dates for<br />

IWMC Dubai<br />

UAE: Due to the uncertainties and challenges posed by the COVID-19<br />

pandemic, the International Council of Marine Industries Association (ICOMIA)<br />

and P&O <strong>Marina</strong>s have agreed to postpone the next ICOMIA <strong>World</strong> <strong>Marina</strong>s<br />

Conference (IWMC) to October 2021.<br />

The 2021 event will have the highest<br />

levels of safety standards in place<br />

and will adopt the original (<strong>2020</strong>)<br />

main theme of “marinas empowering<br />

tourism and economies”. It will focus<br />

on planned topics such as regulatory<br />

frameworks and barriers, best<br />

investment practices, changing the<br />

public perception of a marina, new<br />

technology, as well as climate change<br />

and environmental sustainability.<br />

Considering the worldwide<br />

AMI Expo –<br />

Entries invited for<br />

<strong>2020</strong> MEDA<br />

GLOBAL: PIANC’s Recreational Navigation Commission (Rec-Com) and<br />

ICOMIA’s International <strong>Marina</strong>s Group (IMG) invite owners, operators and<br />

designers to submit marina project entries for the <strong>2020</strong> <strong>Marina</strong> Excellence<br />

Design Jack Nichol Award (MEDA).<br />

The award, which is the most<br />

prestigious international accolade<br />

to recognise excellence in design of<br />

marinas and recreational navigation<br />

infrastructure, is administered by<br />

PIANC RecCom.<br />

Eligible marinas must have been<br />

built or rebuilt within the last 15 years<br />

implications posed by COVID-19 on<br />

human life, speakers and attendees will<br />

have the opportunity to broaden topics<br />

and discussions to include the impact<br />

the pandemic has had on the nautical<br />

sector.<br />

ICOMIA and P&O are currently<br />

working on the possibility of also<br />

hosting an online event at the end of<br />

this year.<br />

More information will be available in<br />

coming weeks.<br />

call for proposals<br />

USA: The Association of <strong>Marina</strong> Industries (AMI) is inviting suggestions for<br />

breakout and workshop topics relevant to the operations and management of<br />

marinas and yards for the next AMI Conference & Expo (formerly IMBC).<br />

The event is scheduled for 2nd-4th<br />

February 2021 in Daytona Beach,<br />

Florida. The deadline for proposals is<br />

1st July <strong>2020</strong>.<br />

“The health and safety of our<br />

attendees, exhibitors, partners and<br />

team are top priority,” says AMI chair,<br />

Chris Petty. “With that in mind, we fully<br />

expect the AMI Conference & Expo<br />

to occur, despite current conditions<br />

related to the COVID-19 crisis. We are<br />

taking safety precautions for all AMI<br />

events and we continue to position<br />

ourselves to pivot as this unpredictable<br />

pandemic unfolds.”<br />

www.marinaassociation.org<br />

and have been operational for at least<br />

two years. Functionality, aesthetics and<br />

environmental sustainability all play a<br />

part in the evaluation criteria.<br />

The submission deadline is 3rd<br />

October <strong>2020</strong>.<br />

For further information, e:reccom@<br />

pianc.org or pianc.reccom@gmail.com<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong> 9<br />

Innovative.<br />

Durable.<br />

Low-<br />

Maintenance.<br />

EXPERT DOCK BUILDER<br />

AND MARINE CONTRACTOR<br />

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800-733-5679


WORLD NEWS<br />

Southern<br />

adds three to<br />

portfolio<br />

USA: Southern <strong>Marina</strong> Holdings, LLC has<br />

purchased three premium Florida marina facilities<br />

from Aqua Marine Partners. The addition of Hi-Lift<br />

<strong>Marina</strong> in Aventura, Hidden Harbour in Pompano<br />

Beach and Palm Harbour in Cape Haze brings<br />

the growing Southern <strong>Marina</strong>s portfolio to ten<br />

properties.<br />

All three marinas have special<br />

attributes. Hi Lift has nearby access from<br />

the Baker’s Haulover Inlet and features<br />

full-service dry storage operations, a<br />

new boat showroom, boat club and<br />

Yacht brokerage. Hidden Harbour is the<br />

newest and most prestigious drystack in<br />

Pompano Beach and has fast and easy<br />

access to the Atlantic. It will soon have<br />

a vibrant, new neighbouring community<br />

of apartments, restaurants and retail,<br />

currently under development by Aqua<br />

<strong>Marina</strong> Partners CEO Andy Sturner.<br />

Palm Harbour is a boutique-style<br />

resort marina near Boca Grande Pass<br />

– home to the world’s best tarpon<br />

fishing. With a combination of drystack<br />

and wet slips, it can accommodate<br />

boats up to 65ft (20m).<br />

Andrew Gendron, principal and<br />

chief investment officer with Southern<br />

<strong>Marina</strong>s, said the company was excited<br />

to have secured the marinas. “Our<br />

overall goal is to continue to expand the<br />

Southern <strong>Marina</strong>s brand through the<br />

purchase of key locations. Our team<br />

is always on the lookout for new and<br />

exciting opportunities like this one from<br />

Aqua Marine.”<br />

While the marinas are currently open<br />

and running as normal, Southern’s<br />

management team will continue to<br />

monitor all government updates on the<br />

COVID-19 pandemic. The marinas will<br />

be implementing the protocols outlined<br />

by these agencies with the primary<br />

goal of providing a safe environment<br />

for boaters and team members at their<br />

locations.<br />

SF boosts factory facilities to<br />

meet increased demand<br />

GLOBAL: SF <strong>Marina</strong> has commenced operations at new manufacturing facilities in Malaysia and Thailand. This is in<br />

addition to expanding its production sites in Sweden, the USA and New Zealand.<br />

The addition of the Malaysia and<br />

Thailand facilities strengthens SF<br />

<strong>Marina</strong>’s commitment to the Asian<br />

region. Located in the Kuala Lumpur<br />

and Bangkok regions respectively, they<br />

are scaled to meet the current demand<br />

for floating concrete structures within<br />

the area.<br />

In Sweden, at the company’s<br />

Wallhamn manufacturing facility, SF<br />

added a sixth precast production<br />

bed and built a new concrete plant<br />

in 2019. This year, it acquired an<br />

adjacent building to accommodate the<br />

expanding demand for its products.<br />

These steps provide the means to<br />

deliver increasingly larger items such<br />

as 10m (33ft) wide x 3m (10ft) high<br />

breakwaters and a floating hotel<br />

structure measuring 22m (72ft) wide x<br />

63m (207ft) long.<br />

The factory expansion of the<br />

North American division, SF <strong>Marina</strong><br />

USA, added a second precast<br />

production line for increased capacity.<br />

It also reconfigured its logistics to<br />

accommodate the delivery of larger<br />

structures via barge. Located in<br />

Norfolk, Virginia, it matches the<br />

delivery levels of SF <strong>Marina</strong>’s other<br />

primary plant in Dubai, UAE.<br />

In New Zealand, SF is constructing<br />

a second production facility to meet<br />

growing demand. This expands the<br />

company’s presence in the country<br />

by as much as 300%. The location<br />

is expected to begin operations this<br />

summer.<br />

“SF <strong>Marina</strong> has expanded its<br />

production capacity worldwide to<br />

keep pace with global demand,” said<br />

Michael Sigvardsson, SF <strong>Marina</strong><br />

System CEO. “But that’s just half of<br />

the equation. We’re also growing our<br />

technology and working on exciting<br />

new products to help marinas weather<br />

the storms for the next 100 years.”<br />

SF <strong>Marina</strong> pioneered the floating<br />

concrete pontoon in the 1920s. It has<br />

additional production facilities in Egypt,<br />

Greece, Saudi Arabia, Spain and Turkey.<br />

10<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong>


WORLD NEWS<br />

<strong>Marina</strong>s21:<br />

a post-pandemic<br />

marker point?<br />

AUSTRALIA: The <strong>Marina</strong> Industries Association (MIA) is putting a lot of energy<br />

into ensuring its next conference and trade exhibition in 2021 will be an<br />

important milestone for the marina industry recovering from COVID-19.<br />

MIA president Andrew Chapman<br />

said with the dates, location and overall<br />

structure now set, the <strong>Marina</strong>s21<br />

Committee is working hard to ensure<br />

the conference and the exhibition<br />

agenda aligns with industry needs.<br />

“As we commence the long haul out<br />

of COVID-19 we will be providing a<br />

slightly different offering,” he noted. “The<br />

move to on-line communications is being<br />

accelerated and health and hygiene<br />

will remain an important issue. The<br />

dire tourism downturn is having a huge<br />

impact on some of our members and we<br />

need to strengthen our focus on tourism<br />

and our cooperation and coordination<br />

with the mainstream tourism industry.”<br />

The <strong>Marina</strong>s21 International<br />

Conference and Trade Exhibition will be<br />

held 24th-25th <strong>May</strong> 2021 at the Marriott<br />

on the Gold Coast. In 2019 there were<br />

350 participants from 11 countries in<br />

attendance. The timing for the event<br />

has again been set so as to follow on<br />

from the Sanctuary Cove International<br />

Boat Show.<br />

MIA <strong>Marina</strong>s21 Committee chairman,<br />

Mike Harvey, said it is important the<br />

planning process is aligned with the<br />

latest international, national and state<br />

forecasts and plans arising from the<br />

pandemic. “There are already many<br />

more variables in the planning of this<br />

event. We are heartened however by<br />

Australia and New Zealand’s progress<br />

in flattening the curve and the steps<br />

being laid out to get the marina<br />

industries back to full strength.”<br />

Mooring boost in Hebrides<br />

UK: Local and visiting leisure craft to Stornoway Harbour on the Isle of Lewis<br />

in the Outer Hebrides will be able to moor up at a new 76-berth marina in 2021.<br />

Inland and Coastal <strong>Marina</strong> Systems<br />

(ICMS) is installing its standard marina<br />

walkway and finger pontoons as part<br />

of Stornoway Port Authority’s 2017<br />

masterplan. The GRP mini-mesh<br />

decked pontoons will provide muchneeded<br />

additional marina berths, all<br />

with excellent anti-slip properties.<br />

“Being in the Hebrides has its<br />

logistical issues when it comes to<br />

installation but we always find a<br />

solution,” explains ICMS project<br />

manager Brian Curley. “Assembling the<br />

pontoons offsite really helps time-wise<br />

and reduces the amount of specialist<br />

machinery needed in situ.”<br />

“This exciting project will also<br />

incorporate a new slipway and boat<br />

hoist, enabling the<br />

marina to offer boatyard<br />

services to visitors<br />

and port users,” he<br />

continues. “We are<br />

delighted to be involved<br />

in such a prominent<br />

project in Scotland,<br />

which will be enjoyed<br />

by locals, sailors from<br />

abroad and the wider<br />

community long into the<br />

future.”<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong> 11<br />

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Made in Italy


WORLD NEWS<br />

Lake marina<br />

ready for first<br />

Photo: Asia Pacific Superyachts Indonesia<br />

season<br />

ITALY: As Italy begins to contemplate life after COVID-<br />

19, Walcon Marine’s latest project in the country will<br />

be a magnet for visitors.<br />

The new marina is located in a<br />

stunning location at Castelletto Ticino<br />

to the south of Lake Maggiore, one of<br />

the largest and most beautiful of the<br />

famous Italian lakes in the north of the<br />

country. It has been built as part of the<br />

development of a contemporary, stylish<br />

new lakeside headquarters complex<br />

designed by Piuarch for Techbau, a<br />

major Italian construction and civil<br />

engineering company, and sits directly<br />

in front of the building.<br />

Walcon’s Italian partner Walcon<br />

Marine Italia (operating as the<br />

Sistema Walcon brand) was<br />

responsible for the supply of the<br />

marina, which has been engineered<br />

by Walcon to<br />

make full use<br />

of the lines<br />

of an existing<br />

curving<br />

breakwater<br />

that protects<br />

the location from swell and wash. The<br />

mooring facilities comprise a 190m<br />

(620ft) walkway that runs along the<br />

inside of the breakwater and provides<br />

stern-to mooring for around 40 boats<br />

up to 12m (39ft) in length, and a<br />

second straight 68m (223ft) walkway<br />

for stern-to mooring on both sides for<br />

a similar number of boats. This pier<br />

projects out into the harbour.<br />

Poised for visitors<br />

when lockdown eases<br />

BALI: Benoa <strong>Marina</strong>, the first ‘international standard’ marina in Indonesia,<br />

opened in January. The facility was built by Pelindo Property Investments<br />

(PPI <strong>Marina</strong>), a subsidiary of government harbour company Pelindo.<br />

The marina has been built using Antares<br />

aluminium pontoons (a Walcon Marine<br />

Italia variant of Walcon’s System 2000<br />

range), polyethylene floats and Novowood<br />

WPC decking in an attractive copper-brown<br />

colour. Access to each walkway is via two<br />

10m x 2m (33ft x 7ft) access bridges with<br />

aluminium handrails.<br />

The marina is managed by CM Nautica<br />

and is open to the general public.<br />

“The new marina has space for 3 x 90m<br />

[10 x 295ft] vessels in alongside positions<br />

and non-potable water can be supplied,”<br />

explained Thomas Taatjes of Asia Pacific<br />

Superyachts in Bali. “Shore power is via<br />

genset rental and we (APS) have a genset<br />

we can use for our clients and also water<br />

treatment facilities to make the dock water<br />

potable,” he added.<br />

“The floating pontoons are top quality<br />

and easily accessed by ramps,<br />

making provisioning and<br />

spare part deliveries simple<br />

and convenient. The lines<br />

are secured using the pilings<br />

which are spaced at 10m [33ft]<br />

and have a diameter of 90cm<br />

[35in], so straps and shackles<br />

are required. Transport can<br />

be arranged from a variety of<br />

sources,” he continued.<br />

Connected to the airport by<br />

a flyover, it is a fast pick up and<br />

drop off at the boat for guests<br />

and the perfect starting point for<br />

cruising once Indonesia is open<br />

to arrivals. On down-time, all<br />

the hotspots of Bali are within<br />

reach and guests and crew will<br />

enjoy everything on offer inside<br />

and outside the marina.<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong> 13


WORLD NEWS<br />

New breakwater<br />

at Seattle marina<br />

USA: Elliott Bay <strong>Marina</strong> in Seattle,<br />

Washington – the largest private<br />

marina on the west coast of the<br />

USA – has replaced its 1,000ft<br />

(305m) long breakwater. Canadian<br />

company International Marine<br />

Floatation Systems (IMFS)<br />

designed and built the new<br />

structure.<br />

Ordered to replace a concrete POD<br />

type system with a timber wave fence<br />

underwater structure, the new floating<br />

concrete breakwater will require no<br />

maintenance below the waterline. It<br />

incorporates existing 38ft (12m) finger<br />

slips on one side and accommodates<br />

superyachts of up to 300ft (90m) on<br />

the outer edge.<br />

Built by IMFS in the company’s Delta<br />

yard in British Columbia, the attenuator<br />

has seven structural sections. Each<br />

has been designed to maximise depth<br />

but also follow the ground contour<br />

condition of the site as it slopes from<br />

shoreline to deeper water. To achieve<br />

this, design depths vary from 6-10ft<br />

(2-3m). The sections are connected<br />

with IMFS rubber block connection<br />

pockets which allow for the rubber<br />

blocks and 2.5in (6.3cm) swage cable<br />

to be replaced without interrupting<br />

electrical and water cables.<br />

IMFS worked with a team from<br />

Amo Construction, who removed<br />

the old system and installed the new<br />

breakwater on 17 existing mooring<br />

piles. Concrete fingers were removed<br />

and reconnected. There was little<br />

room for error as all components had<br />

to fit back precisely.<br />

Upgrades maintain<br />

quality at Sunrise<br />

USA: Significant enhancements have been completed by Westrec <strong>Marina</strong>s at<br />

Sunrise Harbor <strong>Marina</strong> in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The marina is located on the<br />

Intracoastal Waterway in the heart of the city’s bustling yachting community.<br />

