Turtle Island News - 07/08/2020

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Turtle Island News - 07/08/2020

ISSN#1204-1645

Okarahshona kenh Onkwehonwene, Six Nations of the Grand WEDNESDAY, IOHIARIÓ:WA / JULY 8, 2020

Price $1.25 (plus taxes where applicable) www.theturtleislandnews.com

Indigenous Services Minister

Marc Miller and Assembly of

First Nations National Chief

Perry Bellegarde signed an

agreement in Ottawa Tuesday

to keep implementing Bill C-92,

which recognizes the inherent

right Indigenous communities

have to control child-welfare

programs for their own children.

CONTENTS

Local ...........................................2

Editoral........................................6

Sports........................................8

Classified...................................15

Notices.......................................18

Careers.......................................18

Business Directory......................19

Provinces, money, barriers

to new Indigenous child

welfare systems ... page 5

Price $1.25

(plus taxes where applicable)


I TURTLE ISLAND NEWS I IOHIARIÓ:WA / JULY 8, 2020

I PAGE 2 I

LOCALIOHIARIÓ:WA

By Lynda Powless

Editor

Six Nations Elected Council

(SNEC) has until Friday

to apologize to Six Nations

Police Commission (SNPC)

Chair Steve Williams for

demanding his resignation

without grounds or face a

lawsuit.

Williams said he has

served the council members

both as as councilors

and personally with notice

of suit.

“They have targeted me

in this. They sent that so

called media release out

not just to media but to

local organizations and

provincial and national organizations.

They targeted

me,” he said.

In a press release sent

out last Wednesday, SNEC

called for his resignation

citing accountability and

transparency but offered no

grounds.

“We want to ensure accountability

and transparency

and make it clear that

there can be no conflict

of interest, or perceived

or otherwise in such important

roles. This action

speaks to good governance

and to the future sustainability

of our institutions

who serve the community.”

The statement continued,

“As we move forward, it

is important that we have

the trust of the community

that we will make difficult

decisions in order to develop

and build stronger services

in our community.”

The press release did not

say why they were calling

for the resignation.

The Six Nations Police

Commission (SNPC) oversees

the Six Nations Police.

The call for Williams resignation

came within days

of the Six Nations Police

Commission sending a letter

to SNEC suspending

Councilor Wendy Johnson

from the commission.

Johnson apparently disputes

the suspension saying

she quit.

The commission has not

released details on why the

councilor was suspended

or why they are asking for a

replacement councilor.

Wendy Johnson, a new

band councilor in her first

term, has only attended

www.theturtleislandnews.com

aboriginalbusinessmagazine.com

one police commission

meeting.

Turtle Island News has

learned Wendy Johnson’s

suspension may be tied to

an incident involving a Six

Nations Police officer who

has been suspended for releasing

confidential information

to councilor Johnson

and councilor Michelle

Bomberry.

Six Nations Police have

brought in a third party investigator

to look into the

matter. Councilors Wendy

Johnson, Bomberry and

Hazel Johnson are all being

interviewed by the investigation

team.

The Six Nations Police

officer allegedly spoke to

councilor Michelle Bomberry

who in turn provided the

confidential information

to Councilor Wendy Johnson.

It apparently came to

light during a commission

Councillor

Wendy Johnson

meeting when Councilor

Wendy Johnson raised the

personnel information.

Councilor Wendy Johnson

was also questioning

why the police commission

was promoting from within

the service for a new police

chief instead of hiring from

outside.

The SNPC is made-up

of Six Nations community

members with SNEC filling

two seats on the commission.

The website says the

SNPC acts as the supervisory

body for the Police

I LOCAL / ORÌ:WASE NE KÈN:THOR I

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Six Nations Elected Council calls for Police Commission chair resignation

Steve Williams

Elected Chief Mark Hill

Six Nations Policing Services Agreement 2018-2023

SECTION 2.4 INDEPENDENCE

The Six Nations, or the Police Commission established by the Six Nations, shall not be

involved in the day-to-day operations of the Police Service, nor shall any member of

the Six Nations attempt to influence or interfere with the Police Commission, the Chief

of Police, a First Nation Constable or any other employees of the Police Service in the

performance of their duties.

Integrity Commission

Who investigates if Six Nations Elected Council over stepped its bounds in

seeking the removal of the SN Police Commission Chair without giving grounds?

Could a Six Nations council member be sent to the SN Integrity Commission over the Steve Williams controversy?

The integrity commission exists to investigate complaints against the chief or council members.

The integrity commission is established to ensure that confidence in the governance of Six Nations of the Grand

River Elected Council is upheld in an ethical and respectful manner. It serves to restore, uphold and maintain a positive

political reputation to promote the general welfare of the Six Nations people.

The integrity commission ensures councillors adhere to codes, rules and regulations and that they are accountable

and take full responsibility for their deeds and actions.

The election states that the integrity commission will accept, validate and investigate complaints of suspected violations

of council codes, rules and regulations in a fair, unbiased and organized process. The commission is supposed

to include community members to seek, advance and maintain open, honest and accountable governance.

Complaints about councillors can come from a fellow council member, the public, or the whole council. The commission

will have the power to determine whether the Chief or member of council has in fact violated a protocol or

policy governing his or her ethical behaviour and to impose a penalty enforced by council. Types of penalties are not

specified in the election code.

When a case is concluded the commission will publicize the results. It is also supposed to publish an annual report

detailing findings of advice and complaint cases.

The council code of conduct describes rules of conduct surrounding such matters as remuneration, confidential

information, improper use of influence, business relations, use of property and services, election campaigning,

conduct at council, conduct respecting interaction with staff and discreditable conduct.

It’s still not known who sits on the integrity commission. Last fall, the chief electoral officer Steve Williams said

members’ names would not be released in order to protect them from harassment. However, he said if found guilty

of breaching the code of conduct council members could face penalities of fines, suspension of duties for a specified

period of time or removal from council.

Service.

It has, for the past two

years, been engaged in a

succession plan for retiring

Police Chief Glenn Lickers.

The commission decided

to promote from within the

service and has been working

with an outside firm to

determine which of two

candidates who applied

would be promoted when

the controversy began to

unfold.

The commission had

hoped to have the hiring

resolved before June but as

a result of the controversy

has put it on hold with retiring

Chief Glenn Lickers

asked to stay on in the interim.

The Six Nations Police

Commission issued a press

statement last Thursday

(July 2) asking SNEC for answers.

“The Six Nations Police

Commission takes allegations

related to the breach

of policies by any member

of the Commission with

the utmost seriousness,”

the letter reads.

The letter continued,

“The Police Commission

has formally requested that

the Six Nations Elected

Council provide specific details

into the allegations of

transparency and conflict

of interest in relation to Mr.

Williams, as a member of

the Six Nations Police.”

The commission said Mr.

