July 2020 Coeur d'Alene Living Local

livinglocal360

July 2020 Coeur d'Alene Living Local

JULY 2020

LIVING LOCAL

+

impactful people

MAKING A DIFFERENCE

CDALivingLocal.com

1

pg.60

Fourth of July’s

Bright Moment


John Beutler

CCIM, CRS

208-661-2989

C21JohnB@Aol.com

NWSelectRealEstate.com

1836 Northwest Blvd, Coeur d’Alene, ID 83814

$1,729,000

ENGLISH POINT ON HAYDEN LAKE – One of the most desirable yearround

locations on Hayden Lake. Architectural beauty with Northwest look

and feel. 4100 total square feet, 4 bedrooms, 5 baths, high ceilings, must

see lake level gourmet kitchen and spacious family area, 14’ ceilings. 4 car

garage and upper level viewing deck with fireplace. Elevator to all floors, 144

feet of deep water, 180 degree viewing and southern exposure. The quality

is exceptional throughout. Plenty of parking and very private site. 20-1126

$2,995,000

SWEDE BAY - Very desirable west side location on Lake Coeur d’Alene.

Only 18 minutes to town. Custom 4bdrm/4ba, 4300 sq ft home with

spacious, heated 3 car garage with extra storage. Views looking right

down the center of the lake. Southern exposure and 90 feet of deep water.

Outside decks and fire-pit areas are very special. Close to Gozzer by boat

and easy drive to Black Rock and Rock Creek. Great value; can’t replace

location or home at this price. 20-1838

$12,900,000

BLACK ROCK HORSE RANCH - Very rare offering, incredible horse set up. One of nicest in the Nation. Must see veterinary lab and state of the art

breeding facility. Custom home is overlooking the mountains and lakes plus 3 separate homes. Several barns, 96 stalls, 300x150 indoor riding arena,

and much, much more. 1140 acres in all with grassy pastures, rolling hills and 2.9 miles of Lake frontage on Anderson lake. Short boat ride to Lake

Coeur d’’Alene. Close to 3 nationally ranked Golf courses. 19-5500

Kootenai County’s Top Selling Agent Since 1987

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IT MIGHT BE HERE

This might be where you watch your children grow up. It might

be where your family gathers for holiday dinners. Or it might be

where you bake Grandma’s cookies. It might be where you gather

for movie and game nights. Or it might be where you fall in love.

One thing is for certain, it will be where life happens.

208-449-1905 | www.myarchiterra.com

1859 N. Lakewood Drive, Suite 200, Coeur d’Alene, ID 83814

CDALivingLocal.com

3


Timeless Art

INSPIRED BY TRADITION

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4


5097 N. Building Center Dr. | Coeur d’Alene, Idaho | 208.772.9333 | www.MonarchCustomHomes.com

Joel & Shawn Anderson

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Whether Building or Remodeling, We Can Help to

Make Your House feel more like a Home.

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JULY 2020

Volume 10 Number 7

Inside

Individuals Making an Impact in

Their Community

People making a difference in our hometown

Small Business, Major Impact

How locally owned businesses contribute to a

thriving community

How to Positively Impact

Your Community

Tips for making a difference right where you’re at

70

74

80

CDALivingLocal.com

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ASPEN HOMES

Premium Builders. Premium Materials.

aspenhomes.com

25 Years of Dream Building.

Our home designers, interior designers and project managers are all cut from the same cloth:

We keep an open dialogue, deliver what we say we will deliver and place the highest priority on

honesty. And the result is always the same: superior quality homes that seamlessly embody the

spirit of the Great Northwest - no matter what your style is.

1831 North Lakewood Drive, Coeur d’Alene, ID 83815 | 208.664.9171

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CDALIVINGLOCAL.COM

MARKETING

DIRECTOR OF MARKETING

Allyia Briggs | 208.627.6476

allyia@like-media.com

MARKETING & SALES ASSISTANT

Morgan Redal | 208.699.3182

morgan.redal@like-media.com

EDITORIAL

EDITOR IN CHIEF

Jillian Chandler | jillian@like-media.com

STAFF WRITERS

Colin Anderson | colin@like-media.com

Abigail Thorpe | abigail@like-media.com

DESIGN

DESIGN DIRECTOR | Maddie Horton

LEAD GRAPHIC DESIGNER | Darbey Russo

GRAPHIC DESIGNER | Kennedy Pew

DIGITAL CREATIVE DIRECTOR | Whitney Lebsock

MUV Tribe Training Studio

Les Mills Group Fitness

Kids Club

Indoor Basketball, Tennis, Racquetball

& Pickleball Courts

Pool, Sauna, Steam & Jacuzzi

Hot Yoga, Pilates Reformer & Cycling Studios

Group Fitness - 156 classes per week

Executive-Style Private

Locker Rooms

Certified Personal Trainers

& Group Fitness Instructors

ACCOUNTING/ OPERATIONS

MANAGING PARTNER | Kim Russo

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR | Steve Russo

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS | Rachel Figgins

DISTRIBUTION MANAGER

Colin Anderson | colin@like-media.com

CONTRIBUTORS

Ryan Crandall, Trish Buzzone, Dan Thompson, Tom

Greene, Jeff Pufnock, Jessica Youngs, Seth Porter,

Bri Williams, Marc Stewart, Taylor Shillam, Tina

VanDenHeuvel, Marguerite Cleveland

COEUR D’ALENE LIVING LOCAL MAGAZINE

is brought to you by Like-Media.com. If you would

like to advertise with us, please call 208.627.6476

or email allyia@like-media.com. To submit articles,

photos, nominations and events, email us at

events@like-media.com.

www.thePEAKid.com

HAYDEN - 208.762.5777

COEUR D’ALENE - 208.667.2582

POST FALLS - 208.773.0601

Living Local magazine is published monthly and distributed

freely throughout Coeur d’Alene, Hayden, Post Falls,

Rathdrum, Spokane Valley, Sandpoint, Bonners Ferry and

Dover Bay. Opinions expressed in articles or advertisements

do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the publisher.

Living Local magazine is not responsible for omissions or

information that has been misrepresented to the magazine.

Living Local magazine is produced and published by

Like Media, and no part of this publication may be reproduced

or transmitted without the permission of the publisher.

CDALivingLocal.com

10


SELLING RESULTS

NOT PROMISES

F

O

R 2 20

Over 100 Properties

SOLD

By Chad Oakland in 2019!

Properties SOLD ranging from $25K-$2.6M

Thinking of Making a Move?

Call, Text or Email Today!

208.664.4200 2022 N Government Way, CdA, ID

www.northwestrealtygroup.com

119224

Chad Oakland

Realtor/Owner

208.704.2000

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chad@nwidaho.com

11


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PUBLISHER’S

Note

PROVIDING

SOLAR

SERVICES

Going solar has a wide range of

benefits. Whether your focus is

economic, environmental or

personal, solar is a clean

renewable process that uses

the most natural resource – the

sun! – while keeping money in

your pocket.

CELEBRATING OUR FREEDOMS

L

ife has been

unpredictable, and

at times frightening,

frustrating and

heartbreaking, during recent weeks—for us

all. With new “normals” put in place to battle

COVID-19 and keep our communities safe,

and the addition of protests that began in

late May, our world has been turned upside

down. But at the end of the day, as we ponder

the lives we’ve been able to build here in the

United States, we can’t take for granted all

of the freedoms that come with our great

country. Through all the hardships, we are

able to raise our voices and demand to be

heard. Through our voices, we are able to

lift others up while they may be silenced.

We live in a country like no other and are

proud of the communities in which we live.

Despite the difficulties, we always come out

stronger, and more united, than before.

opportunities we desire for ourselves and

our own children, our communities, states

and nation will only become that much

more united.

Take this time to reflect on all the blessings

you and your loved ones have been bestowed,

and focus on what we, as individuals and

whole communities, can do to support each

other. Our strong, hardworking families and

communities are the backbone of this great

nation.

I ask you to take a moment to recognize

the great privilege we have as Americans,

and the great work we have done and will

continue to do, in building this place we call

home.

Happy Independence Day!

On July 4, friends and families will once

again gather to commemorate America’s

independence. Though celebrations may

be a bit different this year, and smaller,

people will still come together to celebrate

our great country—the place we all call

home. If we continue to love our fellow man

and want for them the same freedoms and

Steve Russo

Executive Director | steve@like-media.com

ABOUT THE COVER

208.765.WIRE(9473)

www.nextgencda.com

3645 N Cederblom St

Coeur d’Alene, ID, 83815

JULY 2020

+

impactful people

MAKING A DIFFERENCE

CDALivingLocal.com

LIVING LOCAL

pg.60

Fourth of July’s

Bright Moment

1

THIS MONTH, FAMILIES ACROSS THE U.S.

WILL CELEBRATE OUR INDEPENDENCE. No

matter how you choose to celebrate the Fourth of July

(though a day out on Lake Coeur d’Alene isn’t a bad

way to spend the day), remember what it represents,

and take a moment to reflect on how fortunate we are

to live in a place where freedom reigns, and all have

the right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.

Would you like to receive this issue and future

issues in your inbox? Visit CDALivingLocal.com

and sign up for our FREE Digital Edition.

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14


NORTH IDAHO’S PREMIER CUSTOM HOME BUILDER

The Creekside home philosophy of building is based on achieving superior craftsmanship on all levels.

Our commitment to excellence serves as the foundation on which we build every custom home. It is our

dedication that ensures your new home will meet your highest expectations.

TRADITION - INNOVATION - PERFORMANCE - REPUTATION

www.CreeksideCdA.com // 10075 N. Government Way, Hayden, ID 83835 // 208.666.1111

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15


GET CONNECTED WITH COEUR D’ALENE LIVING LOCAL!

david_perry04 via

emilymarcum_ via

exploreidahoshop via

#CDALIVING

Your photos will show up on our Get

Social page at CDALIVINGLOCAL.COM

and you’ll have the chance to see your

photos in print right here!

facebook.com/cdaliving

instagram.com/cdaliving

pinterest.com/likemedia_

LIFT OFF YOUR DIGITAL MARKETING WITH

Social Media Management | SEO | Branding and Creative | Content Development | Website Building

Reputation Management | Google Optimization | Podcast Production | And More

ALLYIA BRIGGS

Like Media Director of Marketing | allyia@like-media.com | 208.627.6476 | Like-Media.com

CDALivingLocal.com

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Whether you need a little help or a lot, our talented stylists are here to guide you through the

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Contents

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86

60

82

42

GET FEATURED

Join us on Instagram @CdALiving for a

chance to get your photos, recipes, ideas

and much more featured

ESSENTIALS

The latest tips and trends in home,

garden, finances and life

LIFE & COMMUNITY

Celebrating Independence Day: Times

call for the simple traditions

BUSINESS IN THE

SPOTLIGHT

Prairie Home Farm: Coeur d’Alene’s

beloved farm-style experience

16 GOOD NEWS

32 FEATURE STORY

20

28

30

Bringing Bicycles to Coeur d’Alene: A

nonprofit on a mission to give bikes to

kids who can’t afford them

IN FOCUS

Back into the Wild: Area nonprofit cares

for injured, orphaned wildlife

LIVING LOCAL

A Coeur d’Alene Classic: Show, shine

and cruise: Car d’Lane returns to the

downtown drag

HEALTH & LIFESTYLE

36

42

52

Tips and informational articles about living

a healthy, active lifestyle

Pyrotechnics: Fourth of July’s

Bright Moment

TRAVEL & LEISURE

Mountain, City, Sea: Enjoy all three in

one destination

FOOD & DRINK

Your local guide to the tastiest hot

spots around town and local recipes

ARTS &

ENTERTAINMENT

Calendar of great local events, music,

sports and shows!

60

82

85

92

CDALivingLocal.com

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19


From Victory Gardens to Garage Greatness

5 BIG JOBS TO TACKLE FOR SUMMER

(BPT) - SUMMER IS HERE, AND THAT MEANS IT'S TIME TO

TACKLE THE BIG OUTDOOR TASKS.

The importance of getting work done is especially true in this season

of social isolation, when Americans are enjoying their homes' outdoor

spaces more than ever. Outdoor work may require some extra sweat and

elbow grease, but these big jobs are a welcome break right now, keeping

people busy and outside—and helping them truly appreciate their well -

-tended green spaces.

For many, outdoor work is a satisfying endeavor, allowing homeowners

to take pride in their home and yard, along with the work they put into

it, which shows in what people are searching for, posting and sharing

online. For example, Pinterest Insights saw an increase of 89 percent in

backyard renovation ideas on their website, along with a whopping jump

of 658 percent in DIY small patio ideas on a budget, and an impressive

528 percent increase in budget garden inspiration ideas.

Ready to get started on your summer to -do list? Consider adding these

big but worthwhile tasks to your roster.

Start a "victory garden"

Given all the questions brought about by COVID-19, many Americans

are re igniting the WWII practice of growing their own fruits, vegetables

and herbs to give themselves more control over their food supplies.

Many produce varieties are easy to grow, and cultivating them at

home can ward off unnecessary shopping excursions. "Americans are

turning to gardens for food access, food security, food safety and food

affordability," confirms gardening exec Jim Feinson on GardenResearch.

com.

Beef up your landscaping

Look over your landscaping layout and determine which parts need

trimming, filling in, fertilizing or replacing. If you're in doubt, many

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21


Summer is here, and that to-do list

won't take care of itself.

garden centers can draw up plans demonstrating changes or additions

that might look more eye -catching. Before getting started, invest in

easy- to-use equipment that will make the heavy-duty labor less grueling.

Northern Tool + Equipment's Strongway Steel Jumbo Garden Wagon

can handle tough jobs like hauling rocks, pavers or bags of cement; in

fact, it can capably pull up to 1,400 pounds of supplies.

Revamp your deck

Does it just need a good power washing, or is it screaming for a repainting

or re-staining too? Either way, your work will go faster with Northern

Tool's Powerhorse Gas Cold Water Pressure Washer, which has the 2.5

GPM and 3100 PSI you need to effortlessly blast through mud, dirt and

debris on your deck, siding, fence, patio or driveway.