Work undertaken comprised<br />

dredging the marina basin<br />

to a depth of 11ft (3.3m) to<br />

give access to larger boats<br />

with deeper drafts throughout<br />

the entire water space;<br />

substantially remodelling the<br />

fitness centre and Casbah<br />

Spa; upgrading the marina<br />

office; installing a new security<br />

system, which operates all<br />

doors and elevators, and<br />

controls garage access; and<br />

enhancing Wi-Fi so that it<br />

reaches the entire marina as a<br />

streamable high-speed service.<br />

“Sunrise Harbor enjoys a sterling<br />

reputation as a prestigious yachting<br />

facility,” says marina manager Brad St<br />

Coeur CMM. “Of course, earning and<br />

maintaining a good reputation require<br />

constant analysis and action to exceed<br />

expectations. The Sunrise Harbor team is<br />

pleased to announce these considerable<br />

Cottonwood Creek<br />

adds D Dock<br />

USA: A new D Dock at Cottonwood Creek <strong>Marina</strong> on Lake Louisville just north<br />

of Dallas Fort Worth has been completed by Meeco Sullivan.<br />

It is the seventh expansion in 18<br />

years that the company has handled at<br />

this marina for the Miller family, which<br />

also owns and operates two other<br />

facilities in Texas: Anchor Bay <strong>Marina</strong><br />

and Collin Park <strong>Marina</strong>.<br />

Cottonwood Creek’s relationship with<br />

Meeco Sullivan began in 2002 when it<br />

designed, built and installed a 152-<br />

slip galvanised steel dock system. It<br />

has subsequently installed six further<br />

docks in various sizes with super<br />

span roofing, encapsulated foam and<br />

aggregate decking, a service/fuel dock<br />

with ship’s store and a 600ft (183m)<br />

wave attenuator. The newest expansion<br />

on D Dock included adding twelve 32ft<br />

(10m) covered slips.<br />

improvements to the most critical<br />

aspects of operating a premier marina.”<br />

Care was also taken with a green<br />

approach. “As a Clean <strong>Marina</strong><br />

designated by the State of Florida, we<br />

ensure that our work while upgrading<br />

Sunrise Harbor has met the obligations<br />

we have toward ensuring that<br />

environmental responsibility is integral<br />

to our marina operation,” he adds.<br />

14<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong>


WORLD NEWS<br />

Safe Harbor adds three<br />

USA: Safe Harbor <strong>Marina</strong>s boosted its portfolio with the purchase of three<br />

additional marinas via Colliers International in the first quarter of the year. It<br />

now has nearly 100 facilities.<br />

First to join the network was Sunset<br />

Bay <strong>Marina</strong> (above), a full-service<br />

marina near the city of Boston,<br />

Massachusetts. The 2 acre (0.8ha)<br />

family-owned property on Boston’s<br />

desirable South Shore includes 161 wet<br />

slips, a 250-seat restaurant and event<br />

facility, on-site service and repair and<br />

winter storage.<br />

“The Folsoms purchased the marina<br />

a little over ten years ago and rebuilt<br />

the property to bring it up to modern<br />

standards,” said Colliers International<br />

managing director Andrew Cantor.<br />

“They created a wonderful asset with<br />

significant cash flow that was very<br />

desirable to investors and marina<br />

companies as potential purchasers. At<br />

the same time, Safe Harbor is in growth<br />

mode and this acquisition helps them<br />

expand their portfolio in<br />

the region.”<br />

The second purchase<br />

covered two marinas:<br />

Mears Point and<br />

Great Oak Landing on<br />

Chesapeake Bay near<br />

Annapolis, Maryland.<br />

Mears Point <strong>Marina</strong> has<br />

540 wet slips and two<br />

restaurants and sits<br />

within a 42-acre (17ha)<br />

site, which includes<br />

permission to build 211<br />

multifamily units and a<br />

commercial retail/office building.<br />

“Mears Point <strong>Marina</strong> represents<br />

a truly unique opportunity,” Cantor<br />

emphasised. “It’s very rare to find a<br />

property with $1 million of in-place<br />

net operating income annually that<br />

has approvals and utilities in place to<br />

develop what would be the area’s first<br />

resort-style marina community.”<br />

Great Oak Landing (below) has<br />

nearly 74 acres (30ha), 360 wet slips, a<br />

28-room lodge and two restaurants.<br />

The Colliers team marketed the two<br />

properties separately. Interest was<br />

expressed by a variety of prospective<br />

buyers and offers were received from<br />

11 groups.<br />

Safe Harbor now owns seven<br />

marinas on Chesapeake Bay.<br />

Sharpening<br />

regional<br />

focus<br />

MIDDLE EAST & EUROPE: Italian<br />

company Ingemar has signed two<br />

new exclusive licence agreements<br />

to further develop business<br />

opportunities in the Middle East.<br />

Khimji Ramdas LLC (KR) will now<br />

manufacture and market Ingemar<br />

products in Oman. Ingemar will supply<br />

special components and technical<br />

assistance for production. When the<br />

factory site is prepared and a local team<br />

is finalised, the first reinforced concrete<br />

pontoons, measuring 35 x 6m (115 x<br />

20ft) will be manufactured for a fishing<br />

fleet facility in the port of Duqum.<br />

The agreement with KR LLC closely<br />

follows a contract signed with Overseas<br />

AST of Dubai, one of the most important<br />

industrial groups in the Emirates.<br />

Reinforced concrete modules for the<br />

new <strong>Marina</strong> Bay in Dubai Harbour are<br />

already being cast. Megayachts up to<br />

60m (197ft) long will be moored directly<br />

to the maxi floating pontoons and even<br />

bigger yachts up to 120m (390ft) will use<br />

special fingers and anchor with buoys<br />

and a mooring blocks system.<br />

Although there is significant focus<br />

for the company on increasing market<br />

presence in the Middle East, Ingemar<br />

continues, as usual, to complete<br />

projects in the Mediterranean and<br />

Caribbean.<br />

Recent installations in Italy include<br />

<strong>Marina</strong> di Carrara, Porto Cala del<br />

Forte and Cala Balbiano on the island<br />

of Sardinia; floating pontoon systems<br />

have been supplied for Skala Sikia,<br />

Vougliagmeni and <strong>Marina</strong> Zea in<br />

Greece; and second and third phases<br />

have been completed for Lustica Bay<br />

<strong>Marina</strong> in Montenegro.<br />

Despite uncertainties in various<br />

markets, the Ingemar Group enjoyed<br />

a turnover of over €10 million in 2019.<br />

This represented a slight growth on<br />

2018’s figures. An important share<br />

of investment was devoted to R&D<br />

activities, to the study and design of<br />

new floating products and to the search<br />

for materials and innovative technical<br />

solutions for their assembly, storage<br />

and handling.<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong> 15


SETTING THE STANDARDS OF EXCELLENCE<br />

Wherever the site, whatever the size we have the bespoke marina berthing and<br />

protection solution. The photograph shows a recent project at Conwy <strong>Marina</strong>, Wales.<br />

Let us design and build your next project.<br />

Banagher, Ireland (Head Office): +353 579153963<br />

Lossiemouth, Scotland (Sales Office): +44 1343 813233<br />

Southampton, England (Sales Office): +44 239 4002797<br />

Email: sales@inlandandcoastal.com Website: www.inlandandcoastal.com<br />

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From the smallest to the largest<br />

Any customized solutions for every need<br />

Minus Minus top led Geo Aquarius Domyna Link


WORLD NEWS<br />

SF rebuilds neglected<br />

pier marina<br />

USA: The <strong>Marina</strong> at MacMillan Pier in Provincetown, Massachusetts has<br />

been revamped with a new system supplied by SF <strong>Marina</strong> USA. It had been<br />

unprotected from the elements for years and was beyond repair.<br />

The project called for nine SF400<br />

Series heavily reinforced floating<br />

concrete breakwaters to protect the<br />

inner marina. These are specially<br />

designed to absorb and distribute<br />

stress during storms. Installed by lead<br />

contractor ACK Marine & General<br />

Contracting, the 590ft (180m) system is<br />

held in place with 18 steel piles.<br />

Nine SF1030 Series 3m (10ft) wide<br />

concrete pontoons of various sizes<br />

were used to rebuild the 249ft (76m)<br />

north and 351ft (107m) south docks.<br />

Provincetown reused its timber fingers<br />

Reconfiguring a<br />

popular town quay<br />

UK: Walcon Marine has completed a comprehensive reconfiguration of the<br />

mooring facilities at the popular and picturesque town quay in Lymington,<br />

Hampshire.<br />

The quay serves both leisure boaters<br />

and fishermen, and Lymington Harbour<br />

Commissioners had concluded that<br />

an upgrade was required to meet the<br />

demand for more visitor walk-ashore<br />

berths.<br />

The project took place between<br />

November 2019 and February <strong>2020</strong><br />

and involved a series of smaller jobs as<br />

various existing moorings were moved<br />

and replaced and new ones added.<br />

Topping the list was the task to more<br />

than double the number of walk-ashore<br />

that attach to the docks’ embedded<br />

stainless steel T-tracks. Conduits<br />

and pipes for electricity and water<br />

are internal and make for a clean<br />

appearance and low maintenance. The<br />

completed structure supports vessels<br />

up to 46ft (14m) at around 50 slips.<br />

Located on the tip of Cape Cod,<br />

the natural deepwater harbour of<br />

Provincetown is where the <strong>May</strong>flower<br />

first set anchor in 1620. MacMillan<br />

Pier supports a mix of recreational and<br />

commercial traffic, including a ferry<br />

terminal and whale-watching operations.<br />

berths from 19 to 46 while at the<br />

same time continuing to offer a choice<br />

between visitor walk-ashore berths,<br />

with power and water, and lower cost<br />

river moorings.<br />

All pontoon infrastructure was<br />

replaced with Walcon System 21<br />

pontoons to match the new walkashore<br />

facilities. The pontoons for the<br />

fishing fleet have been fitted out to<br />

a commercial standard with rubber<br />

D-fenders, GRP mesh decking and<br />

internal pile guides.<br />

Crossroads<br />

<strong>Marina</strong><br />

opens for<br />

business<br />

MALDIVES: The Crossroads<br />

Yacht <strong>Marina</strong>, located a 15 minute<br />

fast boat ride from capital city<br />

Malé, has now opened. The<br />

facility, outlined in <strong>Marina</strong> <strong>World</strong><br />

November/December 2018, forms<br />

part of an integrated leisure and<br />

lifestyle hub and is the first of its<br />

kind in the country.<br />

Catering for 30 vessels of 10<br />

to 60m (33 to 197ft), it has fullservice<br />

back-up, crew facilities<br />

and concierge offerings. Onsite<br />

superyacht agency Asia Pacific<br />

Superyachts Maldives (APS)<br />

provides all paperwork, provisioning,<br />

services and itineraries needed for<br />

superyachts to enjoy their stay and<br />

maximise cruising potential.<br />

As of the end of <strong>June</strong>, lockdown<br />

restrictions are expected to ease<br />

and commercial and private flights<br />

will be allowed. A further boost to<br />

tourism potential was confirmed in<br />

April when fees to enter the Maldives<br />

were substantially reduced, making<br />

it a viable stopover for all yachts<br />

crossing the Indian Ocean.<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong> 17


NEWS FOCUS: LINDLEY GROUP<br />

90 years for Grupo Lindley<br />

From paper importers to internationally renowned marine equipment suppliers, the Lindley group of companies (Grupo<br />

Lindley) has climbed high. The company celebrated its 90th anniversary in April.<br />

The company’s origins date back to<br />

1930, when Rudolf Ahlers and Antonio<br />

Lindley – with £400 in their pockets –<br />

established Ahlers Lindley in Lisbon,<br />

Portugal as an English paper importer<br />

and distributor. Despite Ahlers’ death in<br />

1933, the company grew successfully<br />

over the next two decades and acquired<br />

Tuella Tin Mines in the north of Portugal.<br />

The company developed several<br />

other mining interests in the pre-war<br />

years in support of the allied war effort,<br />

by supplying raw materials from neutral<br />

Portugal, particularly tin and tungsten.<br />

After the Second <strong>World</strong> War, trading<br />

activity again diversified to include<br />

machinery, metals and chemical raw<br />

materials. In 1956, Ahlers Lindley<br />

began supplying harbour equipment;<br />

it supplied two steam cranes to the<br />

Portuguese naval base, Arsenal do<br />

Alfeite – one of which still exists today.<br />

During the 1960s, the mines were<br />

closed or sold off and the business<br />

returned to concentrating on importing<br />

high quality paper, along with<br />

machinery and metals, chemical raw<br />

materials and plastics.<br />

In 1966, the second generation<br />

Above: Lindley employees at group<br />

headquarters in Cascais. Right: <strong>Marina</strong> da<br />

Gloria in Rio de Janeiro was installed with<br />

a new Lindley pontoon system in time for<br />

the 2016 Olympic Games.<br />

Lindleys took over management from<br />

Lindley’s widow and a period of rapid<br />

expansion followed, resulting in the<br />

building and purchase of premises in<br />

Cacém and Porto. In 1981, the group<br />

purchased its current headquarters,<br />

Edifício Mical, in Cascais. The site,<br />

established in 1951, had previously<br />

been a large mining and crushing plant<br />

belonging to Mical, Mecanica Industrial<br />

de Cascais. The addition of Mical to<br />

the group pushed the total number of<br />

employees to more than 200.<br />

In response to the recession of the<br />

early 1980s, the group reorganised<br />

and divided into several companies<br />

that allowed them to specialise in their<br />

respective markets. By the 1990s the<br />

group comprised: Almovi, a supplier<br />

of mechanical handling equipment<br />

and hydraulic platforms; Almec,<br />

supplying industrial compressed air<br />

and sandblasting equipment; Alchema,<br />

supplying industrial chemicals and<br />

plastics; Florestal, focused on forestry<br />

and wood processing equipment; Alma,<br />

providing platform and scaffolding<br />

hire; and Lindley, supplying floating<br />

equipment for marinas and harbours.<br />

This period, as the third Lindley<br />

generation joined the business, also<br />

saw growth. Firstly in the mechanical<br />

handling area through Almovi, which<br />

distributed major brands such as Grove<br />

and Demag cranes, Simon platforms<br />

and Marine Travelift. Secondly, through<br />

Lindley, with its own brands in marinas<br />

and marine aids to navigation.<br />

From 2000 onwards, the business<br />

began to consolidate, largely in<br />

the marine business area. Almovi<br />

strengthened its position as a supplier<br />

of harbour and industrial handling<br />

equipment, while expanding its<br />

18<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong>


NEWS FOCUS: LINDLEY GROUP<br />

maintenance and service facilities.<br />

Lindley developed its own designs<br />

and products for marinas, while Mical<br />

manufactured for both companies.<br />

In 2004, the company took its first<br />

steps into foreign trade by establishing<br />

Almarin, in Barcelona, to distribute<br />

marine navigation aids in Spain. Seven<br />

years later, as the financial crisis hit<br />

southern Europe, Almarin and Lindley<br />

pivoted to start operations in South<br />

America, where Almarin won a contract<br />

to supply and install navigation buoys<br />

for the Colombian Navy.<br />

Meanwhile Lindley, after supplying<br />

its first marina contracts in Brazil and<br />

taking on further significant contracts,<br />

established a subsidiary in Rio de<br />

Janeiro in 2015: Lindley BR. This led to<br />

a major contract to reorganise, supply<br />

and install <strong>Marina</strong> da Gloria in Rio for<br />

the Olympic Games in 2016. At the<br />

same time, the group invested in Salt<br />

Technologies, a start-up specialised<br />

in marine structure calculations and<br />

high-resolution digital content. Salt<br />

Lindley specialises in the installation<br />

of gangways and pier installations for<br />

mooring various types of vessel. This<br />

facility was built in Tavira on the<br />

Algarve coast, Portugal.<br />

Technologies subsequently developed<br />

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132x182_<strong>Marina</strong> <strong>World</strong>_19_Final.indd 1 07/02/2019 16:11<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong> 19


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CRISIS MANAGEMENT<br />

Owners were still able to access their boats<br />

at <strong>Marina</strong> Palms in Aventura, Florida,<br />

despite the general coronavirus ‘shut<br />

down’.<br />

Group feedback:<br />

lockdown and beyond<br />

Managing marinas as the coronavirus threat increased called for new<br />

initiatives and special measures. Although core action in terms of hygiene<br />

and social distancing was universal, marina groups devised their own specific<br />

action plans.<br />

US <strong>Marina</strong> Group:<br />

Jim Bronstien<br />

Lockdown: Our marinas in Florida<br />

were ‘shut down’ for a period of time<br />

but, in reality, they remained open as<br />

boats were still accessible by owners,<br />

crew and vendors. Fuel operations were<br />

also restricted but only for a few weeks.<br />

Our marina in Panama was technically<br />

shut down as well. Boat movements on<br />

the water were restricted and are just<br />

opening back up [14 th <strong>May</strong>].<br />

Panama had a stronger stay at<br />

home order that limited men to go out<br />

for essentials like food on Monday,<br />

Wednesday and Friday and women on<br />

Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday and<br />

no one out on Sunday. We reduced our<br />

staff to 50% pay and work.<br />

Opening: Boating activities have<br />

increased as one of the few opportunities<br />

for leisure activities. Our boat club<br />

business grew in activity levels the day<br />

boating was again allowed. There was<br />

lots of pent up demand to boat and get<br />

out of the house. Boating also got a lot of<br />

unintended press – mostly good, some<br />

not as good, but it gave an increased<br />

Croatia has experienced a lower impact<br />

from COVID-19 than many other European<br />

countries. Customers are using their boats<br />

at D-Marin Borik with sensible<br />

measures in place.<br />

awareness of how you can socially<br />

distance yourself and be safe.<br />

D-Marin network:<br />

Dean Smith<br />

Lockdown: The restrictions imposed<br />

by the different governments affecting<br />

our marinas were very similar and<br />

social distancing and hygiene standards<br />

were imposed in each facility. The<br />

marinas remained open for enquiries<br />

and administration but were closed to<br />

customers visiting and using their boats.<br />

Our management approach was<br />

common across the countries in that<br />

the health and safety of the staff and<br />

customers was our highest priority. The<br />

teams worked split shifts and all of the<br />

safe systems of work were reviewed.<br />

For those clients who were far away<br />

from their vessels, we made sure that<br />

they could request service providers<br />

who could look after their boat in their<br />

absence.<br />

Opening: As soon as the lockdown<br />

rules were eased boat owners<br />

immediately started to arrive to spend<br />

some time on their boats, undertaking<br />

maintenance or simply sailing.<br />

Everyone is aware how important it is<br />

to be responsible and cautious in order<br />

to stay safe. New social distancing and<br />

hygiene plans were put in place and the<br />

customers were happy to follow them<br />

given that it allowed them to get back<br />

on the water.<br />

F3 <strong>Marina</strong>: Dani Mill<br />

Lockdown: The marina we manage<br />

in Panama City, Panama has been<br />

closed since the government put<br />

severe restrictions on their citizens [as<br />

at 26 th <strong>May</strong>]. The marinas we manage<br />

in Florida were open and the effects<br />

on our customers and staff were more<br />

immediate. We worked as an entire<br />

company to ensure our staff were safe<br />

and comfortable providing our worldclass<br />

service to our customers.<br />

Our Great Lakes area marinas did<br />

not allow customers in the marina office<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong> 21