Williams has stepped back

from his duties as this matter

plays out and an interim

chairperson, Alisha Anderson,

has been appointed.

Williams said he has been

approached by many people

about the SNEC move.

“They all say the same

thing, ‘what did you do.’

I tell them nothing. I don’t

know what this is about.”

Williams said he received

a letter June 22 claiming

he violated the 2018 Six

Nations Police Commission

Governance Policy section

dealing with transparency

and conflict of interest but

(continued on page 3)


I LOCAL / ORÌ:WASE NE KÈN:THOR I

I TURTLE ISLAND NEWS I IOHIARIÓ:WA / JULY 8, 2020 I PAGE 3 I

Ontario First Nations face major revenue loss with casino closures

By Lynda Powless and

Donna Duric

Ontario First Nations

are facing a major drop in

gaming revenues next year

as a result of the closure of

Ontario casinos during the

worldwide pandemic.

Ontario First Nations

Limited Partnership (OFN-

LP) president Steve Williams

said First Nations

across Ontario could lose

up to 50% of their annual

gaming funds as a result

of COVID-19’s negative

impact on gaming funds

across the province.

There has been no announcement

on when Ontario

casinos will re-open.

“The casino shut down

will hurt a lot of communities.

That’s why we are

warning them now to plan

for next year,” said Williams.

He said “Our community

leaders should be very concerned

about a major drop

in gaming revenue next

year,” he told Turtle Island

News.

He said the OFNLP has

sent letters to Ontario First

Nation leaders warning

that a serious drop in revenue

is coming.

“They are getting their

usual amounts in funding

this year (2020-2021)

but the chiefs might want

to be frugal and plan for

next year. We have warned

them the OFNLP funds will

be very slim,” he said

The OFNLP was created

by Ontario First Nations

who are part of the 2008

Gaming Revenue Sharing

and Financial Agreement

with Ontario. The agreement

gives First Nation

partners 1.7 per cent of annual

gross gaming revenues

including revenue from

lotteries, slot machines

and table games. It also

includes non-gaming revenues

(NGR) generated at

casinos and slot facilities,

such as hotel, food, beverage

and other services,

plus the retail value of any

of these services provided

to patrons on a complimentary

basis.

The OFNLP’s major task

is to distribute the 1.7 percent

in funds it receives, on

behalf of First Nations, to

the partners. It also deals

with administrative and

other matters on behalf of

the partners.

Williams said the gaming

funds received from the

Ontario Lottery and Gaming

(OLG) authority could

be as much as half what

First Nations normally see.

Ontario First Nations, on

average, receive an estimated

$149 million a year

through the Ontario-First

Nations gaming agreement

First Nations are able to

use the funds on six areas

1) Health 2) Education 3)

Community Development

Helen Miller

Six Nations Councillor

4) Cultural Development

5) Economic Development

and 6) Permitted Interim

Investments.

Under the agreement

First Nations are required

to hold community meetings

on what the community

wants to see the funds

spent on.

Williams said some communities

have done well

with their funds. “Some of

the communities have gone

into long term joint ventures

for hotels and investments.

There have been

some using the money for

housing issues or language

preservation.”

He said communities

who use the funds to offset

band department deficits

may have problems next

year. “They just won’t have

as much coming in to offset

those deficits so we are

warning them now to start

planning.”

He said some have had

to use their funds to battle

COVID-19.

He said others don’t

spend the income on an

annual basis. “They save it

up and then invest it.”

Others, like Six Nations

spend the funds annually.

Six Nations 2019 audit

shows the community received

almost $12 million

in gaming funds. Of that

$8 million is used to offset

band department deficits.

Local non-profit organizations

can also apply

for gaming funds for their

projects.

And that has at least one

Six Nations councillor concerned.

Coun. Helen Miller said

Six Nations Elected Council

(SNEC) should begin planning

how to handle the

lack of funding, which is

usually around $8 million

a year.

“We’re going to be in dire

straits if we don’t get it,”

she told a SNEC finance

committee Monday. “It’s

going to be dire for our

budget.”

Miller said over $7 million

of gaming funds went toward

covering department

deficits last year.

“We probably won’t get

any next year because the

casinos haven’t been open

since March and there’s no

sign of them opening any

time soon,” Miller told

SNEC’s finance committee.

“My concern is our budget

really depends on that

$8 million we get from

the OFNLP (Ontario First

Nations Limited Partnership).”

She added “All of the administration

depends on

that money.”

She told the committee

“If we’re not going to get

the $8 million or even half

of it, it’s going to put our

budget in dire straits. We

need to start planning now

what we’re going to do if

we don’t get that money.

I’m assuming we’re not going

to get it because if the

casinos are closed, they’re

not making money. And

the gaming agreement we

have, the money largely

depends on the casinos in

Ontario.”

She said council should

bring in OFNLP rep Steve

Williams to explain what

might happen to the money

in light of casino closures.

The money that comes in

every year depends on how

much the casinos make,

said Miller.

“Sometimes we don’t get

$8 million. It depends on

how much money they

make. We’re going to be in

dire straits if we don’t get

it. Council needs to think

about this.”

Coun. Nathan Wright said

council should plan what

to do in case the funds

don’t come next year.

The Ministry of Finance

estimated a loss of 50 per

cent or greater of average

annual casino revenues,

said Wright

“I know the (OFNLP)

board is meeting and looking

at this,” said Wright.

OFNLP revenues come

from both casinos and lottery

ticket sales, he said.

“But we should get an update...from

the entire OFN-

LP board,” said Wright. “I

agree we should get an update

to see what the plan is

going into next year, what

we can expect. Then we

can do our planning once

we have all the information.”

Wright said the casino

closures are not impacting

this year’s funding but will

impact next year’s funding.

“I know the board is meeting

and looking at this. We

should get update from the

OFNLP board.”

Williams told Turtle Island

News if the casinos

open up sooner it may not

hit the communities as bad

as predicted.

“ Right now they only

have lottery and ticket

sales. If there’s a $70 million

pot then you get a lot

of money in.”

He said over 50% of the

gaming funds comes from

lottery ticket sales.

Williams also sits as the

First Nations representative

on the OLG board.

Six Nations Elected Council facing deadline to apologize

(continued from page 2)

has not been provided with

any information on the alleged

violations.

Those sections speak

to commission members

using information gained

from the commission meeting

for personal gain.

Williams says there is no

foundation for the call or

information provided on

how he realized any gain.

“SNEC has not given me

any information,” he said.

He has hired a lawyer to

force SNEC to provide Williams

with information justifying

the request.

Williams said as far as

he is concerned he is still

a member of the commission.

“SNEC cannot call for my

resignation. The commission

can.”

The commission met last

Thursday (July 2) about

the issue Williams was not

present.

Also absent from the

meeting was SNEC appointee

councilor Wendy Johnson.

Just two months ago,

elected Coun. Wendy

Johnson, was calling for a

full review of the police and

commission citing general

governance concerns.