Get your garage in gear

Reclaim your space by getting rid of junk you don't need, power washing

your floors and establishing dedicated space for the tools and equipment

you regularly use. New cabinets, bins, racks, shelves or pegboard panels

can go a long way toward keeping everything handy and easy to find.

You may even want to create a mancave vibe by installing a TV, mini

fridge and casual seating.

Tackle your gutters

It can be a hefty job, but built-up debris must be cleaned out at least twice

annually to avoid wet basements, interior leaks, mold growth, rodent

infestations and/or displacement of the gutters themselves. Use a sturdy

ladder to safely access the edges of your roof, then use a trowel or gutter

scoop to remove refuse. Flush out the system using a power washer or

a garden hose with a spray attachment. Check for cracks, rust or paint

damage and missing attachments, ensure all sections are sloped enough

to drain stormwater and replace any sections that can't be repaired.

Summer is here, and that to-do list won't take care of itself. Plan now

to take on the tasks that will help you and your family make the best

possible use of your outdoor spaces in the warm weather.

CDALivingLocal.com

22


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23


PLANTING SEEDS OF

TRANSFORMATION

To experience real, powerful change,

I have to begin with myself

By Trish Buzzone, Thinking Partner,

Executive Director, The John Maxwell Team

In the song “Revolution,” John Lennon pushes back against the

idea that important changes only happen after people join larger

movements. Revolution begins, Lennon suggests, with a shift

in our own thinking. I agree. Transformation will not happen

around us until it happens inside us.

When we choose to be intentional about personal growth, we plant

a seed of transformation within ourselves. That’s the first step. True

transformation comes when we invest in that process every day.

Shifting our thinking, doing new things, is hard. It feels easier to look

at the world and expect it to change around us. Even if the world does

change, if we don’t invest in ourselves, we experience the world with

the same limits to our thinking and awareness we had before.

Continuing transformational work inside ourselves takes courage

to embrace the unknown and faith in the future we are creating for

ourselves. When we put action behind our vision, cultivating that seed,

we are more aware of the potential within us and within others.

This kind of transformative vision is magnetic. Other leaders will

be drawn to that energy, and those leaders will begin to experience

transformation in their own lives. This is the key difference between

knowing how to lead and being a transformative leader. When we

choose to be transformative leaders, no matter what context we’re in,

we bring life and energy with us to invest in every conversation, every

idea, every enterprise and every solution.

When we make it a point, every day, to take in knowledge, wisdom and

inspiration, this will work in us to create shifts in our thinking, our

mindsets and our actions, transforming who we are and also what we

do. This is why cultivating a seed of transformation in one leader causes

that transformation to begin in other leaders. We may teach what we

know, we reproduce who we are.

Planting that contagious, transformational seed begins with who we’re

inviting to invest in our own lives. Are we choosing thinking partners

who are transformative in their mindset and actions? Do they know

what they’re doing and why they’re doing it? Do they have a contagious

vision? Do they get buy-in from other leaders who are excited to be

part of what they’re doing?

These are the people who help us cultivate the seeds of transformational

leadership in our own lives. They lead because they love people as much

as they enjoy leading them. These leaders challenge us to continue

to invest in personal growth, to never believe we have “arrived,” so,

together, we continue connecting with the transformative energy that

inspires real, positive change.

When we make these choices, act on these intentions and connect with

thinking partners who inspire us to continue growing, no matter what

stream of influence in which we work, we will inspire other leaders

around us to step up, invest and be transformational. When we develop

seeds of transformation within ourselves, leaders around us will catch

that vision and share it with others. As John C. Maxwell says, “If we

want to bring change, we have to be changed.”

You can connect with Trish Buzzone at TrishBuzzone.com, Linkedin.

com/in/trishbuzzone or Facebook.com/trishbuzzone.

CDALivingLocal.com

24


SUMMER AT THE KROC

Opportunities for non-members as well

By Colin Anderson

Let’s connect and help you

find your perfect home!

Whether you’re looking for

something to keep the kids

active and stimulated this

summer, a bit of exercise

yourself, or some pool time, there is something

for everyone going on at the Kroc Center all

summer long. For those who aren’t currently

members, day passes are available both online

and at the front desk. Rates are $12 for adults,

$10 for students, seniors

and military, and $8 for

children under 18. Your

day pass includes access

to the aquatic center,

fitness area and gym,

game room, climbing

wall, drop-in classes

and public areas during

open hours. There are

currently basketball

shoot around and open

gym times as well as a

full slate of aquatic and

group exercise classes.

Those who want to give

their upper body a new

challenge can check out

the climbing wall. An

auto-belay system allows

new climbers to safely

scale the wall. There are

also personal climbing coaches available for

an additional charge. Climbers work one-onone

with a qualified coach from developing a

climbing workout to working on that route that

is eluding you.

Kids can stay busy and active while giving

parents a break by enrolling them in Kroc

YOUR DAY PASS

INCLUDES ACCESS

TO THE AQUATIC

CENTER, FITNESS

AREA AND GYM, GAME

ROOM, CLIMBING

WALL, DROP-IN

CLASSES AND PUBLIC

AREAS DURING OPEN

HOURS.

Summer Day Camps, which are running weekly

through August 21. Pee Wee Camp is for kids

ages 4 and 5 and runs in the morning. Little

ones will experience dress-up days, arts and

crafts, and splash time in the pool. Discovery

Camp is for kids ages 6 through 10 and runs

from 8:30am to 3:30pm, giving parents muchneeded

time during the day. Camp includes

time on the rock wall, swimming and bounce

house time, as well as

arts and crafts and other

learning opportunities.

Adventure Camp is for

those 11 through 14

and uses many of the

same activities but also

has older children work

in group settings and

outside exploring the

wonders of North Idaho.

Scholarships are available

for those who can benefit

from the assistance.

Online registration can

be found at KrocCdA.

org/camps.

Additional opportunities

include CPR/First Aid

courses, tap dancing,

abstract art, and

swimming lessons for all

levels. You can try Zumba, Yoga, cycling, water

aerobics and much more.

If you find yourself in need of some physical

or mental stimulation, look no further than the

Kroc, where there is something going on each

and every day.

SARAH MCCRACKEN

LIFELONG COMMUNITY MEMBER, REALTOR

WWW.BLUEDOORIDAHO.COM

sarah@ bluedooridaho.com

208.651.3131

LICENSE #SP49246

CDALivingLocal.com

25


F I N A N C

I A L F O C U S

DIY Estate Plans

Common mistakes to avoid

By Ryan Crandall, J.D., Crandall Law Group

NOW OFFERING

VIRTUAL ESTATE

PLANNING

APPOINTMENTS

Get personalized information

from an experienced

estate planning attorney from

the comfort of your own home.

The internet offers all the information

and tools we need at our fingertips to

create our own estate plan, right? For

most people, this is simply not true.

Although your DIY “estate plan” may initially

cost only $49.95, it may end up being much,

much more expensive than an estate plan

designed by an experienced estate planning

attorney.

Wills are only one part of a comprehensive

estate plan that fully protects you and your

family. Even if your DIY will meet all your

state’s requirements and is legally valid, the will

alone is unlikely to be sufficient to address all of

your estate planning needs.

DIY estate plans may not conform to the

applicable law. The law that applies to estate

planning is determined individually by each

state. Although the forms you can find on

the internet may claim to conform to your

state’s law, this may not always be the case. In

addition, if you own property in another state

or country, the laws in those jurisdictions may

differ significantly, and your DIY estate plan

may not adequately account for them.

A DIY estate plan could contain inaccurate,

incomplete or contradictory information.

For example, if you create a will using an

online questionnaire, there is the possibility

that you may select the wrong option or leave

out important information that could prevent

your will from accomplishing your goals. In

addition, some online services allow users to

insert additional information not addressed by

their questionnaire that could contradict other

parts of the will.

Your DIY estate plan may not account for

changing life circumstances and different

scenarios that could arise. As opposed to

a computer program, an experienced estate

planning attorney will help you think through

the potential changes and contingencies that

could have an impact on your estate plan and

design a plan that prevents unintended results

that could frustrate your estate planning goals.

Assets may be left out of your estate plan.

Many people do not realize that a trust is

frequently a better estate planning tool than

a will because it avoids expensive, timeconsuming

and public court proceedings (i.e.,

the probate process) that would otherwise be

necessary to transfer your money and property

to your heirs after you pass away. Even if you

have created a DIY trust, if you do not fund

it, that is, transfer title of your money and

property into the name of the trust, it will be

ineffective, and your loved ones will still have

to endure the probate process to finish what

you started.

We Can Help

A DIY estate plan can lead to a false sense of

security because it may not achieve what you

think it does. By working with an experienced

estate planning attorney, they hold the

expertise needed to help you design and create

a comprehensive plan for you and your family.

We offer complimentary estate planning

consultations, virtually, from the comfort of

your own home. Contact our office for more

information.

SCHEDULE YOUR

COMPLIMENTARY

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Celebrating Independence Day

TIMES CALL FOR THE SIMPLE TRADITIONS

By Jillian Chandler

It continues to be a common theme not only in Coeur d’Alene

but across the state and country; large community events and

gatherings continue to be halted as a result of the continued

safety concerns amid COVID-19. Though there won’t be any parades

making their way down the streets as adults and children alike line the

roadways wearing their red, white and blue and waving their American

flags proudly, and the bright sights and booming sounds of fireworks

won’t be taking over the night skies in honor of our independence,

there is still much to rejoice in—even if this means a smaller, more

intimate celebration.

There’s nothing like a good ol’ Fourth of July backyard barbecue.

Whether it’s with your spouse and kids or a gathering among friends,

spending a warm summer day outdoors—especially on Independence

Day—calls for some grilling and cool beverages. Make it a potluck,

and have everyone bring one of their favorite dishes. This is a fun time

to share those traditional family recipes that you grew up enjoying to

help celebrate the holiday.

Add in some fun backyard games, like three-ring toss or horseshoes,

cornhole and table tennis, and everyone, no matter their age, is bound

to take part in some good old-fashioned friendly competition.

Spending a day out on the water is the norm here on a hot summer’s

day, but it’s always that much more meaningful to get out on your boat,

paddleboard or kayak, feeling the breeze across your face as you freely

glide across the open waters—taking in that feeling of freedom; it’s

truly indescribable. And while on the water, you’re sure to meet up

with old friends while making new friends as well!

With the Fourth of July falling on a Saturday, you can always opt for a

quiet holiday and take a mini road trip, and be sure to pack a patriotic

picnic for the road!

However you choose to celebrate this Independence Day, it’s up to

you to make it one to remember. And the most important way is by

celebrating with the ones you hold most dear. Happy Independence

Day, Coeur d’Alene!

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29


Pies and

Pumpkins

Coeur d’Alene’s beloved

farm-style experience

By Abigail Thorpe

PRAIRIE HOME FARM/

LIL’ PUNKIN PIE CO.

7790 North Atlas Road

Coeur d’Alene, Idaho 83835

208.762.3289

PrairieHomeFarm.com

“MY PIES ARE VERY CLASSIC AND

SIMPLE, NOTHING FANCY. WITH FRUIT

OFTEN PICKED ON THE FARM THE

DAY BEFORE BEING BAKED INTO A PIE.

EVERY PIE IS HOMEMADE BY ME, IN

MY BAKERY ON MY FARM. WITHOUT

A STOREFRONT I KEEP MY BUSINESS

EXACTLY WHERE I WANT IT.”

A

100-year-old farm sits just north of Coeur d’Alene on Atlas

Road and continues to provide the community with smiles,

produce and a slice of old-fashioned farm goodness. Linda

Swenson revitalized the farm as Prairie Home Farm in 2004

with a large pumpkin patch offering a diverse variety of pumpkins—

including heirlooms—and fall produce and decor.

Open two days a week in October (Saturdays and Wednesdays), the

farm is a step back in time. Old farm equipment and outdoor vignettes

created by Swenson are the perfect backdrop for photo shoots, and

the farm is home to 12 different kinds of farm animals for families to

feed, pet and enjoy a fun day of farm life while hunting for their perfect

pumpkin.

“I have customers’ children that I’ve watched grow up,” says Swenson.

“They come and say hi at the market, and watching children who

haven’t been on a farm respond to pigs, sheep, etc. makes me giddy!”

Throughout October, the farm is available for field trips, barn rentals

and birthday parties. Last year the farm had 1,831 children pass through

its gates.

Swenson moved to Coeur d’Alene 19 years ago from Spokane, where she

continued to work as a registered nurse. She went through the master

CDALivingLocal.com

30


gardener program just before buying the farm, and the pumpkin patch

seemed to naturally follow. “I just had no idea it was going to get as big

as it has,” she says.

In 2015 she started a bakery on the farm as a member of the Kootenai

County Farmers’ Market, adding Lil’ Punkin Pie Co. to the company.

She bakes each pie by hand from fruit grown on the farm or sourced

locally at the market and offers pickup at the farm or orders for events like

weddings and birthday parties.

The pie making company is very hands on and personal—a call from

someone on a Sunday evening needing a pie for the following day will

find Swenson out fruit picking early in the morning to make sure a pie is

in-hand for company by the evening.

“My pies are very classic and simple, nothing fancy,” she says, “with fruit

often picked on the farm the day before being baked into a pie. Every pie

is homemade by me, in my bakery on my farm. Without a storefront I

keep my business exactly where I want it.”

Swenson has always baked and gardened; it’s in her blood. Her grandfather

owned a bakery on the main street of a small town, and she was in the

baking club in high school.

She started offering pie making classes several years ago, and it has

become one of her most enjoyable aspects of the business. The Farm

Pie School offers classes at the farm or individuals’ homes and focuses

primarily on crust making. The classes include two hours of instruction,

ingredients and the finished pie ready to take home and bake. The fourth

Tuesday of each month Swenson offers open classes as needed on the

farm. The experience has become a favorite offering of the farm and has

taught many a young girl and boy how to make the perfect crust!

Teaching comes naturally to Swenson. She formerly taught at The

Culinary Stone for several years, and continues to teach at a farm

on Green Bluff as well as occasional classes at The Culinary Stone. In

addition to her farming and baking, she and her husband are passionate

about supporting the Kootenai Humane Society. “Last year, after wanting

for years to do so, I hosted a fundraiser on the farm during pumpkin

patch. It was so much fun I’m thinking it will become an annual thing.”