CRISIS MANAGEMENT<br />

during the beginning of the pandemic<br />

and did transactions via phone, email<br />

or window service. These marinas were<br />

able to open on time, with restrictions,<br />

due to being located in areas where<br />

marinas were considered an essential<br />

business.<br />

Opening: With the exception of our<br />

boater population that is at a higher<br />

risk of contracting COVID-19, many<br />

boaters used their boats more as they<br />

had time off of work and chose their<br />

boat as their ‘shelter in place’ location.<br />

The predominant customer mood was<br />

accepting and appreciative of the steps<br />

our team took to allow them to safely<br />

use their boat and facility.<br />

BR <strong>Marina</strong>s:<br />

Gabriela Lobato Marins<br />

Lockdown: We have marinas in<br />

five different cities in Brazil and local<br />

governments acted differently. All,<br />

however, prohibited any kind of tourism<br />

so charter companies have been<br />

unable to work since 16 th March. Our<br />

administrative staff have been working<br />

from home since this date and all<br />

employees over the age of 60 were also<br />

sent home.<br />

We were open in Rio, Buzios and<br />

Agra dos Reis until 25 th <strong>May</strong> but the<br />

mayor of Agra dos Reis declared a 15-<br />

day lockdown until 8 th <strong>June</strong>. This affects<br />

the drystack; clients with wet slips can<br />

still use their boats.<br />

We started lots of WhatsApp,<br />

Instagram, Facebook and email<br />

campaigns and also offered free<br />

Restrictions in place in Panama reduced<br />

operations at US <strong>Marina</strong> Group’s<br />

Buenaventura <strong>Marina</strong>.<br />

education (ten lessons from a boating<br />

licence course), tips on what to watch<br />

while at home and a fundraiser called<br />

Good Wind where we raised 112,00<br />

reals enabling us to buy 32 tons of food<br />

to help those in need in surrounding<br />

communities.<br />

Opening: Our clients are still<br />

using their boats but use masks for<br />

themselves and their crew and don’t<br />

bring guests aboard etc. We’ve seen a<br />

decrease of up to 55% in boat use at<br />

our marinas and do not know when or if<br />

we will have a <strong>2020</strong> Rio Boat Show.<br />

C&N <strong>Marina</strong>s:<br />

Management team<br />

Lockdown: As soon as the first case of<br />

COVID-19 was reported on the island<br />

of Malta on 7 th March, Grand Harbour<br />

<strong>Marina</strong> suspended all social events and<br />

switched staff onto a shift work base<br />

Employees at <strong>Marina</strong> da Gloria in Brazil<br />

are following safe working practices.<br />

pattern to comply with health authority<br />

requirements.<br />

Likewise, within a few days following<br />

the outbreak of the pandemic in<br />

Turkey, all the commercial areas in<br />

Cesme Marine were closed to adhere<br />

to government guidelines. We quickly<br />

initiated a skeleton workforce within<br />

the marina to ensure the safety and<br />

security of our berth holders’ boats. All<br />

our employees who could work from<br />

home started to work from home, some<br />

continue to do so [as at 21 st <strong>May</strong>].<br />

Grenada, Carriacou and Petite<br />

Martinique did an amazing job in<br />

containing the spread of the disease.<br />

From the start, Port Louis <strong>Marina</strong> fully<br />

supported the health protocol and<br />

government regulations to ensure<br />

the safety of employees, customers<br />

and community. Port Louis <strong>Marina</strong><br />

was a key partner in successfully<br />

implementing the yacht entry protocol.<br />

22<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong>


CRISIS MANAGEMENT<br />

F3 <strong>Marina</strong> fully expects its Florida<br />

facilities, such as Halifax Harbor <strong>Marina</strong><br />

in Daytona Beach, to enjoy a<br />

good summer season.<br />

Opening: Grand Harbour <strong>Marina</strong><br />

managed to stay open 24/7 throughout,<br />

with berthing masters available around<br />

the clock carrying out regular dock<br />

walks. The marina also took the initiative<br />

to create a virtual crew programme<br />

specifically tailored to the crew not able<br />

to leave their vessels or with limited<br />

movement around the marina. Virtual<br />

yoga and personal training classes<br />

are still being provided as well as chat<br />

forums to allow crew to socialise virtually<br />

and stay active and healthy.<br />

As at 21 st <strong>May</strong> travel and cruise<br />

restrictions have not been removed in<br />

large cities such as Istanbul and Izmir<br />

where quarantine is valid. There has<br />

been an increasing demand from boat<br />

owners to spend curfews on board, but<br />

this is not yet possible as quarantine<br />

practice has not been lifted in large<br />

cities. We have customers who spend<br />

time on their boats depending on the<br />

marina. The mood is currently cautious<br />

considering the prohibitions. However,<br />

the demand will increase when the<br />

quarantine ban is lifted.<br />

Port Louis <strong>Marina</strong> is now open and<br />

the safety of Grenada and its people<br />

remains our top priority. We continue to<br />

ensure best practice and measures are<br />

continuously assessed. We are actively<br />

taking bookings for the hurricane<br />

season.<br />

What’s to come as the threat of<br />

COVID-19 reduces?<br />

“<strong>Marina</strong>s should still prosper as an<br />

‘escape’ from the house. People will<br />

make shorter trips on boats so as<br />

to stay closer to home without fear<br />

of being caught away in a foreign<br />

country. There will be more boat use<br />

this summer as people want to make<br />

up for lost leisure time, and increased<br />

cleaning of boats. When fall and winter<br />

come, we will probably be somewhat<br />

back to ‘normal’ for marina business<br />

unless economic struggles cause<br />

marina rates and slip demand to drop.”<br />

Jim Bronstein<br />

“If we have learned something, it’s<br />

that, as a business, we have to be<br />

D-Marin is responding swiftly to change and operating with caution<br />

at all of its marinas including its Croatian ‘flagship’ D-Marin Mandalina.<br />

agile and responsive. We can’t predict<br />

everything but we can train our teams<br />

to be ready for anything. It might be<br />

that some things are simply impossible<br />

to predict. We are yet to see the true<br />

scope of the economic consequences.<br />

If our customers will use their boats<br />

less frequently or whether international<br />

travel will restart in the same way. Until<br />

there is a vaccine, D-Marin will be<br />

ready to adapt and help our customers<br />

as much as we possibly can.” Dean<br />

Smith<br />

“There may be a slowdown of<br />

transient business as boaters get<br />

comfortable with going to new locations<br />

with possible increased positive cases.<br />

We expect our marinas to continue to<br />

be popular summer hangouts in the<br />

Great Lakes area and for our Florida<br />

marinas to be great places to visit and<br />

enjoy.” Dani Mill<br />

“What we know is that when this is all<br />

over everybody will run to their boats<br />

and sail, see the sea and breathe.<br />

And we will see an opportunity to<br />

attract new customers to our small<br />

boating market who will be able to<br />

enjoy our vast and beautiful coastline.<br />

We are preparing a campaign to<br />

promote brokerage, charter and local<br />

businesses. It is time to join forces.”<br />

Gabriela Lobato Marins<br />

“Once the travel ban eases, we are<br />

certain the industry will flourish in full<br />

force to compensate for time lost out<br />

on the water. The yachting community,<br />

as a whole, has come together as a<br />

strong entity during these times from all<br />

industry perspectives. This, in turn, will<br />

have a positive impact on the yachting<br />

industry.” C&N <strong>Marina</strong>s<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong> 23


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CRISIS MANAGEMENT<br />

The day after<br />

How is the marina industry going to handle going back to business after this<br />

scary, almost science-fiction COVID-19 medical and social experience? Oscar<br />

Siches shares his thoughts<br />

Most of us live in countries that<br />

have already started to ease strong<br />

confinement measures, and an<br />

educated guess that many people<br />

will be able to use their boats with<br />

minimal restrictions by mid-<strong>June</strong> is<br />

not at all daring. Most governments<br />

forget about the singularities of marine<br />

recreational activities and place the<br />

whole group of users under “maritime”<br />

or “transport” or, at best, “fishing”. This<br />

confirms the need for us to create<br />

a strong relationship with the state<br />

administration. If we inform them it will<br />

help ensure the continuity of our sport<br />

without big hiccups.<br />

Many associations big and small are<br />

issuing guidelines for yacht harbour<br />

behaviour on and after the re-opening<br />

of facilities. Invariably, 80% of the<br />

papers enumerate procedures for<br />

personal cleaning, social distancing,<br />

mask wearing, glove availability, i.e.<br />

information that everybody has listened<br />

to over the past weeks, when TV and<br />

social media saturated us to exhaustion<br />

with such messages. There’s no merit<br />

in repeating all of this information.<br />

Some organisations went a step<br />

further and created a protocol for the<br />

use of the facilities. They organised<br />

way-in and way-out paths, time slots for<br />

bathroom and shower use, circulation on<br />

piers and pontoons and right of way in<br />

gangways; procedures that are easy to<br />

understand and follow. Booking offices<br />

helped by sending out crew/passenger<br />

lists and ETAs ahead of schedule, and<br />

outlining procedures for check-in and<br />

check-out for charter boats, all of which<br />

helped to reduce the risk of catching the<br />

disease. And one very important thing<br />

has not changed. Once you embark on a<br />

boat and cast off, the oceans are yours,<br />

and the limits are the ones you set<br />

between the boat and the universe.<br />

There is, however, another very<br />

important thing, which I feel is missing<br />

in all the ‘guidance’: the human element.<br />

The people who have received an extra<br />

blow by losing family or friends, losing<br />

their jobs, their income, the stability<br />

they’ve gained after years of doing their<br />

best in life. People like this are also<br />

part of the marina industry. They are<br />

self-employed mechanics, sail repair<br />

craftsmen, electricians, metal workers,<br />

chefs and waiters in marina restaurants.<br />

With the recent relaxation of isolation<br />

rules and partial opening of many<br />

marinas and yacht harbours, the<br />

guidelines for user behaviour developed<br />

by various associations in many<br />

countries and especially those put<br />

forward by the International Council of<br />

Marine Industry Associations (ICOMIA)<br />

are being put into practice. But there<br />

is scant attention given to the small<br />

service companies trying to keep their<br />

employees but facing very low demand<br />

as users are encouraged to go directly<br />

to their boats, and when coming back,<br />

to move boat-to-car nonstop. We should<br />

not view them as new pariahs and lock<br />

them away in an emotional safe where<br />

everything unpleasant or inconvenient<br />

is stored until it fades away. They are<br />

part of the industry. They are less lucky<br />

than us (of course we are suffering<br />

too) but they should not be forgotten or<br />

abandoned.<br />

The nautical industry in general and<br />

the yacht harbour/marina industry<br />

in particular share something very<br />

specific: we are bound by the sea, its<br />

freedom and its dangers. A marine<br />

engine technician will share tacitly with<br />

a dockhand or a yacht owner more<br />

feeling of belonging to things nautical<br />

than a vacuum-cleaner assembler will<br />

share with a home owner, or a factory<br />

car wheel fitter to a car dealer.<br />

That’s why I cannot understand that<br />

we are leaving people of our own to<br />

be left on their own during and after<br />

these extremely demanding times.<br />

Such behaviour does not belong to<br />

the nautical spirit. Of course, a human<br />

being’s instinctive reaction is to save<br />

him/herself first, followed by taking care<br />

of closest members (family). Thereafter,<br />

The Port of Palma, especially during the<br />

popular Palma Boat Show, has long been a<br />

vibrant meeting place throughout the year<br />

for boats and visitors enjoying a quality<br />

waterfront experience.<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong> 25


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CRISIS MANAGEMENT<br />

our priorities go to the social groups we<br />

belong to: nationality, job, associations<br />

and affinities.<br />

And this is where I have the<br />

impression that the marina industry<br />

is not reacting as the closely bonded<br />

guild it should be. For some years<br />

we have said that the marina industry<br />

needs more communication, more<br />

cooperation and coordination to be able<br />

to lobby with more chance of success<br />

and to build a database enabling us<br />

to study trends, boat mooring/storing<br />

spaces and seasonal occupation.<br />

Some progress has been done on<br />

the matter, mainly with the help of the<br />

<strong>Marina</strong> Industries Association (MIA)<br />

of Australia and the ICOMIA <strong>Marina</strong>s<br />

Group. But it seems that the industry<br />

has not appreciated the impact of<br />

this year’s pandemic. We are not<br />

speaking about shifting bookings and<br />

occupation or price variation. While<br />

the confinement is in place, a marina’s<br />

day to day is a future situation to be<br />

guessed, a sudden shock to be dealt<br />

with as soon as boat users start to go<br />

boating again. This boating will not be<br />

as it was before: it will be gradual, slow<br />

and very demanding on management<br />

decisions as to how to regulate toilet<br />

and shower use etc. There will be<br />

no more packed restaurants at the<br />

weekend, not even a busy bar to<br />

comment on the catch of the day, the<br />

weather, the neighbour’s new boat or<br />

the latest electronic gadget.<br />

<strong>Marina</strong>s as social communities,<br />

a concept that has been fought for<br />

for many years, will disappear for<br />

some time. The notion of “grouping<br />

is dangerous” will prevail. For how<br />

long? At least as long as the world’s<br />

governments do not consider countries<br />

free of the virus threat, free air travel is<br />

allowed again, and what is much more<br />

important, people do not feel afraid of<br />

being exposed to the virus. For that<br />

matter, media news has not helped at<br />

all by adopting a strong catastrophic<br />

tone. The skipper will always want<br />

to go boating, but many family and<br />

friends will consider that it is too soon<br />

to attempt to do it. And with crippled<br />

services at the marina, the fun will be<br />

considerably less.<br />

We are saturated with the<br />

message of the numbers of people<br />

sick, of deaths, and of hygiene and<br />

social distancing, which is part of<br />

governmental protocols to relax<br />

confinement rules, yet everybody pays<br />

attention and is aware of it. What hurts<br />

me is not seeing a single message<br />

reminding people that boating is a<br />

sport that automatically fulfils the rules<br />

of distancing (if you are less than two<br />

metres from a person on another boat<br />

you’d better call the insurance: you<br />

are in trouble), that is usually enjoyed<br />

with family or friends, that a boat is<br />

very easily sanitised. I also miss the<br />

organising help for all those in the<br />

marina community who are going<br />

through hard times. Raising money<br />

via charities is valid but solidarity is<br />

a horizontal concept that generates<br />

mutual respect. Here are some<br />

thoughts:<br />

• If boat owners are not able to buy fuel<br />

– invite them on your boat<br />

• Give restaurants extra terrace place<br />

at no charge to match their capacity<br />

while fulfilling social distancing<br />

• Small companies are the ones facing<br />

the worst financial trouble: rent and<br />

wages. They will have to downsize to<br />

try to survive. Self-employed single<br />

person services are the next. If the<br />

marina bar or restaurant is operating<br />

at a fraction of capacity, they could<br />

offer cheap meals to marina workers,<br />

own and external.<br />

• Service companies and individuals<br />

can organise small group events:<br />

training on simple subjects like<br />

fishing, engine and outboard<br />

maintenance, cooking onboard,<br />

occupations that the users value and<br />

are simple, and keep the companies<br />

As never seen before? Port of Palma in the<br />

middle of the day during the coronavirus<br />

lockdown belonged exclusively to its yachts.<br />

and service people in contact with the<br />

client.<br />

By doing things like this, various<br />

opportunities will come up for<br />

vulnerable groups and, although it<br />

may not translate into immediate<br />

job increase, it will help people<br />

psychologically by making them feel<br />

less abandoned, and still part of the<br />

marina community. The one value for<br />

the users will be health safety, and they<br />

will agree to change their habits and<br />

respect new ones.<br />

Of course the ideas and examples<br />

given here are not from the coretraditional<br />

procedures we knew and<br />

followed up to January <strong>2020</strong>, but the<br />

priority is, at least for the next five to<br />

ten years, to make the users as well<br />

as the whole industry feel comfortable.<br />

Everybody in the industry knows that<br />

without environmentally controlled<br />

waters, there is no industry. Neither is<br />

any industry without people, and this<br />

is now the weak link. The way forward<br />

is something to be done by all parties,<br />

if we want to succeed. This awful<br />

situation has marked us indelibly. Let’s<br />

hope the lesson is learned and a bright<br />

future lies ahead of us.<br />

Oscar Siches runs <strong>Marina</strong> Matters, a<br />

consultancy based in Mallorca, Spain.<br />

E: oscar@siches.com<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong> 27


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CRISIS MANAGEMENT<br />

The year of ‘If’ in Italy<br />

As Italians, our aim is to have a happy country, far from coronavirus and its<br />

stresses, that is open for boaters to explore 8,000km (5,000mi) of stunning<br />

coastline. Will our dreams come true? It’s all about ‘if’. Donatella Zucca reports<br />