Johnson’s former husband

was a Six Nations Police

officer retiring recently.

Councilor Wendy Johnson,

after his retirement,

became SNEC’s appointee

to the commission and has

attended only one meeting.

Turtle Island News has

learned that SNEC also decided

to headhunt for potential

consultants instead

of going to tender on a

possible review of the police

and commission. The

consultant estimated it

could take a year and cost

almost $1 million. No consulting

contract has been

signed yet.

Turtle Island News has

also learned SNEC met behind

closed doors with the

band lawyer Friday, July 3,

but has not provided any

information on their move.

Questions to SNEC and

their communications director

on the issue have

gone unanswered.

Turtle Island News has

also learned councilor

Wendy Johnson is now on

health leave but questions

on why and how long it is

for have also not been answered.

In addition Turtle Island

News has learned SNEC is

now paying for a security

guard for Councilor Wendy

Johnson who allegedly told

council she is “afraid” but

did not provide details.

Elected Chief Mark Hill

has not returned Turtle Island

News calls.

Williams has been president

of Grand River Enterprises

for 25 years and has

served 18 years on the police

commission.

He is also the Chief Electoral

Officer for Six Nations

Elected Council. Williams

was the only one who applied

for the electoral officer’s

position when it was

posted.

The press release does

not indicate if Elected Chief

Mark Hill declared a conflict

of interest in the controversy.

Hill is directly related to

a Grand River Enterprise

owner. Elected Chief Hill

did sign the letter sent to

Williams.

The press release went

on to say the “Six Nations

of the Grand River Elected

Council will continue to

support the hard working

efforts of the Six Nations

Police officers in protecting

our community.”

SNEC said in the now two

week old statement. “We

will provide more information

in the days ahead.”

SNEC members did not

respond to Turtle Island

News repeated calls for

comment or provide any

additional information by

press time.


I TURTLE ISLAND NEWS I IOHIARIKÓ:WA / JULY 8, 2020 I PAGE 4 I I SPECIAL I

Yellow Sulphur on Black-eyed Susan

“The earth laughs in flowers.”

Ralph Waldo Emerson

(1803-1882)

Photos by Rachel A. Powless

By Rachel A. Powless

I did not choose to become

a photographer 25

years ago but rather by

necessity did I pick-up a

camera. So often when Carl

holds a bird in-hand he will

say things like this, “Rachel,

would you take a photo of

this?” He would point to

a specific group of feathers

such as the 3 very tiny

alula feathers found at the

joint of the primary wings.

Small pieces of information

like this can become a larger

part of the “preponderance

of evidence”. This can contribute

to the id of the bird,

sex, and/or age. I worked

quickly & efficiently. I soon

realized how striking bird

Great Blue Lobelia July

Tall Bellflower in

woodlands

feathers can be while holding

a bird-in hand with my

left & a small pocket camera

in my right hand.

It did not take my eyes

much time to wander within

the woodlands, tallgrass

prairies & old fields that

surrounded our hidden mist

nets. My world exploded

wide open to the joy and

beauty of wildflowers, orchids,

butterflies, and damselflies.

And, yes spiders,

snakes & turtles were part

of the equation, too.

The Great Blue Lobelia

(Lobelia siphilitica) is a

wildflower in the same family

of the Cardinal Flower

which is a favorite of our beloved

Ruby-throated Hummingbird.

In fact, the only

difference between the two

is the color and size. Our

ancestors used the leaves of

this giant as a tea to combat

colds, fevers & stomach

ailments. Great Blue Lobelia

is not only striking but not

difficult to find in our moist

woodlands. I have seen

this statuesque wildflower

reach 5-8 feet. In our territories,

blue catches my eyes

and draws me in like a moth

to a flame.

Tall Bellflower (Campanulastrum

americanum)

is yet another blue beauty

and can reach 5-6 feet.

I have seen this summer

wildflower wrap around

tree trunks. Like the Great

Blue Lobelia, it can be seen

at the edge of woodlands

where partial sunlight peeks

through. Blue is the color of

our sky and oceans. Blue

is considered beneficial to

the mind & body. For me it

has a calming effect. I have

hundreds of photographs

of blue flowers and birds.

Might there be something

to this?

Our native Wild Lupine

(Lupinus perennis) is

a single two-foot spike of

pea-like flowers. The blue

spectrum of color begins

with deep purple then flows

into indigo blues and finishes

with Caribbean blues.

Wild Lupine covers the entire

gamut of this spectrum.

Our ancestors made a cold

tea made from the leaves

to treat nausea. It has

been cultivated and your

local nursery has a similar

plant with multiple stems. I

have to yet photograph the

Wild Lupine and then say,

“That’s it. I have captured

Orange Sulphur butterfly

on Wild Lupine

the essence.”

There are times in one’s

life where seeing is believing.

My lens revealed to

me an intricate yet simple

symmetry of beauty within

each flower and as quickly

exposed the exquisiteness

of asymmetrical wildflowers.

Obedient is not a common

name I would consider

for a wildflower, yet somebody

dared to contemplate:

respectful, dutiful, submissive,

compliant? No,

let’s name it the Obedient

Flower (Physostegia virginiana).

That’s perfect. And,

it was! The lovely tubular

pink flowers can be rotated

around the stem and remain

where they are placed! And,

yes, I did move the flowerheads.

See my photos. This

is a photographer’s dream

come true. Another common

name is False Dragonhead.

Jewelweed (Impatiens

pallida) is named so because

when it rains, these

funnel-shaped flowers glisten

like jewels. I see tiny

French horns when I take

to my lens. Another common

name is Touch-menot.

The seedpods will explode

when touched. It’s

meant for a child’s pleasure

& amusement. This bushlike

plant grows quickly

Touch-me-not also known

as Jewelweed

throughout our territories

and can be easily transplanted.

It is a delight for

the Ruby-throated Hummingbird.

I will often tell

students and birders, if you

Obedient Flower with

multiple heads

want to see a hummingbird

in our woodlands, find

Jewelweed, then grab your

binocs and folding chair.

Sit down and enjoy. Colors

vary widely within the yellow-orange-red

spectrum

with lots of polka-dots.

White Rattlesnake Root

(Prenanthes alba) is an ominous

name for this flower.

Our ancestors utilized the

roots of this wildflower as

a remedy for a snakebite.

The flower reminds me of

the woven hats worn by the

Haida First Nation located

along the coastline of the

Pacific NW. The hats are

woven with twined spruce

roots and decorated beautiful

Haida designs. White

Rattlesnake Root is also

referred to as White Lettuce.

Several species can be

Rattlesnake Root flower

as seen in August

found throughout Ontario

with minor differences.

The Black-eyed Susan

(Rudbeckia hirta) is ubiquitous

throughout our Native

Lands & Provincial Ontario.

