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June 28 - July 11, 2020 www.columbusmessenger.com Vol. XXXVIII, No. 1

Protest march in Groveport

Hometown Realtor

Marylee Bendig

580 Main St., Groveport, OH 43125

(614) 218-1097

marylee@maryleebendig.com

A name you KNOW,

the name you TRUST

Shoemaker

resigns

Groveport Police Sgt. Josh Short

shares a pleasant moment with the

organizer of the march, Pastor Kelsey

Crenshaw.

Angela Smith, 17, gave an impassioned

speech at the end of the march in

Groveport Park.

Photos by Marie Kujawski

About 200 people marched along Groveport’s Main Street on June 13 to protest

against police violence and the death of George Floyd. Floyd, a black man, died in

Minneapolis on May 25 after a white police officer (who is now charged with murder)

pressed his knee on Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes. Unlike other recent

protests nationwide that turned violent, the protest in Groveport was peaceful. See

more photos online at columbusmessenger.com (look under Southeast News).

By Rick Palsgrove

Southeast Editor

A group of about 200 protest marchers

brought their message of “Black Lives

Matter” to Groveport on June 13.

The march, led by Pastor Kelsey

Crenshaw, went the length of Groveport’s

Main Street from the Kroger parking lot

to the Groveport Recreation Center. The

march was organized as a protest against

police violence and the death of George

Floyd. Floyd, a black man, died in

Minneapolis on May 25 after a white

police officer (who is now charged with

murder) pressed his knee on Floyd’s neck

for nearly nine minutes. Unlike other

recent protests nationwide that turned

violent, the protest march in Groveport

was peaceful.

When asked why such a march was

held in Groveport, Crenshaw, who is a

Groveport resident and noted he has

experienced “zero of examples of racism”

himself in Groveport, said, “Why not

here? The message is not just for big

cities, it is important to small communities,

too. Groveport needs diversity just as

Columbus and elsewhere. We want to

educate. We must abolish racism. People

are tired of racism. We have a purpose.

We must all stand up for truth and righteousness

and know that the love of God is

everywhere.”

Crenshaw met with Groveport city officials

and the Groveport Police prior the

march. He said the police, the mayor, and

city officials were “fantastic and supported

this 100 percent.”

“We are not against the police,” said

Crenshaw. “We are against racism. We

want to use our voices for positive purposes.”

The march began during a steady rain

in the late morning of June 13. The 200

marchers were a mix of white and black

protesters who chanted, “No division with

God,” “Black Lives Matter,” “No justice,

no peace,” and other phrases while they

walked.

Among the marchers was the Goudy

family of Groveport.

“We as a family have seen inequality

and injustice in person, not just on the

nightly news,” said Roy Goudy. “As

humans we must eliminate inequality

and seek justice one day at a time and one

step at a time.”

A little ways into the march,

Crenshaw stopped to slow the pace of the

procession.

See PROTEST, page 2

By Rick Palsgrove

Southeast Editor

Seven applicants are seeking to fill the

vacant seat on the Groveport Madison

Board of Education.

The selected applicant will take over

the seat vacated by Groveport Madison

Board of Education member Bryan

Shoemaker, who announced his immediate

resignation from the board on June 10 citing

his recent move outside of the school

district. Shoemaker was serving in his

third term on the board, having been first

elected in November 2010. His term

expires on Dec. 31, 2021.

“Bryan joined the board at a crucial

time in the district’s history,” said Board

President Libby Gray. “The district had

significant financial challenges which

required strong leadership and guidance

from the board. Bryan’s understanding of

the community and his insights helped

forge community trust and confidence and

guide the district back to financial stability.

Bryan was instrumental throughout

the design and construction of the high

school, where his construction experience

was invaluable.”

The applicants (in alphabetical order

and with information included in their letters

of application) are:

•Seth Bower - Bower has 17 years

experience in the non-profit industry

where he has been responsible for budgets

more than $800,000. He co-chaired the district’s

2019 bond issue/levy campaign.

“Unfortunately, Issue 7 did not pass,”

wrote Bower. “This led me to further support

the district by advocating for the levy

that passed in November 2019 while also

See RESIGNS, page 3

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PAGE 2 - SOUTHEAST MESSENGER - June 28, 2020

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PROTEST

Continued from page 1

“Slow down,” he told the marchers, “We want everyone

to see and hear what we have to say.”

The sidewalks and yards along Main Street were

mostly deserted during the march. A few people could

be seen watching from their yards and porches and

others peered out windows. One man flashed a peace

sign to the marchers as they passed his house. The

town was so quiet during the march that the sounds of

the chanting protesters could be heard echoing off the

buildings along Main Street.

At College and Main streets a small group of peaceful

counter-protesters stood with an outstretched

“Thin Blue Line” police flag to show their support for

the police.

“We are here to support the men and women of the

Groveport Police Department,” said David Kalb of

Groveport as he held the Thin Blue Line flag. “The

Groveport Police are a great bunch of people. We need

the police. They are working people just like anyone

else. The police are getting a bad rap. There are always

a few bad apples in any job.”

The Groveport Police provided protection and support

for the marchers and everyone along the march

route. The officers wore their regular uniform gear and

were present in police cruisers, on bicycles, and an allterrain

vehicle. The marchers and onlookers remained

peaceful the entire time and there were no incidents.

“When we got word that the pastor was planning a

protest we reached out and made contact to see how we

could help to make the protest go as smoothly as possible,”

said Groveport Police Sgt. Josh Short. “All of the

communication with the pastor was great and he made

it clear from the start that this was to be a ‘peaceful

protest.’”

Short said the large number of participants and

their enthusiasm “was impressive” and there were no

problems.

“After seeing how many of the other nationwide

protests had become violent and not having any real

experience with large scale protests in Groveport we

were pleased and proud with how this turned out,”

www.columbusmessenger.com

said Short. “This speaks to the positive sense of community

that has been fostered in the city of Groveport

where people try to do the right thing and treat each

other courteously every day.”

“Kudos to the Groveport Police for how they handled

the march,” said Mayor Lance Westcamp.

“Nothing like this has ever happened in Groveport

before and we made it a success. Everyone went home

safe.”

Among the marchers was a heavy presence of

Groveport Madison Schools employees and students,

including Superintendent Garilee Ogden who said,

“We know it is our duty to serve all of our students and

to give our kids a voice. All black kids matter and all

kids matter at Groveport Madison Schools. We will do

whatever we have to do to eliminate systemic racism in

our district.”

The Daugherty family participated in the march

and carried signs with a biblical theme. Toya

Daugherty said the family chose the Bible verse

Proverbs 31:9 for one sign because it is about the

power of protest. They said the verse speaks to the idea

that silence is complicity and that it is important to

stand up and speak out.

Once the march reached Groveport Park, the group

gathered in one of the parking lots and several people

made short speeches. One impassioned speaker was

17-year-old Angela Smith, who said in reference to the

long history of violence against blacks nationwide,

“There’s been too many killed. Say their names. It’s too

many. If you feel uncomfortable talking about that,

that’s too bad. People shouldn’t have to ask for justice.

We want change. We need unity.”

The marchers then kneeled silently at the end of the

march for eight minutes and 46 seconds, which is the

amount of time a Minneapolis police officer pressed his

knee on the neck of George Floyd as Floyd died.

Afterwards, the crowd quietly dispersed. Crenshaw

noted this march is just the beginning.

“Enough is enough,” he said.

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The Daugherty family with their signs. Toya Daugherty (right)

said the family chose the Bible verse Proverbs 31:9 because it

is about the power of protest. They said the verse speaks to

the idea that silence is complicity and that it is important to

stand up and speak out. (Photos by Marie Kujawski)

The marchers

kneeled at the

end of the march

for eight minutes

and 46 seconds,

the amount of

time a policeman

pressed his knee

on George Floyd’s

neck.