If the curve of the epidemic makes<br />

it possible; if no serious mistakes are<br />

made; if good luck prevails, Italy will<br />

continue to offer up its coastline, its<br />

marinas and moorings in the heart of<br />

the Mediterranean.<br />

To drive the reopening, we need<br />

to breathe extra life into the nautical<br />

economy to supplement the helping<br />

hand it’s already received from ordinary<br />

people, entrepreneurs, and big names<br />

in luxury goods and in the megayacht<br />

sector where Italy is a world leader<br />

and where there are strong links with<br />

tourist ports. These harbours never<br />

completely closed, even during time<br />

of total lockdown, as the government<br />

recognised the need to protect the port<br />

heritage, ensure continuity of fishing<br />

as part of the food supply chain and<br />

support the role of the maritime police<br />

in the pandemic emergency.<br />

Irrespective of this, the country has<br />

moved with great caution in gradually<br />

reopening tourist ports – to prevent the<br />

dream from becoming a nightmare.<br />

Local customers have returned to <strong>Marina</strong><br />

di Punta Ala in Tuscany and a good<br />

summer season is expected.<br />

Imposing rules<br />

The RINA Naval Register stepped up to<br />

the task by devising the Biosafety Trust<br />

Certification; the first management<br />

system certification aimed at the<br />

prevention and mitigation of spread<br />

of infections in public places. On 21 st<br />

<strong>May</strong> RINA hosted a webinar “The<br />

<strong>Marina</strong> di Genova in Liguria is starting to<br />

open services to customers.<br />

new normal after COVID-19: how<br />

the yachting sector can get ready?”<br />

to discuss the future impact on the<br />

industry and the challenges facing<br />

professionals.<br />

Stakeholders included regional<br />

authorities, associations, port networks<br />

and marinas but the playing field was far<br />

from level. Regions are subject to limits<br />

set out by Prime Ministerial Decree,<br />

which allow for businesses to diversify<br />

from the rules in order to specifically<br />

balance economics and health. For<br />

example, there is virtually no coronavirus<br />

impact in Umbria, Sardinia, Basilicata<br />

and Calabria. In Sicily, Abruzzo and<br />

Molise fewer than ten cases have been<br />

reported. Softer rules are thus being<br />

applied although governors of Sicily and,<br />

in particular, Sardinia are thinking about<br />

asking for a document that confirms<br />

negative virus symptoms for people<br />

coming from Lombardy and other areas<br />

in the north where there is/has been a<br />

higher infection rate. The government<br />

doesn’t, however, favour the request.<br />

“Contagion differs from region to<br />

region,” confirms Alfredo Malcarne,<br />

president of Assonautica Italiana. As<br />

of 3 rd <strong>June</strong>, there have been different<br />

rules for different territories. “The<br />

problem only affects some areas of Italy<br />

[and restrictions would have different<br />

results]. Here in Puglia, for example,<br />

lockdown would mean dying of hunger<br />

more than of COVID.”<br />

Since March, Assonautica Italiana’s<br />

free of charge legal department<br />

has responded to thousands of<br />

emails and provided useful help and<br />

suggestions. Furthermore, as<br />

Antonio Bufalari, member of<br />

Assonautica Italiana Technical<br />

Scientific Committee and Legal<br />

Counsel of the Marinedi Group,<br />

explains: “With the standards<br />

of the prime minister as a<br />

baseline, trade associations<br />

have acted on their own<br />

initiative to tailor appropriate<br />

action to port activities.”<br />

Matteo Italo Ratti, president<br />

of the Marine Consortium of<br />

Tuscany and CEO and director<br />

of <strong>Marina</strong> de Medici, adds:<br />

“The risk is to fall into areas<br />

of contradiction, as happened<br />

in Campania. The problem of<br />

opening and closing is linked<br />

to the overlapping of multiple<br />

activities.”<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong> 29


CRISIS MANAGEMENT<br />

The impact of coronavirus in Sicily has been minimal but facilities such as Base Nautica<br />

Flavio Gioia has followed cautious practices.<br />

Roberto Perocchio, president of<br />

Assomarinas, clarifies the protocol:<br />

“A tourist port is an interface between<br />

the land and the boat. A boat is an<br />

island and contact opportunities are<br />

minimal especially if used by one single<br />

family.” But boats are closely watched.<br />

“There are many patrols at sea by<br />

the Capitanerie di Porto, Carabinieri,<br />

Guardia di Finanze especially in Naples<br />

where the regional rules have been very<br />

severe out of fear that the population<br />

density in the Gulf could act as a<br />

detonator. All marinas report maximum<br />

attention from the maritime authorities<br />

and highly aware customers.”<br />

In Campania, city mayors, the<br />

regional Task Force, ASL and health<br />

companies are preparing a safety plan<br />

for the Amalfi coast, which has been<br />

barely touched by the virus. Over 2,100<br />

swabs had been taken as this article<br />

was prepared (end of <strong>May</strong>).<br />

On 19 th <strong>May</strong> Confindustria Nautica<br />

confirmed that the Italian Government<br />

intended to reopen all borders between<br />

Italy and other European countries on<br />

3 rd <strong>June</strong>. All movements are to be limited<br />

by state regulations or relate to specific<br />

territories provided they adequately<br />

meet the level of epidemiological risk<br />

and are in line with the restrictions of EU<br />

legislation and international obligations.<br />

There will be no mandatory 14 day<br />

quarantine period.<br />

Guidelines for marinas<br />

The Ministry of Infrastructure and<br />

Transport (MIT) has decreed that all<br />

tourist ports must display information<br />

signs in Italian and English outlining<br />

the precautions that must be taken on<br />

site, e.g. use of personal protective<br />

equipment when in common areas<br />

and complying with a 1m (3ft) social<br />

spacing rule.<br />

<strong>Marina</strong>s must install sanitiser<br />

dispensers on every pier, limit boat<br />

movements and ban gatherings on the<br />

quays. The ability for any boat to move<br />

between different regions or countries<br />

is conditioned by national, regional and<br />

union regulations of the movement of<br />

people. As the marina is seen as an<br />

‘economic activity’, in the event of a<br />

serious lack of respect for standards,<br />

activity can be suspended if the rules<br />

are violated.<br />

Boat owners must follow the same<br />

rules on a boat as they do at home.<br />

Any symptoms of fever, respiratory<br />

infection etc. must be reported to the<br />

regional health authorities. The same<br />

rules apply for rental boats, which must<br />

be sanitised internally and externally<br />

(living spaces) after every use, even<br />

if only for a few hours. The boat must<br />

have supplies of sanitising products<br />

and have information signs in multiple<br />

languages outlining hygiene measures.<br />

If a boat is chartered with a crew, the<br />

skipper must provide everyone with<br />

appropriate protective provisions and<br />

ensure crew quarters are periodically<br />

sanitised. The crew must always wear<br />

protective gear when mooring up,<br />

leaving a berth, bunkering and during<br />

towing phases with marine vehicles.<br />

Everyone must have regular tests for<br />

COVID-19 and temperatures must be<br />

taken daily. Guests must respect social<br />

distancing.<br />

Where we are now<br />

Italy has over 740 marinas and mooring<br />

areas, which are generally of good<br />

quality. All have basic anti-COVID rules,<br />

often improved by their own initiatives.<br />

With the exception of Piedmont and<br />

Lombardy, where the majority of Italian<br />

megayacht owners live, maxi yachts<br />

are scattered around the Italian coast<br />

– especially in the south and on the<br />

islands where there is little or no sign of<br />

the virus.<br />

Liguria was among the first to<br />

impose restrictive measures and is now<br />

reopening in a regulated manner. It also<br />

has a very special goodwill initiative<br />

called “And it will be a good wind!” This<br />

was developed at <strong>Marina</strong> degli Aregai<br />

to give intensive care and therapy<br />

personnel working in the COVID-19<br />

emergency a time-off experience on<br />

board a boat.<br />

<strong>Marina</strong> di Loano (Savona) is,<br />

meanwhile, following a rigorous<br />

safety protocol and Giorgio Casareto,<br />

director of <strong>Marina</strong> di Varazze speaks<br />

of attention to detail while also looking<br />

forward to a summer season of<br />

<strong>Marina</strong> di Rimini, open to berth holders,<br />

is located in Emilia Romagna, the third<br />

highest region in Italy to be challenged by<br />

COVID-19 (after Lombardy and Piedmont<br />

respectively).<br />

30<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong>


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CRISIS MANAGEMENT<br />

unprecedented length. “We’ve activated<br />

every measure to guarantee safety and<br />

assistance to boat owners, visitors and<br />

workers,” he says. “We have access<br />

protocols to the marina – a regulation<br />

aimed at limiting gatherings in common<br />

areas – and a daily sanitisation plan.<br />

We are working with our franchisees<br />

to evaluate the best way for bars and<br />

restaurants to give good service despite<br />

the restrictions. As the picture becomes<br />

clearer, we will look at the feasibility of<br />

our entertainment initiatives.”<br />

In Tuscany, <strong>Marina</strong> Cala de Medici<br />

made a unique stand. “We were the<br />

first to produce the ‘Banchina Sicura’<br />

(safe dock),” explains CEO and director<br />

Matteo Italo Ratti. The dock area is<br />

around 5% of the mooring space,<br />

is secured by a gate and is used as<br />

a transit holding area. “When boats<br />

arrive it’s a problem as when mooring<br />

up those on board have contact with<br />

the marina staff,” he says. “At the quay<br />

we have trained, fully equipped and<br />

protected personnel and nurses for<br />

health procedures for those coming<br />

from other regions or from overseas.<br />

Once all is checked, the boat can<br />

progress to its berth.” The Tuscan<br />

Operators at <strong>Marina</strong> di Varazze in Liguria have implemented a full range of sanitising<br />

measures and social distancing initiatives and are thinking through potential longer term<br />

ways to open more social spaces.<br />

Marine Consortium has extended the<br />

Banchina Sicura for charter at its ports<br />

(2,500 berths of 5 – 100m/16 – 330ft).<br />

The aim to keep Tuscany safe<br />

throughout is to be admired especially<br />

as its safe location is a lure to boaters,<br />

and marinas - such as <strong>Marina</strong> di Punta<br />

Ala - are surrounded by valuable<br />

natural assets. “Reservations exceed<br />

expectations and suggest a greater<br />

summer turn-out than in previous years,”<br />

says Marco Corti, director of <strong>Marina</strong><br />

di Punta Ala. “In the first partial restart<br />

weekends, our Tuscan customers<br />

arrived, and now we are ready to receive<br />

boaters from other regions,” he adds.<br />

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www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong> 33


CRISIS MANAGEMENT<br />

Glass half full for NZ<br />

marina operators<br />

Yachting and maritime pastimes have a history of thriving in times of hardship.<br />

Many of New Zealand’s yacht clubs and sailing classes came out of the<br />

depression and post-WW2 years. They were founded in the days where there<br />

were fewer travel and lifestyle opportunities and, for this same reason, the<br />

marine and marina industries in New Zealand could be part of the country’s<br />

economic recovery today.<br />

On the eve of the move to the relative<br />

freedom of Level 2 [12 th <strong>May</strong>], and even<br />

after seven weeks of strict lockdown,<br />

there is a lot of reason for optimism for<br />

the marine and marina industries, say<br />

operators of the country’s marinas at<br />

a meeting of the New Zealand <strong>Marina</strong><br />

Operators Association (NZMOA)<br />

Executive.<br />

“Right now we are focused on<br />

measures to eliminate COVID, to get<br />

out of lockdown as quickly as possible,”<br />

says Andrew Welsh, general manager<br />

at Wellington’s Chaffers <strong>Marina</strong>. “We all<br />

need to play the game to get out of it<br />

quickly.”<br />

Assuming that New Zealand’s<br />

lockdown is successful, what will the<br />

‘new normal’ look like for the marina<br />

industry and those it supports, including<br />

its customers, commercial tenants,<br />

marine suppliers, marina contractors<br />

and its staff?<br />

Andrew Wilkes is owner-operator<br />

of the stainless steel engineering firm<br />

Dixon Manufacturing. He has noticed<br />

that while no marina related projects<br />

have been cancelled (some have been<br />

postponed) there is a pulling back on<br />

other projects that has put strain on<br />

small-medium sized businesses like<br />

his. This includes some cancelled<br />

boat builds and the cancellation of the<br />

annual Hutchwilco Boat Show in <strong>May</strong>.<br />

Wilkes says it’s too early to tell<br />

what the industry will look like, but he<br />

expects we will have a clearer picture in<br />

the next two months.<br />

Generally, however, Wilkes – even<br />

as a business owner – sees reason to<br />

be positive. For one thing, many New<br />

Zealanders who cannot travel overseas<br />

will have more opportunity to use their<br />

boats, and with that they will need<br />

to maintain, upgrade<br />

and provision them,<br />

spending money with<br />

New Zealand businesses<br />

in the process. The<br />

reduced price of fuel is<br />

helpful to those who own<br />

powerboats too.<br />

This is also the mindset<br />

of Tom Warren, director<br />

of Heron Construction,<br />

which specialises in<br />

building marinas all<br />

around the country.<br />

Left: Port Opua, Bay of Islands <strong>Marina</strong>, is<br />

located in a stunning natural environment<br />

where boating is a very popular pastime.<br />

Below: Picton, one of the Marlborough<br />

Sounds <strong>Marina</strong>s, is a busy boating hub.<br />

Warren also sits on the board of New<br />

Zealand Marine.<br />

“People will still enjoy getting out on<br />

the ocean, it is part of the New Zealand<br />

psyche. I believe the marine sector will<br />

be vibrant,” he notes.<br />

Two months ago, many of New<br />

Zealand’s marinas had redevelopment<br />

or expansion projects planned or<br />

underway, to accommodate more<br />

boats, commercial buildings, and to<br />

improve environmental outcomes.<br />

While Warren foresees slow down<br />

in some waterfront infrastructure<br />

projects - the Marlborough region, for<br />

example, is now rethinking some of its<br />

programmes - he confirms there is a<br />

long term shortage of marina berths in<br />

the country and demand remains high.<br />

<strong>Marina</strong> consultant Phil Wardale<br />

is on the cusp of starting two new<br />

waterfront projects with support from the<br />

government’s Provincial Growth Fund.<br />

He concedes there are unknowns. “We<br />

are now going into one of the biggest<br />

recessions the world has seen. We know<br />

it’s there but we won’t feel it for a little<br />

while,” he observes. “There are people<br />

who were doing well who now don’t have<br />

businesses. As an industry, we need to<br />

ensure that we choose to support New<br />

Zealand businesses and New Zealand<br />

people however we can, and that our<br />

projects are designed to do this.”<br />

Chris Galbraith is general manager<br />

of Far North Holdings and chair of<br />

NZMOA. From his position in the Bay<br />

of Islands, he believes that despite<br />

stresses in the economy, the industry<br />

is fortunate to have a passionate group<br />

of New Zealanders who love boating.<br />

“Even in a depression or recession, we<br />

can get out on our boats,” he says, “and<br />

spend money on them.”<br />

34<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong>


CRISIS MANAGEMENT<br />

Accommodating nearly 2,000 boats,<br />

Westhaven <strong>Marina</strong> in central Auckland is a<br />

focal point of the capital.<br />

By nature, boating is also the ideal<br />

pastime for isolating from a virus. You<br />

can isolate with your ‘bubble’ on your<br />

own vessel, and with blessing to go<br />

ahead in early 2021, the 36 th America’s<br />

Cup will be another boost.<br />

Galbraith asserts that the marina<br />

industry is in a position to support other<br />

maritime industries and it should do<br />

so. “There will be challenges but we<br />

are here to keep going and to keep the<br />

dream alive,” he concludes.<br />

UPDATE – 2 nd <strong>June</strong><br />

A survey of the New Zealand marina<br />

industry, analysed as this issue of<br />

<strong>Marina</strong> <strong>World</strong> was being finalised,<br />

shows the industry emerged from<br />

lockdown in a strong, confident<br />

position.<br />

Members of the NZMOA were<br />

asked to indicate how their metrics or<br />

perceptions had changed as a result<br />

of COVID-19.<br />

75% of respondents say their<br />

confidence in the industry for the<br />

next six months has improved, and<br />

81% believe that as a result of the<br />

pandemic, marina projects, including<br />

extensions, refurbishments and<br />

improvements, will continue as planned.<br />

68% of these believe that there will be<br />

more projects planned as a result of<br />

lockdown, possibly as part of economic<br />

stimulus packages from government<br />

and councils. 19% believe marina<br />

projects will slow down as a result of<br />

the pandemic.<br />

Generally, operations report that use<br />

of their boat ramp and marina facilities<br />

has increased: 50% report use of<br />

marina facilities is up, and 44% report<br />

use of boat ramp facilities is up. 25%<br />

report a decrease in use of marina<br />

facilities. The survey was completed<br />

at the end of <strong>May</strong> when weather<br />

conditions were favourable for boating.<br />

Most operations report that<br />

customers are continuing to pay their<br />

invoices as usual.<br />

MARTINI MARINAS<br />

PONTILI GALLEGGIANTI / FLOATING PONTOONS<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong> 35


