13.07.2020 Views

Magazine Helicopter Industry #102

You also want an ePaper? Increase the reach of your titles

YUMPU automatically turns print PDFs into web optimized ePapers that Google loves.

EUROPE - MIDDLE EAST - AMERICAS - AFRICA - ASIA - RUSSIA

#102


THE BEST PLACE TO BE

AT THE HEART OF SWISS ALPS

ALL UNDER ONE ROOF

> 24 PARKING STAND AT THE SAME TIME INCLUDING 3 BBJ

> 7 COMFORTABLE ROOMS FOR CREW

> 3 MEETING ROOMS

> 2 VIP LOUNGE

> FITNESS & SPA

> CAMO, AOC & FLIGHT OPS AVAILABLE

FOR ANY REQUEST

CONTACT@ALPARK.CH

+41 27 324 42 42

WWW.ALPARK.CH


© Leonardo Compagny

EUROPE - MIDDLE EAST - AMERICAS - AFRICA - ASIA - RUSSIA

#102

MILITARY

Double Dutch

Anniversary Heavy

Rotary

By Carlo Kuit & Paul Kievit

02

EDITORIAL

42

BREAKING

NEWS

By Frédéric VERGNÈRES

50

NEW

TECHNOLOGIES

A helicopter on Mars

By Frédéric LERT

4

22

FOCUS

Helicopters faces

Covid-19

By Frédéric Vergnères

& François Blanc

MILITARY

The SP dolphins take to the

open sea!

By Frédéric LERT

56

36

INTERVIEW

Christoph Zammert,

Executive Vice-President

customer support

and services at

Airbus Helicopters

62

INTERVIEW

Russian Helicopters is

weathering the storm

By François BLANC

By François BLANC

HI I 1


HELICOPTER INDUSTRY I EDITORIAL I

ARNAUD DEVRIENDT I DIRECTEUR DE LA PUBLICATION

Professionals in the broad sector of the aviation industry, and a large segment of the public around the world, will

have witnessed something new in the last five months.

With eyes turned to the Wuhan region of China, everyone has seen the speed at which the Covid-19 outbreak

has spread. In the case of this epidemic, it is clear that global air transport has been one of the vectors of the

spreading, albeit in spite of it. The thousands of aircraft grounded at the height of the health storm will long be

remembered as evidence of the scale of this disaster.

Once governments realized the nature of the problem, and built infrastructures to grapple with the magnitude of

issues, aviation took on a completely different role. Through the repatriation of nationals, surprised by the crisis

and far from home; and, the airlifts thrown in between continents to supply urgently needed medical equipment to

Western countries - starting with protective masks from China, to the emergency medical equipment - the wings

of rescue planes crisscrossed the skies on many routes across the globe.

More locally, and unsurprisingly, it was time for the helicopter to join the dance. But this time, the challenge was

different: first in Europe, then North America; the overcrowding of healthcare institutions required the transport

of patients to hospital units that were better equipped to treat them. It was impossible, however, to assign all

medical helicopters to this mission, because while the coronavirus was gripping the world, «normal» medical

transport had to be maintained, outside of the viral tidal wave. And for this reason, military aircraft were called to

provide support wherever needed.

Once again, the rotary wing aerodyne has demonstrated its virtues.

The personnel responsible for its implementation, from the manufacturers’ design offices (consulted by operators

who had to adapt new medical equipment to their machines), to the crews and medical professionals called upon

to be placed at the front line; all have provided further proof of the helicopter’s extraordinary usefulness.

We invite you to discover our website

Retrouvez l’ensemble de nos informations sur le site

helicopter-industry.com

HI I 2


IF YOU ARE ROTORS

WE GOT IT!

Nov 10 – 12, 2020

Koelnmesse | Germany

www.europeanrotors.eu

organised by

in cooperation with


HELICOPTER INDUSTRY I BREAKING NEWS I

©Boeing

HI I 4


6 I EUROPE

16 I INTERNATIONAL

HI I 5


HELICOPTER INDUSTRY I BREAKING NEWS I EUROPE

©Airbus Helicopters

H160 RECEIVES EASA APPROVAL

Airbus Helicopters’ multi-role twin engine H160 has been granted its type certificate by the European Union Aviation Safety Agency

(EASA), marking a new chapter for the programme. The company is expecting FAA certification to follow shortly prior to first delivery to

an undisclosed US customer later this year.

«The successful completion of the H160 Type Certificate is the result of several years of tremendous work and efforts accomplished jointly

by the involved technical teams of the Agency and Airbus Helicopters in a remarkable fruitful cooperation spirit,” EASA Certification Director

Rachel Daeschler said. “It is the result of thorough design and testing efforts, to ensure the highest safety standards are reached. The design

of the H160 makes it suitable for a wide range of versatile missions. It is also one of the most environmentally friendly with respect to fuel

consumption and one of the quietest helicopters of its class. My personal appreciation and warmest congratulations are conveyed to the

involved technical staff who continuously showed high commitment for constructive collaboration to overcome the challenges inherent to this

type certification project,» she added.

«We are proud that the H160 has received its EASA type certificate. This achievement represents years of hard work designing, industrializing

and defining the support ecosystem with our suppliers and partners and I would like to thank everyone who has dedicated their time and energy

to turning this next generation helicopter into reality,” said Bruno Even, Airbus Helicopters CEO. “I now look forward to the H160 entering into

service and offering its innovative features that bring competitiveness alongside additional comfort and safety to customers worldwide,» he

added.