David Kalb of Groveport holds up the “Thin

Blue Line” flag as a counter-protest to the

march and to show his support for the

police.


www.columbusmessenger.com

RESIGNS

Continued from page 1

running for election to the school board.” Bower serves on

the board of the Center for Groveport Madison Human

Needs. Bower said he would “make sure the district is

operating well, continue to rebuild community trust, and

provide our children with the education they deserve.”

•Wayne Bryan - Bryan serves on the Madison

Township Citizens Advisory Committee. He is a graduate

of Groveport Madison High School and has worked in construction

and maintenance over the years. (His application

did not include a cover letter.)

•Lisa Butts - Butts raised four children in Groveport

Madison Schools and she wrote, “As an engaged parent

and active community member I have enjoyed partnering

with educators to help support a high quality education for

students.” Her goals include: keeping students as the

focus; encouraging an innovative learning environment;

maintaining a system of accountability ensuring the district

drives toward goals; and promoting relationships

with families and children that establish leaders as education

advocates. “I share the vision of our district to prepare

students for the future that they deserve,” wrote Butts.

•LaToya Dowdell-Burger - Dowdell-Burger’s letter stated,

“I am highly skilled in a variety of computer software

programs and have plethora of experience and knowledge

dealing with complex issues, project management, evaluations/investigations,

presentations, interpreting regulations,

research, customer service, and creating, developing

successful processes, policies, budgeting, training, performance

management, and procedures.” She said her professional

demeanor, commitment to education, diversity,

and military bearing are qualities of importance when

working with parents, teachers, the administration, and

students.

•Aaron England - England is a 2010 graduate of

June 28, 2020 - SOUTHEAST MESSENGER - PAGE 3

Groveport Madison High School and he wrote, “I believe

my commitment and heart are with the students of the district,

their educators, and our taxpayers.” He stated he

would work to ensure today’s students receive the same

great experience with the district that he received. “I’ve

worked with the district and school board for many years

through student advocacy, event promotions, and volunteer

work, and my personal business Appeal 5 Content

Creation has worked with the high school as well.”

•Lori Rea - Rea was as a project manager for an engineering/environmental

company and taught business and

computer classes at Robert S. Rodgers High School in

Toledo. She became a technology and data peer coach and

then transitioned into administration. “I led an

effort to improve the four lowest performing schools

in Toledo where we had great successes,” she wrote.

She served as director of curriculum at Otsego

Local. She works as a program coordinator of a two

year program for teachers and principals for the

University of Cincinnati. “I bring a unique perspective

and skill set that combines my business and

education experiences,” wrote Rea.

•John Showman - Showman is Scoutmaster for

Groveport Boy Scout Troop 71 as well as serving as

the parent advisor for the Jobs Daughters Bethel

and DeMolay chapter in Groveport. He volunteered

for the Groveport Madison Technology Committee

last winter that recommended possible upgrades

and solutions. He said Groveport Madison led the

way during the coronavirus pandemic with its E-

learning programs. “I feel we have the best

resources and teachers for our students,” wrote

Showman. “I want to make sure we have accountability

and provide the best education for our students.”

The process

The board conducted candidate interviews on June 24.

State law requires school boards to fill vacancies at

their next regular or special board meeting, but not earlier

than 10 days after the vacancy occurs.

The board must fill the vacancy within 30 days after the

vacancy occurs.

The new board member will serve the shorter of the

completion of the unexpired term, or until the first day of

January immediately following the next regular board of

education election taking place more than 90 days after

someone is selected to fill the vacancy.


PAGE 4 - SOUTHEAST MESSENGER - June 28, 2020

Letters policy

The Southeast Messenger welcomes letters

to the editor. Letters cannot be libelous.

Letters that do not have a signature, address,

and telephone number, or are signed with a

pseudonym, will be rejected. PLEASE BE

BRIEF AND TO THE POINT. The

Messenger reserves the right to edit or

refuse publication of any letter for any reason.

Opinions expressed in the letters are not

necessarily the views of the Messenger. Mail

letters to: Southeast Messenger, 3500

Sullivant Avenue, Columbus, OH 43204; or

email southeast@columbusmessenger.com.

Keep tabs on the latest news and

events in Groveport and Obetz

Look for the Southeast Messenger on

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southeast

Messenger

(Distribution: 29,110)

Rick Palsgrove ...................................Southeast Editor

southeast@columbusmessenger.com

Published every other Sunday by

The Columbus Messenger Co.

3500 Sullivant Ave., Columbus, Ohio 43204-1887

(614) 272-5422

The Columbus Messenger Co. reserves the right to edit, reject or cancel

any advertisement or editorial copy at any time. The company is not

responsible for checking accuracy of items submitted for publication.

Errors in advertising copy must be called to the attention of the company

after first insertion and prior to a second insertion of the same advertising

copy.

There’s a curiosity made of concrete on

Groveport’s Main Street that has puzzled

me since my youth.

Editor’s Notebook

Rick

Palsgrove

column

The stairway to nowhere

I grew up in a

house on the north

side of Main Street

between West Street

and Frank Alley.

Directly in view

across the street from

my boyhood home on

the south side of Main

Street, embedded in

the grassy incline, is

a short set of very old,

weathered, concrete

steps leading from

the sidewalk to, well,

nothing. I shouldn’t really say “nothing,” as

the steps do lead to an open grassy yard

between a house on the southwest corner of

Main and West streets and apartments

near the southeast corner of Frank Alley

and Main Street.

The steps most likely led up to a house

that must have stood on the site at one

time. But this ghost house is a mystery. As

long as I can remember there has not been

a house on this lot. Just the steps. Over the

years I have asked many an old timer if

they ever remember a house on this site

and none of them do. Often they tell me

that they, too, have pondered over the presence

of the steps leading to nowhere.

Many historic maps mark the outlines of

structures on lots in towns. I have looked at

old Groveport maps that show this area on

the south side of Main Street between West

Street and Frank Alley many times trying

to decipher the mystery of what was once

there accompanying the steps.

The map from the “Franklin County

Atlas of 1872” reveals that, at that time,

three lots owned by G.W. Kalb were platted

in that area. However, only the lot on the

southwest corner of Main and West streets

shows the outline of structure that stood

there. The area where the steps exist is

shown to be vacant of any structure.

A map of Groveport in 1900 shows these

three lots were owned by Amos Culp, but

still only the one structure mentioned

above is in place.

I then went to my trusty, highly detailed

Sanborn Fire Insurance maps of Groveport

from the early to mid-20th century to see

what they could reveal about what was

near the mysterious steps. Unfortunately,

the area west of West Street was not

included in any of the Sanborn maps I

could find, so the mystery continued.

Next I consulted the historical parcel

transfer sheets from the Franklin County

Auditor’s records. This produced a curious

find. Listed in 1932 under the name James

Frank on the sheet under “classification

and valuation of premises - houses” is one

house valued at $1,250. However, this

same historical parcel sheet records no

www.columbusmessenger.com

house on the lot before 1932, but does, in

1924, list a total value of a non-described

building on the lot at $1,050. The next

transfer on the list is 1965 and no house

information is listed. In fact, on the 1965

entry the spot that lists a building value on

the lot appears to have been covered by

that old substance once used to cover printed

mistakes in older times known as “corrective

fluid,” better known as “Wite-Out.”

So, was there a structure there on this

lot that disappeared for some reason

between 1932 and 1965? If so, why doesn’t

anyone seem to remember it being there?

At this point I can only speculate what

building the mystery steps once led up to.

Was it a house? Was it a business? If a

building was once there, when was it there,

how long was it there, who lived there, and

why is it gone now? The fact no one living

today or in the recent past can recall a

structure there is a bit mystifying. Because

a structure on that spot is not definitively

marked on the historic maps seems to indicate

that, if a building was there, it was not

there for long. Maybe it burned down.

Maybe the owner just tore it down. Maybe

the steps were constructed in anticipation

of a building that was never built for some

reason.

