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Places Volume 1

In the field with conservation photographer Jerry Monkman.

In the field with conservation photographer Jerry Monkman.

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PLACES

In the Field with Jerry Monkman

THE POWER OF PLACE

Jerry’s film about a controversial

electricity transmission line project

hits New Hampshire theaters.

MAKING A GREENWAY

A land trust in southern New

Hampshire aims to protect open

spaces in a sprawl-threatened region.

DISCOVER ACADIA

Work begins on the 4th edition

of this classic guidebook to

Maine’s national park.

BIG SIX

Protecting the Quebecois

tradition of producing maple

syrup in northern Maine.

MAINE’S HIGH PEAKS

Conservation efforts in Maine’s north

woods aim to protect vital wild places

near the Appalachian Trail.

DECEMBER 2015 ECOPHOTOGRAPHY 1


PLACES

In the Field With

Jerry Monkman

The sun shines through a grove of Eastern

Hemlock trees in southern New Hampshire.

2 ECOPHOTOGRAPHY DECEMBER 2015


From Jerry

2015 has brought me to a variety of beautiful places in New England. Many are

relatively unknown, some are threatened by development, all are worthy of

permanent protection. Several of my projects this year involved photographing

land that is in the path of urban sprawl or has the potential to be developed for

second homes. This has been the case for many of the places I have worked over the

course of my 20+ year career. What’s becoming clear to me is that over this time

span, my clients have successfully begun a process of not only protecting land for

wildlife and recreation, but they are also creating corridors from north to south,

and from sea level to alpine zones, that will help some species survive the coming

change in climate, and I expect much of my work in the ensuing decades will

be guided by climate change.

Most of the stories here have appeared in one form or another on my website, but

I still love seeing photos printed on paper, hence this magazine. I hope you enjoy

turning the pages as much as I enjoyed putting these photos and stories together.

Cheers,

Jerry

Table of Contents

THE POWER OF PLACE............................................................................................4-5

A film about a controversial electricity transmission line project hits New Hampshire theaters.

DISCOVER ACADIA................................................................................................. 6-7

Work begins on the 4th edition of this classic guidebook to Maine’s national park.

MAINE’S HIGH PEAKS.......................................................................................... 8-11

Conservation efforts in Maine’s north woods aim to conserve vital wild places near the Appalachian Trail.

MAKING A GREENWAY...................................................................................... 12-15

A land trust in southern New Hampshire aims to protect open spaces in a sprawl-threatened region.

BIG SIX................................................................................................................ 16-18

Protecting the Quebecois tradition of producing maple syrup in northern Maine.

P.O. Box 424, Portsmouth, New Hampshire 03802

p. 888-705-8274

m. 603-498-1140

nature@ecophotography.com

www.ecophotography.com

DECEMBER 2015 ECOPHOTOGRAPHY 3


The

Power of

Place

Documentary

NEW HAMPSHIRE

Jerry's film about a controversial

electricity transmission line project

hits New Hampshire theaters

4 ECOPHOTOGRAPHY DECEMBER 2015

Funded through a successful Kickstarter campaign in 2013, my first

feature-length documentary, The Power of Place, premiered to a sold out

crowd at the Red River Theatre in Concord, NH back in March. The film has

since screened throughout New Hampshire, in Boston, and most recently

as an official selection of the New Hampshire Film Festival. The film looks

at the potential impacts of a proposed electricity transmission line dubbed

Northern Pass that will traverse 190 miles of New Hampshire, and

features interviews with a diverse collection of New Hampshire residents –

from a third generation dairy farmer, to a veteran NBA forward, to a state

senator – all of whom fear the negative impacts of the project. The Power of

Place can be streamed on-line at Vimeo On Demand: https://vimeo.com/

ondemand/thepowerofplace.


Photo above left: A hill farm in

Stewartstown, New Hampshire, was in the

cross-hairs of the Northern Pass project as

proposed in 2010

Photo above right: An existing high voltage

transmission line in western New

Hampshire

Photo bottom right: This view of the White

Mountains in Bethlehem, New Hampshire

is threatened by Northern Pass

DECEMBER 2015 ECOPHOTOGRAPHY 5


Discover Acadia

Guide Book

MAINE

Work begins on the 4 th edition

of this classic guidebook to Maine’s

national park.

6 ECOPHOTOGRAPHY DECEMBER 2015

In 2000, my wife Marcy and I wrote our first book, Discover Acadia National Park

for AMC Books. At the time, it was the first guide in the region to provide detailed

trip descriptions for multiple outdoor sports – hiking, biking, sea kayaking, and

quiet water paddling. This sort of ‘combined sports’ guide is now common, but

Discover Acadia still remains one of our most popular books. This summer we

began researching what will be the 4 th edition of the book, to be released in 2017.

This will be the first edition to be printed in color and it will be the first time we’ll

be featuring stand up paddle boarding in the guide. When writing the 1st edition,

we never expected we would have to make room for new sports in the book 15

years later, but we are now looking forward to exploring our favorite waterways

in the park in a new way.


Photo above left: Dawn light washes over

Otter Cliffs

Photo above right: Teenagers walking on

Sand Beach after a day of hiking

Photo bottom right: Sunset as seen from

the granite ledges on Cadillac Mountain

DECEMBER 2015 ECOPHOTOGRAPHY 7


Conservation

MAINE

Maine’s High

Peaks

8 ECOPHOTOGRAPHY DECEMBER 2015


Conservation

efforts in Maine’s

north woods aim to

protect vital wild

places near the

Appalachian Trail.