INTELLIGENT MARINA SYSTEMS<br />

<strong>Marina</strong> technology in<br />

a post-pandemic world<br />

In the midst of a global pandemic, technology promises to be the glue that<br />

holds us all together. The marina industry – historically lagging behind other<br />

industries in this area – must adapt to the ‘new normal’ and take advantage of<br />

the slew of products on offer. Iaian Archibald, co-founder and CEO of Swell<br />

Advantage Ltd, looks at the options.<br />

As from <strong>May</strong>, we started to see some<br />

jurisdictions around the world flirt with<br />

re-opening parts of society, but we<br />

don’t really know how this will play out<br />

in the coming months and years. The<br />

good news is that access to boating<br />

and the opening of marinas, at least on<br />

a limited basis, has been considered<br />

an essential service in some regions –<br />

and for most of those where it hasn’t,<br />

boating will be one of the first activities<br />

to be allowed.<br />

Regardless of the level of restrictions<br />

in your area, we’re all struggling<br />

with how to adapt personally and<br />

professionally to this new reality.<br />

Increasingly, we’re relying on<br />

technology. Individuals, organisations<br />

and whole industries are getting a crash<br />

course on technologies that they had<br />

been avoiding, or were not interested in<br />

previously. It’s been surprising how well<br />

and quickly we’re all adapting to digital<br />

tools and new ways of doing things.<br />

Austin Bleier, CEO of San Diegobased<br />

marina hardware manufacturer<br />

MarineSync, neatly sums up the current<br />

situation: “I think this pandemic has<br />

been a reality check for practically<br />

everyone. I think it’s safe to say that<br />

all businesses will forever change how<br />

they service their client accounts and<br />

conduct day-to-day operations. It’s hard<br />

to imagine taking this seriously, until it<br />

actually happened.”<br />

The marina industry has been a<br />

technology laggard compared to a lot of<br />

industries. There are a number of valid<br />

reasons for this, and a few maybe not<br />

so valid, but the real question is, how<br />

do we move forward?<br />

Mike Melillo, co-founder and CEO<br />

of the company behind brands like<br />

<strong>Marina</strong>s.com and Dockwa, believes<br />

“technology will play an important role<br />

in empowering marina operators to<br />

simultaneously provide great customer<br />

service, limit face-to-face interaction<br />

with and among boaters, and keep both<br />

themselves and their time protected.<br />

When marinas open back up,<br />

not only will there be new socialdistancing<br />

policies to implement and<br />

become comfortable with, there will<br />

be a backlog of tasks (launching<br />

boats, work orders, etc.) to work<br />

through. The best tech will keep<br />

boaters and marina employees<br />

delightfully distant, and save marina<br />

operators time as they focus their<br />

energy on the more physical<br />

aspects of their business.”<br />

Digital tools<br />

For organisations in any industry<br />

there are three types of digital tools<br />

replacing the physical office. Internal<br />

workflow and communication<br />

tools, document management and<br />

video conferencing. For day-to-day<br />

collaboration Slack has become<br />

the default tool replacing internal<br />

emails and in-person conversations.<br />

Google Drive with Google Docs<br />

has become a popular tool for<br />

organising, storing and collaborating<br />

on documents. Our marina software<br />

company Swell Advantage has been<br />

using Slack and Google Drive/Docs<br />

since they were founded. It’s now hard<br />

to imagine not using them.<br />

For external sales demos and internal<br />

meetings, Zoom has become popular.<br />

Other options include Google Meet and<br />

Microsoft Teams. Loom is a great way<br />

to create personalised sales videos<br />

and some salespeople are using apps<br />

like FaceTime to give virtual tours of<br />

high-ticket items like boats. These tools<br />

are generally supported by product/<br />

project management tools (generic or<br />

industry specific), customer relationship<br />

management (CRM) software and/or<br />

enterprise software systems like the<br />

marina management software many of<br />

us are used to.<br />

Modern software tools are usually<br />

developed to do one set of tasks and<br />

connect with other systems that handle<br />

other tasks. We’ve seen some legacy<br />

software systems for marinas start to<br />

develop partnerships and APIs (how<br />

digital systems exchange information<br />

and coordinate tasks). Dockmaster, one<br />

of the highest rated legacy systems<br />

on the market, has partnered with<br />

drystack software Boat Cloud to handle<br />

drystack management and we’ve<br />

seen others connect to products like<br />

TaskRabbit. At Swell, we’ve partnered<br />

with Square POS. We decided not to<br />

build our own point of sale (POS), or<br />

white-label a generic POS with limited<br />

functionality. More importantly, the<br />

36<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong>


INTELLIGENT MARINA SYSTEMS<br />

partnership enables our customers to<br />

take advantage of Square’s advanced<br />

security features, reporting, payanywhere<br />

handheld systems, online<br />

payments, retail software, hospitality<br />

software and HR features.<br />

A problem with a lot of the systems<br />

used throughout the industry is they<br />

are older systems, which follow the<br />

ineffectual ‘one solution for all tasks’<br />

paradigm. They tend to be closed<br />

systems hosted on-site, with access<br />

only available in the office and have a<br />

limited ability to exchange information<br />

with outside systems like accounting<br />

software. Some established players like<br />

Scribble are completely redeveloping<br />

their technology to provide modern<br />

functionality (<strong>Marina</strong> Go). And newer<br />

companies like ours and Molo are<br />

entering the market with cloud native<br />

solutions built around application<br />

programming interfaces (APIs).<br />

Physical contact<br />

<strong>Marina</strong> and boat club customer service<br />

has traditionally been high touch.<br />

Both managers and older generations<br />

of boaters are accustomed to filling<br />

out paper applications in the office,<br />

dropping off a cheque and sealing the<br />

deal with a handshake. These face-toface<br />

interactions provided opportunities<br />

to build relationships, make boaters feel<br />

well cared for and expand the marina’s<br />

brand. A well-run marina is defined by<br />

its cohesive boater community and staff<br />

who know the boater’s boat and how<br />

they use it.<br />

The problem many in the industry<br />

are now facing is how to manage<br />

facilities and boaters when “high<br />

touch” has taken on a less positive<br />

meaning? <strong>Marina</strong> customer service<br />

can generally be put into three baskets:<br />

transactions – mostly the exchange<br />

of money and documents; services<br />

– like boat maintenance or an onsite<br />

deli; and community – which includes<br />

events, races and general day-to-day<br />

interactions.<br />

Transactional customer service<br />

is probably top of mind for most<br />

marinas right now. Stopping into<br />

the office with a paper cheque<br />

is no longer encouraged, nor is<br />

putting a cheque in the mail. Onsite<br />

POS systems that do not have a<br />

tap option are now obsolete as<br />

they are a key vector for disease<br />

transmission and should be one of<br />

the first technologies any business<br />

replaces. Most modern marina<br />

management systems should have<br />

the ability for boaters to pay online<br />

directly in the system with a boater<br />

facing tool or through e-mailed<br />

invoices. Accounting software<br />

systems like Xero and Quickbooks<br />

often have invoicing with online<br />

payment options if you don’t want<br />

to commit to a full management<br />

system. E-transfers are also an<br />

easy option available to most<br />

people.<br />

Much of the resistance to alternative<br />

payment methods comes from older<br />

operators and boaters but we might<br />

all be surprised by how far older<br />

generations have come using online<br />

systems these past few months. Let’s<br />

face it, it’s a pain to learn new things<br />

and trust processes that are different<br />

from the ones we grew up with,<br />

especially when it comes to money.<br />

Document management,<br />

including signing berthing<br />

agreements and collecting things<br />

like insurance papers, is a lot easier<br />

these days. Some systems like<br />

Swell have document management<br />

with e-signatures built into their<br />

products. Alternatively, there are<br />

a number of digital signature<br />

providers such as DocuSign, and<br />

then there’s the even easier PDF.<br />

PDFs now have a signature feature<br />

that enables a person to digitally<br />

sign the document, or they can<br />

print, sign, scan and send the<br />

document back. Recently, transient<br />

boater platforms, like Snag-A-Slip<br />

and Dockwa here in North America,<br />

have emerged to handle these<br />

tasks for transient boaters with the<br />

extra benefit of having numerous<br />

marinas for boaters to choose from.<br />

<strong>Marina</strong> services are tough because<br />

it depends on the nature of the service.<br />

Boat maintenance and refit are pretty<br />

straightforward. Invoicing and service<br />

requests probably won’t change that<br />

much. Things like restaurants and<br />

retail will open when, and how, local<br />

governments dictate. Drystack specific<br />

systems like Boat Cloud and Speedy<br />

Dock are focused on online scheduling<br />

tools for launch and haul-out.<br />

Community spirit<br />

Managing and maintaining a<br />

community is going to be a challenge<br />

for a lot of marinas and clubs.<br />

Activating and using social media<br />

has become more important, as are<br />

digital newsletters. At the very least,<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong> 37


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keeping the organisation’s website<br />

up-to-date on if, how and what<br />

services are still available and<br />

when or how boaters can access<br />

their boats along with regular<br />

email send-outs, are ways to<br />

keep everyone informed. Tools<br />

like Canva can help you create<br />

beautiful content for social media<br />

and mass communications (it’s also<br />

really fun!). Hosting Zoom happy<br />

hours, creating fun competitions for<br />

boaters to do from their own boats<br />

with leaderboards posted on your<br />

website, and low touch, socially<br />

distant “adventures” for kids<br />

around the marina are all options.<br />

Creative marina managers will<br />

find ways to leverage social media<br />

and other technologies to keep<br />

their communities engaged and<br />

interacting with each other.<br />

All of these customer service<br />

components rely on good<br />

communication. Email and phone<br />

calls are a regular part of most<br />

operations and support most activities.<br />

A CRM is a software tool designed to<br />

help manage customer relationships.<br />

The software acts as a kind of phone<br />

book recording customer details, notes<br />

and usually allows you to send emails<br />

from within the system. Some marina<br />

management software systems like<br />

Swell have a built in CRM specifically<br />

designed to serve boaters offering<br />

features like group e-mailing to<br />

specific groups of boaters, automated<br />

communications to support accounts<br />

receivable and booking slips, and<br />

even includes text messaging. CRMs<br />

generally meld operational information<br />

with customer support tools designed<br />

to streamline customer service and can<br />

assist with social distancing.<br />

The new kid on the block for a lot<br />

of organisations will be using text<br />

(SMS) messaging to communicate with<br />

boaters. The pandemic will probably<br />

accelerate the use of texting by<br />

businesses. It’s a great way to know<br />

when your food order is ready for<br />

pick-up or that the pump out has been<br />

sanitised and is ready for the next boat.<br />

For some of us who didn’t grow up<br />

with texting, it can feel like an invasive<br />

and cold way to communicate. But,<br />

especially for those under 40, texting is<br />

a preferred method of communication.<br />

There are a number of industry nonspecific<br />

group texting services available<br />

and we’re increasingly seeing drystack<br />

systems use automated texting to<br />

coordinate launch and haul-outs.<br />

<strong>Marina</strong> hardware has been<br />

steadily improving with a focus on<br />

customer self-service, monitoring and<br />

wireless meter reading. A lot of these<br />

improvements can inadvertently help<br />

operators in a post-pandemic world.<br />

Companies like MarineSync have<br />

developed pedestals with various<br />

sensors and online meter reading<br />

enables services like power and water<br />

to be turned on and off remotely.<br />

These innovations can limit staff’s<br />

need to directly interact with transient<br />

boaters. Self-serve fuel pumps have<br />

been gaining popularity for a few years.<br />

Given expected new regulations and<br />

insurance policy clauses, marinas will<br />

probably have to disinfect these kinds<br />

of self-serve tools on a regular basis,<br />

as well as track when the task was<br />

completed.<br />

There have also been a lot of<br />

improvements with remote marina<br />

monitoring through video systems and<br />

sensors that allow people to remotely<br />

monitor boats. A direct video or image<br />

capture feed to the marina’s website<br />

can give boaters’ peace of mind and<br />

reduce unnecessary trips to the marina<br />

if desired.<br />

Deciding on what technologies to<br />

use to help your organisation in this<br />

new post-pandemic reality is going<br />

to depend on your service offering,<br />

your staff, new local regulations, any<br />

adjustments to your insurance policy<br />

and your boaters. The good and<br />

bad news is that you have a lot of<br />

options to find just the right fit for your<br />

organisation.<br />

Bleier, from MarineSync, thinks the<br />

pandemic is going to lead operators<br />

towards “new ways of accessing data<br />

remotely. New ways of accepting<br />

payments. New ways of communicating<br />

with clients. New ways of interacting.<br />

The new technologies and software<br />

we’re leveraging and embracing during<br />

the pandemic, will likely be adopted<br />

(in some capacity) into business<br />

architecture once this all calms down.”<br />

One thing the experts agree on is<br />

we will see waves of the coronavirus in<br />

the coming months and years. Through<br />

all of this, people and organisations<br />

are getting a crash course on using<br />

technology – from ordering groceries<br />

online, to grandparents giving parents a<br />

break by distracting the kids on Zoom.<br />

Many people, who wouldn’t think of<br />

using digital services a few months ago,<br />

are coming out of the pandemic with<br />

a new comfort level when it comes to<br />

using technology. It will be interesting<br />

to see if and how the boating industry<br />

adapts to meet this new comfort<br />

level and boaters’ new expectations<br />

around service delivery supported<br />

by technology. If we as an industry<br />

play it right, boating might even see a<br />

resurgence as a safe, socially distant<br />

activity.<br />

Iaian Archibald is the co-founder and<br />

CEO of Swell Advantage Ltd. Swell<br />

builds modern management software<br />

for marinas, boat clubs and mixed-use<br />

waterfronts. www.swelladvantage.com<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong> 39


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INTELLIGENT MARINA SYSTEMS<br />