The steps remain and will most likely be

there for years to come, making us all ponder,

“What was once there by the stairway

to nowhere?”

Rick Palsgrove is editor of the Southeast

Messenger.

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Groveport history

Two documentary films on the history of

Groveport, produced by the Groveport

Heritage Society and Midnet Media, are

now available for viewing online on

YouTube. The films are: “Groveport: A

Town and Its People” and “The Story of

John S. Rarey and Cruiser.” The films were

originally made about 15 years ago.

The Groveport Heritage Museum contains

photographs, artifacts, and documents

about Groveport’s history. The

museum is located in Groveport Town

Hall, 648 Main St., and is normally open

during Groveport Town Hall’s operating

hours. Call 614-836-3333. Currently Town

Hall is closed to the public due to the ongoing

coronavirus pandemic.

Library curbside pick-up

The Columbus Metropolitan Library

expanded its curbside pickup to include its

Southeast Branch Library, located at 3980

S. Hamilton Road. Curbside pickup will be

available Monday-Thursday, 11 a.m.-7

p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.,

with no service on Sunday.There will be no

public access into this building.

Visit columbuslibrary.org for information

or call 614-645-2275.

Photo courtesy of the

Groveport Heritage

Museum

Main

Street,

1980s

This 1980s view of

Groveport’s Main

Street, looking west

from College Street,

shows the large

shade trees that once

lined both sides of

the street. Most of

these mature trees

were removed when

the reconstruction

and renovation of

Main Street was completed

in the 1990s.

New, smaller trees

were planted in their

place.

Our Pictorial Past by Rick Palsgrove


www.columbusmessenger.com June 28, 2020 - SOUTHEAST MESSENGER - PAGE 5

Groveport Madison makes budget reductions because of state funding cuts

State cuts $1.1 million

from Groveport Madison

Groveport Madison Schools

Superintendent Garilee Ogden said, due to

state funding cuts of more than $5 million,

the district was forced to make budget

reductions to maintain a balanced budget

throughout the next five years.

In May, Governor Mike DeWine issued

an executive order reducing state funding

to Ohio’s schools by $300 million due to the

loss of sales tax revenue from the effects of

the coronavirus.

Of that amount, Groveport Madison’s

reduction equaled approximately $1.1 million

(approximately 2.67 percent of the district’s

fiscal year 2020 budget).

The state made the initial funding

reduction with only six weeks remaining in

the current fiscal year (ending on July 31,

2020).

“While the $1.1 million in state funding

reductions immediately impacted our

budget, thankfully, we were in a better

financial position than many school districts,”

said Groveport Madison Treasurer

Felicia Drummey. “Last year,

Superintendent Ogden made expenditure

reductions that resulted in $700,000 in net

savings for the district. These savings, coupled

with other cost-cutting measures

taken over this year, set up the district to

be more than $988,000 under budget by

our July 31 fiscal year-end. Were it not for

the $700,000 in reductions made last year,

the $1.1 million in state funding cuts we

just received would have caused significantly

more impact on our current financial

situation.”

According to the state treasurer’s projections,

Ohio’s public schools should expect to

see state funding cuts ranging from four to

10 percent.

“Groveport Madison is dependent on

state funding,” said Drummey. “Nearly

half of our total funding comes from the

state. A state funding cut of 10 percent

equals nearly $4.2 million to us annually.

Keeping in mind that deficits compound

year over year, it’s critical that we also

make budget reductions for the coming

year, or we will see even greater deficits in

the coming years.”

Added Ogden, “We are taking the

responsible step of reducing expenditures

now to avoid future operating deficits that

would have wide-ranging impacts on programs,

staffing, and opportunities for our

students. Ensuring the continuity of

instruction and the financial stability of

the district are our top concerns. This is

particularly challenging now when considering

the potential expenses that will

inevitably result from operating our

schools while dealing with the coronavirus

pandemic.”

Ogden said schools provide services, and

like other service industries, the vast

majority of expenses are related to labor

costs.

“We know that making budget reductions

impact people’s livelihood, and it’s

one of the most gut-wrenching decisions we

have to make as leaders,” said Ogden. “We

have worked very hard to develop a costreduction

plan that: minimizes the impact

on our students and the quality of their

academic program; minimizes the impact

on our staff; and ensures the district

remains on stable financial footing through

at least 2024 (when the current operating

levy is up for renewal).”

District officials believe most of the job

losses could be managed through attrition

and/or not filling positions that were anticipated

to be filled in the future.

The district’s financial plan includes:

•$2.3 million in staffing reductions and

spending reductions in fiscal years 2021 or

2022 staff positions to remain unfilled

(through attrition, expiring contracts and

program changes).

•Addition of $2 million in Student

Wellness and Success Funding from the

state ($500,000 new dollars this year).

•Addition of one-time federal “CARES”

Funding for Title services (estimated at

$1.9 million).

“Based on these assumptions, we expect

to end fiscal year 2021 with a projected surplus

of $793,130,” said Ogden. “Additional

cost reductions will be made in fiscal year

2022 by not filling positions that occur

through attrition and revising scheduling

of certain courses to maximize operational

efficiency. Based on the information we

know now, we believe we have a solid

financial plan in place for the foreseeable

future. There are still many unknowns, but

we will continue to follow any additional

news from the state closely, monitory any

additional expenses realized as a result of

the Coronavirus, and we will do our

absolute best to provide the high-quality

education that our students deserve.”


PAGE 6 - SOUTHEAST MESSENGER - June 28, 2020

Bat houses

According to Groveport Community

Affairs Director Patty Storts, Amanda

Robinson made bat houses for the city of

Groveport for her Girl Scout Gold Project.

Robinson held a informational bat program

last fall in the city.

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Jeffrey Winnestaffer, age 65 of Canal

Winchester, passed away Thursday, June 18,

2020. Born July 4, 1954 to the late Ernest

and Mary Winnestaffer.

Jeff was an avid card player, as well as

loved playing board games and watching

his grandchildren play soccer and baseball.

Jeff is survived by his son, Jordan (Tiffany)

Winnestaffer, and their sons Keagan and

Kallen; son, Jered Winnestaffer and his son

Gabriel; son Justin Winnestaffer and his

children; brothers, Ernest Joseph (Marcia),

Jim (Sue), and John (Diane) Winnestaffer;

and many nieces, nephews, and friends.

A visitation will be held 10-12pm on

Saturday, June 27, 2020 at THE DWAYNE R.

SPENCE FUNERAL HOME, 650 W. Waterloo St.,

Canal Winchester, Ohio 43110, where a

funeral service will follow at 12pm.

All COVID 19 guidelines will be followed

and masks are encouraged.

Online condolences at

www.spencefuneralhome.com

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Obetz cuts $2.1 million due to pandemic

By Ris Twigg

Staff Writer

the fun stuff until we figure it out, and

that’s because we spend so much money on

ried” because of the ongoing uncertainty

with the coronavirus.

The coronavirus pandemic has created

fun stuff,” Davisson said. “(We spend) $1.5 Frequent changes to public health

record unemployment and a host of other

million on fun stuff.”

orders issued by Dr. Amy Acton and

economic problems that caused Obetz’s two

Many of those events are free to residents,

but actually create a profit loss for difficult situation, Davisson said. He esti-

Governor Mike DeWine put the village in a

main sources of funding – income tax and

event revenue – to dramatically decrease

the village. For example, Davisson said the mates the coronavirus could cost the village

millions by the time the pandemic

for the remainder of the year.

annual Zucchinifest generates limited to

Obetz officials estimate at least a 10

no revenue for the village and costs about reaches its end, which could result in further

budget cuts that would potentially

percent drop in income tax revenue, and

$300,000 per year to host. Community

this, coupled with additional expenses the

events and programming cost the village affect employees.

village took on to help prevent the spread

more than $1.5 million per year in total. Building services was the only spending

of COVID-19, are what lead to the $2.1 million

cuts in village funding.