Stop for a visit to Prairie Home Farm, enjoy the true, simple spirit of farm

life and take some family pics. You might even want to put in an order for

a pie—your family (and guests) will love every morsel.

CDALivingLocal.com

31


Bringing Bicycles to Coeur d’Alene

A NONPROFIT ON A MISSION TO GIVE BIKES TO KIDS WHO CAN’T AFFORD THEM

STORY & PHOTOS BY ABIGAIL THORPE

Serving as an HVAC repairman for 32 years, Tom Morgan would

often see old bikes in the bushes of client’s yards or leaned up

against the garage. Morgan grew up in a low-income family and

had to borrow or ride his friends’ bikes as a child. “It’s something

that kind of sticks with you when you’re a kid,” he recalls. “You know that

you don’t have stuff that other kids do.”

He would work on a $2 million home for one call, and a single-wide

manufactured home the next. “So I was aware of the families that had

kids that didn’t have bicycles, so I just started asking people, ‘Hey, what

are you gonna do with that old bike in the bushes over there? Because I

know a family that could use it,’ and nobody said no,” he recalls.

And so his mission to bring bikes to kids who couldn’t afford them

started out of the back of his repair van, one or two bikes at a time. Over

the years, customers got to know him as he returned each year to do their

HVAC service and started picking up old bikes when they could to pass

off to him. “So I would leave with an invoice—and a bicycle,” Morgan

smiles.

Around the time it got to the point he had about 30 bikes at his house,

Morgan and his wife took a trip to Boise that would prove instrumental

in directing his future.

A flat tire on a bike ride led him to the Boise Bicycle Project, a nonprofit

that provides bicycles to those in need as well as a space for people to work

on their own bikes and receive help from knowledgeable volunteers. “I

go walking through the doors and it was nothing like any bike shop I’d

ever been in,” recalls Morgan.

He had forgotten his bike repair kit on the trip. “I think the reason I

forgot it is because I was meant to stumble into Boise Bicycle Project and

see what was going on there … It planted a seed in my head: I thought,

‘Why doesn’t Coeur d’Alene have something like this?’”

He spent hours at the shop, and when he returned to Coeur d’Alene,

he gathered with some like-minded individuals to discuss starting

something similar in his hometown. “I don’t know why I didn’t think I

was the guy to do it,” says Morgan. “Finally one day my wife says to me,

‘Let’s just do it!’” and so Lake City Bicycle Collective was born.

The shop opened in 2014 and in six years’ time has given away more than

CDALivingLocal.com

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1,000 bicycles and over 500 helmets. “The goal of the place is we want to

get bicycles to kids who financially would have no opportunity to have

a bike,” says Morgan.

It soon outgrew its original space 10 blocks from the current shop in

the basement of the First Baptist Church on Wallace Avenue. The shop

serves anyone who enters its doors, providing affordable bikes to those

who are looking for a bike on a budget or offering space to work and

fix your own for a minimal fee—$5 for an hour or $10 for the entire

day. The shop is fully equipped with all of the tools, work stations and

replacement items a person might need, and includes volunteers with

years of experience.

Bikes typically range from $20 to $50, but the shop provides free bikes

to those truly in need and works with CASA, the homeless community,

veterans and families who are financially struggling to help each

individual get a bike at a price they can afford—whatever that may be.

Sometimes it takes two or three bikes from what Morgan calls “the

boneyard” to make a good one. He and the volunteers pull pieces from

each bike to restore one to good working condition and recycle the parts

they can’t use. “Everything either gets upcycled or recycled or reused,”

he says.

The shop is entirely volunteer run by Morgan and a team of volunteers,

and partners with a diverse mix of nonprofits in Coeur d’Alene including

Kootenai Health—which provides its helmets—and community

business partners and individuals.

But it’s been a slow go to get here. The shop will get an influx of donations

after a news report during Christmas, but then many people will forget

about them. “You have to keep on reaching out and keep on going to

events,” says Morgan.

At 52, he’s been a bicycle lover for over 40 years now and loves to see the

joy in kids’ eyes when they get their first bike. “It’s a lot of fun. You get

to see the good that you do, you get to see the face light up on a kid that

really thought, ‘I’m not getting a bike, there’s no hope for me,’” he says.

He has kids he starts on a bike at 4 or 5 years old, and if they take good

care of it, will trade them for a bigger one when they need it. “The

connection that we really want to make is the kid that gets this bike,”

says Morgan. “This might be someone’s first bicycle, and the hope is

that this is a connection that will stay with this young person forever.

There’s good people in the world, and maybe one day they become some

of them.”

Lake City Bicycle Collective is open noon to 6pm Tuesday through

Saturday and always welcomes volunteers, donations or unwanted

bikes. Reach out to Tom at tom@lcbcbikes.org or 208.740.1502, and

stop in to see the exciting work going on. It costs about $25 to refurbish

a bike, so each bike you buy for $50 allows one to go out the door for

someone in need.

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BACK INTO THE WILD

AREA NONPROFIT CARES FOR INJURED,

ORPHANED WILDLIFE

BY DAN THOMPSON | COURTESY PHOTOS

The early June roster of animals in

recovery at the American Heritage

Wildlife Foundation represents

a wide swath of the North Idaho

branch of the animal kingdom.

There are orphaned pine squirrel babies, as well

as a young flying squirrel. One batch of orphan

skunks was already in, with another expected

the next day. A young magpie with neurological

issues had already been there for more than a

month. A wild turkey and a blue grouse were

also in the recovery process.

The AHWF sees about 100 different animals

a year, founder Kathleen St. Clair-McGee

estimated, so multiplied by the nearly 20 years

she has been at the Clark Fork facility, she has

seen quite the variety of animals.

“It’s incredible. We’ll have little animals come

in and you’re working on them desperately. You

only meet them a half a day and they might die

on you,” she said. “It’s always a challenge. It’s

always tricky.”

But the reward of sending off a rehabilitated

animal into the wild again—something St.

Clair-McGee estimates the organization does

about 60 percent of the time—is worth the

heartache.

“Probably the greatest reward is when you do

have that animal and on the day of release you

say, ‘OK, here you go, you’re back where you

should be,’” she said.

The AHWF’s stated mission is to work toward

the preservation of all wildlife through

rehabilitation and community education. A

nonprofit started in 2001, the organization

has no paid staff and relies on volunteers, who

provide between 3,000 and 4,000 combined

hours each year, St. Clair-McGee said. They

are working to create the first Inland Pacific

Northwest nature center.

There are only a few species, like deer, elk and

moose, that the AHWF cannot accept. But

raccoons, skunks, squirrels, waterfowl, ducks,

geese—volunteers will attempt to rehabilitate

all of them if brought in. Some rehabilitations

or recoveries take only a couple weeks. Others

take much longer, like raccoon orphans, who

usually spend three, four or even five months

with American Heritage Wildlife Foundation.

Sometimes people will bring in orphans after

CDALivingLocal.com

36


seeing an adult animal killed by a car and then

later locating the orphaned young. Other times,

people bring in animals who have been injured,

either by them or someone else.

“Rehabilitation is important because if you look

at the animal cases brought in, the majority are

not from nature-caused incidents. They are

caused by human interaction,” St. Clair-McGee

said.

She has been with the AHWF since the

beginning after working at three different zoos

as well as horse ranches and animal shelters.

She realizes not everyone fully understands—

or agrees with—the work the AHWF does, so a

big portion of her job is education.

The organization’s website has numerous

documents available that describe how humans

can best cohabitate with wild neighbors, and

she also spends time in public forums like

libraries and spreads awareness through social

media and other means.

Volunteers come from a variety of walks of life

and aren’t just “animal people,” she said. One

board member has an accounting background

and so serves as treasurer. Another who loves

to take pictures comes out to help with animal

feeding. Still other volunteers work at the

hospital or live on a ranch.

“You don’t necessarily have to have an animal

background,” St. Clair-McGee said. “You just

have to have a desire to learn.”

The care provided at the AHWF is very different

from what might be done at an animal humane

society, where part of the goal is to include the

human factor. At the AHWF, volunteers try to

do the opposite.

“We don’t talk when we’re in the animal room,”

she said. “We put up towels or wear masks so

they don’t directly see this is a human that’s

feeding me. We wear gloves. We do everything

we can think of to remove that human barrier.

… The highest praise that can happen on a wild

animal on release is you go in there and try to

catch them and they come at you or try to avoid

you. (If they do that) you’ve done your job.”

One of St. Clair-McGee’s favorite rescue stories

involves an osprey that was “in pretty rough

shape” when it was brought in. The AHWF

lacks adequate staffing to go out into the field

CDALivingLocal.com

37


and pick up injured animals, relying instead on people to bring them

in. Staff will coach them over the phone, but animals in their care often

require feedings every 30, 20 or even 10 minutes, St. Clair-McGee said,

so they cannot dash away.

Found late one August, the osprey was about two months old when it was

brought in: weak, underweight and dehydrated. Normally osprey don’t

leave the nest for two months, and once on the ground, as this one was,

they’ll starve, St. Clair-McGee said, “unless they have the spirit to figure

it out.”

The bird spent two weeks in rehabilitation, gaining strength. Upon

release, volunteers pitched her up into the air and she took off. It was the

sort of success story that sticks with St. Clair-McGee—she has taken in

other osprey in similar predicaments that don’t survive.

“It’s always taxing. Sometimes it’s 16-hour days,” she said. “It’s not for the

faint of heart, but that’s why we love our volunteers, and that’s why we

strongly encourage people when they do find animals to follow the right

steps.”

Some traumatic injuries the AHWF cannot handle, and in those cases

volunteers will refer people to veterinarians. But many people do bring in

animals, and some are willing to drive hours, St. Clair-McGee said.

“When I get people who are kind hearted and compassionate, I can’t say

thank you enough,” she said. “It’s really uplifting.”

The cost of rehabilitating animals will vary, depending on their length

of stay and the cost of food. Owls, for example, can require $5 of food

per day. Others are more, St. Clair-McGee said. The organization offers

various levels of donation and sometimes holds raffles to raise more

money.

“That’s where the community support comes in, and we’ve been so very

blessed to have the money we need each year,” she said.

St. Clair-McGee said she is excited, too, that Mya Jinright, a raptor

rehabilitator, has joined the AHWF ranks of volunteers. Jinright works

at the VCA North Idaho Animal Hospital in Sandpoint, and St. Clair-

McGee said her help will allow them to better care for hawks and owls

who are in critical condition.

And so the work continues. St. Clair-McGee was preparing to return a

gray squirrel to Post Falls, where three weeks earlier it had fallen and

suffered a head trauma. The squirrel has been getting its coordination

back, she said.

“That’s the best part, the release,” she said. “It makes all the hard work

worthwhile.”

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IS HITTING THE STREETS!

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GET OUT AND RIDE

Easy or challenging, your choice!

BY COLIN ANDERSON

PHOTOS BY MATTHEW SAWYER

What’s better than seeing some of the most spectacular

scenery in North Idaho while traveling

almost entirely downhill? The Route of the Hiawatha

is open for the season. For those who haven’t

been, it’s an easy yet spectacularly beautiful ride. Lookout

Pass Ski Hill operates the trail and offers rentals and shuttle service

if you don’t want to take two vehicles on the trip.

Most riders begin at the East Portal Trailhead, which is located 7

miles into Montana off the Taft exit. A 15-mile leisurely downhill

ride awaits you as you glide down smooth path that was once

a busy Milwaukee railway. Riders pass through beautiful vistas

and overlooks of the Bitterroot Mountains as well as several high

trestle bridges and train tunnels—including one that is more

than a mile-and-a-half long. If you want a bigger challenge, you

can extend the ride up to 30 miles with only a little bit of uphill

grade near the beginning of the ride. Helmets and headlamps

are required of all riders, and passes can be purchased at any

trailhead, Lookout Pass or the Wallace Inn. Mountain bike tires

are recommended, as the pathway surface is a mixture of hardpacked

gravel and dirt.

A shuttle service schedule is available at RidetheHiawatha.com.

Here you can also buy passes, rent bikes, helmets, pre-purchase

bagged lunches, and even tag-alongs or burly trailers to pull

younger children.

Route of the Hiawatha is a great way to see the incredible backcountry

we have all around us without having to exert maximum

energy. Enjoy a leisurely ride and be reminded why we choose to

call this part of the country home.

Those looking for a bigger challenge can head down the road

to Silver Mountain Resort, where the fresh powder is gone but

a network of challenging mountain bike trails is ready to ride.

The Silver Mountain Bike Park (SilverMt.com/index.php/mountain/bike-park)

offers 39 trails with seven marked Easy and three

marked Expert, leaving a vast majority to challenging yet doable

single tracks.

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Your ticket gets you a ride on North America’s longest gondola

(3.1 miles one way), and you’ll be dropped at the top of the

mountain where you can start picking your routes. Those new

to mountain biking can play around at Chair 3, where there is

800 feet of elevation drop, some basic features and wider tracks

to navigate. More advanced riders can tackle a descent of more

than 3,400 feet where they’ll encounter technically challenging

turns, rough patches, bridges and various jumps. Maps clearly

state trail difficulty levels, and bike patrol is on the mountain

ready to help. Rentals are available, and after your ride you can

enjoy food and drink at the base of the mountain or at several

great local hangouts in Kellogg.

CDALivingLocal.com

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41


A COEUR D’ALENE

classic

SHOW, SHINE AND CRUISE: CAR D’LANE

RETURNS TO THE DOWNTOWN DRAG

BY ABIGAIL THORPE

PHOTOS COURTESY OF COEUR D’ALENE DOWNTOWN ASSOCIATION

July 17 and 18 would mark the 30th anniversary of Coeur d’Alene’s

beloved Car d’Lane, when the downtown streets typically fill with

classic cars and happy crowds of car enthusiasts and families, but

due to COVID-19 health concerns, the event was unfortunately

canceled for this year. Typically held around Fathers’ Day in June

every year, the event was rescheduled for July in order to allow for the

traditional gathering of people, but ultimately the city made the decision

to cancel and look to 2021 to bring back the beloved event.