Working smarter<br />

rather than harder<br />

by Vance Young<br />

Reflecting on my youth, I can still hear the words of my father telling me to<br />

always work smarter rather than harder. Being the son of an engineer, it was<br />

quite common to hear such catchphrases and tips offering advice as to how to<br />

streamline the activities of one’s life. As a young child, of course, this went in<br />

one ear and out the other for all that was currently on my mind was the desire<br />

to play. As time continued and I focused on my own career path, it became<br />

quite clear that all those years of helpful advice really did stick as I focused on<br />

a life journey of producing technology to allow people to work smarter rather<br />

than harder.<br />

There has always been a natural<br />

evolution with the use of technology<br />

to enhance daily activities. Think<br />

of how far we have come from the<br />

creation of the wheel to today’s<br />

use of computers and phones to<br />

perform our day-to-day tasks. This<br />

is particularly relevant with regard<br />

to marina operations. With so many<br />

matters needing attention within a<br />

marina, operators are constantly<br />

looking for better ways to manage<br />

smarter rather than harder. As<br />

difficult as this may be under normal<br />

conditions, the year of the COVID-<br />

19 pandemic has complicated<br />

businesses exponentially.<br />

New catchphrases and words<br />

such as “social distancing” and<br />

“contactless” have been introduced<br />

to our daily lives. While the<br />

pandemic situation is quite new to<br />

our generation and the long-term<br />

effects are unknown, one thing<br />

is quite clear: working smarter<br />

is no longer a luxury and is now<br />

a requirement for businesses to<br />

prosper.<br />

So, what does this mean to<br />

the marina industry? In the most<br />

simplistic view, it means that the<br />

technological automation process<br />

will be accelerated beyond its<br />

current natural curve. There has<br />

always been a natural evolution of<br />

marinas adapting to new technology<br />

and processes advancing their<br />

“smarter” operations. This evolution<br />

has been consistent and steady. Now,<br />

with the age of “social distancing” and<br />

“contactless”, this trend will drastically<br />

accelerate.<br />

One of my core beliefs is that when<br />

difficult situations arise, we should use<br />

them as opportunities to excel. This<br />

is really just a twist on the old phrase,<br />

“when life gives you lemons, make<br />

lemonade”. However, it is a very real<br />

concept understood and applied by<br />

innovators and good leaders. This<br />

is the reason why the adaptation<br />

of technology and automation will<br />

accelerate the use of technology within<br />

marinas and allow operators to work<br />

smarter. In a time of difficult situations,<br />

such as the COVID-19 pandemic,<br />

innovators will stand and shine.<br />

The big question now is what this<br />

innovation will look like. For the most<br />

part, it should reflect and expand on<br />

the innovation already available today.<br />

The most obvious is the use of cloud<br />

technology. The social distancing<br />

concept has caused a record number<br />

of people, including marina staff, to<br />

work from remote locations. The use of<br />

cloud technology simplifies this much<br />

more than the use of traditional clientserver<br />

or back-office technologies.<br />

Cloud systems are designed from the<br />

core to allow users to be anywhere at<br />

any time.<br />

Other areas of innovation may<br />

include the expansion of “contactless”<br />

technology. For as long as I can<br />

remember, society has been used<br />

to receiving bills in the mail which<br />

are then paid by a mailed in cheque.<br />

This includes a lot of touching, a lot<br />

of steps and a considerable amount<br />

of time to complete. So, what is the<br />

smarter way? Innovation provides<br />

a way to send out bills by email or<br />

text thus allowing customers to pay<br />

instantly using electronic means. Not<br />

only does this drastically decrease the<br />

time it takes to fulfil a bill payment, but<br />

also reduces the physical contact and<br />

touching of objects such as envelopes<br />

and cheques.<br />

Other areas of innovation allowing<br />

marinas to work smarter and honour<br />

social distancing will increase the<br />

means of self-service activities. There<br />

is a lot of potential in this area and it will<br />

be interesting to see how the marina<br />

self-service ideas roll out. There are<br />

many departments within today’s<br />

marina - everything from rental space<br />

management to the ship store, fuel<br />

dock and service yard – that stand to<br />

benefit from self-service.<br />

While the level of technology<br />

continues to advance and evolve, the<br />

underlying reason and purpose remains<br />

the same and continues to be passed<br />

on from generation to generation. Life<br />

continues to present obstacles, and<br />

society continues to rise above by<br />

working smarter rather than harder.<br />

Vance Young is director of technology<br />

at Scribble Software, Inc., based in<br />

Mechanicsville, Virginia, USA.<br />

www.scribblesoftware.com<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong> 41


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INTELLIGENT MARINA SYSTEMS<br />

The test of time -<br />

when to revamp your MMS<br />

or install a new system<br />

by Chris Thomas<br />

Computer software systems, e.g. marina and boatyard management systems<br />

(MMS), like any business asset, need maintenance to deliver optimum<br />

functionality. Internal and external change can impact the operation of a<br />

business, and these changes should be reflected in your management<br />

systems to ensure your business can grow and develop in tune with the needs<br />

of the end-user.<br />

What drives a need to change your<br />

system?<br />

One important driver of change is<br />

managing risks to the business.<br />

Unfortunately, in today’s business<br />

environment there is an array of<br />

bad actors and criminals with everincreasing<br />

skill sets to penetrate your<br />

business and systems to obtain data.<br />

Couple this with the need to open<br />

system access to staff, customers<br />

and the public; and with more<br />

sensitive information available in your<br />

databases - e.g. payments, credit card<br />

and personal bank details - regular<br />

updates and maintenance are critical.<br />

This creates an ever-increasing need<br />

to ensure your computer systems<br />

are updated with the latest Microsoft<br />

system software, security controls<br />

and patches. Your MMS vendor must<br />

provide new releases to support such<br />

updates.<br />

Over time, all software develops to<br />

be able to ‘provide more functionality’,<br />

requiring more computing power<br />

to maintain system performance.<br />

Eventually, such upgrades will mean<br />

you need faster computers. This,<br />

in turn, will mean updated system<br />

software which your existing MMS may<br />

not support.<br />

There are many contributing<br />

factors that could become reasons for<br />

reviewing your current MMS software.<br />

One of these is ongoing MMS problems<br />

and the continual need for costly<br />

support.<br />

Consumer behaviour has changed<br />

and, as staff and customers are<br />

becoming more familiar with technology,<br />

they have higher expectations of<br />

business anywhere, ‘do it now’ and<br />

‘do it here’. Your business will need to<br />

provide more responsive services to<br />

your customers. MMS software vendors<br />

should be providing continual updates<br />

to meet such changes.<br />

Increased regulatory compliance can<br />

require improvements in your MMS<br />

system. Recently we have all suffered<br />

a massive life and business change<br />

with COVID-19 forcing new business<br />

practices and new compliance issues.<br />

Internet access is becoming more<br />

extensive, and more boaties have<br />

access from their boats and are looking<br />

for reservation and payment options<br />

remotely.<br />

A good MMS system will have the<br />

capacity to meet and support changes<br />

in your business.<br />

But perhaps the most important<br />

factor for change is complacency: ‘if it<br />

ain’t broke, don’t fix it’. Complacency<br />

can result in inefficient operations that<br />

could be better served by a better MMS<br />

solution and vendor. Good practice is<br />

to be constantly looking for changes<br />

to improve operations and customer<br />

service, working with your MMS vendor<br />

on ideas and reviewing new features<br />

in the vendor release to see if they can<br />

help improve your business.<br />

Regular review and understanding<br />

of the full features and capabilities<br />

of your MMS and comparing it to a<br />

quality MMS solution is good business<br />

practice. Examples of a quality MMS<br />

solution are:<br />

• Removing the need for manual<br />

pricing and calculations by staff<br />

• Ability to audit and log vessel arrivals<br />

(or parts used in the boatyard etc.)<br />

and have complete confidence that<br />

all revenue is captured and passed<br />

through to your Profit & Loss and<br />

Balance Sheet<br />

Could you be getting better<br />

information, increased staff productivity<br />

and enhanced customer services with a<br />

different MMS system vendor?<br />

Chris Thomas is general manager of<br />

Pacsoft International. Pacsoft has been<br />

providing innovative marina-specific<br />

software solutions for over 22 years<br />

www.pacsoftmms.com.<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong> 43


INTELLIGENT MARINA SYSTEMS<br />

Riding a new industry wave:<br />

managing from home with<br />

<strong>Marina</strong> Master<br />

<strong>Marina</strong> Master’s intelligent systems, designed specifically for marinas, are<br />

changing the way they are operated. The company’s cloud based platforms<br />

and agile development processes are helping marinas to stay ahead of the<br />

game.<br />

Changing tides<br />

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic<br />

has forced many marina operators<br />

to manage properties from home.<br />

Luckily, some countries and regions<br />

are already recovering as this issue<br />

of <strong>Marina</strong> <strong>World</strong><br />

is being finalised.<br />

<strong>Marina</strong>s are already<br />

welcoming new and<br />

existing boaters<br />

while implementing<br />

all necessary<br />

social distancing<br />

precautions.<br />

Necessary changes<br />

have had a positive<br />

effect as well,<br />

as businesses<br />

have honed their<br />

operations by<br />

making use of<br />

advanced digital<br />

solutions.<br />

Boaters around<br />

the world have embraced a new reality<br />

by utilising mobile apps. They are eager<br />

to use personalised and automated<br />

solutions that enable them to monitor,<br />

dock on their own and review their<br />

statements on the go. <strong>Marina</strong>s are<br />

also aware that swift and regular<br />

communication between staff and<br />

customers significantly improves long<br />

term customer relationships.<br />

<strong>Marina</strong> Master systems enable<br />

owners, managers and staff members<br />

to manage a marina from home.<br />

Boaters can use my<strong>Marina</strong> mobile<br />

app to communicate with the marina,<br />

book a berth, pay invoices and review<br />

statements anywhere and anytime.<br />

“Visiting a marina shouldn’t be just an<br />

urgent duty to find a berth, fill up fuel<br />

and water tanks, but an unforgettable<br />

holiday experience,” says <strong>Marina</strong><br />

Master CEO Vesna Pavlovic.<br />

A leap forward for all<br />

<strong>Marina</strong> owners and managers take<br />

advantage of having complete control<br />

and management capabilities in their<br />

home office. The personalised <strong>Marina</strong><br />

Master interface can be adapted and<br />

customised for every marina, shipyard,<br />

boatyard and dry storage facility,<br />

enabling the user to inspect marina<br />

property in real time, manage berth<br />

occupancy, reservations, invoicing<br />

and agreements on a mobile app.<br />

By automating and streamlining<br />

the processes marinas increase<br />

productivity and income.<br />

<strong>Marina</strong> staff benefit from having a<br />

complete real time overview of customer<br />

data, reservations, notes, alarms and<br />

task management. All communication<br />

via app, email or text message is done<br />

on a single platform and is saved on a<br />

customer’s CRM tab. Enquiries, quotes,<br />

invoicing and contract signature are<br />

processed swiftly with a few taps on<br />

a smart device. <strong>Marina</strong> surveillance<br />

and dock walks are done automatically<br />

– either by CCTV or by using dock<br />

sensors. Customers can check in and<br />

plug in to shore power on their own in a<br />

<strong>Marina</strong> Master smart marina.<br />

As these time-consuming tasks<br />

are now automated and controlled<br />

remotely, marina staff can finally tend<br />

to their main objective: taking care of<br />

customers by supplying customised<br />

services and products. This is of the<br />

utmost importance in order to gain loyal<br />

and valuable customers.<br />

As a result, boaters have<br />

improved boating experience<br />

through the peace of mind of<br />

knowing that their expectations<br />

will be met. They are free and<br />

flexible in ordering services<br />

from the comfort of their boat<br />

or home.<br />

It’s all ‘app-ening’ in<br />

marinas<br />

Soldiers Point <strong>Marina</strong> in<br />

New South Wales was the<br />

first marina in Australia to<br />

implement <strong>Marina</strong> Master and<br />

take advantage of remote<br />

facility management. This has<br />

paid dividends in the current<br />

climate. “The <strong>Marina</strong> Master<br />

solution enabled our key office<br />

staff to work from home, keeping them<br />

safe during this difficult time while<br />

still ensuring the marina is running as<br />

normal. The software not only improves<br />

the day to day operations but is saving<br />

us thousands of dollars a year in<br />

operational costs,” says Soldiers Point<br />

marina manager Darrell Barnett CMM.<br />

Communicating and managing marina<br />

services remotely not only helps the<br />

owners but also the marina customers.<br />

“The <strong>Marina</strong> Master platform has<br />

driven the professional perception our<br />

customers have of our business through<br />

the innovative use of technology. This<br />

has been absolutely central to our ability<br />

to operate the marina remotely and<br />

without interruption during the current<br />

COVID-19 pandemic. Everything from<br />

responding to berth enquiries to billing<br />

runs and back-end financial reporting<br />

we’ve been able to facilitate from<br />

44<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong>


INTELLIGENT MARINA SYSTEMS<br />

home which has been terrific for the<br />

health and freedom of our staff whilst<br />

staying engaged with our existing and<br />

prospective customers,” says Scott<br />

Marshall, general manager, Breakwater<br />

<strong>Marina</strong>, Queensland.<br />

Moments of truth on a typical day in<br />

most marinas managed remotely start<br />

when new or existing customers visit.<br />

<strong>Marina</strong> staff essentially respond a few<br />

days before the customer is expected<br />

to arrive, adopting all necessary new<br />

social distancing measures. An auto<br />

email is sent to the customer with a<br />

my<strong>Marina</strong> registration link. The customer<br />

can view the berth on the marina map<br />

and once docked, just clicks on the<br />

check-in button. A meter is automatically<br />

assigned to the berth and notification is<br />

sent to marina staff to advise that the<br />

customer has docked and checked-in.<br />

This allows staff to click on the berth<br />

(web or app) to view a live feed of the<br />

camera that covers the specific berth<br />

to check that the customer has docked<br />

in the correct place. Staff then call the<br />

customer to welcome him and advise<br />

on where he can pick up his preprogrammed<br />

access fob. This can be<br />

located in a secure lock box near the<br />

gate of the jetty or potentially on the<br />

pedestal next to the berth. The customer<br />

can always check information about<br />

available services in the my<strong>Marina</strong><br />

app. Delivery orders for restaurant or<br />

chandlery items can be placed and<br />

automatically invoiced to account.<br />

<strong>World</strong> class service provider Gold<br />

Coast City <strong>Marina</strong> & Shipyard (GCCM)<br />

has also automated the majority of<br />

its manual operational processes via<br />

<strong>Marina</strong> Master. “The <strong>Marina</strong> Master<br />

team know their business well which<br />

helps with timely updates and system<br />

developments that we can efficiently roll<br />

out to benefit the customer experience,”<br />

says general manager Luke McCaul.<br />

<strong>Marina</strong> Master has also made a<br />

breakthrough on the other side of the<br />

Pacific Ocean – in North America.<br />

Ocean Havens, a group of marinas<br />

in the New England area, has taken<br />

charge of implementing the latest state<br />

of the art modules to manage marinas<br />

remotely. The marina group is forwardthinking<br />

and its main objective was to<br />

automate reservations management,<br />

eliminate dependence upon individuals<br />

and to provide all functionalities on<br />

mobile devices. “We wanted that the<br />

Out on the water: the <strong>Marina</strong> Master team<br />

has 28 years of experience in developing<br />

marina management software and shares a<br />

love of the open sea.<br />

system could be as “future proof” and<br />

flexible as possible and the <strong>Marina</strong><br />

Master program has exceeded in all our<br />

expectations,” says regional manager<br />

Kevin Lussier CMM.<br />

It’s also all ‘app-ening’ in Europe<br />

where <strong>Marina</strong> Master is helping to<br />

boost marina management intelligent<br />

solutions at D-Marin Portonovi <strong>Marina</strong>,<br />

Montenegro. “We implemented <strong>Marina</strong><br />

Master [just a short] while ago but<br />

already see its huge advantages. The<br />

reliability and Smart specifications are<br />

making remote controlling very simple.<br />

Everything is just a click away and very<br />

easy to access. This software gives us<br />

an opportunity to interact with customers<br />

through CRM, and to refine internal<br />

communications,’’ says manager Nikola<br />

Banovic, CMM.<br />

Consulting approach<br />

<strong>Marina</strong> Master’s agile support<br />

and development team is guided<br />

by professionalism and expert<br />

knowledge. Benefiting from 28 years<br />

of experience in providing advanced<br />

marina management software solutions<br />

worldwide, the team sees consulting<br />

as an important part of implementation<br />

and support. “We always listen to each<br />

customer’s need and utilise requests<br />

to create a custom-tailored solution,”<br />

Pavlovic confirms. Consulting on best<br />

practices in marinas worldwide is also<br />

undertaken via the <strong>Marina</strong> Master<br />

Academy, which is currently conducting<br />

a free webinar series on ‘How to<br />

Manage a <strong>Marina</strong> from Home’.<br />

“Every experience with our customer<br />

is a goldmine for our strategy,” says<br />

<strong>Marina</strong> Master president and owner,<br />

Tone Britovsek.<br />

www.marina-master.com<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong> 45


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INTELLIGENT MARINA SYSTEMS<br />

the most common safety threats in<br />

the boat such as water intrusion, fire<br />

and damaged batteries. All sensors<br />

are directly connected to the marina,<br />

so whenever an incident occurs, the<br />

marina and the owner are immediately<br />

notified via voice call, SMS, email and<br />

mobile app. Each sensor is powered by<br />

an internal battery and is completely<br />

autonomous; it directly connects to<br />

the Internet without any central unit on<br />

the boat. The legal framework is well<br />

defined so that using the system does<br />

not affect the marina liability in any way.<br />

Using technology to<br />

boost safety<br />

by Kresimir Zic<br />

Most safety-related incidents regarding boats in marinas can be prevented<br />

(except for natural disasters of course). These incidents can result from<br />

simple and well-understood physical phenomena such as galvanic currents,<br />

corrosion, fatigue of materials and many others, which in a highly complex<br />

structure like a modern boat may lead to a catastrophic event if not handled<br />

properly. In some cases, those incidents may also come from a deliberate<br />

human act like vandalism and theft. Although the liability of the marina is<br />

usually very well defined, we all know how difficult it is to handle an angry<br />

customer who expects to find his boat in the same state in which it was left.<br />