“Loss has a negative connotation. That’s category to increase. Davisson attributes

$1.5 million that our residents didn’t have the $80,000 in additional spending to the

“Our council essentially put a pause

to pay to use those amenities,” he said. continued development efforts of companies

throughout the pandemic.

button on any non-essential spending. And

“Our responsibility to the community is to

it will remain that way until the fall,” said

make sure that we are operating these “It’s an increase for money that we get

Obetz Village Administrator Rod Davisson.

things at the right level.”

right back,” he said, adding the money is

“We’re taking our resources and we’re centralizing

those to keep the heart and the

Because of these major cuts and the spent on building inspection services and is

ongoing uncertainty the coronavirus pandemic

brings with it, Obetz Village Council the work has been completed.

paid back by a third-party inspector after

brain of Obetz alive so we can function.”

Davisson said fundamental services -

will begin considering a parking or But Davisson said most areas are feeling

the effects of the budget cuts.

including but not limited to police, fire,

entrance fee for major events later this

water, streets, groundskeeping and facilities

management - are still operating and

year to make up for lost funding. “We made cuts. Everybody’s feeling the

Currently, only non-residents are charged cuts, we want to be responsible with the

have continued to operate throughout the

for some events in the village.

taxpayers’ money. To the extent that I can

pandemic.

Zucchinifest, Fortress Obetz, and squirrel away money for hard times, as bad

Major cuts were made in spending areas

increased rates for the Obetz Athletic Club as this time is, it could be worse and I don’t

such as printing, training, advertising and

were all potential amenities council discussed

charging more for.

“I want to make sure we are prepared for

know what’s coming next,” Davisson said.

community events.

“Everything’s working just like normal.

Budgets have yet to affect any village whatever the worst eventuality is and so

We just honestly had to shut down some of

personnel, Davisson noted, but he added that we can be supportive of those people

that village staff members “should be wor-

in the hardest of times.”

Obetz Splash Pad to reopen on July 1

By Ris Twigg

Staff Writer

The Obetz Splash Pad is scheduled to

reopen July 1 with state and federal guidelines

in place, Obetz Village Council

announced at its June 22 meeting.

To help prevent the spread of COVID-

19, the Ohio Department of Health issued

a series of guidelines specific to operating

public pools and splash pads in the state of

Ohio. Obetz Village Administrator Rod

Davisson said he hopes his staff will be

prepared to implement each of those

changes by July 1.

“We’re scrambling to pull off the guidelines,”

Davisson said. “The order’s been out

for a minute, but the trick is you have to

absorb the order, understand what the

requirements are, then build those requirements

and make sure you have the appropriate

staffing.”

The Splash Pad – like the Obetz

Athletic Club – is increasing its staff to

ensure regular cleaning and sanitizing of

Dr. Bender 5K Classic

The Dr. Bender Virtual 5K Run and

Walk will be held between July 16 and July

19. Participants can select any time and

location to run/walk their 5K distance in

that time frame. The move to a virtual race

continues the tradition of running for a

chairs, equipment, restrooms and other onsite

areas.

Some of the state’s mandates include

installing physical barriers in high-interaction

areas between patrons and staff, prohibiting

large groups from gathering in the

shelterhouse, increased sanitization, continuing

to test the water and social distancing.

Davisson believes social distancing will

be one of the more difficult guidelines to

enforce, adding he isn’t sure if the Splash

Pad will need an occupancy limit.

“Obviously there is a practical limit and

you have gathering limits,” he said. “I’m

still working my way through whether or

not that park has to have a limit.”

Because of the additional requirements

and staffing needed to run the Splash Pad,

the food service will not be opening this

year, Davisson said.

“The Splash Pad will be open, but it

won't be open in the way people are used to.

It’s just going to be different,” he said. “It’s

an important public asset. We’ll keep adapting

to the changes. We’re trying to make

around the Southeast

great cause in the midst of practicing social

distancing. There will not be a kids 1 mile

fun run this year nor alumni/team competitions.

Proceeds benefit the boys and girls

cross country teams at Canal Winchester

High School. Post-race features include a

random raffle drawing for four $50

Amazon gift cards that will be conducted

sure our residents have the opportunity to

enjoy that this summer in a safe way.”

The government building and the Obetz

Athletic Club are continuing to operate

with limited capacity. Fortress Obetz and

the Obetz Community Center are still

closed. Rental facilities and the Obetz

Senior Center will be closed throughout the

month of July, but could open in August,

Davisson said.

For a small town like Obetz, keeping up

with the changing health orders can be

costly and difficult. One month, the village

could spend a significant amount of money

on one health order, only for a new guideline

– with new costs – to take its place

the next month, Davisson said.

“It's really like starting over again, and

then you rebuild the whole thing in a way

to where it really wasn’t designed to work

that way. It’s certainly not easy for a smaller

town like us, or Groveport, the ones that

don’t have 500 employees to do all this

stuff,” he said.

via Facebook live on the Dr. Bender 5K

Classic page July 20 at 7 p.m.

Registration for the race is open and the

first 50 registrants will receive a $10 gift

card (one per household) to Columbus

Running Company. Entry fee is $25. Visit

www.drbender5k.com for more information

and to register.


www.columbusmessenger.com

June 28, 2020 - SOUTHEAST MESSENGER - PAGE 7

HAMILTON

HAPPENINGS

ews

fro

rom

across th

he Ha

amilto

on Local School Distri

B oard Ma

kes

Diversity

Statement

Hamilton Local Schools

Board of Education voted unanimously

to approve a diversity resolution that suppp

orts the need fo

or civil

c

hange while

committing i to providing support, resources, and

profe

essional development to students and employees.

Board Diversity Resolution as approved on June 22, 2020:

Whereas,

the Hamilton Local School District Board of Education

is saddened by the racial and social injustices

that continually

occur across our country; and

Whereas,

Hamilton Local Schools wants it known that we stand

fir

irmly behind those who have expressed a need fo

or civil

change in

our country, especially any district student, employee, or

community memberm

who has been a victim of racial or social

injustice

in their lives; and

Whereas,

our district remains committed to educating students in

an environment that welcomes diversity and displays compassion

and inclusivity among all

students

and employees;

and

Whereas,

it is our responsibility to provide

every student and

employee

in our district wit

ith a safe

and nurturing place to learn

and work every day; and

Whereas,

we will consciously work to provide curriculum and

resources

that educate all of our students about diff

ferent

cultures,

diversity, history, and current events so they have a broad

knowl

ledge about the world around them; and

Whereas,

we will provide our employees with profe

essional

development pertaining to racism and cultural diversity; and

Whereas,

we will continue to work with local municipal

leadership to come up with solutions that will remove any racial

or

social injustices

in our district boundary; and

Th

herefo

ore,

Hamilton Local

Schools

will

fo

ocus on conversations

and programs that include equity and cultural competency among

all students and employees, while continuing to teach each child

and provide an environment that is fil

illed with love and respect

fo

or all who visit our schools each day.

District Seeking Feedback

Through Online Survey

Hamilton Local

School

District

is

asking fo

or

fe

eedback fr

rom

district

fa

amilies as it considers the best way to restart school.

There

are many variables to consider befo

ore making this

decision,

and your responses wil

ill provide additional

information fo

or the district to refe

erence while creating the best

plan fo

or the 2020-2021 school year.

Submit

fe

eedback by visiting the link below.

https://bit.ly/HLSRestartSurvey2020

Online Registration Open for

the

2020-2021 School Ye

ear

Hamilton Local is now accepting online applications fo

or

Hamilton Preschool and Kindergarten students fo

or the

2020-2021 school year.

You can fin

ind complete registration info

ormation on the student

registration web page at

ww ww.hlsd.org/registration.aspx

If you have any questions about kindergarten registration,

please

contact our student registration off

fice

at 614-491-8044

ext

1239. If you have questions about registering your child fo

or

Hamilton Preschool, please contact their main off

fice

at

614-491-8044 491

ext.