Car d’Lane is one of the largest classic car cruises in North Idaho

and started as a result of the positive reaction to the show the State

Centennial brought to Coeur d’Alene in 1990. The following year, local

car enthusiasts wanted to do another gathering of classic cars like that

done on Father’s Day weekend when the Centennial came through town.

Three years later they joined forces with the Coeur d’Alene Downtown

Association and Car d’Lane was formed.

All cars and trucks 40 years and older are welcome to participate in

the show, and the event usually kicks off Father’s Day weekend with a

group like The Red Hot Mamas dancing down the main drag of Sherman

Avenue.

The Friday night cruise that follows is always a must-see for car lovers,

with people lining the street to keep an eye out for their favorite cruiser,

cheering the drivers and admiring the cars, and the car show is an all-day

event on Saturday.

“This [would have been] the second year of bringing back the Young

Builders Alley, where car enthusiasts 25 years of age and younger can

show their automotive projects of any make/model/year,” says Emily

Boyd, events coordinator for the Coeur d’Alene Downtown Association.

Each young adult can participate for the Young Builders Award, which

they plan to continue for next year’s event. “The highlight will be

CDALivingLocal.com

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43


CAR D’LANE IS A VERY

TRADITIONAL EVENT, FOCUSED

AROUND FAMILY, GOOD HEALTHY

FUN AND AN APPRECIATION FOR

CLASSIC CARS.

seeing the community come together and have a great time downtown

and bringing the car enthusiasts together,” she adds.

Car d’Lane is a very traditional event, focused around family, good

healthy fun and an appreciation for classic cars. It’s become a much-loved

community event that brings people together, and next year promises to

be extra special when it returns to the main drag.

Whether you’re a fan of the muscle cars of the ‘60s and ‘70s, or like to

take it back to the classic, all-original Cadillacs and Fords of the 1940s

and ‘50s, there’s an era for everyone represented at the show. Visitors are

invited to wander the streets, chat with car owners and peer under the

hood for an up-close inspection of their favorite classic.

Coeur d’Alene’s tree-lined, old-fashioned downtown makes for the

perfect backdrop for the show, and attendees can expect to run into old

friends and acquaintances while wandering the show. Stop for an ice

cream along the way, or take a moment to stroll the lakefront and take

a rest in the park.

It’s always been a place where memories are made, and families of all

ages can find something to enjoy. “One of the most memorable stories

I have experienced actually took place last year,” recalls Boyd. “A

gentleman entered his 1970 red convertible Datsun into the show, and

then after having breakfast downtown with his best friend and family,

they wandered up to the vehicle admiring it.” The friend explored the

classic car, admiring the new engine that was put in just days before as the

gentleman walked him around it.

“The gentleman then turned to his friend and said, ‘You like the car?’

The friend said ‘yes’ and complimented the vehicle. Then the gentleman

said, ‘It’s yours buddy,’” says Boyd. After a friendly embrace, the friend got

behind the wheel of what was now his restored vintage Datsun. It was a

special moment that represented what Car d’Lane was about in so many

ways; a time and place for friends and family to share special memories

and bring joy to others’ lives.

Beyond being one of North Idaho’s most anticipated classic car shows,

CDALivingLocal.com

44


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CDALivingLocal.com

45


Car d’Lane is unique because of its stunning location

and small-town feel. “We feel the community and

gorgeous setting by the lake sets this event apart from

the others,” explains Boyd. “Community members

will sit along the cruise route and cheer on cars they

love and wave to their friends. On Saturday, families

and friends—whether they are knowledgeable in

classics or not—will come out to enjoy the relaxed

atmosphere and beautiful cars.”

Visitors can make it a full weekend getaway and

enjoy all that Coeur d’Alene has to offer in addition

to the car show. There are several options for places

to stay located right along the main downtown drag,

including the Coeur d’Alene Resort, Resort City Inn

and the Flamingo Motel, or you can branch out and

explore what other parts of the city have to offer.

Guests can enjoy a dinner downtown after the cruise

and be ready bright and early to hit the streets for the

show and festivities.

As Car d’Lane joins other beloved car shows like

Sandpoint’s Lost in the ‘50s that have been forced to

cancel due to COVID-19, North Idaho classic car

enthusiasts eagerly look forward to its return in 2021

and the opportunity to get out and celebrate, enjoy the

classics and return to a sense of normalcy.

Events like Car d’Lane depend on the help and

support of the community. For opportunities to

volunteer and help out, call 208.415.0116 or email

info@cdadowntown.com. For more information

about Car d’Lane and Downtown Coeur d’Alene, visit

CdADowntown.com/cardlane.

This article has been updated and differs slightly from

the article you will find in print, as it was announced

that Car d’Lane had been canceled after we had

already gone to print on our July issue.

CDALivingLocal.com

46


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ROLLER DERBY SISTERS

JAMMIN’ ON THE RINK, IN THE CLASSROOM

BY TOM GREENE

Amy Palmer catches an opponent off guard playing roller derby.

Amy and her sister, Kate, play roller derby together and both recently

graduated from the NIC Workforce Training Center’s CNA program.

Photo Courtesy of Danny Ngan

Two Spirit Lake sisters are adding Certified Nursing Assistant to a

list of skills that includes hip checks, jamming and avoiding rink

rash.

Kate Palmer, 19, and Amy Palmer, 18, recently graduated from the

Certified Nursing Assistant program at the North Idaho College

Workforce Training Center. They both have their eyes set on entering

NIC’s Nursing program in the future.

“A career in health care is great. It’s also a way to give back to the

community. The class was so convenient, I thought, ‘Why not?’” Amy

said.

For the Palmer sisters, the family that roller derbies together stays

together. They started playing in their early teens.

“It was just supposed to be Katie (playing roller derby) at first, but it

looked like so much fun,” Amy said. “I could be as aggressive as I wanted

to be in a safe environment with family and friends.”

Growing up, the Palmers were both athletic but struggled to find their

niche. They tried basketball, soccer, rugby, even boxing.

“They just weren’t my thing. I couldn’t get into them. But roller derby was

different. I fell in love with it on day one,” Kate said.

Kate said she developed self-esteem and learned how to collaborate with

others to achieve a common goal from her time spent in the rink.

“The main thing is the pack. You help your girls to score and hurt the

other girls to keep them from scoring. It makes for a lot of really close

teamwork,” she said.

Kate has already finished her prerequisites for the Nursing program at

NIC. Amy graduated from Timberlake High School in June but already

has some college-classes under her belt, since she was a dual-credit

student. The NIC Nursing program is in high demand, and there is a

rigorous application process.

“To be competitive, that CNA class really helps,” Kate said. “It’s not an

actual requirement to get into nursing school, but now I can’t imagine

not doing it before becoming a nurse.”

Kate is already working as a CNA, but she said she will earn $3 an hour

more with the CNA certificate. Amy will start off working as a CNA at

the higher pay grade.

“I like that there are 15 different directions I can go in the (health-care)

field. I can make good money and always have a job,” Kate said.

Local roller derby leagues top out at age 18, so the two sisters are currently

part of pick-up leagues to stay on the rink.

“Roller Derby is my safe space. It’s a place where I can grow and then

bring that to my everyday life,” Kate said.

For more information on Health Professions courses offered through

the NIC Workforce Training Center, visit NIC.edu/healthcareers or call

208.769.3214.

CDALivingLocal.com

48


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CDALivingLocal.com 51


LIVING FROM THE HEART

Finding balance in summer’s activity

By Jeff Pufnock L.Ac. Ph.D. and Jessica Youngs L.Ac.

Our April 2020 article spoke to the principles of spring seasonal

living. Now we find ourselves in the midst of summer, the time

of full expansion and expression resulting from winter’s deep rest

and spring’s active growth. Summer is the manifestation and luxurious

abundance of all that has been growing this year. As we see nature clearly

expressing this process through the radiance of the flowers and the

abundance of the farmers’ market, there is also an opportunity to recognize

this process occurring within our own physiology and behavior. We are

constantly being invited to find more active participation with the world

around us: to rise earlier, to smell the flowers, to play in the sunshine and

to take in the starry nights. In summer we are called to shine forth all of

which is most beautiful within ourselves; all that was hidden by winter and

growing in spring.

In Chinese medicine, health is the expression of a harmonious balance

between activity and rest, and this balance should be tailored to agree with

the energy of each season. Summer is the most difficult season in which

to find balance between activity and rest and between the expansion and

containment of our energy. It is common to try to fit in as many exuberant

summer activities as possible, while many of us are supposed to be on

vacation. Finding this balance is critical for our health because if our

activities are too outwardly focused in summer, our energy stores are not

replenished and we quickly become depleted internally, allowing for illness

and disease in the upcoming colder seasons.

Summer also corresponds to the heart in Chinese medicine, which invokes

a time of sharing ourselves from our hearts with our communities. The

HEALTHY TIP

DON’T FORGET ABOUT YOUR HAIR!

We all remember to use that SPF to protect our skin and to drink

plenty of water to hydrate our bodies, but one thing we tend to forget

about during the summer months is our hair! The heat and sun, along

with chlorine, can take a toll on your hair, so be sure to use clarifying

shampoo to wash out that chlorine, product and sunblock, followed by a

conditioning treatment to add that moisture back in.

CDALivingLocal.com

52


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CDALivingLocal.com

53


WHEN FEELING HOT,

FOCUS ON EATING

COOLING, FRESH FOODS.

IN CHINESE

MEDICINE,

HEALTH IS THE

EXPRESSION OF

A HARMONIOUS

BALANCE

BETWEEN

ACTIVITY AND

REST.

summer holds plentiful invitations to connect with

our communities and to share in the abundance

surrounding us all. Especially after this time of

isolation and quarantine, there may be a tendency

to respond with exuberant togetherness. However,

it is also necessary to find balance in our social

interactions, as too much outgoing energy can make

us feel scattered, tired and anxious. Balance is also

suggested because we still may be vulnerable in many

ways after COVID-19, and we must integrate our

enthusiasm to connect with others with attentiveness

to our own resilience and the immune systems of

others.

Summer Dietary Recommendations:

• Quickly and lightly prepare a wide assortment of

local fresh produce: steam, blanch, saute, simmer.

• Avoid greasy, creamy or fatty foods that are counter

to the freshness of the season, as these promote

sluggishness.

• Avoid foods that are overly drying, such as baked

goods, chips and crackers.

• If you have any digestive issues, avoid raw foods

and iced beverages, which require excessive energy

from the stomach to digest and therefore weaken the

stomach’s digestive process.

• When feeling hot, focus on eating cooling, fresh

foods such as salads, sprouts, cucumbers, apples,

watermelon, lemons and limes. Also try eating calming

bitter greens such as endive, escarole, romaine lettuce,

radicchio, asparagus and dandelion.

Jeff Pufnock and Jessica Youngs are the owners of

Embodied Virtue Acupuncture & Herbal Medicine,

located at 307 Church Street, in Sandpoint, Idaho.

To find out more, call 208.254.1188, email info@

embodiedvirtue.com or visit EmbodiedVirtue.com.

CDALivingLocal.com

54


Now serving in Twin Lakes

Moon

7 TENETS FOR OPTIMAL HEALTH

CREATING RESILIENCY AT THE FOUNDATION

OF WELL-BEING

BY SCOTT PORTER

T

he philosophy underlying Integrative and

Functional Medicine encourages us to

address the underlying contributors that

lead to disease. Tipping points to chronic illness

are reached after long-term imbalances in lifestyle

and dietary choices take a toll.

Addressing the symptoms we experience will help

us feel better, but these aren’t solutions that lead

to long-term optimal health. There are ways in

which we can build resiliency and reserve so our

body can respond appropriately to the challenges

it receives.

I. Breathe - We can increase the capacity of our

breath through strengthening and relaxing the

muscles that expand the lungs. Too often we are

shallow breathers. Practice breathing fully from

your lower abdomen, into your back body and

up into your upper chest. Not only do we take in

fuel for our cells through the lungs, we also release

toxins.

II. Drink Water - Chronic dehydration can take

several months to eliminate. It is important to

keep plenty of water in your body. Not juice,

milk alternatives, wine or beer. Just clean water

with good trace minerals, like spring water. This

is a great support for the immune system and

detoxification processes.

III. Whole Food Diet - There is no one-sizefits-all

diet for everyone due to differences in

genetics, lifestyle, microbiome, heath states and

philosophies. Several factors are consistently

important though: whole food, nutrient dense,

low toxins, clean fats, small amounts of quality

protein and a variety of vegetables. Eat clean real

food and not too much.

IV. Supplement - Food itself is challenged

to provide us adequate amounts of the core

nutrients we need. Adding in effective probiotics

and prebiotics, vitamins D and K, absorbable

magnesium, a multi with active forms of B

vitamins and chelated trace minerals, clean

bioavailable omega 3s, and fiber and greens has

become essential.

V. Sleep and Relax - Rest offers important healing

time. As we sleep, cells are repaired. When we take

time to settle down and settle in, we release the

havoc stress creates. Consistent cool temperature,

background noise and blackout curtains promote

restful sleep.

VI. Positive Attitude - Our thinking can be

just as important as what we eat. Work to create

thoughts that help you feel energized. Changing

our thoughts doesn’t change the world, but it can

change our experience of the world, and this has a

direct effect on our health.

VII. Be Active - Our community is perfect for

getting out and about. When we move and play,

our body sets itself up for even more activity.

Sitting around does the opposite.

Optimal health demands proactivity, taking

care of things before we have a problem. Our

body does much of the work for us, but our

responsibility rests squarely on nurturing these

tenets of well-being.

Scott Porter, a functional medicine pharmacist, is

the director of the Center for Functional Medicine

at Sandpoint Super Drug.

EAT GOOD FOOD

Now serving in Twin Lakes

Call or visit our website for more information

on business hours and operations.

208.687.5396

MoonDollarsBistro.com | f

5416 W Village Blvd., Rathdrum, ID

CDALivingLocal.com

55


Common Beauty Myths

TRUE OR FALSE? WE SOLVE YOUR MOST COMMON QUESTIONS

By Bri Williams, RN, BSN, Refined Aesthetics Med Spa, pllc

We all want to look our best, and the beauty industry is full of

information, products, tips and tricks to help us do just that.