Maine’s High Peaks region is home to 8

of Maine’s mountains over 4000 feet,

yet until recently most of the 200,000+

acres in the area were privately owned

and unprotected. More than 30 miles

of the Appalachian Trail traverses

the High Peaks, and the expanse of

working forests in the area are wellknown

for having one of the highest

concentrations of moose in the state.

High elevation spruce-fir forests

provide important breeding habitat

for the threatened Bicknell’s thrush,

and the area's cold water streams and

rivers are home to native brook trout

and Atlantic salmon. In previous

years, I photographed conservation

efforts on Mount Abraham and

Crocker Mountain. This year, I shot

four properties, totaling more than

10,000 acres for The Trust for Public

Land - in Reddington Township, near

Saddleback Mountain, and in the

Perham Stream and Orbeton Stream

valleys.

Photo left: A cow moose near the headwaters of

Perham Stream in Maine

Photo above right: The Appalachian Trail on

Saddleback Mountain

Photo bottom right: Fly-fishing on Orbeton

Stream for native eastern brook trout

Photo next page: Dawn breaks over the Bigelow

Range

DECEMBER 2015 ECOPHOTOGRAPHY 9


10 ECOPHOTOGRAPHY DECEMBER 2015


DECEMBER 2015 ECOPHOTOGRAPHY 11


Making a

Greenway

Conservation

NEW HAMPSHIRE

A land trust in southern New Hampshire aims to protect

open spaces in a sprawl-threatened region.

Southern New Hampshire is one of

the fastest growing areas in northern

New England due to its beautiful open

spaces combined with its proximity to

urban centers like Boston, Manchester,

New Hampshire, and Portland, Maine. Of

course, the fields, forests, hills, and

rivers that make up that open space are

being gobbled up by development. The

last 15 years have seen some great work

done by a variety of organizations that

are striving to protect priority southern

New Hampshire wild spaces, from the

oyster beds of Great Bay, to the

forests surrounding the bay’s biggest

tributary, the federally designated

Wild and Scenic Lamprey River.

Today, the NGO taking the lead in the

region is the Southeast Land Trust of

New Hampshire, which is working in

conjunction with several towns, the

state, and other NGO’s to conserve a

greenway from Great Bay to the 5000+

acres in Pawtuckaway State Park in

Deerfield. This year, I photographed

several land conservation projects for

the land trust totaling close to 3500

acres that will protect key links in the

envisioned greenway.

12 ECOPHOTOGRAPHY DECEMBER 2015


Photo above left: Spring clouds over a

recently conserved hayfield that is part of

more than 1100 acres of contiguous open

space in Epping, NH

Photo above right: A family enjoys a

summer walk in Epping

Photo bottom right: A beaver pond in

Epping

Photo next page: The Lamprey River in

southeastern New Hampshire is one of only

two rivers in the state to be federally

designated as a Wild and Scenic river

DECEMBER 2015 ECOPHOTOGRAPHY 13


14 ECOPHOTOGRAPHY DECEMBER 2015


DECEMBER 2015 ECOPHOTOGRAPHY 15


Storytelling

MAINE

Big Six

16 ECOPHOTOGRAPHY DECEMBER 2015


Protecting the Quebecois tradition

of producing maple syrup in

northern Maine.

In April, I made the trip to Big Six Township, on Maine’s border with Quebec, to

photograph a unique conservation project being undertaken by The Trust for

Public Land. The 25,000 acre township is currently owned by one central Maine

family, who manages most of the property for sustainable timber harvesting.

However, about one third of Big Six has been managed primarily for sugar maple

trees for more than 100 years by a handful of Québécois families in neighboring

Quebec, who lease the trees and tap them every spring. With upwards of

80,000 taps on the property, Big Six syrup producers harvest 3 to 4 percent of

the entire US syrup crop. Harvesting the spring sap run is a tradition that has

been sustaining these families for four generations. To insure this tradition can

continue, The Trust for Public Land is working with the landowner, The US Forest

Service, and other partners, to permanently protect the Big Six “sugarbush” with

a conservation easement. More info about the Big Six conservation efforts can be

found at tpl.org/bigsix.

Photo left: Dawn in the Big 6 sugarbush

Photo top: Jean Francois Faucher checks the sap lines on his family’s sugarbush, looking for lines

trampled by moose and taps pecked out of trees by woodpeckers

Photo bottom right: Rheaume Rodrique stirs boiling maple sap in his sugarhouse in Big 6

Photo next page: Approximately 4% of the US syrup crop is produced in Big 6 and shipped to

bottling plants in these stainless steel barrels

DECEMBER 2015 ECOPHOTOGRAPHY 17


18 ECOPHOTOGRAPHY DECEMBER 2015


facebook.com/ecophotography

twitter.com/jerrymonkman

linkedin.com/in/jerrymonkman

instagram.com/jerrymonkman

DECEMBER 2015 ECOPHOTOGRAPHY 19


P.O. Box 424

Portsmouth, New Hampshire 03802

p. 888-705-8274

m. 603-498-1140

nature@ecophotography.com

www.ecophotography.com

20 ECOPHOTOGRAPHY DECEMBER 2015

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