1231.

Free Summer Lunch and Snack

Offered by Columbus Libraries

If

your fa

amily needs meals fo

or children ages 1-18, you can

stop by the Marion-Frankl

lin branch of the Columbus

Metropolitan Library system Monday - Friday between

1:30 - 2:30 p.m. to pickup meals to take home.

The

Marion-Franklin branch is located at 2740 Lockbourne

Rd.

Columbus,

OH 43207. If you have questions about the

program,

call the branch off

fice

at 614-645-2275.


PAGE 8 - SOUTHEAST MESSENGER - June 28, 2020

By Rick Palsgrove

Southeast Editor

Some large, old trees in the historic section

of the city of Groveport are slated to be

removed due to their decaying condition.

“The city will personally deliver a letter

to each property owner about the trees and

the plans to remove them,” said Groveport

City Administrator B.J. King. “Every time

a strong storm blows in I get worried about

another falling large tree incident.”

City officials met with a licensed

arborist on May 18 to have some large,

older trees along Front Street inspected

along with two trees on Elm Street. The

inspection was prompted after a strong

storm knocked down a large tree that

smashed into a Groveport Police cruiser on

Front Street on May 10.

The inspection results revealed six troubled

trees including a large hole in a trunk

that collects water and rot at 215 Front St.:

a maple tree at 235 Front St. with a dying

root system and decay in the crown; an ash

tree at 197 Front St. with a dying root system;

a maple tree at 173 Front St. with

roots that were removed for a sidewalk

repair; a dead tree at 537 Elm St. where

immediate removal is recommended; and a

tree with a dying root system, dead limbs,

and a decaying crown at 545 Elm St.

BETHANY

LUTHERAN

CHURCH, LCMS

1000 Noe-Bixby Rd.

Columbus, OH 43213

614-866-7755

Traditional Worship Service: 10:00 a.m.

Free Movie Night: Weds. at 6:30 p.m.

Be a Part of Our Local Worship Guide

Our Worship Guide is geared toward celebrating faith and helping readers

connect with religious resources in our community. Make sure these readers

know how you can help with a presence in this very special section distributed to

more than 19,000 households in the Southeast area.

Contact us today to secure your spot in our Worship Guide.

614.272.5422 • kathy@columbusmessenger.com

southeast

Please visit the

Southeast Church

of your choice.

List your Worship

Services here.

For info. call 614-272-5422

By Rick Palsgrove

Southeast Editor

Those who drive U.S. Route 33 on a

daily basis know traffic congestion on that

highway is a common, often frustrating,

occurrence.

Now, another study is being planned to

research what to do about the traffic problems

and safety issues on U.S. Route 33 in

southeastern Franklin County.

Ohio Department of Transportation

Public Information Officer for Central

Ohio Breanna Badanes said the last study

of this stretch of U.S. Route 33 was done in

2004 and there have been various improvements

to the roadway since then. She said

this new study will review U.S. Route 33

from State Route 104 east to Pickerington

Road.

Badanes said the study, which is

expected to be released by April 2021, will

include safety and improvements recommendations

for the U.S. Route 33 corridor

and interchanges. The study will evaluate

safety issues, traffic volume, traffic congestion,

capacity, interchanges, ramps, and

traffic counts.

“We are still seeing crash patterns and

traffic congestion on this stretch of U.S.

33,” said Badanes.

She said interchanges that could be

looked at for potential updates and modifications

include U.S. 33 at: I-270; at

Hamilton Road; at Gender Road; at Bixby

Road; and at Hill/Diley.

Badanes said “nothing is out of the

question” for consideration for improvements.

“Everything will be looked at,” she said,

including things like interchange

www.columbusmessenger.com

Groveport to remove potentially dangerous old trees

According to B.J. King, the arborist recommended

removal of all six trees to eliminate

any hazards. The city received quotes

of $10,300 and $14,100 to remove the trees.

“I recommend we remove the trees,”

King told Groveport City Council on June

15. “We will talk to an arborist about planting

trees on Front Street to replace those

that are removed.”

Groveport City Councilman Shawn

Cleary cautioned residents to beware and

be alert for someone who is contacting

homeowners around town and falsely stating

the city plans to take down their trees.

“Be aware there are some rogue tree

people out there making false statements

about tree removals,” said Cleary.

King assured residents that, if the city

plans to take down a tree, city officials will

contract residents directly.

Groveport finances

The city of Groveport’s 2020 income tax

revenue as of May 31 is $7.3 million, which

is 4 percent higher than the same time in

2019. Income tax revenues comprise the

largest portion of the city’s total revenues

year-to-date, or 55.9 percent of all revenues,

according to Groveport Finance

Director Jason Carr.

In a report to Groveport City Council,

Carr also noted that, due to the impact of

the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, the

city’s recreation fund and golf course fund

are down $289,000 and $158,000 respectively

year-to-date.

“The recreation fund and golf course

have historically operated at losses,” wrote

Carr. “In order to break even annual transfers

from the general fund are necessary.

Based on the current operating environment,

we anticipate the need to increase

budgeted transfers from the general fund

as these departments are unable to generate

sufficient receipts from operations consistent

with prior years.”

Groveport Police statistics

May crime statistics for the city of

Groveport, according to the Groveport

Police: 16 arrests, 14 accidents, 4 assaults,

0 burglary, 1 criminal mischief/trespassing,

9 domestic disputes, 2 domestic violence,

2 OVI and alcohol, 0 fights, 2 disorderly

conduct, 10 thefts/robberies, 0

stolen/unauthorized use, 0 missing persons,

2 weapon related calls, 2 narcotic

related offenses, 7 general complaints, 0

school related incidents, 0 identity theft, 1

suspicious vehicles/persons, 0 parking, 2

threats, 2 vandalism, 50 traffic citations, 0

sex related crime, 1 warrant/arrests/subpoenas,

3 suicide attempts.

New public service director

Brian Strayer was named the new public

services director for the city of

Groveport.

Last January Groveport City Council

approved replacing the existing public

works superintendent job with the new

position of public service director.

Strayer, who is a Groveport resident,

previously worked for more than 10 years

as operations manager in New Albany’s

public services department. He will start

work in Groveport on July 13. His annual

starting salary is $91,842.

According to city officials, the new public

service director position has an annual

salary range of $70,446 to $113,237. The

public works superintendent position that

was replaced had an annual salary range of

$59,964 to $95,942.

“Council wanted to make the position

more of an executive position with requirements

for various certifications (such as

water operator’s license) and broad based

knowledge of all facets of public works

(streets, sewer and water),” said Groveport

Assistant City Administrator Jeff Green.

ODOT to study U.S. 33

redesigns, widening U.S. 33, and smaller

cost effective ideas such as ramp metering

and smart lanes during peak travel times.

Groveport City Engineer Steve Farst

said, “They’ve been studying this corridor

for the last 20 years. The Hamilton Road

interchange is an old style cloverleaf configuration.

It’s possible ODOT could consider

some radical and different changes

there, like constructing flyovers.”

“Proposed improvements like that

would be exciting,” said Groveport City

Councilman Chad Grashel.

Citing concerns about frequent traffic

back-ups and accidents at the Hamilton

Road/U.S. 33 interchange, Groveport City

Councilman Ed Dildine said, “That interchange

is just not safe. It needs an overhaul.”

ODOT recently completed a project that

widened U.S. Route 33 in both directions

between Hamilton Road and I-270 creating

three travel lanes for both east and westbound

travel on U.S. 33. The project also

widened bridges over Big Walnut Creek.

Noise walls were constructed with one

15-foot high noise wall on the outside

shoulder of U.S. 33 eastbound between the

Big Walnut Creek bridge and west of

Hamilton Road and a 19-foot high noise

wall on the right-of-way fence along U.S.