In this article we will present a few<br />

different techniques which have proven<br />

successful in improving boat safety in a<br />

marina.<br />

Daily dock walk: most marinas<br />

perform a periodic check of the<br />

berths and boats in the marina. With<br />

all the technology available today,<br />

our approach was to develop a<br />

mobile application to capture all the<br />

information about the boats during<br />

these dock walks. Whenever anything<br />

relevant is observed, the dockhand<br />

logs it in the mobile app using images<br />

and a description of the event. After<br />

the information has been verified<br />

by the dockmaster, the customer is<br />

immediately notified via email, or even<br />

better via the mobile app for the boat<br />

owners, of course with attached images<br />

and a detailed description of the event.<br />

Smart boat: whereas the daily dock<br />

walk gives us valuable information<br />

from the outside of the boat, the most<br />

important safety threats come<br />

from inside the boat. It might be<br />

a corroded valve or damaged<br />

seal; the bilge might be full<br />

of stale water and mould for<br />

months before the owner<br />

comes. Or even worse; the<br />

batteries can overheat with<br />

every charging, which will<br />

eventually lead to a fire in the<br />

marina. All those incidents can<br />

be easily prevented using the<br />

smart Sense4Boat Internetof-Things<br />

sensors. The smart<br />

Sense4Boat sensors detect<br />

Advanced video surveillance with<br />

image processing and recognition is<br />

a technology with a lot of potential<br />

in the marina industry. Traditional<br />

video surveillance systems rely on<br />

the human eye and deliver very<br />

limited results. Nowadays with the<br />

development of artificial intelligence<br />

and machine learning, computers are<br />

able to interpret the information from<br />

the provided context. Having intelligent<br />

cameras able to detect safety threats<br />

while simultaneously streaming video<br />

content to the satisfied boat owners will<br />

become an essential component of the<br />

marina service.<br />

The marina industry is predominantly<br />

a very competitive market and it has<br />

become very difficult to retain existing<br />

customers and attract new ones.<br />

Although individual marinas will always<br />

have different business strategies,<br />

focusing on the safety of the boat is<br />

a proven winning strategy for many<br />

marinas. We have been successfully<br />

applying this concept in <strong>Marina</strong> Punat<br />

in Croatia and in many other marinas<br />

over the past few years with great<br />

results.<br />

Kresimir Zic helped develop the <strong>Marina</strong><br />

Cloud software solution; a management<br />

system designed by marina managers.<br />

www.marinacloud.net<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong> 47


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INTELLIGENT MARINA SYSTEMS<br />

Software serves customers and companies<br />

by Nick Gill<br />

To be successful, marina management software must deliver for both the<br />

marina and its customers. <strong>Marina</strong> professionals know what they need<br />

to run operations - berth allocation and occupancy, reservations, asset<br />

management, maintenance scheduling, invoicing and payment, plus<br />

accessible reporting. Control over processes and access to information<br />

that delivers smooth and stress-free site management.<br />

What do customers want?<br />

It is clear that while boat owners want<br />

what they’ve always wanted - more<br />

time afloat - they’re also demanding<br />

transparency, flexibility and control.<br />

They’re used to internet shopping and<br />

managing their financial transactions<br />

online and expect the same seamless<br />

service from their marina.<br />

This is good news.<br />

Customer portals<br />

and other selfservice<br />

access points<br />

give customers the<br />

flexibility they desire<br />

without an impact on<br />

staffing. Mike Braidley,<br />

director of Castle<br />

<strong>Marina</strong>s says: “Having a portal means<br />

those customers who don’t want to talk<br />

to us don’t need to, freeing us to spend<br />

more time with the customers who do.”<br />

Reduce the churn<br />

Research shows that over 80% of<br />

customers expect a reply to an email<br />

within an hour, and a third expect an<br />

answer in 15 minutes. These are tall<br />

asks for most busy marina offices,<br />

so educating customers to self-serve<br />

online has to be a sensible move,<br />

indeed vital with current and future<br />

COVID-19 restrictions on marina<br />

operations and staffing.<br />

A portal that gives customers direct<br />

access to their account information,<br />

such as financial transactions, contact<br />

details, marketing choices and<br />

reservations removes many of the dayto-day<br />

phone calls and emails.<br />

Faster payment, fewer debtors<br />

Technology is not a barrier for most<br />

customers. <strong>Marina</strong>s using Harbour<br />

Assist transacted a third more online<br />

payments in the first three months of<br />

<strong>2020</strong> compared to 2019. In April <strong>2020</strong><br />

the value jumped by 14% compared to<br />

the previous year.<br />

A lot of customer contact revolves<br />

around money – querying invoices and<br />

chasing payment. Giving customers<br />

online access to view and drill<br />

down into transactions provides the<br />

transparency they desire and gives<br />

control (even if illusory) over how<br />

and when to pay.<br />

Cut barriers to action with a ‘pay<br />

now’ button with a link through to<br />

a secure payment gateway and<br />

vaulted card facility. The experience<br />

at South West Lakes<br />

Trust bears this out:<br />

“With the portal,<br />

more customers are<br />

naturally switching<br />

to payment in full,”<br />

comments director<br />

James Platts. “This<br />

means we get<br />

income earlier in the year and fewer<br />

contract drop-outs. It is easier to keep<br />

on top of potential debtors.”<br />

Quality communications<br />

Reduce the churn of daily activity<br />

with self-service, and marinas can<br />

spend more time building quality<br />

relationships with customers. Who<br />

wants to chase debt when you can be<br />

having conversations that build deeper<br />

relationships with customers?<br />

Integrated CRM enables managers<br />

to send personalised emails, HTML<br />

newsletters, letters or SMS to targeted<br />

groups of customers. “During the<br />

coronavirus shut down, it’s been vital to<br />

communicate regularly with customers,”<br />

says Alison Wakelin at Emsworth Yacht<br />

Harbour. “Using smart lists to select<br />

customers in the boatyard or marina<br />

and to separate contracted and casual<br />

customers for tailored messages is<br />

invaluable.”<br />

A Microsoft survey showed that<br />

over three-quarters of people expect<br />

all customer-facing staff to know their<br />

service history, making complete<br />

customer records a priority. Alongside<br />

free-text notes fields and storing<br />

outgoing correspondence, a quality<br />

marina management system will track<br />

email ‘opens’ and automatically file<br />

email responses to provide a complete<br />

picture of the customer relationship.<br />

What is the future for marina<br />

IT?<br />

Recent events have changed marina<br />

operations, whether for a limited period<br />

of home working or an extended shutdown.<br />

These experiences will influence<br />

planning, investment and staffing<br />

decisions.<br />

Many operators are considering how<br />

to reduce face-to-face interactions<br />

with customers and suppliers, and<br />

even between team members, how<br />

to effectively administer the marina<br />

remotely and to deploy staff from home.<br />

<strong>Marina</strong>s are complex environments<br />

and will always need hands-on<br />

intervention to keep them safe and<br />

enjoyable places to work and visit.<br />

However, technology can play a more<br />

active part, for example in remote<br />

monitoring and control of electricity<br />

and water supply. Meter readings<br />

automatically fed into the marina<br />

management system to automate<br />

billing, or pre-pay systems controlled<br />

by the boat owner. Smart guardinage<br />

systems with onboard sensors sending<br />

push notifications to the marina<br />

office and boat owner if battery levels<br />

drop, bilge pumps activate, or cabin<br />

temperatures increase.<br />

This is about allowing customers into<br />

part of the marina management system.<br />

To blur the line between the customer<br />

and the marina by using the technology<br />

to deliver the transparency, flexibility<br />

and control that both parties need.<br />

Nick Gill is the co-founder and<br />

commercial director of marina software<br />

company Harbour Assist.<br />

www.harbourassist.com<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong> 49


Digital transformation<br />

during the global crisis<br />

by Idan Cohen<br />

Let’s start with a quick question: is COVID-19 the catalyst in driving the<br />

biggest digital transformation in marine history?<br />

Most marinas are now facing the<br />

same needs and challenges and are<br />

asking themselves the tough questions:<br />

how do we continue to operate, provide<br />

exceptional customer experience,<br />

generate revenue and enable our<br />

marina to operate during and after the<br />

current global crisis?<br />

The new environment which<br />

materialised out of the COVID-19<br />

pandemic generates a new set<br />

of needs. As of the beginning of<br />

<strong>May</strong> <strong>2020</strong>, recreational boating<br />

activity is still kept on suspension,<br />

being perceived by the majority<br />

of the regulating institutions as<br />

non-essential travel. As such, it<br />

is not expected to be among the<br />

first sectors to be restored to full<br />

operational capacity. Moreover,<br />

the new reality creates new<br />

challenges for the gates of entry<br />

to the countries. As one of the<br />

measures to contain the spread<br />

of the pandemic is to monitor the<br />

entrances to the country and trace the<br />

route of potential infectors, the need<br />

that may arise in reopening the borders<br />

will be thorough documentation of the<br />

travellers’ history, health conditions and<br />

plans at the destination.<br />

<strong>Marina</strong>s that are currently servicing<br />

residents and visitors in lock-down<br />

are faced with a new reality. The<br />

communication and interaction with<br />

them have changed significantly, as<br />

have the number of necessary facilities<br />

and essential services.<br />

As Martinho Fortunato, CEO of<br />

Marlagos <strong>Marina</strong> and vice chairman<br />

of the Portuguese <strong>Marina</strong> Association,<br />

puts it, “We have to keep the operations<br />

going. We have close to 90% occupancy<br />

right now and have changed the way we<br />

are working. The relationship between<br />

the marina, the clients and how the<br />

information is spread is changing. We<br />

need to inform residents with updates<br />

every day. In the future, we will have<br />

platforms where at all times residents<br />

will have all the information. We are<br />

working to get there.”<br />

INTELLIGENT MARINA SYSTEMS<br />

The technology and solutions that<br />

seemed like a futuristic endeavour<br />

that would take years to design and<br />

implement are now essential to cope<br />

with the existing crisis and with the day<br />

after.<br />

International travel will involve<br />

extensive reporting and testing<br />

protocols, requiring both the points of<br />

origin and of destination to communicate<br />

and coordinate information with each<br />

other. Passengers may even need to<br />

go through instant testing procedures<br />

at the gateways, just like the events of<br />

9/11 created entire new protocols for<br />

international travel security. National<br />

governments from their side would like<br />

to know, above any doubt, that anyone<br />

they are letting in will not provoke<br />

another infection outbreak which, as<br />

was witnessed, can send entire cities<br />

into lockdowns. Thus, they will impose<br />

strict regulations and inspections on<br />

any traffic entering their borders, by all<br />

means - air, land and sea. Any gateway<br />

which does not comply with the strict<br />

requirements may not be approved for<br />

operation or reopening. The pandemic<br />

forces every country to close or restrict<br />

access to its borders and define<br />

regulations that reflect the unique habits,<br />

limitations and cultures of its citizens.<br />

<strong>Marina</strong>s that wish to operate will<br />

be required to carefully monitor the<br />

recreational boating traffic that passes<br />

through and will have to comply with<br />

numerous standards of information<br />

sharing, visitor monitoring, data<br />

collection and coordination with multiple<br />

fellow destinations of origin. If the<br />

industry aspires to be among the sectors<br />

that are trusted to operate, it must prove<br />

that it possesses the capacity to monitor<br />

itself. As governments are not rushing<br />

to release sectors that are not seen as<br />

essential, in the fear of a second wave<br />

of outbreak, the recreational boating<br />

industry will have to prove that the<br />

balance between the health concerns<br />

and the economic implications of the<br />

lockdown will be tipped in the right<br />

direction through risk mitigation.<br />

The outdated practices in the<br />

recreational boating sector, along<br />

with the expanding needs discussed<br />

here, create both a challenge and an<br />

opportunity. The wide array of estimated<br />

requirements can serve as a crucial<br />

catalyzer for the entire industry<br />

to evolve and go through longoverdue<br />

processes. Recently the<br />

concern of public health in many<br />

places is starting to give way to the<br />

concern for the economic future of<br />

the countries. Governments start<br />

to feel the pain of the continuous<br />

lockdown and the paralysis of<br />

economies. In many countries, the<br />

curve of the pandemic is flattening<br />

and governments must start<br />

concentrating on ways to rescue<br />

collapsing sectors while also going<br />

long distances to survive a sharp<br />

recession.<br />

This current state of emergency can<br />

lead to necessary reforms, killing two<br />

birds with one stone. The modernisation<br />

process will both address government<br />

limitations on international travel and<br />

optimise the way boating and marinas<br />

are managed and supervised.<br />

When the world is weathering a<br />

significant economic blow and facing<br />

a severe recession, optimisation of<br />

industries and resources is not only<br />

recommended, it is essential. This<br />

can be done only through innovation,<br />

collaboration and communication. Our<br />

industry must work together to return<br />

to operate quickly in a safe, healthy,<br />

economical and secure way.<br />

Let’s start now.<br />

Idan Cohen is chairman of the Marine<br />

Innovation Association, a full member<br />

at ICOMIA, and CEO of Pick a Pier,<br />

an innovative technology company<br />

that is creating a global standard<br />

for service-oriented and sustainable<br />

recreational maritime travel.<br />

www.pickapier.com<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong> 51


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marina berth an easier and infinitely more stable experience for boat owners<br />

who felt this part of boating to be particularly challenging. The concept has<br />

since been further engineered as a heavy duty mooring system capable<br />

of keeping floating homes, floating pontoons and any other water-based<br />

structures secure.<br />

In principle, DualDocker is an<br />

alternative solution to traditional<br />

methods such as chains and piles. Its<br />

main strength is its ability to absorb the<br />

forces that impact on a floating pontoon<br />

- unlike a pile, for example, which<br />

has virtually no damping capacity.<br />

DualDocker completely avoids the build<br />

up of kinetic energy caused by wind,<br />

waves or current, and any wake energy<br />

from the docking of ships and yachts.<br />

It is a highly damped mooring solution<br />

without play.<br />

Manufactured in Austria using top<br />

quality materials and available to ship<br />

worldwide, the system is extremely<br />

environmentally friendly as nothing is<br />

secured to the seabed or drags across<br />

the seafloor.<br />

New heavy-duty systems can be<br />

used to secure aluminium, steel and<br />

concrete pontoons and gangways<br />

in a manner that is safe, has no<br />

visual impact and requires very little<br />

A DualDocker pontoon mooring solution<br />

installed in Corsica boosts the number<br />

of recreational berths.<br />

maintenance. It can be used to solve<br />

problems in challenging shaped sites or<br />

where sea levels significantly vary.<br />

Arrangements ideal for floating<br />

pontoons include the TriDocker and<br />

the V-Setup. TriDocker incorporates a<br />

docking arm at each end of the pontoon<br />

and one in the centre along either the<br />

length of a pier (for alongside mooring)<br />

or at the quay wall end of a stern-to<br />

mooring.<br />

The V-Setup replaces each of the<br />

arms with a V-shaped docking arm.<br />

This arrangement can also be installed<br />

on piles or on concrete mounts on the<br />

quay wall.<br />

In tandem with Swedish company<br />

Seaflex, DualDocker has also<br />

developed the 90m (295ft) floating<br />

pontoon concept (left). This moors a<br />

90m aluminium pontoon comprising six<br />

15 x 3m (49 x 10ft) sections. The result<br />

accommodates up to 30 boats of up to<br />

15m (49ft) in length and is moored by<br />

DualDocker at ‘landside’ and Seaflex<br />

‘seaside’. The system absorbs up to<br />

500kN, and pontoon movement is just<br />

0.05m (2in) in normal conditions and up<br />

to 0.25m (10in) in a heavy storm.<br />

Pontoon mooring installations to date<br />

range from heavy 5,000 ton floating<br />

structures in the UAE and a floating pier<br />

for heavy tug boats in Tangier, Morocco<br />

(12 DualDocker arms) to medium<br />

and smaller sized floating pontoons<br />

in marinas around the world, and<br />

numerous recreational pontoons and<br />

large, heavy floating homes worldwide.<br />

In addition to the significant benefits<br />

of high and instant damping capacity<br />

and the lack of mechanical parts<br />

requiring maintenance (no hydraulics,<br />

oil, gas or pneumatics), DualDocker is<br />

available in a choice of materials that<br />

offer great durability. The anodised<br />

aluminium alloy version is fully resistant<br />

to salt water and UV rays.<br />

www.dualdocker.com<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong> 53


PRODUCTS, SERVICES & PEOPLE<br />

Wobble-free<br />

boarding with<br />

new design<br />

kayak launch<br />

Certified for fair<br />

and traceable<br />

transactions<br />

Dutch company Seijsener has become the first<br />

manufacturing company in Europe to be granted a type<br />

examination certificate by the German National Metrology<br />

Institute (PTB) for its shore power cabinets.<br />

This means that any<br />

user plugging in to obtain<br />

power will benefit from a fair,<br />

transparent and traceable<br />

transaction.<br />

“We are quite pleased and<br />

very proud to be Eichrecht<br />

certified,” says Seijsener<br />

director Bas Durieux. “This is<br />

an important step to further<br />

strengthen our position in<br />

the German market for shore<br />

power facilities.”<br />

“Currently, following<br />

an awarded tender, the<br />

Seijsener-Involtum consortium<br />

is installing more than 120<br />

shore power facilities along<br />

the canals and rivers in<br />

North Rhine Westphalia.<br />

The cabinets are the first<br />

in Europe to comply with<br />

German calibration law. This<br />

underlines our dedication and<br />

drive to serve markets across<br />

Europe while respecting local<br />

regulations,” he<br />

continues.<br />

Seijsener will<br />

now be able to<br />

supply shore<br />

power cabinets<br />

throughout Europe<br />

that will give<br />

users complete<br />

confidence that<br />

they are paying<br />

the correct<br />

amount for their<br />

energy and,<br />

if desired, the<br />

technology can<br />

be applied to car<br />

charging stations<br />

etc.<br />

www.seijsener.nl<br />

Many paddlers find the act of getting into and out of a<br />

kayak nerve-racking, especially with onlookers. Even the<br />

most stable solo or tandem boat will wobble and slip.<br />

Golden Boat Lifts has<br />

taken this concern into<br />

account with a completely<br />

redesigned and innovative<br />

kayak launch, which can<br />

safely and easily launch and<br />

recover the craft in under<br />

90 seconds, even from high<br />

docks and seawalls and<br />

areas with tidal fluctuation.<br />

Using the Golden Kayak<br />

Launch couldn’t be easier.<br />

The user slides the kayak<br />

or canoe onto the twin<br />

bunks and lowers it into<br />

the water using the crank.<br />

Paddlers descend the stair<br />

tread ladder and enter the<br />

boat, using the grab rail on<br />

the opposite side to steady<br />

themselves. The launch’s<br />

stable platform minimises the<br />

awkward movement common<br />

with boarding. Boaters then<br />

slide their vessels out into the<br />

open water. Upon return, the<br />

steps are simply reversed.<br />

In a change from previous<br />

models, the new launch<br />

is now made from fullywelded<br />

square marine<br />

grade aluminium tubing<br />

and receiver pockets for<br />

maximum rigidity and<br />

strength. Nylatron rollers and<br />

a stainless steel brake winch<br />

and cable have been added<br />

to ensure moving parts will<br />

operate smoothly for years<br />

to come with very little<br />

maintenance.<br />

Craft up to 249lb (113kg)<br />

can be supported, and two<br />

models are offered with fiveand<br />

seven-step ladders.<br />

www.goldenboatlifts.com<br />

54<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong>


MIA offers online education<br />

courses during pandemic<br />

The <strong>Marina</strong> Industries Association (MIA) has ramped up its online<br />