But what information out there is true, and what is a myth?

Below we break down some common misconceptions and set your beauty

record straight.

Botox and filler will make me look unnatural and “done.”

False. Botox and filler are wonderful tools for helping you to age gracefully

and continue looking like you! But you need to find an aesthetic provider

who shares the same vision and approach. The technique used to place the

product, the type of product used and the amount of product all plays a

role in your outcome. Do your research before choosing a provider. Look

at their before and after photos and schedule a consult before treatment to

ensure that you are on the same page. When done well, “work” should be

undetectable. You should still look like you, only refreshed.

Junk food can cause breakouts.

True. High sugar and high fat (particularly hydrogenated fat) diets can

increase the body’s sebum production, which then creates inflammatory

responses in the body—sometimes in the form of acne. Further,

overindulging in junk food can increase your chances of becoming

deficient in skin-healthy nutrients found in fruits, vegetables and healthy

fats. It is best to keep junk food to a minimum and stick with nutrientdense

foods to help ward off breakouts.

I do not need to wear sunscreen because there is SPF in my foundation.

Baumann, MD, “You need seven times the normal amount of foundation

and 14 times the normal amount of powder to get the sun protection

factor on the label.” It is important that you wear a dedicated sunscreen

under your makeup. Look for one that is labeled “broad spectrum,”

meaning it protects from UVA and UVB damage.

Department store skin care is good because it is expensive.

False. The high price tag on department store beauty counter goods can

fool you into thinking it is high quality. Big price tag must mean high

quality, right? Wrong. While some may be better than drugstore brands,

they still do not have to meet criteria set forth by the FDA to prove

efficacy. They fall under the category of “cosmetics,” meaning that they

are only “considered to make people more attractive.” Medical-grade skin

care, on the other hand, falls under the category of “drugs,” meaning that

the product has been proven to change the structure or function of the

skin. So, when a medical-grade product claims to diminish fine lines for

instance, it has been scientifically proven to do just that.

So why the higher price tag with department store brands? Advertising

and packaging, whereas medical grade is more expensive because of

research, blind clinical trials and FDA approval. Which would you rather

pay for?

It is important to do your research when it comes to your health and

beauty routine. It is easy to get caught up in mainstream hype, celebrity/

influencer advice and big marketing, but look to your professionals for

the facts.

False. The amount of protection provided in your makeup is not enough

to protect you from UV damage. According to Dermatologist Leslie

CDALivingLocal.com

56


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CDALivingLocal.com 57


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58


GESUNDHEIT AND GOD BLESS YOU!

Allergies, asthma can make

life miserable

BY MARC STEWART, HERITAGE HEALTH

Healthcare from the Heart

Hannah used to suffer from red watery eyes,

runny nose, sneezing and shortness of breath.

Her allergies were a source of misery. Today,

the 30-year-old North Idaho woman keeps one

step ahead of her allergies during the spring and

summer months.

“I am keeping my allergies at bay,” she said. “I

moved to this area from California 15 years ago

and my allergies have actually improved, but they

never really go away.”

She takes over-the-counter allergy relief medicine

every day. She also places a cold washcloth over

her face to wash away any allergens from her eyes.

And she meets regularly with her health-care

provider to monitor her condition, along with her

asthma.

Hannah is not alone in her battle against

allergies. More than 50 million Americans have

experienced various types of allergies each year,

and according to the Centers for Disease Control

and Prevention, one in 13 people have asthma.

Allergy problems are often intertwined with

asthma.

“Hannah’s airways are prone to swelling from

allergens,” says Melanie Moss, a physician

assistant with Heritage Health. “She has a lot of

bad symptoms that can affect her breathing. We

have to monitor it closely.”

Allergy and Asthma 101

An allergy is when your immune system reacts to

a foreign substance, called an allergen. It could be

something you eat, inhale into your lungs, inject

into your body or touch. This reaction could

cause coughing, sneezing, itchy eyes, a runny

nose and a scratchy throat. In severe cases, it can

cause rashes, hives, low blood pressure, breathing

trouble, asthma attacks and even death.

Pollen from grass and trees, dust, pet dander

and smoke are common allergy causes across

North Idaho. While there is no cure for allergies,

they have to be managed with treatment and

prevention.

“I always carry an inhaler for my asthma just in

case,” says Hannah. “Melanie has been awesome. I

love working with her.”

Asthma is the narrowing of the airways that

carry air from the nose and mouth to the lungs.

Allergens or irritating things entering the lungs

trigger asthma symptoms. Symptoms include

trouble breathing, wheezing, coughing and

tightness in the chest. Asthma can be deadly.

• There is no cure for asthma, but it can be

managed with proper prevention of asthma

attacks and treatment.

• More Americans than ever before have asthma.

It is one of this country’s most common and costly

diseases.

“So many of my patients have asthma and/or

allergies,” says Moss. “Often their childhood

asthma resolves once they reach adulthood, but

allergies can still trigger an attack. We typically

start with nasal sprays and other over-the-counter

medications.”

If that doesn’t resolve things, patients can receive

prescriptions and injections to help manage

allergic reactions.

“We can find solutions,” says Moss. “Nobody

should suffer from seasonal allergies.”

To speak with a provider about allergies and

asthma, please call 208.620.5250.

208.620.5250

Follow Us!

myHeritageHealth.org

CDALivingLocal.com

59


PYROTECHNICS:

Fourth of July’s Bright Moment

BEHIND THE SCENES OF AMERICA’S FAVORITE

INDEPENDENCE DAY EVENT

BY ABIGAIL THORPE

CDALivingLocal.com

60


Every year as Independence Day approaches, we anxiously await the festivities: parades, barbeques, three-legged races and an abundance

of watermelon. But the moment that has always captured American’s focus are the fireworks. Every year we wait for the moment the first

explosion hits the night sky. It’s become synonymous with freedom, and the main attraction of every Fourth of July event.

Part of the magic is perhaps that we can’t see the process taking place—the brightly lit sky and colorful patterns feel almost magical. But

behind the scenes there is a whole lot of work and planning that makes the show possible, and decades of science that date back to ancient China.

Historians believe fireworks’ precursors date back to the second century B.C., when the Chinese would throw bamboo stalks into the fire to produce a

loud pop and explosion, thought to ward off evil spirits. Somewhere around 600 to 900 A.D., Chinese alchemists mixed potassium nitrate, sulfur and

charcoal to produce the original “gunpowder.” They would then pack this powder into hollowed out bamboo stalks—which would later become stiff

paper tubes—and light them on fire, forming the very first man-made fireworks.

It wasn’t until the 13th century that gunpowder started making its way into Europe and Arabia. It was quickly adopted for military purposes, but also

gained a popular use in fireworks used to celebrate military victories and mark celebrations and ceremonies. In medieval England, the first skilled

fireworks professionals were known as “firemasters,” and their assistants were “green men,” aptly named because of their caps made of leaves to protect

their heads from the sparks.

Italians in the 1830s were the first to incorporate trace amounts of metals and other additives to the powder to produce the colorful, vibrant modern

CDALivingLocal.com

61


fireworks that we know today. Fireworks came with the first

colonists to the Americas and were a popular part of colonial life.

The day before the Declaration of Independence was adopted by

the Continental Congress, John Adams memorably predicted in

a letter to his wife the significant role fireworks would hold in

celebrating the independence of the United States.

“The day will be most memorable in the history of America,” he

wrote. “I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated by succeeding

generations as the great anniversary festival. It ought to be

solemnized with pomp and parade … bonfires and illuminations

[fireworks] … from one end of this continent to the other, from

this time forward forevermore.”

And so it would be—since its inception, the United States has

used fireworks to mark its independence, with shows taking place

in large cities and small towns alike throughout the country.

But our beloved fireworks displays don’t just happen every year.

In fact, planning for them often starts the previous year, says

Heather Gobet, president of Western Display Fireworks out

of Oregon. “There's so much that goes into one of these,” adds

Gobet. Fireworks for the shows need to be ordered over a year in

advance, and there are a lot of permits, paperwork and state and

national laws that have to be taken into consideration.

The process of planning a fireworks show begins with a

preliminary evaluation of the site through Google Earth.

There has to be adequate room for a display, and the space will

determine the size and types of fireworks that can be used. “If

you're using smaller caliber multi-shot boxes, you may only need

100, 150 feet,” says Gobet. But the large shells require 1,000 feet

in every direction.

“There's kind of two major components of designing a fireworks

show,” explains Gobet. “The first one is safety. There are state

and federal laws that dictate how much area you have to have

open around the launch site.” After evaluating the site on Google

Earth, Gobet’s team will talk to the sponsors about their goals for

the show, their budget, and the context of the event the fireworks

are being used for.

This initial conversation sets the stage for early planning of the

show, and at this point, the pyrotechnics company will go out to

the site in person to understand the logistics of the launch area.

Once the show is designed and a contract put together, it gets sent

off to the customer for approval. “There may be some back and

forth,” says Rich Vaughan, district manager and show designer in

Spokane, Washington, for Pyro Spectaculars.

Once it is approved, permits are filed and the process begins.

“I take the show design itself, and depending on the size of the

show, I do the choreography and how the show will be laid out,

CDALivingLocal.com

62

since its inception, the United

States has used fireworks to

mark its independence, with

shows taking place in large

cities and small towns alike

throughout the country.


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how it will be fired. We make sure we have a good crew that is

experienced,” adds Vaughan.The majority of Western Display

Fireworks’ crews for the Fourth of July shows are between six and

12 people, says Gobet, and shows start out at $15,000 to $20,000

at a minimum and go up from there. The process of getting

permits and approval is fairly laborious, and there are different

laws in each state pyrotechnics companies have to know and

work with. “We have so many entities that we have to answer to,”

says Vaughan.

Once the permit is received from the fire department, the physical

planning for the event starts. “On Lake Coeur d’Alene [in Coeur

d’Alene, Idaho] we have to sign up barges and tug boots, file a

marine permit to be on the lake,” explains Vaughan. “When I

design the show, all the paperwork goes to California, they pack

the shows and then they ship them up, and we have a storage

facility where everything goes.” Setup for the show usually starts

the day before, but often the fireworks arrive the day of the show,

since you have to have 24-hour security and house the fireworks a

certain distance from any inhabited building, says Gobet.

Equipment like forklifts and cranes will often be used to move the

fireworks and mortars around on site. “For every single firework

that goes up in the air you need a tube to launch it,” she adds.

If you have an electric or computer firing system that actually

launches the fireworks, then you need a preprogrammed script.

While small shows can still be hand fired, the majority are fired

electrically. Anything on the water is electrically fired. “We can

shoot in just about any weather,” says Vaughan. “What will shut

us down is wind. The wind is really bad.” In addition to wind,

dangerous fire conditions can also halt a fireworks show. But the

rain—and even snow or below zero temps—isn’t enough to stop

the show.

The second component of designing a fireworks show is

presentation, says Gobet. Multiple zones, water features, themes,

color combinations and the type of event all play a part in

determining the design of the show. “One of the things we pride

ourselves on is the artistic value of what we do,” says Vaughan.

There are 2,500 different types of effects you can use to put a

program together in conjunction with or without music, says

Gobet. A lot of times there are scripted shows that don’t have

music, so the fireworks are the show. If there is music involved,

fireworks can be planned and timed in conjunction with the

music. “In virtually every case that we're involved in, when

somebody's purchasing a show, they're not just purchasing a

show,” says Gobet. They’re purchasing everything involved—the

design, the planning, the presentation, the equipment and the

day of show.

“I take a look at what I have available to me, and then I try and do

color scenarios,” explains Vaughan. “When you get into really big

production shows you do what they call scenes. What you don't

want to do is shoot the same stuff over and over again, it gets

repetitive. If they have the same budget, I don't just pull up last

year's show and repeat it. Everything I do is custom designed.”

When it comes to pyrotechnics companies, the majority are

family companies that have been in the business a long time.

“The crazy thing is, virtually every major fireworks company in

the U.S. is a family business. I'm the fourth generation, my kids

work here, they're the fifth,” says Gobet.

“Almost, without exception, the fireworks production companies

are people who are born into it,” she says. The pyrotechnicians

come from all walks of life, but a large number are people who

CDALivingLocal.com

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were born into it or who have loved fireworks

since they were kids.

It’s what makes the pyrotechnics industry

special. “The family nature of this business and

the fact that some of the customers we're

dealing with go back to doing business

with my parents and grandparents,” says

Gobet. Despite—or perhaps because of—

its smaller size and family roots, Western

Display Fireworks brings professionalism

and excellence to every show they put on.

“We would go up against the biggest shows

that anyone in the country could do,” she

adds. “We made a conscious effort to not

change the geographic area where we

operate or that small-company feel. We've

traveled the world and seen the best of the

best, and then we try to apply that to what

we do.”

Vaughan’s story with fireworks began in

1984 when he was a young adult. A friend

of his father’s worked in the fireworks

industry. Vaughan got roped into helping with

a show, and he was instantly hooked. “I did

that show and I told George this is the coolest

thing ever; I want to do this for a living. I was

banging on his door every time I heard there

“Almost, without

exception,

the fireworks

production

companies are

people who are

born into it.”

was a fireworks show,” he laughs. He worked

for free in the evenings after he got off from his

regular day-time job, and when George retired

in 1989, Vaughan took over the business.

Last year alone, they worked on 180 firework

shows. “You stay busy all the time,” he says.

This year fireworks companies have been hit

hard by the virus. “Everyone’s sales are down

tremendously,” says Vaughan. As many cities

and towns across the U.S. cancel or postpone

their Fourth of July and other fireworks events,

it’s been a tough time for the companies that

rely on the business. But they’re hopeful when

COVID lifts, things will rebound and be even

busier than before.

It’s not an industry for the faint of heart, but it

is one that holds a lot of passion. People are in

it for the long haul. So this time, when those

bursts of magic reign down this Fourth of July,

we can all appreciate just how much time—

and work—went into our favorite display of

independence.