Our ancestors used the

roots as a dye. This is one

of those flowers that birders

and nature lovers alike

can identify. Who Susan

was remains unknown. The

seeds are eaten by American

Goldfinches, House

Black-eyed Susan

Finches, and an array of

seed eaters during the fall

including small mammals.

The simplicity of this yellow

flower as seen through

my lens is timeless and reminds

me of that ever-present

food chain of life.

As William Blake once

wrote; “As I wonder’d the

forest, The green leaves

among, I heard a Wildflower,

Singing a Song.”

Our woodlands echo with

song and beauty this time

of year. Listen and look.

Mother Earth is telling us

her summer show is open

for business.

Keep looking up.


I LOCAL / ORÌ:WASE NE KÈN:THOR I

By Donna Duric

Writer

At least one community

member has accused the

Six Nations Cannabis Commission

of fear-mongering

after a community update

meeting via Zoom last

Thursday.

A consultant hired by the

commission, which is trying

to create regulations for

the sale and production of

cannabis in the community,

said unregulated cannabis

could contain deadly compounds

that could kill people.

“There are certain wellknown

substances that are

used on cannabis during

the production stages that

can trickle down to the

product and pose a very

high risk of illness,” said

Sherry Boodram, of Cann-

Delta, a cannabis industry

advisor.

She said untested cannabis

could have high levels

of heavy metals, pesticides,

microbial contamination,

fungi, or residues from solvents

like butane and ethanol.

“Without that information

and transparency of

those types of substance

being applied to the cannabis

the user can fall ill,” said

Boodram.

Wanda Davis, a community

member who tuned into

the meeting, said the Six

Nations People’s Cannabis

Commission (SNPCC) is capable

of providing its own

testing to ensure product

safety for dispensaries that

have already begun operation.

“You are fear mongering,”

said Davis. “There is testing

and there are standards

developed by the cannabis

coalition.”

Others have called for the

commission to dissolve and

called it a dictatorship and

complained they were not

able to have any of their

questions answered during

the community Zoom session.

Davis asked a number of

questions in the question

and answer feature at the

bottom of the Zoom Webinar,

along with Ben Mac-

Donald. Neither of them

received responses to their

questions or comments.

The commission’s community

update came just

one day after the Six Nations

People’s Cannabis

Coalition (SNPCC) began

issuing its own permits to

Six Nations members wishing

to sell retail cannabis on

the territory. At least five or

six cannabis shops opened

on the territory on July 1,

according to estimates by

the SNPCC.

The commission and SN-

PCC have been at odds for

over a year over how cannabis

should be regulated

on the territory.

Last week, the commission

and Six Nations Elected

Council (SNEC) sent out

a joint statement condemning

the SNPCC for opening

retail cannabis stores in the

community on July 1.

During the Zoom meeting,

commission Chair

Nahnda Garlow asked Kim

Thomas, a lawyer hired by

the commission, what civil

penalties a person could

face from selling “black

market” cannabis at an “illicit

dispensary” (not regulated

by SNEC) that harmed

a customer.

“If there was loss of life,

that’s personal damages for

that person and potentially

their heirs and their estate,”

said Thomas. “Under

Canadian law, a status Indian

can sue another status

Indian and recover damages.”

One minute before the

meeting wrapped up, Garlow

asked if there were any

questions. She said she was

not seeing any questions

coming through.

However, Davis had commented

she had a question

but her question went unanswered.

Garlow wrapped up the

meeting and ended the webinar.

The commission has been

in place since February

2019. It was put in place by

the SNEC to oversee cannabis

at Six Nations including

finalizing draft regulations

that would govern the sale

and production of cannabis

on the territory. Those draft

regulations are now being

revised.

SNEC placed a moratorium

on the sale of cannabis

in the territory in August

2019.

Community members

have complained about

the sluggish process of the

commission in developing

regulations.

Applications for production

will be ready in November

and dispensary

permits will be issued by

spring 2021.

“We understand there’s

frustration with the timeframe,”

said Thomas, adding

that it’s, “complex to

create a regulated industry

from the ground up.”

She said they are currently

going through the

feedback from community

members received last winter

to make revisions to the

draft regulations.

“It’s not as easy as just

simply putting pen to paper

and revising the law and

drafting the regulations –

we have to make sure the

community input is there.”

In the meantime, the commission

has drafted a “constitution”

to replace its

terms of reference, which

govern how the commission

functions. That constitution

has yet to be brought

before elected council for

approval.

“It outlines the commission’s

governance structure

and how the commission

will operate,” said commission

member Cole Squire.

“We will eventually become

an arm’s length regulator.”

The constitution has not

been released for public

I TURTLE ISLAND NEWS I IOHIARIÓ:WA / JULY 8, 2020 I PAGE 5 I

Provinces pose challenge to Indigenous child welfare reform: Bellegarde

OTTAWA-National Chief

Perry Bellegarde says provincial

governments that

want to cling to their jurisdiction

over child welfare

are the biggest barrier to

implementing new legislation

giving Indigenous

communities control over

their children’s well-being.

Bellegarde and Indigenous

Services Minister

Marc Miller signed an

Indigenous Services

Minister Marc Miller

agreement in Ottawa this

morning that is the next

step forward in implementing

Bill C-92.

The bill passed in the last

Parliament and took effect

Jan. 1, setting national

standards for Indigenous

jurisdiction over child and

family services.

However several provinces

are concerned over the

impact on their own roles

AFN National

Chief Perry Bellegarde

SNEC’s Cannabis commission accused of fear-mongering

in child-welfare programs,

and Quebec is challenging

the constitutionality of the

bill in court.

The agreement signed

today is a guide for discussions

between Ottawa and

Indigenous governments as

each community moves to

assert its control of child

welfare for its own kids,

recognizing Indigenous

laws and customs.

viewing.

The commission is also

going to hire staff by September,

including a project

manager and administrative

assistant.

The commission has

brought numerous consultants

on board to provide

expertise on legal issues,

health and safety, protection

of the environment

and the business aspect of

the industry. Those are the

community’s four priorities

when it comes to the sale

of cannabis on the territory,

said Thomas.

To meet those priorities,

Thomas said it was important

to have experts in all of

Bellegarde says those discussions

must also happen

with provincial governments,

which he pegged as

one of the biggest barriers

to reducing the number of

Indigenous children in foster

care in Canada.

This report by The Canadian

Press was first published

July 7, 2020.

those fields.

Thomas, a Six Nations

lawyer, was brought on to

look at the legal issues surrounding

cannabis.

“It became very clear early

on that this was a very

unique, very complex and

very groundbreaking initiative

and also very exciting

because it’s the opportunity

for Six Nations to advance

in a unified fashion,”

she said. “We want something

that is safe as well it

has to be reflective of our

own people. We have to

ensure that it fits for our

community.”