33 westbound east of the Hamilton Road

interchange. Repairs were also made to the

Gender Road bridge over U.S. 33.

This $14 million project was completed

in late 2019. Its purpose was to improve

travel and safety on U.S. 33 between I-270

and Hamilton Road and to decrease congestion.


www.columbusmessenger.com

“Babyteeth” an offbeat story about terminally ill teen

While there are no real positives to be

found with the temporary closure of movie

theaters, a small beacon of light has been

the increased access to independent films

through on-demand or streaming services.

Dedra

Cordle

The Reel Deal

Living in a smaller

market means their

release plays second

fiddle to big studio

releases so having them come right to your

computer or television screen is a pleasant

revelation for fans of indie cinema.

One of the indie films making a lot of

noise late last year was “Babyteeth,” an

Australian stage adaptation that explores

teen romance and terminal illness.

Drawing praise for its acting and nonmanipulative

storytelling, it was set to

open at small and locally owned theaters

and then expand to the larger chains

through word of mouth. Then the global

pandemic hit and scrapped those plans.

Knowing it could get a decent audience

through on-demand and virtual screenings,

it was released this past weekend and generated

decent buzz online. And, as someone

who ordered it for rent, I can attest it lives

up to its shortened hype.

In the film, Eliza Scanlen (“Sharp

Objects”) plays Milla Finlay, a teenager

who experiences her first brush with love

near what could be the end of her life.

She is drawn away from her melancholia

by the presence of a strange boy named

Moses (newcomer Toby Wallace) who

seems to have a complete disregard for his

physical safety and she remains oblivious

to his desire to score some cash from her.

When the alarm bells do start to ring in her

head, Milla ignores the sound in favor of

more time with the odd, hyperactive fellow

who has scars and facial tattoos and no

qualms about wearing shirts spotted with

nasal blood.

Next we meet the second couple in this

movie —Milla’s mother and father, Anna

and Henry (Essie Davis and Ben

Mendelsohn, respectively). While slightly

high from medication, the married duo

meet the potential new couple at dinner.

Henry, having a bit more awareness of the

situation, tries to figure out why his daughter

is attracted to Moses while Anna is trying

to determine whether she is having a

stroke.

“This is the worst possible parenting I

can imagine,” Anna admits as they allow

Moses temporary quarters in their home.

But the “love story” between Milla and

Moses isn’t the kind that is often depicted

in similar films; for the most part, Moses

only hangs around Milla to steal drugs to

June 28, 2020 - SOUTHEAST MESSENGER - PAGE 9

sell and Milla, well, her motives might be

deeper than attraction to a “bad boy” with

a zest for living life as it comes.

Though the elements featured in this

film are more serious minded, it is not

devoid of humor. There are some absurd

observations and scenes that will have you

laughing out loud and then wondering if

you should be having as great of a time

watching as you are.

While “Babyteeth” occasionally stumbles

into a sense of disjointedness through

director Shannon Murphy’s use of jump

transitioning with title cards, the script

(written by Rita Kalnejais and adapted

from her play) is sharp and the acting raw

enough to propel it past the occasional missteps

in telling this offbeat and original

story.

Grade: B

Dedra Cordle is a Messenger staff writer

and columnist.

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xPublic Notice

PUBLIC NOTICE

The public hearing of the Madison Township 2021

Annual Budget will be held via phone conference

during the regular meeting scheduled at 6:00PM on

July 14, 2020. To attend the meeting, you must dial

1-425-436-6368 and use access code 490334.

The Cash Basis Annual Financial Report of Madison

Township, Franklin County, for the year ending

December 31, 2019, is available for public inspection

at 4575 Madison Lane, Groveport, Ohio, 43125.

Please contact the office at 614-836-5308 if you wish

to schedule a time to review.

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ADVISORY

The National Trade Association

we belong to has

purchased the following

classifieds. Determining

the value of their service

or product is advised by

this publication. In order

to avoid misunderstandings,

some advertisers do

not offer “employment”

but rather supply the

readers with manuals, directories

and other materials

designed to help

their clients establish mail

order selling and other

businesses at home. Under

NO circumstance

should you send any

money in advance or give

the client your checking,

license ID or credit card

numbers. Also beware of

ads that claim to guarantee

loans regardless of

credit and note that if a

credit repair company

does business only over

the phone it’s illegal to request

any money before

delivering its service. All

funds are based in US

dollars. Toll Free numbers

may or may not

reach Canada. Please

check with the Better

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NE, NC, NH, OH, OK,

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requires seller of certain

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Thank You For

Reading

THE MESSENGER

xInformation

JULY GIVEAWAY

Place a prepaid classified line ad in our paper

during the month of JULY and be registered

to win a $50 Gift Card from

The Columbus Messenger

Newspapers.

All ads received by mail, in person, e-mail or

phone will be included in the drawing.

Drawing will be held July 29, 2020

and the winner will be notified and published

in our August 9th, 2020 issue .

GOOD LUCK TO EVERYONE!!!!

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PAGE 10 - SOUTHEAST MESSENGER - June 28, 2020

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xEmployment

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15% off Entire Purchase.

10% Senior &

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Cross Country Moving,

Long distance Moving

Company, out of state

move $799 Long Distance

Movers. Get Free

quote on your Long distance

move 1-844-452-

1706

Employment

HIRING?

Let us help you recruit the qualified employees you need to make

your business succeed. With a print and online audience of more

than 39,000 readers, our employment section is your key to meeting

local job seekers where they look first for fresh career opportunities.

Our Eastside Messenger

now covers

Canal Winchester

Our Southeast Messenger

still serves our Groveport,

Obetz, Madison Twp. and

SE Columbus areas.

Reaches over 35,000

household in these 2 area

ASSOCIATION ADS

CARS/TRUCKS WANT-

ED!!! All Makes/Models

2002-2019! Any Condition.

Running or Not. Top $$$

Paid! Free Towing! We’re

Nationwide! Call Now: 1-

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[CARS/TRUCKS

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All Makes/Models 2002-

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or Not. Competitive

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are Nationwide! Call Now:

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Applying for Social Security

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FREE Consultations. Local

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AUTOMOTIVE

Get cash for your used

or junk cars today. We

buy all cars, trucks &

SUVs. Free pick up. Call

888-368-1016

Wants to purchase minerals

and other oil and gas

interests. Send details to

P.O. Box 13557, Denver,

CO. 80201

SELL YOUR ANTIQUE

OR CLASSIC CAR.

Advertise with us. You

choose where you want

to advertise. 800-450-

6631 visit macnetonline.

com for details.

To list a job opportunity, contact a

recruitment advertising specialist today at

614.272.5422

or

Kathy@columbusmessenger.com

columbus

ASSOCIATION ADS

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Become a Published Author.

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DISH TV $59.99 FOR 190

Channels + $14.95 High

Speed Internet. Free Installation,

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Included, Free Voice Remote.

Some restrictions

apply. Call 1-855-270-

5098

BUILDING MATERIALS

Metal Roofing, Siding &

Interior. Barns, sheds,

etc. Use it yourself or resell.

Huge selection. Low

Prices. Slate Road Supply

717-445-5222

HELP WANTED

Busy Handyman Company

looking to hire immediately.

Exp. required. Must

have own tools. Call for

inverview 614-284-2100

xAdult Care

HELP WANTED

Licensed barber or cosmetoligist

needed to

work Saturdays, located

in Great Southern Shopping

Center. Call Cindy

614-239-1976

Mobile Home

Worker

Willing to Learn

And Dependable

We Train-U

Call 614-209-5744

DATED SALES

FREE

Garage Sale

Signs

When You Stop By

Our Office At:

3500 Sullivant Ave.

And Place Your

DATED SALE AD

Welcome

Carolyn’s

Cottage

Private Assisted Living

3036 Woodgrove Dr.

Grove City, OH

Michelle Preston - Owner

614-991-0652

614-376-9761

Senior Home Care

by ANGELS

Same day care while you wait for your

facility to accommodate your loved one.