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IMPACTFUL

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INDIVIDUALS

MAKING AN IMPACT IN THEIR COMMUNITY

People making a difference in our hometown

BY ABIGAIL THORPE

c

oeur d’Alene is a unique place. Anyone

stopping through can sense the difference,

and there’s a reason for that. It’s a warm, open,

proud and caring community. Generations

of families have lived here, and those who

moved from other places came because

they love what North Idaho has to offer: the

beauty, the outdoors, the opportunity, and most importantly, the

community.

Despite the lovely beauty that surrounds us, and the outdoor

opportunities that beckon, it’s the people in our community who

make it truly amazing to live here. Walk into your local library,

visit a local store or restaurant, or join a community meeting,

and odds are you’ve run into them. The kinds of people who

give so much to benefit their community and ask for nothing in

return. Their reward is to see a thriving, close-knit community

that cares for its people.

Jamie Green is a fifth generation North Idaho native. She grew

up in Coeur d’Alene, and after college at Boise State, returned

to raise her own family here. “Growing up here, most teenagers

don’t understand Coeur d’Alene’s magic,” she says.

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Green’s roots go deep in North Idaho—her paternal

great-grandparents owned a furniture store next to

the Dingle Building on Sherman, and her maternal

grandfather developed land in North Idaho,

owning part of Farragut State Park at one time. “My

connection to Coeur d’Alene and North Idaho is

one of heritage, pride and love,” she says.

After the birth of her first child in 2007, Green

created a business manufacturing baby products

that allowed her to work from home and stay

with her daughter. She sold the business in 2017,

transitioning into helping her husband start

Kootenai Law Group and working as the director

of marketing at the firm. “This position allows me

to network with our community, stay involved, and

use my skills for website design, social media and

event planning with both work and the nonprofits I

serve,” she explains.

When her eldest daughter of four children started

elementary school, Green became more actively

involved in serving the community. “My heart has

always been with the children in our community,”

she says.

She began her volunteering in her daughter’s

classroom, and then started Girl Scout Troop 3062

with a friend. “My philanthropic journey deepened

when I became a board member for the Children’s

Village in 2017,” she adds. Her husband Robert and

she became PTA co-presidents in 2018 and along

with other parents helped triple the budget and

start programs and initiatives to develop the culture

of learning, family and community for children,

staff and families. “My life’s mission will continue

to lead me in ways to serve the underprivileged

children in my hometown,” Green adds.

Her love of her hometown and state has only

deepened over the years. She has memories of

summers on Priest Lake with her parents, memories

she now strives to share with her children. “Even

though I’ve lived here for 37 years, I still find new

things to explore or old ones to fall in love with

all over again,” she says. “Coeur d’Alene offers the

outside adventures I crave, the four seasons I love,

the hometown feel that keeps me connected to my

community, and the opportunities for my family to

enrich our lives with service to others.”

Coeur d’Alene is a unique place.

Anyone stopping through can sense

the difference, and there’s a reason

for that. It’s a warm, open, proud

and caring community.

Vanessa Moos’ passion for serving the community

started in college, through the process of two

separate internships. The first was with a forprofit

global polymer company, the second was in

marketing at the Cleveland National Air Show.

“Working with volunteers who would use their

vacation time at work just so they could be involved

in their favorite air show brought beautiful humans

together, aligned by one common cause,” she

remembers. “After seeing this incredible wave of

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71


passion, I realized the environment

of a nonprofit would be the best work

for me ... this is where you consistently

find people who care, and those people

are the ones I want to be around each

day.”

Moos grew up in a diverse area

of Cleveland, the daughter of a

Venezuelan native and an American

father. Her work ethic is deeply

ingrained—learned from her parents.

Her dad worked three jobs to allow her

the privilege of a private education.

“If I wanted to buy a new pair of jeans

in high school, I had to work for the

money,” she recalls.

She, her husband and two boys moved

to his hometown of Coeur d’Alene

two years ago after several moves

throughout the country during his 12

years in the Marine Corps. “In 2018 we

bought our home in Coeur d’Alene and

haven’t looked back,” she says.

She now serves as the director of

Charitable Giving at the Children’s

Village, managing philanthropic giving

and events, marketing and outreach,

in addition to its social media. “As

a nonprofit industry professional, I

can call the president of a company

in the same day as I talk to someone

donating their time as a volunteer, and

we all come to the organization for the

same reason—to help and to make a

difference,” Moos says.

Alongside her nonprofit work, Moos

is part of the leadership 2020 class

through the Coeur d’Alene Chamber

and owns a party rental business called

CDA Kids Rentals + Play. “Between

that and my 2- and 4-year-old, things

are pretty busy these days!” she smiles.

A town is only as strong as the people

in it, and we have some incredible

locals who make a lasting impact on

Coeur d’Alene. Take a moment to meet

the people behind the scenes who

make this town what it is—like Jamie

Green and Vanessa Moos, among

many others.

A TOWN IS ONLY

AS STRONG AS

THE PEOPLE

IN IT, AND WE

HAVE SOME

INCREDIBLE

LOCALS WHO

MAKE A LASTING

IMPACT ON

COEUR D’ALENE.

CDALivingLocal.com

72


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THE IMPORTANCE OF

local

How locally owned businesses contribute to a thriving community

BY TAYLOR SHILLAM

They

may be “small” by definition, but when it comes to small

businesses, the word only applies to the technicalities.

The profound impact of small businesses is multidimensional

and often underestimated. Now more than ever, it’s time to

rally in support of shopping small.

Can you imagine what your neighborhood or town would look and feel

like without any of its locally owned businesses? Each small business adds

a bit of value, culture and diversity to their surrounding community in a

way that larger chains simply don’t have the ability to. Economically, the

impact of small businesses on both local and national levels is critical,

and only expected to grow.

The exact definition of “small business” can be difficult to articulate.

Most often, small businesses are defined within a specific range of assets,

revenues and employees.

The federal government sets the definition by trade; for example, having

less than 100 employees as a wholesale company, less than 500 employees

in manufacturing, and generating less than $6 million in the retail and

service industries.

Consumers may define “small business” as their favorite local boutique,

the corner restaurant or bar they frequent, or the locally owned fitness

studio where their mornings begin. With some reflection, it isn’t difficult

to identify the small businesses that have become a major part of your

daily life.

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LAND OF THE free

HOME OF THE SMALL-BUSINESS OWNERS

Each small business adds a bit of value, culture and

diversity to their surrounding community in a way

that larger chains simply don’t have the ability to.

Economically, the impact of small businesses on

both local and national levels is critical, and only

expected to grow.

It’s largely because of this, small businesses becoming so ingrained

into the daily lives of many, that they have also become a major

lifeblood of their local economy. Of their revenue, a significantly

larger portion is recycled back into the community compared to chain

stores. According to G1VE, one Chicago study found that $68 from

every $100 spent at a local business will stay within that community,

compared to $43 from $100 spent at a chain.

On a national level, the United States Small Business Administration

found that small businesses generated 44 percent of the country’s

economic activity from 1998 to 2014, an impressive feat when up

against the immensely larger chain establishments and Fortune 500

companies. Today, over 50 percent of sales made in the U.S. come

from small businesses.

Sales provide the need for increased staffing and job opportunities.

More than half of the United States’ jobs in the last 25 years have

been created by small businesses. There are over 30 million small

businesses in the country, and as that total continues to rise, so does

the potential for more people to be hired.

Beyond their economic impact, many small business owners cultivate

an experience within their establishment that transcends outward

into the community. Passionate business owners who pursue their

ideas and share their talents while achieving financial independence

are often, deservedly, a source of inspiration. Times that are difficult

and uncertain call for leaders like these; consumers often look to

them for comfort, certainty and motivation, just as owners look to

consumers for the continued support to stay operational.

The relationships between small-business owners and their customers

is truly something special. The care an owner puts into the business

they’ve poured their heart and soul into will be the level of care they

take with their customers, and that can be felt throughout the “shop

small” experience.

Being locals themselves provides small-business owners a greater

ability to foster deep connections with shoppers, community members

and fellow owners, promoting an environment of collaboration and

support. Knowing exactly who is behind a business provides a level

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OVER 50 PERCENT OF SALES

MADE IN THE U.S COME

from small businesses.

of personal relationship and investment to

both sides.

Small businesses impact their local

community and economy in ways that

are unmatched. They stimulate economic

growth, diversity and innovation within their

communities, both locally and nationally, all

while touching the lives of the patrons who

walk through their doors.

Right now, the importance of supporting

small businesses has become more critical

than ever. With uncertainty being a constant

presence throughout the last several months,

businesses and consumers alike have drawn

on creative solutions to stay afloat during

trying times. Making cuts and adjustments

to everything from operational procedures

to the presence of staff, business owners face

difficult decisions every day while navigating

an unprecedented period of crisis.

Although supporting your favorite small

businesses may look different today than it

has in the past, there are still ample ways to

show your support in 2020.

Some of the most simple ways include

ordering takeout and delivery, shopping

online and buying gift cards. A supportive

gesture doesn’t have to cost anything; it’s also

as easy as pausing (rather than canceling) a

membership or subscription, and promoting

your favorite establishments through wordof-mouth

and social media.

Every purchase and each demonstration of

support makes an impact. For the business, it

contributes to keeping their doors open and

their people employed. For the community,

it contributes to keeping diversity and

innovation thriving, and the spirit of

entrepreneurship alive.

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H O W

CAN YOU

POSITIVELY

IMPACT

YOUR LOCAL

community?

It’s easy to feel like you need to do something big and important in order

to make a difference, but often the opportunities to make an impact on

your community are right in front of you; all it takes is the first step. It’s the

small things that often make the most difference. Here are some great ways to

positively impact your community today.

Tips for making a difference right

where you’re at

BY ABIGAIL THORPE

1. Use your skills to fill a gap in

your community.

You don’t have to go through extensive training to find a way you can make

a difference. The best way to give back to your community is to use skill sets

and talents you already have. Take something you do well and enjoy, and find

a gap in your community you can help fill—even if it’s something that’s not

readily apparent. Whether it’s a talent for numbers and accounting, a love for

cooking and baking, or the ability to unite and lead a group, there’s a perfect

opportunity where you can do what you do best.

2. Mentor someone.

We are the people we are today because along the way individuals took the

time to take us under their wing, teach us something new, guide us and share

their wisdom or advice. It’s our turn to give back. Find an opportunity to help

someone younger than yourself, or to teach someone a skill or ability that will

help them achieve their goals. We’re not all on this road alone; every mentor

and teacher we have along the way is the secret to our success. You can be that

person who made a difference in someone’s life.

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3. Focus on local.

When it comes to giving back, start right in your own community.

Focus on how you can make a difference locally. This starts with

your daily habits—choose to shop locally and support local

businesses. When was the last time you went to a community

meeting? Part of giving back to the community is knowing what’s

going on in your town, finding ways you can contribute and using

your voice to make sure change is for the better.

4. Start a club, team or group.

Have you ever thought, “It would be nice if there was a group or

club for that”? Be the one who starts that book club, cooking group

or event fundraising team. Sometimes the lack of something is

simply an opportunity to step forward and take up the helm. You’ll

contribute something to the community, provide a space and outlet

for people who share a common interest, and grow as a leader in the

process. And who knows, you may just make some new friends and

learn something new along the way.

5. Volunteer.

There are so many organizations that depend on volunteers for their

survival. From helping animals to feeding the hungry, cleaning

up streets, building trails or working with kids, there are a ton

of opportunities to give back to a local volunteer organization or

event. Choose an area that you feel passionate about, and make a

commitment to volunteer once a month to start. It won’t take that

much time out of your schedule and will make a big difference in

the lives of others. Nonprofit organizations are the backbone of

serving a community, and it just takes your commitment to lend a

helping hand.

6. Random acts of kindness.

It’s easy to get caught up in the day-to-day bustle of life, but you

can completely change a person’s day through one random act of

kindness. Take a moment out of your day to take your neighbor’s

trash out, buy a coffee for a stranger or leave a generous tip for your

server. Maybe someone needs a helping hand to cross the street or

help carrying bags to her car. It won’t throw your day off track, will

brighten someone else's day (you never know what someone else

is going through), and just the process of doing something nice for

someone else will boost your mood and give your day purpose.

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MOUNTAIN, CITY, SEA

Tacoma and Pierce County fit the bill

By Marguerite Cleveland

Photos Courtesy of Travel Tacoma

Have you ever been challenged while planning a vacation? Some in the group want outdoor fun while others want the cultural

experiences only found in a city. Tacoma and Pierce County is a destination sure to appeal to everyone in your group. It’s

only 42 miles from a saltwater shoreline to the peak of a glacial volcano with an art-focused downtown in between. Discover

exhilarating outdoor activities at Mount Rainier National Park. Learn about art glass in Downtown Tacoma and see why the

art form really shows off the beauty of the Pacific Northwest. Then throw in a bonus by visiting Gig Harbor, the Maritime City, because

who doesn’t love time spent by or on the water. Plan to stay a night in each area for a short getaway or add a few more days to explore in

depth for a longer vacation.

Mountain

Every now and then you stumble upon a unique lodging that is incredibly special. The Paradise Village Lodge is just such a place. Lovingly

renovated to look like a Ukrainian village, owner Anatoliy Zaika has created a cozy inn with comfortable touches from the old country. He

and his family run the lodging, restaurant and coffee shop in the town of Ashford, the gateway to Mt. Rainier. Make sure to try the galushki,

Ukrainian gnocchi which is a rich and hearty dish. What really brings people to stay here is the Instagram-worthy Cannibal Hot Tub. A

giant cauldron is heated over a wood fire to create the most unusual soak you will ever have.

To get the most out of your time at Mt. Rainier, book a Discover Nature Tour with Diann Sheldon. She has degrees in ecology and

evolutionary biology and is truly knowledgeable about the flora and fauna in the park. With many years of experience exploring Mt.

Rainier, she knows the ins and outs of the crowds and how to plan a day which will have you experiencing the best the park has to offer.

Before each tour she speaks with you to plan a day based on your interests. A tour is only as good as the guide, and Sheldon is engaging and

never boring. In July, wildflowers will start peeking out in lower elevations and will peak at higher elevations in August. Well worth seeing.

After a day in the park, stop at the Wildberry Restaurant. You can’t miss it with Buddhist prayer flags adorning the building and courtyard.