I TURTLE ISLAND NEWS I IOHIARIÓ:WA / JULY 8, 2020 I PAGE 6 I

I COMMENTARY I TSI NAHÒ:TEN RÓN:TON I

Six Nations Cannibis Commission

...just wait...again!

Six Nations has been more than patient when it comes

to trying to figure out what the Six Nations Elected

Council’s (SNEC) cannabis commission is doing.

Put in place in 2019 after the elected council passed

a law to regulate cannabis here the elected council appointed

cannabis commission appears to be going no

where fast.

After spending its first year in turmoil, with infighting,

SNEC should have written off the entire commission

and put new people with experience on boards

and commissions, who know how to actually be a

board member in place.

Instead three people from that inner turmoil are left,

one resigned and one was crucified on the SNEC alter

while it tried to get the controversial group under

control.

After a year Six Nations is still no further ahead.

Now heading towards its third year, the only progress

has been with expensive lawyers and consultants

and a commission that oddly seems to be its own staff

as well as the policy developers.

Any administrative staff are gone and commissioners

say they are doing any work that needs to be

done displaying again their inexperience in working on

boards or commissions.

In fact their current lawyer is probably the only salvation

the commission has found and is without doubt

trying to keep them focused.

The cannabis commission was put in place to regulate

cannabis at Six Nations. To regulate, to protect

the health and safety of community members and to

frankly ensure Six Nations jurisdiction is maintained.

Those are hefty responsibilities for an inexperienced

board that in itself is in violation of the elected council’s

own policy that set up a commission of five members

and a chair. Right now the commission is operating

with only three members and has been for a year.

That refusal by either the commission or the band

council to fill the empty seats may in fact be leading

to the continued delays that have the community on

edge.

While the chair may be asking for patience it’s naive

and way past time for anyone to ask a community that

is already behind the eight ball in developing a cannabis

market here to persevere.

The continued delays by the commission are continuing

to spur provocation with those that have an

interest in getting into the industry, those that should

be your allies in the industry.

Instead of motherhood statements the commission

would do well to just get the job done...soon!

CORRECTION

In a June article on business and COVID-19 Turtle Island News published an article that said an employee at a local

convience store had tested positive for COVID-19 when the employee was tested and the test came back negative.

We apologize for the error.

COVID-19 Nationally

(Continued from page 7)

•limiting the size of group

gatherings,

•keeping a distance of at least

2 arms lengths (approximately

2 metres) from others when

away from home,

•wearing a non-medical mask

when physical distancing is not

possible, and;

•limiting contact with people

at higher risk, such as Elders

and those in poor health, or

with underlying health conditions.

ISC recognizes the importance

of cultural gatherings or

events. By using public health

guidelines in their respective

provinces and territories, First

Nations leaders and ceremonial

organizers can help protect

community members, including

those who are most vulnerable

such as Elders, from the serious

risks to health and safety presented

by COVID-19.

As we look ahead with cautious

optimism, the priority

remains supporting Indigenous

leaders as they work to protect

the health, safety and prosperity

of communities.

Quick facts

Approximately $1.7 billion

has been committed in specific

support to Indigenous and

northern communities and organizations:

•$285.1 million to support

the ongoing public health response

to COVID-19 in Indigenous

communities.

•$380 million for a distinctions-based

Indigenous Community

Support Fund which

includes $90 million to support

Indigenous Peoples living in urban

centers.

•$10 million for emergency

family violence prevention shelters

on-reserve and in Yukon to

support women and children

fleeing violence.

•$72.6 million for health and

social services support to the

governments of Yukon, Northwest

Territories, and Nunavut,

for health and social support.

•$34.3 million for territorial

businesses, through CanNor’s

Regional Relief and Recovery

Fund.

•$25 million for enhancement

to the Nutrition North Canada

Subsidy.

•$17.3M in support for

Northern Air Carriers.

•$15 M for CanNor’s Northern

Business Relief Fund.

•Up to $306.8 million in interest-free

loans to help small

and medium-sized Indigenous

businesses.

•$75.2 million in 2020-21 in

distinctions-based support for

First Nations, Inuit, and Métis

Nation students pursuing

post-secondary education

•$270 million to supplement

the On-Reserve Income Assistance

Program to address

increased demand on the program,

which will help individuals

and families meet their

essential living expenses.

•$44.8 million over five years

to build 12 new shelters, which

will help protect and support

Indigenous women and girls

experiencing and fleeing violence.

The government will also

provide $40.8 million to support

operational costs for these

new shelters over the first five

years, and $10.2 million annually

ongoing. Starting this year,

$1 million a year ongoing will

also be provided to support

engagement with Métis leaders

and service providers on shelter

provision and community-led

violence prevention projects for

Métis women, girls, and LGBTQ

and two-spirit people.

• $117 million in new funding

to support community-owned

Indigenous businesses and

$16 million in new funding to

support Indigenous tourism

through the pandemic and into

recovery.

Turtle Island

NEWS

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Turtle Island News is published weekly on the Six Nations Grand River Territory.

It is a politically independent newspaper that is wholly owned and operated

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pictures or editorial content may be reproduced without permission.

Publisher -Lynda Powless,

Turtle Island News Publications

EDITOR - Lynda Powless

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I LOCAL / ORÌ:WASE NE KÈN:THOR I

No active cases of Covid-19 at Six Nations

By Donna Duric

Writer

It’s been almost five weeks

since Six Nations reported a

positive case of Covid-19 on

Six Nations.

After a spate of cases were

reported in late May, Six Nations

has not had a single

new case reported throughout

the month of June or the

first week of July.

There are currently no active

cases of Covid-19 on Six Nations

as of press time, joining

neighbouring communities

in seeing a reduction in positive

cases and active cases.

To date, there have been 14

positive cases on Six Nations

and one death.

The province of Ontario has

also seen a shrinking number

OTTAWA-TTAWA, TRADI-

TIONAL ALGONQUIN TERRI-

TORY,-First Nations on-reserve

have four times the lower case

rate than that of the general

Canadian population, three

times less fatalities, and a 30%

higher recovery rate, Dr Thom

Wong, Chief Medical Officer of

Public Health said in a report

Tuesday.

Throughout the COVID-19

pandemic both the Honourable

Marc Miller, Minister of Indigenous

Services, along with Dr.

Tom Wong, Chief Medical Officer

of Public Health have been

providing regular updates to

media. In lieu of an in-person

briefing this week Dr. Wong is

provided a COVID-19 update.

The COVID-19 curve continues

to flatten in Indigenous

communities as leaders are

working tirelessly to make sure

their community members

have access to the most up to

date public health information

and who are advocating for

the support their communities

need.

Indigenous Services Canada

(ISC) recognizes that this virus

has affected nearly every facet

of day-to-day life, and continues

to support the delivery of

quality care, while Indigenous

individuals and communities

take the lead in responding to

their unique, evolving needs.

On First Nations communities

in provinces, as of July 6 Indigenous

Services Canada is aware

of:

• 324 confirmed positive cases

of COVID-19

• 30 hospitalizations

• 274 recovered cases.