Prepared and Ready but still operating COVID Free.

Very Reasonable Rates

“We Do Things Your Way”

614-80-ANGEL (614-802-6435)

Call or text for info.

www.v-angels.com

Adult Care

7-5 A

xInformation

To Our Gift Card Winner

For JUNE 2020

AARON REEVES

From

The Columbus Messenger

Newspapers

Information


www.columbusmessenger.com

xCome & Get It

June 28, 2020 - SOUTHEAST MESSENGER - PAGE 11

xClassified Services

COME AND GET IT

Deadlines are Tuesdays by 5 pm.

Call For Publication Schedule 614-272-5422

Need to Get Rid of Something Fast - Advertise It Here For FREE!

FREE Garden Straw for gardens or bedding. Call for appointment for pickup.

Circle S Farms, 9015 London-Groveport Road, Grove City, 43123

Grove City - 614-878-7980

Round Glass Top Table, 42 inch diameter with 4 padded chairs.

White canopy style crib, Disassembled with assembly instructions.

Changing table, dark wood finsh

TE - Groveport - 614-783-7123

. Come and Get It! is a bi-weekly column that offers readers an opportunity to pass

along surplus building materials, furniture, electronic equipment, crafts, supplies,

appliances, plants or household goods to anybody who will come and get them - as

long as they’re FREE. NO PETS! Just send us a brief note describing what you want to

get rid of, along with your name, address and phone number. Nonprofit organizations

are welcome to submit requests for donations of items.

Send information to The Columbus Messenger, Attention: Come and Get It, 3500

Sullivant Ave., Columbus, OH43204. Deadline is Tuesdays by 5 pm for following

Mondays publication. Messenger Newspapers is not responsible for any

complications that may occur. Please contact us when items are gone. 272-5422

Come & Get It

xMisc. for Sale

WANT TO BUY

We Buy Junk Cars &

Trucks. Highest Prices

Paid. 614-395-8775

WANTS TO Purchase

minerals and other oil &

gas interests. Send details

to: P.O. Box 13557,

Denver, CO 80201

ANTIQUES

WANTED

Victrolas, Watches,

Clocks, Bookcases

Antiques, Furn.

Jeff 614-262-0676

or 614-783-2629

RENTALS

Property

Management

We are always available!

40 yrs. exp in

Certified Property Mgmt.

Reas. Fees. Call Now!

614-783-7464

Misc. for Sale

MISCELLANEOUS

FOR SALE

Knock Knock Who’s

There? Your favorite

AVON LADY! Come

browse our digitel catalog

Delivered right to

your door. Www.your

avon.com/jenniferwood

Jenny Wood

HOMES FOR SALE

SP Payroll & Tax Service

Remote Online Notary

Remote Closings

Remote Notarial Acts. To

Schedule a Closing Call

Stacey at 614-203-5134

or Email

sptaxes@wowway.com

VACATION RENTALS

Englewood, Florida

Palm Manor Resort

Within minutes of white

sand Gulf beaches,

world famous Tarpon

fishing, golf courses, restaurants/shopping,

Bush

Gardens. 2 BR 2 BA

condos with all ammenities,

weekly/monthly, visit

www.palmmanor.com

or call 1-800-848-8141

USED VEHICLES

2017 Chevy Silverado LT,

4 wheel drive, deep

ocean blue. 35,000 miles.

$27,500. 614-361-0602

INFORMATION

NEED SOMETHING

DONE THIS SUMMER?

CHECK OUT OUR

CLASSIFIED SERVICES!

FOR

ADVERTISING

INFO. CALL

614-272-5422

THE COLUMBUS

MESSENGER

AIR CONDITIONING

AIR CONDITIONING

Complete System

Clean & Check

$49.95

BLACKTOP

SANTIAGO’S

Sealcoating & Services LLC

Quality Materials Used

Driveway Seal &

Repairs Summer Special

Top Seal Cracks

Commercial & Residential

Clean-Ups

7/19 A

Free Electronic Leak Testing

All Makes • All Models

45 Yrs. Exp. • Senior Discount

614-351-9025

COLD-AIR

Top Off Your

Air Conditioner

Freon Charge

4 P to 1 Lb. $89.95

45 Years Exp.

614-351-9025

APPLIANCE REPAIR

AFFORDABLE

Appliance Repair

Service on all makes &

models of Washers/Dryers/

Ranges & Refrigeration. Fully

cert. on LG & Samsung brands.

Lowest rates in the city.

All work guaranteed.

Call 614-800-8041

Washer, Dryer, Stove &

Refrig. Repair 875-7588

7-19

A&M

Mowing, Mulching, Edging

“Ask for whatever you need”

BBB Accredited

FULLY INSURED

Call or text for Free Est.

614-649-1200

7-19 A

7/5 A

BLACKTOP

BLACKTOP SEALING

Driveways & Parking Lots

614-875-6971

CARPET CLEANING

DIRT BUSTERS

Any 5 areas $75. Home

Powerwash $99 to $200.

614-805-1084

Specializing in Pet Odors

CLEANING

Looking for Mrs. Clean?

For excellent cleaning

services at reas. rates

w/great refs, depend. 10%

Sr. Disc. Free Est. Fogging

Avail. Powerwashing.

Gwen 614-226-5229

Holly’s Halos

Accepting New Clients

Under $100

Bonded-Ins. 614-426-3624

CONCRETE

AJ’s Concrete,

Masonry

Good Work - Fair Prices

Block Foundations

Driveways • Sidewalks

Epoxy/Overlay Floors

Bonded-Ins. • Free Ests.

Now Accepting Credit Cards

614-419-9932

D.J. & DAD KIMMLE

CUSTOM CONCRETE

7-5

All Types E/SE

Free Estimates

All Work Guaranteed

614-206-0158

ALL-CITY CUSTOM

CONCRETE

All Types Concrete Work

New or Tear Out-Replace

37 Yrs. Exp.

(614) 207-5430

Owner is On The Job!

EDDIE MOORE

CONSTRUCTION

Quality Concrete Work

Lt. Hauling & Room Add.,

Block Work & Excavation

Stamp Patios,

Bsmt. Wall Restoration

35 Yrs Exp - Lic & Ins.

Free Ests. 614-871-3834

Buckeye City

Concrete & Excavating

* Concrete * Foundations

* Waterlines * Drains

*Catch Basins

614-749-2167

buckeyecityconcreteand

excavating@yahoo.com

GUTTERS

Bates & Sons

GUTTER CLEANING

5 ★ Google Reviews

614-586-3417

Low Price-Great Service

5 & 6” Seamless gutters,

covers, siding, gutter clng.

Bill 614-306-4541

7/19 A

7/19 A/M

HOME

IMPROVEMENTS

SINCE 1973

Phil Bolon Contr.

Windows & Siding

Decks, Kitchens, Baths

Room Additions,

Flooring, Roofing

Bsmt Waterproofing

Deal With Small Non-Pressure Co.

47 Yrs. Exp. - Refs. Avail.

Lic.-Bond-Ins.

Free Est. - Financing Avail.

Member BBB Of Cent. OH

O.C.I.E.B. ID #24273

614-419-3977

or 614-863-9912

KLAUSMAN HOME

IMPROVEMENT

Siding-Windows-

Doors-Roofing-Soffit-

Fascia-Gutters-Trim

Earn FREE Seamless

Gutters with Siding Over

1000 Sq. Ft.

FREE Shutters with

Soffit & Trim

EPA Certified

Member of BBB

Financing Available

Over 20 yrs exp. • Free Est.

Licensed-Bonded-Insured

Owner & Operator

James 614-419-7500

C&JHandyman

Services LLC

Minor Plumbing &

Electric

Install Hot Water Tanks,

Dishwashers & Disposals

Also Fencing &

Interior/Exterior Painting

Free Est. ~ 18 Yrs. Exp.