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EXPLORE MOUNTAIN, CITY AND

SEA ALL IN ONE DESTINATION.

It is owned by Lhakpa Gelu Sherpa, who holds the world speed record

by summiting Mt. Everest from base camp to the top in 10 hours, 56

minutes and 46 seconds. He has climbed to the summit of Mount Everest

15 times and Mount Rainier 95 times. The restaurant is decorated with

memorabilia of his exploits. Now his wife, Fulamu, shines as the chef

of the restaurant serving up Nepalese favorites from home as well as

American pub fare.

City

Tacoma has all the big-city amenities with a small-town charm. The

Silver Cloud Tacoma Waterfront has one of the best locations in town.

Every room has a waterfront view and it is just 2 miles from the Museum

District and 3 miles from Point Defiance. You can easily walk from the

hotel to numerous restaurants along Ruston Way on the waterfront urban

trail that connects to Point Ruston, where you can find restaurants, shops

and a movie theater.

You can’t go to Tacoma without seeing artwork from the most renowned

glass artist in the world, Dale Chihuly. You can see his work at two

museums, the Museum of Glass and the Tacoma Art Museum by crossing

over the Chihuly Bridge of Glass, a public art installation. Purchase a

three- or seven-day attractions pass at Travel Tacoma to save on city

museums.

To really appreciate what Tacoma has to offer, take a tour offered by Pretty

Gritty. “Tacoma is a beautiful and honest city. It's a city of entrepreneurs

and innovators. From craft breweries, to restaurants, to experiences,

most businesses here are owned by passionate and local owners, so you

get an experience or flavor that is wholly unique to the area,” said Chris

Staudinger, owner of Pretty Gritty Tours. “Our ‘Get to Know Tacoma’

tour is a crash course in the art, food and history of the area and prepares

you to launch into the city proper.”

African American business owner Terry Waller has created a Victorian

wonderland at her Olive Branch Café and Tea Room located at

Freighthouse Square. A master of upcycling, she has transformed this

warehouse space into an oasis. From the time you walk in the door, are

greeted with a hug and hear Brian playing the grand piano, you know you

are in for a treat. Reservations are a must, and order one of the specialty

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The Speci f ics

WHERE TO STAY

Paradise Village Lodge - ParadiseVillageLodge.com

Silver Cloud Tacoma Waterfront

SilverCloud.com/Tacoma

Maritime Inn Gig Harbor - MaritimeInn.com

WHERE TO EAT

Wildberry - RainierWildberry.com

The Olive Branch Café and Tea Room

OliveBranch-Cafe.com

Brix 25 - HarborBrix.com

WHAT TO DO

Tacoma Visitors Information - TravelTacoma.com

Discover Nature with Diann Sheldon

TourMtRainier.com

Pretty Gritty Tours - PrettyGrittyTours.com

Tacoma Attraction Pass

Explore.TravelTacoma.com

Gig Harbor Gondola - GigHarborGondola.com

Heritage Distilling - HeritageDistilling.com

Gig Harbor Boat Shop – GigHarborBoatShop.org

Photo By Marguerite Cleveland

teas so you can try all the deliciousness the

Olive Branch Café has to offer. Make sure

to check out the hat room for a jazzy hat or

fascinator to wear while you enjoy your tea.

Sea

For a more intimate “sea” experience, head

across the Tacoma Narrows Bridge to Gig

Harbor, a maritime city. You will want to

head to the waterfront, which is known

as downtown. Plan to stay at the Maritime

Inn Gig Harbor. This cute boutique inn is

located across the street from the harbor

and centrally located so you can walk

everywhere.

Rather than your typical harbor cruise, book

a trip on the Gig Harbor Gondola. Owner

John "Cinque" Synco will serenade you as

you float through Gig Harbor. Reservations

are a must, and you can order appetizers or just stop by the Harbor

General Store to pick up your own and a bottle of prosecco, an Italian

sparkling wine.

Gig Harbor is well known for its many great restaurants, but Brix 25˚

really stands out. This is one of the pricier places to eat but well worth it.

The food is outstanding, but they really shine with the craft cocktails. All

the ingredients are fresh or made in house. Classic cocktails are updated

and reimagined with a Brix twist. Each season a new cocktail list is

created so there is always something new to try.

The Gig Harbor BoatShop has classic boats you can rent to take out on

the harbor. If you have more time, book a family boat building workshop

over a weekend. Over two days you will build your own rowboat which

you can take home with you.

No visit to Gig Harbor is complete without a visit to Heritage Distilling.

What started as a small, local business now has multiple locations

throughout Washington and Oregon. Their signature Brown Sugar

Bourbon has won “World’s Best Flavored Whiskey” by Whisky Magazine’s

World Whiskies Awards in both 2018 and 2019. It really is that good and

put this company on the map. There is a tasting room in Downtown Gig

Harbor and in Uptown Gig Harbor is the distillery.

There is so much to see and do in Tacoma and Pierce County. Visit Travel

Tacoma for more ideas and itineraries so you can explore mountain, city

and sea all in one destination.

CDALivingLocal.com

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YUM

Your local Dining Guide

PRESENTED BY

www.RealNorthwestLiving.com

RECIPES LOCAL FLAVOR SPOTLIGHTS

CDALivingLocal.com

85


FOURTH OF JULY PARFAITS

Recipe & Photo Courtesy of

Tina VanDenHeuvel, NTP NHC

INGREDIENTS:

1 1/2 cups fresh raspberries

1 1/2 cups fresh blueberries

Lemon cookies (see recipe below)

Coconut cream (see recipe below)

FOR THE LEMON COOKIE

3/4 cup salted butter, softened

1 cup Erythritol sweetener

Zest of 1 lemon

1 large egg

1 egg yolk

Juice from one lemon

1 tsp. pure lemon extract

1 3/4 cups almond flour

1/4 cup coconut flour

2 tsp. baking powder

METHOD:

• In a medium bowl using a hand mixer, cream the butter and

sugar. Add lemon zest, egg, yolk, lemon juice and extract and mix

thoroughly. Add almond flour, coconut flour and baking powder and

mix until all ingredients are combined.

• Refrigerate dough for 15 minutes.

• Scoop 1 tablespoon-sized cookie dough into your palm and roll

into balls. Place on a parchment-lined cookie sheet at least 2 inches

apart.

• Bake at 350˚F for 9 to 10 minutes. Let cool entirely before serving.

FOR THE COCONUT CREAM

1 (13.5 oz.) full fat canned coconut milk

1 tsp. vanilla

METHOD:

• Place the can of coconut milk in the refrigerator for up to at least 4

hours. Chill a medium glass bowl in the refrigerator for 15 minutes.

• Open your can of coconut milk and scoop out all of the cream into

the bowl. Reserve liquid for another recipe like a soup or smoothie.

• Using a hand mixer, fluff up the coconut cream for one minute. Add

vanilla and mix for another minute until creamy.

• Use the coconut cream right away or store in a glass jar with a fitted

lid for up to one week.

LAYERING THE PARFAIT

• Using a pint-sized mason jar, layer parfaits in this order: lemon

cookie, cream, blueberries, lemon cookie, raspberries and then

cream. Repeat each layer. Each jar should hold 4 total layers. On the

top layer use both raspberries and blueberries.

• Serve immediately or keep chilled in the refrigerator for up to

24 hours.

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2129 Main Street at Riverstone | 208.277.4116 | www.CulinaryStone.com

CDALivingLocal.com 87


SWEET LOU’S RESTAURANT

AND TAP HOUSE

American fare with a twist. Ribs (pork or bison) smoked in house. Unique

burger menu featuring burgers made from ground top sirloin, topped with

pulled pork, hand-battered onion rings or jalapenos. 32 beers on tap to

enjoy while watching the game on one of their 24, 4K TVs.

601 E. Front St., Ste. 101 | Coeur d’Alene

208.667.1170 | SweetLousIdaho.com

f SweetLousCDA

Browse, Eat, Relax, Enjoy

A shopping and culinary experience awaits

By Jillian Chandler

Photos by Owen Aird

The Culinary Stone has been serving the Coeur d’Alene

community for six years now, and exciting things are

happening!

Be sure to stop by their neighborhood boutique deli for

artisan deli meats and cheeses. They invite you to take

a seat and enjoy great food. Try their delicious gourmet

sandwiches, salads and homemade soups, all made to order!

If you are looking for that perfect charcuterie or veggie

platter for a party or special event that is not only tasty but

a work of art, The Culinary Stone is read to make it happen.

Just call or stop in. And don’t forget about their café featuring

artisan breads, European pastries and cakes.

SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE

At Seasons of Coeur d’Alene Fresh Grill, you will find a menu that is

delicious and always fresh! Whether you choose to dine in the intimate

dining room, at the vibrant bar or quiet fireplace lounge, it’s sure to be

an unforgettable dining experience. They also offer banquet and meeting

facilities. You can find Seasons in Downtown Coeur d’Alene just one block

off Sherman.

209 Lakeside Ave. | Coeur d’Alene

208.664.8008 | SeasonsofCdA.com

Each week, area chefs invite you to pull up a seat at one of

The Culinary Stone’s cooking classes, where you will learn

to create new delicious meals that you can share with others,

all while engaging with new friends. They also host weekly

wine tastings, so you can explore new wines to pair with your

meals at home.

The Deli is open 10:30am to 6pm Monday through Saturday,

10:30am to 5pm Sunday; while The Cafe is open 7:30am to

5:30pm Monday through Saturday, 10:30am to 5pm Sunday.

Enjoy an experience you won’t find anywhere else … at The

Culinary Stone.

The Culinary Stone

2129 Main Street | Coeur d’Alene

208.277.4116 | CulinaryStone.com

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MAX AT MIRABEAU

Join MAX at Mirabeau for an unforgettable experience. You’ll be treated

to eclectic cuisine, an award-winning menu with more than 100 items, a

wine list boasting more than 500 labels and 75 eclectic cocktails—a perfect

match for everything on the menu. Enjoy two happy hours daily, a-la-carte

brunch featuring multiple benedicts, mimosas and the area’s best Bloody

Mary Bar—starting at only $5.90 per person! There’s live music on Friday

and Saturday evenings, and late-night dining with a full menu is offered

until close. Open daily at 6am.

1100 N. Sullivan Rd. | Spokane Valley

509.922.6252 | MAXatMirabeau.com


BEEF, PORK, CHICKEN, FISH, YOU NAME IT - WE GOT IT!

We are especially known for our prime rib & pork roasts - both bone in & boneless - as well as our delicious

housemade ham, bacon, and fresh & smoked sausages. And don’t forget about our freezer meat packages!

Stop in for all of your home cooking essentials from Wood Chips for Home Smokers, Select

Sauces, Rubs and everything in between! Large selection of American-Made Smokers,

Grills and Locally Made Fire Pits.

Tim’s Special Cut Meats, Inc

.

Come see us at our NEW LOCATION!

525 N. Graffiti St. • Post Falls, ID 83854 • 208.772.3327

YOUR OLD-FASHION BUTCHER SHOP...

You.Beer.Here.

Sweet Lou’s Restaurant & Bar

Hwy 95 N Ponderay | 208.263.1381

Come hungry, Stay late, Eat well!

www.sweetlousidaho.com

Sweet Lou’s Restaurant & TAP HOUSE

601 Front Ave. 208.667.1170 | DOWNTOWN Cda

CDALivingLocal.com

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THE PORCH PUBLIC HOUSE

OPEN 7 NIGHTS A WEEK

208.265.2000

41SouthSandpoint.com

A beautiful golf-course view without the cost of joining the

country club. They offer a full menu of sandwiches, salads,

soups and specialties prepared from scratch without the

high price of fine dining, and the region’s finest cocktails,

microbrews and wines to accompany your meal. Feel at home

in the comfortable pub-style dining room or the fantastic

outdoor dining area. Open daily at 11am year round.

1658 E. Miles Ave. | Hayden Lake

208.772.7711 | WeDontHaveOne.com

MOON TIME

Serving some of the best food around in a comfortable pub-style

atmosphere. The menu offers soups, sandwiches, pastas, salads

and other specialties prepared from scratch daily, along with a

fantastic selection of micro-brewed beers and fine wines by the

glass and bottle. Open daily at 11am, the kitchen is open late

every night. Be sure to stop in Thursday night for live music

featuring national and local artists. For more information

including photos, menu, specials and directions, make sure to

visit their website.

1602 E. Sherman Ave. | Coeur d’Alene

208.667.2331 | WeDontHaveOne.com

2 SEPARATE RESTAURANTS TO

SATISFY ANY CRAVING

DELICIOUS FOOD & FUN COCKTAILS

41 Lakeshore Drive, Sagle, ID

Next to the Lodge at Sandpoint

We Are Open!

FISHERMAN’S MARKET

A local favorite for an array of reasons, including the friendly

staff, unbeatable atmosphere and phenomenal food. Find fresh

fish at Fisherman’s on the market side, while the grill offers everything

from fish and chips, specialty tartars, fish tacos, salads,

steamers, catfish, oyster po’ boys and more. Check out the sushi

bar and the offerings of beer, wine and sake.

215 W. Kathleen Ave. | Coeur d’Alene

208.664.4800 | FishermansMarketCdA.com

VINE & OLIVE EATERY

AND WINE BAR

Guests will be treated to European-inspired small plates using

simple, seasonal ingredients for simply good food served with

soul, executed with Northwest flair. Choose from the full wine

bar, which serves thoughtful wines by the glass and eight local

brews on tap, to complement your meal. Voted Best of 2019

Wine Bar and Girls Night Out.

2037 N. Main St. | Coeur d’Alene

208.758.7770 | VineAndOliveCdA.com

FORTY-ONE SOUTH

208.265.2001 | ShogaSandpoint.com

OPEN WED-SUN NIGHTS

A beautiful waterfront, fine-dining restaurant in a romantic

lodge setting overlooking Lake Pend Oreille. Whether it

is summer on the patio or cozying up to the fireplace in the

winter, Forty-One South’s spectacular sunsets, innovative

cuisine, full bar and extensive wine list are sure to make it a

memorable night out. A variety of delicious food year-round.

Reservations recommended.