“This means that First Nations

on-reserve have four

of cases, both total new daily

cases and active infections.

By the first week of July,

Ontario had just under 2,000

active cases of Covid-19,

compared to over 4,000 active

cases in the middle of

June.

The community, which was

locked down to outside visitors

from the end of March

to the middle of June, has adopted

strict safety measures

since it entered phase two of

Six Nations Elected Council’s

reopening plan. Phase two

of the plan included taking

down the barricades at community

entrance points on

June 15.

Phase two also allowed the

reopening of most businesses,

including gas stations,

times lower case rate than that

of the general Canadian population,

three times less fatalities,

and a 30% higher recovery

rate.”

He said while recently in First

Nations communities in Saskatchewan

and Alberta, a rise

in COVID-19 cases has been

noted; Indigenous Services

Canada, and other partners are

working with these communities

to provide the supports

required. There is a total of 17

confirmed positive cases in

Nunavik, Quebec and all but

one have recovered. To support

the response to an outbreak,

ISC – when requested - supports

community health staff

to manage cases, with contact

investigations, the communication

of test results, and conducting

check-ins with those in

self-isolation in the community.

ISC continues to quickly process

PPE requests, as effectively

as possible, to ensure communities

are ready to respond to

COVID-19, and to ensure the

safety of healthcare workers

and others supporting the delivery

of health services.

He said “as of July 3, we have

shipped 1,009 orders for PPE,

including hand sanitizers, N95

masks, isolation shields, and

gloves.”

To date, the Government of

Canada has responded to hundreds

of requests from Indigenous

communities and organizations

to support a variety of

measures, including addressing

additional space for medical

screening and self-isolation,

support to Elders as well as

contracting additional medical

professionals to support

communities in their response

convenience stores, smoke

shops and restaurants. Many

of those businesses voluntarily

shut down in late

March.

Since then, businesses

throughout the community

have re-opened with strict

measures in place.

Stores such as Gas, Grub

and Goodies in Ohsweken

have implemented strict

safety measures, including

allowing only one customer

inside at a time, plexiglass

shields protecting cashiers,

staff wearing masks, and

refusing entry to anyone

exhibiting Covid-19 symptoms.

The store even closed

down at one point early in

the pandemic after one of

its employees had contact

to the virus. In the instances

where ISC has direct responsibility

for healthcare, nearly

1,000 health professionals

have been transported carefully

and cautiously in and out of

fly-in First Nations communities

through chartered private

transportation measures that

reduce the risks of community

exposure to COVID-19.

It is important to note that

no communities will be left

behind. For example, when the

situation worsened in northern

Saskatchewan, ISC provided

$2.3 million to the North West

Saskatchewan Pandemic Response

Plan, a collective effort

between First Nations, Métis,

municipal, provincial, and federal

partners to coordinate the

response to the growing numbers

of COVID-19 cases in the

area. Meadow Lake Tribal Council

and Métis Nation–Saskatchewan

have undertaken exemplary

collaboration in leading

the response to this significant

outbreak.

The Government of Canada

also made available funding

to address immediate health,

economic, and transportation

needs in the North. This includes

transfers to the governments

of Yukon, Northwest

Territories, and Nunavut to

support their COVID-19 health

and social services preparations

and response. The Government

of Canada also provided funding

to support northern air

carriers, to ensure the continued

supply of food, and other

essential goods and services to

remote and fly-in communities.

Additional funding was also

provided to Nutrition North

Canada to increase subsidies so

with someone who exhibited

symptoms but the test

for that employee came back

negative. The store was one

of a handful of convenience

stores that remained open

throughout the community

lockdown.

The community has not

fully opened, however. All

recreational facilities remain

closed and hundreds of band

council employees are still

working from home.

Sports teams remain inactive

and the beloved Grand

River Champion of Champions

Powwow, which normally

takes place the last

week of July every year at

Chiefswood Park, has been

cancelled this year.

Because the Six Nations

families can afford much-needed

nutritious food and personal

hygiene products. ISC also provided

support to the Government

of the Northwest Territories

and the Inuvialuit Regional

Corporation to help Indigenous

families who are choosing to be

on the land as part of the territory’s

response to COVID-19.

The report issues Tuesday

I TURTLE ISLAND NEWS I IOHIARIÓ:WA / JULY 8, 2020 I PAGE 7 I

economy was shut down

for almost three months

this spring, elected council

launched a Covid-19 business

relief fund, which is

currently accepting applications

until Friday July 10th at

3 p.m. Businesses are eligible

for a non-repayable grant up

to $5,000.

Community members who

have more than one business

are only allowed to receive

one grant.

Successful applicants will

be notified by July 17, with

funds disbursed the following

week.

It’s not known where

elected council obtained the

funds or how much is available

in the total fund.

Six Nations received $2.2.

Update on COVID-19 Nationally In Indigenous Communities

million from the federal government

in March to respond

to the pandemic but elected

council was already warning

it was running out of funds

in May.

It’s not known if or when

Six Nations will be receiving

more money.

Elected Council has not

responded to Turtle Island

News’ requests for comment.

In the meantime, Elected

Council continues to hold

official meetings via Zoom,

an online Webinar platform.

“We are attempting to

minimize as much in person

meetings as possible,”

said Elected Chief Mark Hill

during a weekly radio update

last Friday.

says Canada is ready to support

communities to respond

to their needs, according to

their priorities.

While these are positive developments,

individuals and

communities need to remain

vigilant in employing measures

to protect themselves, their

families and communities. The

federal government will continue

to support communities

at each stage of the pandemic,

and as parts of our economy

begin to reopen.

To prevent the spread of

COVID-19, within communities

and across the country, individuals

can help by:

•avoiding all non-essential

trips in the community,

(Continued on page 6)


I TURTLE ISLAND NEWS I IOHIARIÓ:WA / JULY 8, 2020 I PAGE 8 I

I SPORTS / TEHONTKAHRI’TSHERÓN:NIS I

Lacrosse Practices

going on at OMSK

The lacrosse practices at OMSK have been a huge hit

with the Six Nations youth. (Submitted Photo)

JOSH GILES

TURTLE ISLAND NEWS SPORTS REPORTER...LOOK FOR HIM AT YOUR NEXT SPORTING EVENT!


I SPORTS / TEHONTKAHRI’TSHERÓN:NIS I

Lacrosse Practices going on at OMSK

By Josh Giles

Writer

With organized lacrosse,

all but cancelled this season,

many people have

taken it upon themselves

to organize safe practices

at OMSK for Six Nations

youth. Starting a couple of

weeks ago, it has become

very popular in the community.

Cubb McNaughton is one

of the people helping organize

the practices, and he

said that they want to keep

the kids active. “We’ve

been talking about it. Just

to get the kids going and

to get them away from the

television. They’re used to

having some schedule and

we’re trying to slowly.”