learning for the marina industries amid the COVID-19 pandemic. The<br />

MIA’s online offering has increased from two to six types of online<br />

programmes and the association expects to deliver a minimum of 17<br />

online educational activities.<br />

PRODUCTS, SERVICES & PEOPLE<br />

MIA president Andrew Chapman<br />

said momentum for online learning was<br />

already growing before the COVID-19<br />

crisis. “Twelve months ago we launched<br />

the Club <strong>Marina</strong> Extreme Weather<br />

Preparedness course online. While<br />

initial take-up was slow, there has been<br />

a 60% increase in course enrolments<br />

from nine countries this year.”<br />

In July, the MIA will conduct<br />

its first ever online Intermediate<br />

<strong>Marina</strong> Management (IMM) course.<br />

Traditionally face-to-face and conducted<br />

over 4.5 days, the online IMM will take<br />

place over a period of four weeks.<br />

MIA’s industry education officer,<br />

Vijaya Selvaraj, said studying online<br />

has practical advantages not<br />

just during COVID-19. “Shorter,<br />

more intensive and self-directed online<br />

learning gives our members greater<br />

flexibility to choose when, where<br />

and how they study. Members can<br />

participate from anywhere in the world<br />

and experts can be brought in via<br />

recorded interviews or live webinars.”<br />

“MIA’s Extreme Weather Course is<br />

self-paced and the materials can be<br />

accessed 24 hours a day, seven days<br />

a week – and participants are given<br />

30 days to complete the course,” she<br />

added. “We are also rolling out a course<br />

focused on marina boat fire prevention,<br />

which will be a blended online course.”<br />

MIA CEO, Colin Bransgrove, said:<br />

“Face to face learning will always be a<br />

core part of MIA’s education offering<br />

in normal times. The use of online<br />

learning, however, is suited to the MIA<br />

membership that is scattered across<br />

many countries from the Middle East to<br />

New Zealand. With 300 plus members<br />

across such a vast area of the globe, it<br />

is inevitable online learning will become<br />

an increasingly important component of<br />

MIA activity to support the sustainable<br />

growth of the marina industries.”<br />

www.marinas.net.au/training/coursetimetable<br />

28 metres<br />

65 tons<br />

no crane<br />

www.roodberg.com<br />

The Original<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong> 55


PRODUCTS, SERVICES & PEOPLE<br />

Reach and Rescue<br />

poles saving lives<br />

in marinas<br />

UK marina managers are seeing the benefit of having a<br />

lightweight Reach and Rescue pole to hand to ensure<br />

safety. MDL <strong>Marina</strong>s has supplied every marina manager<br />

at each of its 20 marinas across the UK and Europe with a<br />

pole, and Bangor <strong>Marina</strong>, part of the Quay <strong>Marina</strong>s group,<br />

has recently added one to its emergency equipment<br />

inventory.<br />

The telescopic rescue pole<br />

is a multi-award winning,<br />

compact, lightweight design<br />

that can be extended to<br />

20m (66ft) within seconds,<br />

saving valuable time in an<br />

urgent rescue situation.<br />

Its simple, quick-release<br />

clasps with a range of<br />

interchangeable water rescue<br />

attachments ensure the pole<br />

can be operated efficiently,<br />

accurately and with minimal<br />

training.<br />

The team at MDL’s<br />

Shamrock Quay marina in<br />

Southampton was the first<br />

to recognise the need for a<br />

swift and accurate method<br />

to recover any person in the<br />

water without needing to get<br />

into the water themselves.<br />

The pole was called into<br />

action almost immediately –<br />

three lives have been saved<br />

at the marina since it was<br />

installed.<br />

“We have used the<br />

equipment on three<br />

occasions to successfully<br />

recover persons who<br />

have accidentally fallen<br />

in the water,” said marina<br />

supervisor Barry Radband.<br />

Elsewhere, marina<br />

manager Kevin Baird and his<br />

team at Bangor <strong>Marina</strong> have<br />

also positioned a Reach and<br />

Rescue pole inside a water<br />

rescue system, dubbed the<br />

‘Emergency Point’, which<br />

is available to fishermen<br />

working on the busy pier.<br />

“Fishermen do fall in the<br />

marina,” Baird said and,<br />

while typical water safety<br />

equipment such as life rings<br />

are already in place on the<br />

pier, “a life ring is no use if<br />

you fall between the boat and<br />

the quay.”<br />

To date, the long-reach<br />

Reach and Rescue pole<br />

has prevented the deaths of<br />

more than 50 people during<br />

potentially life-threatening<br />

situations, including rescuing<br />

people from man overboard<br />

situations.<br />

www.reachandrescue.com<br />

Barton Marine<br />

launches ‘Quick<br />

Cleat’ range<br />

UK marine equipment manufacturer Barton Marine has<br />

introduced a range of Quick Cleat mooring solutions – an<br />

alternative to tying knots to secure items on pontoons<br />

and around marinas by simply twisting open a locking<br />

mechanism, dropping in a line and releasing.<br />

With a low profile and<br />

unobtrusive design, Quick<br />

Cleat is ideal for mounting<br />

to pontoon decks, providing<br />

a fast secure mooring point<br />

with a considerably lower<br />

trip risk in comparison to<br />

traditional open cleats. It is<br />

particularly useful for those<br />

looking to secure vessels<br />

that are in frequent use, or<br />

on short-term moorings such<br />

as fuel pontoons or visitor<br />

berths. Lines are held tight in<br />

one direction while being fully<br />

adjustable in the other and<br />

totally secure.<br />

Quick Cleats can also be<br />

used for hanging or storing<br />

fenders, securing tenders,<br />

SUPs, kayaks or other<br />

watercraft, without any knot<br />

tying knowledge.<br />

The range includes:<br />

• Quick Cleat 60040: a 316<br />

marine grade stainless<br />

steel version, which<br />

securely holds lines<br />

from 6-10mm (0.3-0.4in)<br />

and loads up to 540kg<br />

(1,190lbs).<br />

• Quick Cleat 60030:<br />

a versatile, tough<br />

construction of heavy duty<br />

nylon Zytel from DuPont,<br />

which holds lines from<br />

6-10mm (0.3-0.4in) and<br />

loads up to 70kg (154lbs).<br />

• Quick Cleat 60020: a<br />

smaller version constructed<br />

of DuPont’s heavy duty<br />

nylon Zytel, which holds<br />

lines up to 6mm (0.3in) and<br />

loads up to 30kg (66lbs).<br />

www.bartonmarine.com<br />

56<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong>


PRODUCTS, SERVICES & PEOPLE<br />

Sanitising on<br />

the docks<br />

Italian pedestal manufacturer Plus<br />

International is offering a wide range<br />

of floor-standing hygiene dispensers<br />

for marinas.<br />

The product launch came in time to<br />

meet new regulations for sanitiser to<br />

Hydrohoist launches<br />

larger storage locker<br />

be made available on marina pontoons<br />

in Italy (see article p. 29) and the<br />

likelihood that similar rulings may be<br />

introduced in other countries.<br />

Most models are customisable with<br />

marina logo and come in a choice of<br />

colour, design and material. Larger<br />

dispensers offer space for hand<br />

sanitiser, gloves, face masks and a<br />

waste bin. The smallest free-standing<br />

model (right) is a functional but stylish<br />

hand sanitiser pole which takes up little<br />

space and is ideal for marinas looking to<br />

provide a solution alongside each berth.<br />

Other options include a wheeled unit<br />

that can be moved between busy areas<br />

and a tabletop version with room for<br />

hand sanitiser and gloves.<br />

US-based HydroHoist Boat Lifts has released a new solution for dockside<br />

storage – the 78-inch (198cm) Rectangular HydroLocker.<br />

The HydroLocker series now offers<br />

two designs built to withstand harsh<br />

marine environments and manufactured<br />

using tough, UV-stabilised polyethylene,<br />

which is more resistant to cracking<br />

and longer lasting than glass fibre. The<br />

rotomoulded HydroLockers are impactresistant<br />

and virtually maintenancefree,<br />

accepting standard padlocks to<br />

securely store items inside.<br />

The new Rectangular version boasts<br />

25ft³ (7,800cm³) of storage capacity.<br />

The tongue and groove lid resists water<br />

penetration and the ribbed bottom of<br />

the locker provides better structural<br />

support, increases airflow and doesn’t<br />

trap water between the locker and dock,<br />

thus reducing wood rot and mould. It<br />

has a removable tray to accommodate<br />

smaller items or fishing rods. The unit<br />

can also be purchased with optional<br />

accessories like the Gas Shock Assist<br />

and Off Dock Mounting Bracket kits.<br />

The 50-inch Triangular version offers<br />

14ft³ (396,000cm³) of storage capacity,<br />

accommodating a water riser and hose<br />

storage. It integrates with a HyPower<br />

EnergyMate power supply for an allin-one<br />

water and power organisational<br />

tool.<br />

“We are proud to produce the most<br />

practical, durable and well-thoughtout<br />

products on the market,” said<br />

Mick Webber, HydroHoist CEO. “Our<br />

Triangular HydroLockers have been a<br />

huge success over the years, however<br />

we have seen increased demand for<br />

polyethylene dock lockers in additional<br />

sizes. The material is very popular<br />

due to the product being virtually<br />

maintenance free and they don’t get a<br />

chalk film or crack like fiberglass dock<br />

lockers. The new 78-inch Rectangular<br />

HydroLocker should be a<br />

necessary purchase for any<br />

boat owner.”<br />

www.boatlift.com<br />

Products are available<br />

via <strong>Marina</strong> Planet, which<br />

represents a network of<br />

companies manufacturing<br />

marina- and yard-specific<br />

goods.<br />

www.marinaplanet.it<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong> 57


PRODUCTS, SERVICES & PEOPLE<br />

Index to Advertisers<br />

ASAR/GCM Safe<br />

Harbour Drystacks, USA 33<br />

Bellingham Marine, USA 7, 9 &11<br />

Bluewater Marine & Dock<br />

Specialities, USA 24<br />

Capria, Argentina 38<br />

Conolift by Kropf<br />

Industrial, Canada 28<br />

Dual Docker, Austria 48<br />

Dura Composites, UK 28<br />

Eaton <strong>Marina</strong> Power &<br />

Lighting, USA 24<br />

Flovac, Spain 32<br />

GH Cranes & Components,<br />

Spain 38<br />

Gigieffe, Italy 16<br />

Golden Manufacturing, USA 59<br />

HydroHoist, USA 42<br />

Ingemar, Italy 12<br />

Inland & Coastal <strong>Marina</strong>s,<br />

Ireland 16<br />

Lindley, Portugal 52<br />

Livart Marine, China 50<br />

Lumberock Premium<br />

Decking, USA 50<br />

MYP at IBEX, USA 31<br />

Marex, Croatia 38<br />

Maricer, UK 26<br />

<strong>Marina</strong> Cloud, Croatia 42<br />

<strong>Marina</strong> Master by IRM, Slovenia 52<br />

<strong>Marina</strong> Projects, UK 19<br />

<strong>Marina</strong>Go by Scribble<br />

Software, USA 50<br />

Marinetek, Finland 4<br />

Martini Alfredo, Italy 35<br />

Metstrade <strong>2020</strong>, Netherlands 20<br />

Pacsoft, New Zealand 48<br />

Pick a Pier, Israel 46<br />

Rolec Services, UK 6<br />

Ronautica, Spain 40<br />

Roodberg - a brand of Frisian<br />

Industries, Netherlands 55<br />

SF <strong>Marina</strong> System, Sweden 2<br />

Seaflex, Sweden 8<br />

Sunwalk Superior<br />

Surfaces, USA 46<br />

Swedeship Sublift, Sweden 40<br />

TIVA Building Products,<br />

Canada 48<br />

Twinwood by Soprefa, Portugal 32<br />

Walcon Marine, UK 26<br />

Wiggins Lift Co, USA 60<br />

Jean-Pierre<br />

Carminati<br />

Jean-Pierre Carminati, director of<br />

Poralu Marine, passed away on 6th<br />

<strong>May</strong> at the age of 63 following a long<br />

battle with illness.<br />

Together with his brother Philippe,<br />

Jean-Pierre developed Poralu’s<br />

‘pontoons’ division in the 1980s and<br />

over 30 years of entrepreneurial<br />

initiatives and adventures followed.<br />

Léa Carminati, his niece, joined<br />

the company a few years ago and,<br />

alongside company president Laurent<br />

Gasiglia, strives to carry on his legacy<br />

within Poralu Marine.<br />

Jean-Pierre was also committed to<br />

helping his community and served as<br />

mayor of Nantua in 2008.<br />

His loss leaves a great void and<br />

all 150 Poralu employees feel deep<br />

sadness.<br />

Our sincere sympathy goes out to the<br />

Carminati family.<br />

New<br />

CEO at<br />

MIA<br />

Suzanne Davies (below right) is to<br />

become CEO of the Australia-based<br />

<strong>Marina</strong> Industries Association (MIA)<br />

on 1st October. She takes over from<br />

Colin Bransgrove who has headed<br />

up the association for 13 years.<br />

MIA chairman Andrew Chapman<br />

(below left) said he and the MIA<br />

board were delighted to welcome her.<br />

“Suzanne has all the attributes we<br />

could wish for in a CEO. Additionally,<br />

she has an intimate understanding of<br />

the MIA and the needs of our members<br />

that comes with being an active MIA<br />

member and MIA director since 2012.”<br />

Davies’s most recent position was<br />

as CEO of d’Albora <strong>Marina</strong>s and<br />

previously as general manager of Royal<br />

Prince Alfred Yacht Club in Sydney<br />

for 12 years. Prior to that she held a<br />

range of senior positions, particularly<br />

in sales and marketing in the hotel<br />

accommodation sector. She is a current<br />

director of Australian Sailing.<br />

Dura wins second<br />

Queen’s Award<br />

Composite materials firm Dura Composites has scooped a second Queen’s<br />

Award for Enterprise, this time in the Innovation category, for its pioneering<br />

rapid-deployment train station platform solution known as Dura Platform.<br />

The Queen’s Awards are a royal<br />

seal of approval for the UK’s most<br />

outstanding businesses and Dura’s<br />

<strong>2020</strong> award follows the Queen’s Award<br />

for Enterprise in International Trade,<br />

which was presented to the company<br />

in 2017.<br />

Dura Platform - a height-adjustable<br />

composite train station platform that<br />

reduces gaps between train and<br />

platform edge to enhance passenger<br />

safety, is rapidly installed and therefore<br />

reduces passenger disruption.<br />

www.duracomposites.com<br />

58<br />

www.marinaworld.com - <strong>May</strong>/<strong>June</strong> <strong>2020</strong>


Golden® has more than 40 years experience<br />

in manufacturing a comprehensive range of<br />

boat lifts and floating dock systems. Golden<br />

manufactures boat lifts and floating docks<br />

for individual boat owners, marinas and<br />

municipalities around the globe. We have<br />

installed over 75,000 boat lifts and<br />

floating dock systems in 146 countries.<br />

®


WIGGINS<br />

MARINA<br />

BULL<br />

www.wigginslift.com<br />

wigginslift@wigginslift.com<br />

+1 (805) 485-7821

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