CDC/EPA Approved Guidelines

614-284-2100

J.A.F. HANDYMAN

& Remodeling Services

Jim A Ferbrache

614-271-5793

HOME

MAINTENANCE

Finishing Carpenter for all

your extra home repairs or

Honey-do-list. over 40 yrs.

exp. Sonny 614-325-1910

JOE’S HOME MAINT.

Home Repairs, Roofing,

Siding, Gutters, Soffits,

Misc. Int. Repairs

Int. Painting

Call Joe 614-778-1460

37 Years Exp.

LAWN CARE

Accepting New Clients

Total Property Maint.

Mulching, Lawn Mowing

& Fertlizataion

Free Estimates.

614-301-3575 - Patrick

FREE ESTIMATES

The Lawn Barber

Cut & Trim Starting at

$28 & up

614-935-1466

LAWN CARE

GOOD NEIGHBORS

LAWN CARE

Mowing, Mulching, Pruning

Light Landscaping

Weeding & Edging of Flower Beds

Taking on New Accounts

Res. / Comm.

Lic./Ins. BBB Member

614-238-9237

614-937-0658

$10 Off 1st Service for New Customers

LET US MAINTAIN

YOUR LAWN & GARDEN

FOR YOU

Summer, Spring,

Winter or Fall

WE DO IT ALL!!!!

Lawn Cuts, Edging,

Trees & Shrubs, Garden,

Mulching, Hauling,

Garden Pond &

Home Maint.

Free Ests. Low Rates

$20 & Up

Kevin - 614-905-3117

MOVING

Aaron Allen Moving

Local Moving Since 1956

Bonded & Insured

614-299-6683, 263-0649

Celebrating 60 yrs in business

MOWER REPAIR

LAWN MOWER DR.

“House Calls Only”

Overall Checkups

Oil Change & Filter,

Spark Plug &

Blades Sharpened

MINOR REPAIR

John

614-395-7909

johnellis0333@sbcglobal.net

PAINTING

A Job Well Done Again

A lic. General Contractor

Some Skilled Services

Incl: Painting • Stucco,

Repair•Carpentry•Exterior

Drainage & Home Maint.

Call Today! 614-235-1819

Painter Over 30 Yrs Exp.

Free Est. Reas Rates

Daniel 614-226-4221

PLASTERING

DRYW

YWALL &

PLASTER

7/5

A&M

REPAIR

Textured Ceilings

614-551-6963

Residential/Commercial

BIA

PLUMBING

All About Drains & Plumb.

Will snake any sm drain

$125 + tax. 614-778-2584

ALL IN ONE

PLUMBING LLC

“One Call Does It All”

$25 OFF LABOR

7/5

With This Ad

A

614-801-1508

All Major Credit Cards Accepted

Classified Services

7-19

A/M

7-19 A

7-5 A

7/5 E/SE

7-5 A

PLUMBING

CHRIS’

PLUMBING

“Plumbing & Drain Professional

That You Can Count On”

24 Hrs., 7 Days/Week

No Overtime Charges

24 Yrs. Exp. in Plumbing &

Drain Cleaning Field

Call For A Free Phone Estimate

$100.00 For Any Small Drain

614-622-4482

30% OFF with AD

POWER WASHING

Bates & Sons

Soft Wash & Powerwash

5 ★ Google Reviews

614-586-3417

MRS. POWERWASH

Any house wash $149 + tax

Single deck $69 + tax

2 Tier deck $99 + tax

Best Wash In Town

Over 45,000 Washes

Ashley, 614-771-3892

MDB POWERWASH

We Specialize In Decks.

Clean, stain, reseal,

revitalize any deck.

Quality work at fair prices.

Guarantee All Work 3 Yrs.

24 Yrs Exp. Free Est.

614-327-9425

ROOFING

Robinson roofing & repairs

30 yrs. exp. Lifetime Cols.

resident. Lic./bonded/Ins.

Reas rates. Member of

BBB. Dennis Robinson

614-330-3087, 732-3100

SEWING MACHINE

REPAIR

REPAIR all makes 24 hr.

service. Clean, oil, adjust

in your home. $39.95 all

work gtd. 614-890-5296

TOP SOIL

Alexander Hauling

Driveways topped w/new

limestone. We also deliver

Topsoil - sand - mulch.

Specializing in residential.

614-491-5460

Bobcat Service Avail.

TREE SERVICES

TROTT

TREE & LANDSCAPE

Tree Trimming

& Removal

7/19

A

Also Stump Removal

Free Est. - Fully Ins.

Call 614-235-3791

Cell 614-738-0682

BURNS TREE SERVICE

Trimming, Removal &

Stump Grinding.

614-584-2164

Brewer & Sons Tree Service

• Tree Removal

• Tree Trimming 7-5

A&M

• Stump Grinding

• Bucket Truck Services

Best Prices • Same Day Service

614-878-2568

7/5 A/M


PAGE 12 - SOUTHEAST MESSENGER - June 28, 2020

Southeast Messenger

available throughout area

Besides home delivery in “The Bag” and

in the Sunday Dispatch, the Southeast

Messenger is also available at these locations:

Southeast Branch of the Columbus

Metropolitan Library (when it re-opens),

Huntington Bank in Groveport, Groveport

Recreation Center, Groveport Senior

Center (when it re-opens), Groveport

Senior Village, Little Italy in Groveport,

Flyer’s Pizza in Groveport, Madison

Township Administration Building,

Groveport Municipal Building, The Links

at Groveport golf course/Paddock Pub, and

Groveport Town Hall (when it re-opens).

Golden Cruiser Club

Groveport Madison Schools invites senior

residents of the district to attend athletic

and performing arts programs showcasing

the talents of its students. The

Golden Cruiser Club is a free program for

residents of the Groveport Madison School

District who are age 60 and older. Club

membership provides free access to all

school and district sponsored athletic contests,

plays, concerts, and other events.

To be a member of the Golden Cruiser

Club, get an application at www.gocruisers.org,

at any of the school offices, or call

(614) 492-2520. Requirements are applicants

be age 60 or older and be a resident

of Groveport Madison Schools.

www.columbusmessenger.com

Soapcitylaundry.com

2056 Lockbourne Rd.

Columbus, OH 43207

(614) 443-7627

SUMMER BLAST!

Spring and summer down on the farm

Earlier this spring, a farmer (above photo by Cheryl Blair) performed the harrowing

of the farmhouse kitchen garden to get it ready for planting at Metro Parks’ Slate

Run Living Historical Farm using work horses the 1880s way. Harrowing the

ground breaks up dirt clods and smoothes the surface of the soil to make planting

easier. Summer means it is time to gather hay down on the farm. Pictured below

(photo by Dave Trotter) is a Slate Run Living Historical Farm farmer bringing in a

load of hay from the fields the 1880s way in June. “This hay will not be baled, but

will go up loose in the barn with the hay fork. Baled hay was rather unusual in the

1880s,” said Ann Culek, farm program manager. Slate Run Living Historical Farm is

located at 1375 State Route 674 North, Canal Winchester. For information visit

metroparks.net.

ELVIS

featuring

Mike Albert

and the Big E Band

Friday,

August 14, 2020

VILLA MILANO

1630 Schrock Rd.

Dinner/Show Tickets $ 51.00

Tables of 10 Available

Tickets by Phone: 614-792-3135

Still Good Seats Available

Visa • Mastercard • Discover

NO REFUNDS

Drug Drop Box

around the Southeast

The Madison Township Police

Department provides an opiate prescription

“Drug Drop Box” for the community.

This drop box is located in the lobby of the

Madison Township Police Department,

4567 Madison Lane, and is accessible to

the public during normal office hours

Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Any person can walk-in and dispose of new

or old pills, including prescription medications,

or any other illegal substances and

place them into this box with no questions

asked.

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