The practices mostly consist

of around 25-30 kids

maximum, but they won’t

turn away anyone unless

they really have to. They

break into groups of 5 to 6

and pass the ball around.

“It’s a field style right now.

There’s no real curriculum

we’re just trying to put it

on ourselves to let the kids

have fun in a safe way.”

McNaughton has been

very encouraged by the

people who have showed

up to help. “We have dads

coming down to help and

play along as well. We’re

just there for the kids to

interact and to see their

friends. It’s something we

I TURTLE ISLAND NEWS I IOHIARIÓ:WA / JULY 8, 2020 I PAGE 9 I

need to constantly remind

them to stay properly social

distant,” he said.

But with no real curriculum,

they’re just taking

it as they go. McNaughton,

along with the other

coaches are hoping to

grow off of this as well,

and maybe expand it depending

on the demand.

“If the demand goes higher

we will break into different

schools and start a proper

curriculum.”

It’s a good safe way for

the youth of Six Nations to

be able to get up and have

fun with a favourite sport

in the community.

Six Nations running virtual summer camps

By Josh Giles

Writer

Six Nations Health Promotions

found great success

by running a virtual Tom

Longboat run in early June,

and now they are trying to

get kids active through virtual

summer camps. The

decision wasn’t easy, but

Six Nations is working on a

structure to make sure it’s

successful.

Carrying on with scheduled

things as usual hasn’t

been easy, but according to

Health Promotions Kinesiologist

Skylar Powless, they

want to keep kids busy

and active this summer.

“Health Promotions decided

to participate in camps

this year, as it is programming

that we normally run

in the summer. So, we decided

to try to continue to

keep some normalcy and

give the kids activities to

be able to participate in to

keep them busy.”

They are hoping that

this will be a success as

well. “Like all of our other

programming, we have

switched to offering them

virtually and have had

some success with virtual

programs we offer that are

geared towards kids and

youth. So, we are going to

trial this method as well,

and hopefully there will be

success.”

Six Nations Health Promotions

will also be doing

things a number of ways

in order to help kids get

as active as possible. “We

will be releasing videos

demonstrating different activities,

offering interactive

programs over zoom and

dropping off activity kits

to families. Other services

that are offering camps are

likely doing things similarly,”

said Powless.

Right now Six Nations is

still coming up with ideas

in order to build a proper

structure and activities for

the children, but it looks to

be an eventful summer.


I TURTLE ISLAND NEWS I IOHIARIÓ:WA / JULY 8, 2020 I PAGE 10 I

Turtle Island News

I SPECIAL I

Summer

road trips

to beautiful

local parks

NC) Although at the

moment we may not

be able to head cross

country to some of

our beautiful national

parks, with local

parks now reopened

to the public there are

plenty of great drives

to experience with

spectacular views.

Niagara Falls to Niagara-on-the-Lake.

This drive is a shortbut-sweet

trek along

the Niagara Parkway.

The road follows the

Niagara River and features

plenty of beautiful

sites along the

way. Start by seeing

the powerful falls and

end your journey in

the lush wine region

of Ontario.

Icefields Parkway.

The best part of this

Calgary drive is that

you don’t have to

head off the beaten

trail to see gorgeous

views. The parkway

will take you from serene

Lake Louise to

breathtaking Jasper in

over 200 kilometres

of non-stop wildlife.

Skinner Pond to

Jude Point. P.E.I. may

be a small island, but

it boasts some of the

most iconic coastal

views in the country.

Start your journey in

Skinner Pond, the

home of “Stompin’

Tom” Connors and

make your way to

Judes Point Harbour.

The harbour has the

largest inshore fishing

fleet on the island.

Yellowhead Highway

to Minnedosa

Valley. The prairies

may have a reputation

for being rather

flat, but the drive

along Highway 16 in

Manitoba will change

your mind. This road

trip winds through

peaks and valleys,

passing through

quaint towns ending

the journey in Minnedosa.

If you’re lucky,

the Northern Lights

have been known to

make an appearance.

Make sure you have

the best coverage for

your next auto adventure

– find more

information at pcinsurance.ca.

www.newscanada.

com


I SPECIAL I

I TURTLE ISLAND NEWS I IOHIARIÓ:WA / JULY 8, 2020 I PAGE 11 I


I TURTLE ISLAND NEWS I IOHIARIÓ:WA / JULY 8, 2020 I PAGE 12 I

I SPECIAL I


I SPECIAL I

I TURTLE ISLAND NEWS I IOHIARIÓ:WA / JULY 8, 2020 I PAGE 13 I


I TURTLE ISLAND NEWS I IOHIARIÓ:WA / JULY 8, 2020 I PAGE 14 I

I DINING GUIDE I

The incredible story of the green egg

(NC) We all want to feed

our families nutritious

meals that are simple to

make and affordable. Bonus

points if the dish is

fun to prepare and environmentally

friendly.

When preparing meals

the whole family will love,

a great option is using Canadian

eggs. They are a

fresh, local, high-quality

ingredient available in all

grocery stores and produced

by more than 1,100

family farms from coast to

coast.

Working under the system

of supply management,

egg farmers have

invested in new technologies

and innovative farming

practices over the last

decades to reduce their

environmental footprint

by 50 per cent, while increasing

their production

to meet Canadian demand.

Talk about a green source

of high-quality protein.

Looking for new recipe

inspiration? Try eggs in

this delicious pizza recipe

that’s simple enough

to get the kids involved.

To make the dough easy

to roll, remove from the

fridge and allow it to

rest for 30 minutes. For a

thin crust, use the lower

amount of pizza dough.

Hand-Tossed Pizza

with Eggs

Prep time: 15 minutes

Cook time: 10 minutes

Serves: 2

Ingredients:

• 1 lb (0.5 kg) storebought

pizza dough

• 2 tbsp (30 mL) olive oil,

divided

• ½ cup (125 mL) pizza or

marinara sauce

• 1 ½ cups (375 mL)

shredded Italian blend

cheese

• 1/2 cup (125 mL) pitted

Kalamata olives,

chopped

• 4 eggs

• ½ cup (125 mL) arugula

• All-purpose flour for

rolling

Directions:

1. Lightly coat a 12-inch

(30 cm) pizza pan with

cooking spray. Place pan

in an oven preheated to

500°F (260°C).

2. On a well-floured surface,

roll dough into a

12-inch (30 cm) circle.

3. Remove hot pan from

oven. Carefully arrange

dough to the edges of

the pan. Pierce dough

all over with a fork, then

lightly brush with some

olive oil. Evenly spread

pizza sauce over top.

Sprinkle cheese over

dough and top with olives.

Crack eggs over top

of pizza.

4. Place pizza in oven

and bake until crust is

browned and crisp; 8 to

10 minutes.

5. Serve topped with arugula

and a drizzle of remaining

olive oil.