41 Lakeshore Dr. | Sagle

208.265.2000 | 41SouthSandpoint.com

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SHOGA POKÉ &

COCKTAIL BAR

Newly reopened and located in the Lodge at Sandpoint,

at Shoga Poké & Cocktail Bar, guests will be treated to the

finest in cuisine, featuring fresh and unique poké bowls,

delicious Asian-fusion entrees and appetizer, innovative,

handcrafted cocktails, all paired with amazing sunset views

overlooking Lake Pend Oreille.

41 Lakeshore Dr. | Sagle

208.265.2001 | ShogaSandpoint.com

Shopping. Dining. Take-Out.

MOONDOLLARS BISTRO

Moondollars Bistro is known for their burgers,

accompanied by scratch-made bread and soups. They

uses only fresh ingredients, which are the backbone

of this customer favorite. With a comfortable, friendly

atmosphere, awesome food, great service, huge patio

and full bar there is always something to keep customers

coming back for more.

5416 W. Village Blvd. | Rathdrum

208.687.5396 | MoondollarsBistro.com

ANGELO’S RISTORANTE

Angelo’s is the local favorite with a taste of homemade,

authentic Italian cuisine! Join them for a fresh, organic,

hand-crafted menu of veal, steak, chicken, seafood,

pasta and gluten-free offerings. They also offer an

extensive wine selection and warm romantic décor.

Catering and private cooking classes available with

Chef Angelo.

846 N. Fourth St. | Coeur d’Alene

208.765.2850 | AngelosRistorante.net

MONARCH RAMEN +

NOODLE HOUSE

Monarch Ramen + Noodle House in Coeur d’Alene’s

midtown opened in fall 2019 to eager diners. Specializing

in ramen and noodle dishes, as well as a variety of smallplate

options, guests will be treated to incredible cuisine

paired with great brews and service.

1401 N. Fourth St.| Coeur d’Alene

208.966.4230 | MonarchNoodles.com

TIM’S SPECIAL CUT MEATS

Tim’s Special Cut Meats is your perfect, old-fashioned

butcher shop. The friendly staff is ready to help you pick out

the perfect cut. Tim’s carries only the finest natural meats

and also handles custom orders, with an extensive line

of house-made products from pickled garlic to specialty

sauces, marinades, rubs and salsas. Mobile butchering and

wild game processing are also available.

525 N. Graffiti St. | Post Falls

208.772.3327 | fTimsSpecialCutMeats

TimsSpecialCutMeats.com

CDALivingLocal.com

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Summer is Here!

Be a chef at home or dine with us!

• Fresh Fish Market and Sushi Bar

• Smoked Fish

• 12 different kinds of fish and chips

208.664.4800

Mon-Sat 11am-8pm

215 W. Kathleen, Coeur d’Alene

Locally Owned & Operated

t f


coeur d’alene

COMMUNITY EVENTS

Congrats,

Class of 2020!

What’s happening

in July

JULY 2020

CDALivingLocal.com

92


Creating Beautiful Spaces

A Finer Cut in Quality

and Customer Service

Tile & Stone Installation

Commercial/Residential

Lifetime Warranties Available

Discounts on maintenance by

Cleanlinez for all installations.

Fully Licensed and Insured

208.946.3919

RustTileAndStone.com

Now Serving Coeur d’Alene And Surrounding Area

RACE DETAILS

07.25.20

AT 10:00AM

VOLUNTEER PARK

SPIRIT LAKE, ID

» Gates open at 9:00am.

» Quarter mile begins at 10:00am.

» Races are 30min apart.

» Each race is open to all ages.

» Quarter Mile. Half Mile. One Mile. 5K.

» Register at RunningShoes4Kids.org or

on race day email RunningShoes4Kids@gmail.com

We at Running Shoes 4Kids, empower youth. We provide each

student, male & femaile, an opportunity to receive

a pair of quality running shoes in our #GoGood

community project.

EACH RUNNER RECEIVES:

1 Raffle Ticket for a Chance to Win 1 of 50 Pairs of Running Shoes.

1 Free Iced Beverage From a Local Business.

RunningShoes4Kids.org

Running Shoes 4 Kids is a Non-Profit 501c3. We appreciate and accept donations. Donate new/gently used running shoes. RS4K Charity.

CDALivingLocal.com

93


A RACE FOR KIDS...

AND SHOES

x

x

RUN TO SUMMER RETURNS JULY 25

BY JILLIAN CHANDLER

JULY

25

RUNNING SHOES 4 KIDS IS ALL ABOUT EMPOWERING YOUTH. They

provide each student an opportunity to receive a pair of quality

running shoes in their #GoGood community project.

Mark your calendar (and be sure to tell your friends!) for Saturday,

July 25. Grab the kiddos and head to Volunteer Park in Spirit Lake

for the eighth annual Run to Summer family fun run. With a 1/4-mile,

1/2-mile, 1-mile and 5k distance, there’s just the perfect race for each

runner in your family, and each race is open to all ages. Race categories

include: Youth, Adult, Family, Team of 10 and Team of 25+.

Gates open at 9am, with the 1/4-mile race kicking off at 10am, and the

race starting times 30 minutes apart.

Each participating child will receive one raffle ticket for a chance to

win one of 50 pairs of running shoes, one free iced beverage from a

local business, and one #GoGood swag bag. Medals, ribbons and

prizes will be given out following each race, and running shoes will be

raffled in between each race.

Additional raffle tickets can be purchased for $1 or 20 tickets for $10.

Complete the early bird registration by July 15, $10 for youth and $15

for adults. For those who take advantage of the early bird registration,

they will also be entered to win: two Silverwood tickets, a pair of

running shoes from Fleet Feet, five passes to the KROC Center, $50 gift

card to Tri-State Outfitters, a bike helmet from Two-Wheeler Dealer

and more! After July 15, registration will be $15 for youth and $20 for

adults (scholarships are available).

This is a community event that brings friends, family and businesses

together for a day full of fun and healthy activity.

Registration can be done online at RunningShoes4Kids.org, though

there will be race-day registration.

Running Shoes 4 Kids is a nonprofit 501c3. To find out more, visit

RunningShoes4Kids.com or Facebook.com/RunningShoes4Kids.

CDALivingLocal.com

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FUN & ENTERTAINMENT

JULY

FOR MORE EVENTS, VISIT CDALIVINGLOCAL.COM.

CDALivingLocal.com

11

24-

25

31-

AUGUST

02

95

4TH ANNUAL BREW FEST

JULY 11

What better way to spend a hot summer day in North Idaho than

by enjoying greet brews and fun in Downtown Coeur d’Alene!

The fourth annual Downtown Coeur d’Alene Brewfest is set for

Saturday, July 11. Held outdoors at McEuen Park from 1 to 8pm,

purchase your ticket for the opporTunity to sample from 30 beers

and ciders. Tickets are $25 per person and include six 5-ounce

beer pours and a commemorative pint glass. Extra tasting tickets

are available for $2 each. There will also be a great selection of

food, Cornhole Tournament with big prizes, yard games, a DJ and

the chance to win beer for a year! Find the event on EventBrite.

com for additional information and to purchase tickets.

HAYDEN DAYS

JULY 24 & 25

It’s that time again for Hayden’s highlight of the summer ... Hayden

Days! This two-day event is held at McIntire Family Park. The fun

takes place 2 to 9pm Friday, July 24, and 10am to 9pm Saturday,

July 25. Presented by Idaho Central Credit Union, this promises

to be a weekend of fun for all ages, with live music from the Kelly

Hughes Band and The Rhythm Dawgs, Pancake Feed at Northern

Lakes Fire Department, parade, car show, Hayden Senior Center

Beer & Wine Garden, Hayden’s Got Talent, plus great food and

vendors, children’s games, pony rides, bounce houses and more!

Don’t miss a weekend of fun as Hayden celebrates its 65th birthday!

For additional information, call Hayden Rec and Community

Events at 208.209.1080.

29TH ANNUAL STREET FAIR

JULY 31 - AUGUST 2

This year marks the 29th annual Downtown Coeur d’Alene Street

Fair. The best arts and crafts weekend in the Northwest! During the

hustle and bustle of summer activities here in Coeur d’Alene, there

is nothing quite like this three-day event, where the community and

visitors come together to explore the dozens of vendors offering

a variety of goods from fine art and crafts to specialty goods and

food, and much, much more! Head downtown to Sherman Avenue

to explore all of the wonderful offerings: Friday, July 31, 10am to

8pm; Saturday, August 1, 10am to 8pm; and Sunday, August 2,

10am to 5pm. For additional information about the 2020 event,

please call 208.415.0116, email info@cdadowntown.com or visit

CdADowntown.com/streetfair.

Please check event websites as events draw

near for up-to-date information.

SUBMIT YOUR EVENTS ONLINE!

Want your event to appear on the largest event site in the

Northwest? Submit your events to us online at

Events.DirectoryNorthwest.com 24/7, 365 days a year!


OPEN

WE LET YOU

LIVE BETTER

Your property is our priority.

We are a high-end boutique management company in Sandpoint,

Idaho, specializing in working with out-of-town owners on the

management and marketing of their vacation rentals.

If you want to maximize your return and maintain a high-quality

rental, we are your partner.

FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED IN SANDPOINT, IDAHO

ALL-INCLUSIVE MANAGEMENT & MAINTENANCE

FREE MARKETING ON MAJOR PLATFORMS

NO HIDDEN FEES

CDALivingLocal.com

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For Bookings, Inquiries & Homeowner Information:

SandpointVacationHomes.com | 208.610.4416 | Jackson@GoSandpoint.com

CDALivingLocal.com

97


Where your office can feel like a

WEEKEND GETAWAY!

PROFESSIONAL BUILDING

NOW LEASING!

• 40,000+ SQ. FT. BUILDING

• VARIOUS OFFICE SIZES

• SPECTRUM HIGH SPEED INTERNET

• CONFERENCE ROOMS

• OPEN SEATING AND GAZEBO BY THE RIVER

• LARGE, SURROUNDING PRIVATE PARKING LOT

• 24-HOUR SECURE BUILDING

Contact Paul Bielec for your tour today!

208.699.9000 | 13403 N. Government Way, Hayden, ID 83835

CDALivingLocal.com

98


Free Home Search

All homes, all companies at www.BrendaBurkGroup.com

$1,425,000 | MLS # 20-5792

One of the most desirable waterfront properties

on the Spokane River. The open floor plan

includes wonderful spaces for entertaining

both inside and out. A full outdoor kitchen with

a fireplace, extensive decking and a hot tub

right at river’s edge. This home is comprised

of 3 bedrooms, 3 baths, a media room, and a

4 car garage. The master suite boasts limitless

mountain and water views, a stone stacked

fireplace and a private sitting room or office.

A perfect primary or secondary home with RV

parking, located only 20 minutes to either the

charming downtown of Coeur d ‘alene or the

Spokane International Airport.

$2,195,000 | MLS # 20-1927

The log cabin lifestyle awaits you at the lodge

at 122 Makridge Lane in Kingston, Idaho. Placed

right in the middle of grand forests, this is a

home for every leisurely activity and for every

conceivable guest. Whether you use it for vacation

or live in it full-time, the beauty needs to be

experienced. Climb the rock wall, play basketball,

ski mountain virtually next door, ATV riding and

all on luscious 9 acres, then relax with a sweet

nighttime elixir at the bar. Entertain your friends

and family in one of two dens, each equipped

with a fireplace. Shoot pool in the loft or steam

out your worries in the dry sauna.

$1,080,000 | MLS # 20-1407

Perfectly situated on 10 acres with a 24x35 SHOP.

Enjoy 180 degree views of stunning Lake Coeur

d’Alene and majestic North Idaho sunsets. This

custom home is not to be missed! With views

from every room it’s easy to relax and recharge

with 3 spacious bedrooms, 3.5 bathrooms and a

private studio apartment above the garage. Open

floor plan with vaulted ceiling in great room,

windows that let in an abundance of natural light

and provide spectacular views, and a fireplace

with gorgeous rock surround. Large kitchen with

commercial grade stainless steel appliances, quartz

counter tops, hardwood flooring and pantry.

$1,200,000 | MLS # 20-169

Elegance and grandeur abound in the exclusive

gated Wandermere Estates Golf & Country Club

community. This estate sits on two premium view

lots nestled in the hillside of one of Spokane’s

most prestigious 55+ gated communities

and features beautifully landscaped grounds

showcasing breathtaking views of the golf course.

High ceilings, oversized doors and windows,

and custom Italian tile flooring. Gourmet chef’s

kitchen is outfitted with granite counters, Viking

stainless appliances and knotty alder woodwork.

$1,500,000 | MLS MLS # 20-4269

Magnificent waterfront estate on the Pend

Oreille River sitting on 6.64 acres and 1,231

feet of extraordinary waterfront. Meticulous

log craftsmanship, chef’s kitchen, hand-picked

knotty cedar throughout, oversized master suite,

including private office, fantastic indoor raquet

ball court, indoor inground pool, sauna, 48x60

shop, 9-hole golf course out your front door with

gorgeous mountain views along with 2 ponds and

2 year-round creeks. The Serendipity Estate is a

private retreat not to be missed.

$2,150,000 | MLS # 20-3471

This Stunning Spokane River Waterfront home

located in Post Falls, Idaho, truly has it all. Spend

your day in your own private pool or dip your toes

in the sand with a private beachfront including a

boat dock. The home features a climate-controlled

wine room, professional kitchen appliances

flanked by double island of granite, an oversized

open great room, a lower level bar and game room

plus a gym. The large master bedroom suite has

a romantic fireplace, soothing soaker tub and a

private deck just for you with panoramic views of

the clean water, blue sky and rugged mountains.

Stretched out with over 5,400 sq. ft. of luxury, 5

bedrooms, 4.5 baths and 3-car garage.

Proudly Selling North Idaho & Eastern Washington

208.818.3668 | Brenda@BrendaBurk.com

CDALivingLocal.com

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THINKING ABOUT BUYING OR SELLING A HOME IN NORTH IDAHO?

Give me a call today at 208.640.3794

@OURTOWNCDA

BEST OF

raniel diaz

208.640.3794

for sale

CDALivingLocal.com

100

1302 N C St. - $575,000

Midtown Coeur d’Alene

MLS 20-5386

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