Learn more at eggfarmers.

ca.

www.newscanada.com


I CLASSIFIED I

I TURTLE ISLAND NEWS I IOHIARIÓ:WA / JULY 8, 2020 I PAGE 15 I

Reduce. Reuse.

Recycle

Lets look after Mother Earth

CLASSIFIED

Turtle Island News Classified

Show off your new baby this year!

Share your pride!

OBITUARY

CRAWFORD: RICHARD

“WADE”

Suddenly at St. Paul’s

Hospital, Vancouver on

Monday June 29, 2020 at

the age of 49 years. Father

of the late Jade. Beloved

son of Bev & Decarlo & the

late Rose Crawford. Loving

brother of Dave (Ken),

Barry (Laura), and the late

Mark. Also survived by

several nieces and nephews.

The family will honour

his life with visitation at the Hyde & Mott Chapel, R.H.B.

Anderson Funeral Homes Ltd., 60 Main Street South, Hagersville

on Thursday from 7-9pm. where Funeral Service

will be held on Friday, July 10, 2020 at 11am. Interment

Garlow Line Cemetery. www.rhbanderson.com

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I TURTLE ISLAND NEWS I IOHIARIÓ:WA / JULY 8, 2020 I PAGE 16 I

Kid’s Corner - Activity Page

I SPECIAL I

LEARNING

AND GROWING AS

...

Keeping your minds nourished...

Colouring page

Activity page for all ages!


I SPORTS / TEHONTKAHRI’TSHERÓN:NIS I

I TURTLE ISLAND NEWS I IOHIARIÓ:WA / JULY 8, 2020 I PAGE 17 I

Doug Jamieson wins NLL Goaltender of the Year

By Josh Giles

Writer

Doug Jamieson has

earned his first ever NLL

Goaltender of the Year

award after an impressive

season that saw him

breakout to help the New

England Black Wolves to

an amazing season. Being

the anchor in the net for

the Black Wolves, he certainly

earned the honour.

Leading the league in a

number of stats, Jamieson

broke out in his fourth

season with New England

to have himself the

best season of his career.

He lead the NLL in goals

against average, save

percentage and was tied

for the most wins with

8 alongside Zach Higgins

and fellow Six Nations

goalie Warren Hill.

“I was pretty happy to

win it, I wasn’t sure who

was going to win because

so many goalies had great

seasons this year,” said

Jamieson. “It’s nice to be

recognized because a lot

of hard work goes into

practicing and we spend a

lot of time travelling. My

defence was so good this

year they made my job

much easier.”

Although being humbled

by the award, and enjoying

the moment, Jamieson

is fixated on carrying this

momentum and these improvements

over to New

England for next season.

“I’m definitely hoping

myself and the team can

keep the momentum rolling

into next season because

I think we’re poised

for a deep playoff run and

had a legit chance at winning

a championship.”

That they did.

On top of winning the

award, Jamison was

elected to the NLL’s All-

League First Team, as well

as Halifax Thunderbirds

captain Cody Jamieson

being named to the All-

League Second Team.

Doug Jamieson felt like a lock to win the NLL Goalie of

the Year Award with his remarkable season. (Photo by

the New England Black Wolves)


I TURTLE ISLAND NEWS I IOHIARIÓ:WA / JULY 8, 2020 I PAGE 18 I

I CAREERS AND NOTICES I


I SPORTS / TEHONTKAHRI’TSHERÓN:NIS / BUSINESS DIRECTORY I

I TURTLE ISLAND NEWS I IOHIARIÓ:WA / JULY 8, 2020 I PAGE 19 I

CAP calling for Theo Fleury to be put on the 2021 Hockey Hall of Fame ballot

By Josh Giles

Writer

Another year goes by

where Theoren Fleury did

not get inducted into the

Hockey Hall of Fame, and

the Congress of Aboriginal

Peoples (CAP) is asking to

give him another chance

next year. The Métis hockey

player from Oxbow,

Saskatchewan was very

talented player in the NHL

but substance abuse violations

during his tenure

is the only reason he isn’t

in the Hall of Fame already,

and CAP is trying to put an

end to that.

In a press release on June

30, CAP called on the

Hockey Hall of Fame’s 18

person committee to put

Fleury on the ballot for

next year. “With Indigenous

History Month coming

to a close, it’s time to

recognize the accomplishments

of Theoren Fleury

for his contributions to

hockey and place him in

the Hockey Hall of Fame.

This is a long overdue acknowledgement,”

said

CAP National Vice Chief

Kim Beaudin.

The stats that Fleury

has put up speak for

themselves. Being one of

15 players to average at

least one career point for

every game played in the

regular season and Stanley

Cup playoffs. The other 14

players have already been

Washington Redskins consider name change

The Washington Redskins

have met a myriad of scrutiny

over their team name

for a number of years,

and with race being such

a big topic of discussion

right now, it appears it has

come to a head. The team

announced on Friday that

they are going to thoroughly

review changing

the team name.

In a press release,

Washington said, “In light

of recent events around

our country and feedback

from our community, the

Washington Redskins are

enshrined in the hockey

hall of fame. Fleury has

also surpassed 100 points

in a season twice in his career,

so it appears he has

the stats to back up the

reasoning.

The only thing that many

people have troubles with

is his history with substance

abuse. But it became

known later on as self

medication for his abuse as

a young hockey player. The

CAP note this in their press

The Washington Redskins will have to go through a

complete rebranding of team name and logo in order

to please the public and their advertisers.

release as well. “Theo Fleury’s

struggles while playing

in the NHL are a matter

of public record. So too

are his accomplishments,

leadership, and community-building,

including visitation

to Canadian prisons

since that time.”

Being sober since 2006,

Fleury has made an impact

to actively create better

lives for people in Canada

who have struggled with

what he struggles with. He

announcing that the team

will undergo a thorough review

of the team’s name.”

This request

comes shortly after 87 investment

firms requested

FedEx, Nike, and PepsiCo

to stop doing business

with the team. Nike did

their part in stopping the

sale of team apparel from

their website which is a

step in the right direction,

and FedEx followed suit

shortly after requesting

that the team name be

changed.

The fact that FedEx

requested the name

change is specifically more

notable because they

bought the naming rights

to where Washington

plays for $205-million. As

well as FedEx CEO, Fred

Smith is a minority owner

of the team, so it appears

there’s a lot at stake.

Unfortunately,

for advertisers, and fans

alike, Washington owner

Dan Snyder went on the

record in 2013 saying that

he will never change the

team name. But times are

changing and it appears

has even won the Canadian

Humanitarian Award

and the Queen’s Jubilee

Medallion for people who

have made huge efforts to

contribute to Canada.

He’s seemed to be forgiven

for his past by everyone,

and the CAP want to

make sure he’s recognized

as the great hockey player

that he was.

that Snyder will go along

with the process in order

to do their part in changing.

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