Airbus Helicopters relied on three prototypes, the first serial aircraft, and two additional test means, the dynamic helicopter zero and

the system helicopter zero, to develop and certify the aircraft and continues to mature the aircraft ahead of entry into service. The

helicopters have flown over 1500 hours both for flight tests and demo flights so that customers can experience first-hand the innovation

and added value the H160 will bring to their missions.

MORE ABOUT H160

HI I 6


©Norwegian armes forces

PATRIA CONSOLIDATES ITS OPERATIONS IN NORWAY

Patria onsolidates its helicopter maintenance operations in Norway for better customer support and efficiency selling its Bardufoss

operations (Patria Helicopters AS) to Kongsberg Aviation Maintenance Services (KAMS) of which Patria owns 49,9% of the shares. The

deal is effective from July 1, 2020.

«The main purpose of the deal is to help the Norwegian Armed Forces to increase the availability of their NH90 fleet. KAMS is a strategic partner

of the Norwegian Armed Forces, and the Bardufoss operations will have much better opportunities to operate within a bigger Norwegian entity

in future», states Jukka Holkeri, President of Patria’s International Support Partnerships business unit.

In Bardufoss, there is a one-stop shop for maintenance, repair and overhaul services specialised in the maintenance of helicopters.

Patria acquired the unit in 2011. The unit employs 27 persons.

KAMS supply maintenance, repair and modification services for aircraft, helicopters, components and field equipment to the Norwegian

Armed Forces and other military and civilian organizations. It is located in Kjeller and Rygge in Norway, and the company employs 285

persons.

MORE ABOUT PATRIA

HI I 7


HELICOPTER INDUSTRY I BREAKING NEWS I EUROPE

©NHI

BELGIUM COULD WITHDRAW ITS NH90TTH

«Confronted with a profound change and an extraordinary challenge», according to the expression used in their press release, the Belgian

Defense is forced to drastically reduce its NH90 fleet.

In order to do so, the Belgian Ministry of Defense could prematurely withdraw from service its four NH90TTHs, the last of which was

delivered in 2014. According to the press release, «the measures related to the TTH version of the NH-90 are do to its limited operational

production from the imperfect industrial support (which threatens to diminish in the coming years), as a result of very costly but necessary

upgrades and personnel shortages». The excessively high operational cost has in fact forced a 40% reduction in the 1050 flight hours

initially allocated by the government until 2022. Although considerable, this figure, however, comes as no surprise since a report by the

Kingdom’s Court of Auditors dating back to 2019, had already mentioned the «budgetary» drift of the aircraft.

With the help of the crisis, the Belgian Defense would therefore choose to concentrate primarily on the NFH (Nato Frigate Helicopter)

version which, in its maritime role, should increase the efficiency of the frigates and at the same time ensure the SAR (Search and

Rescue) mission. However, the possible withdrawal of the land version of the NH90 within two years could have major operational

consequences for the Land and Medical Components, which would have to find a new aircraft. Belgian Defense says it has several leads

currently under review. In particular, there are discussions of an acquisition of H145s, which are already possessed by Germany and

Luxembourg. A multi-purpose machine that would enable the salvage of the Belgian budget, and at the same time allow the replacement

of the NH90 and A109, which have been in service since 26 years. To be continued…

MORE ABOUT NH90

HI I 8


©Cyril Abad - Safran

SAFRAN TO SUPPORT GERMAN AND NORWEGIAN NH90 ENGINES

Safran Helicopter Engines has signed a support contract with the NATO Helicopter Management Agency (NAHEMA), to support

276 NH90 engines owned by BAAINBw (Federal Office of Bundeswehr Equipment, Information Technology and In-Service Support)

in Germany and the Norwegian Defence Materiel Agency (NDMA). The RTM322 engines will be covered by Safran’s Global Support

Package (GSP) under NAHEMA management.

This NH90 helicopters fleet is operated by the German Army (Deutsches Heer) and Navy (Deutsche Marine), and the Royal Norwegian

Air Force (Luftforsvaret). Within this agreement, their engines will be supported under a framework agreement with NAHEMA.

Giorgio Gomma, General Manager of NAHEMA, said: «the Global Support Package and its philosophy as a Service by the Hour Contract

based on an availability commitment for the supported engines represents a further step in the direction of unifying In Service Support of NH90

community».

Olivier Le Merrer, Safran Helicopter Engines EVP Support and Services, said, «this new contract is founded on the excellent service

experience we have developed with the German and Norwegian armed forces. It also marks a major milestone in our partnership with NAHEMA

and European NH90 users. We are extremely proud of their commitment to a GSP supporting RTM322-powered rotorcraft. We are committed to

offering world-class support to all European armed forces».

In 2017, Safran Helicopter Engines and NAHEMA agreed a support program protecting RTM322 engines installed on NH90s operated by

France’s armed forces, the Belgian Army and Navy and the armed forces of the Netherlands.

Under a GSP, the customer receives a commitment to engine availability. Other benefits include budget stability, a fixed price per engine

flying hour and a technical partnership with the OEM.

MORE ABOUT SAFRAN HELICOPTER ENGINES

HI I 9


HELICOPTER INDUSTRY I BREAKING NEWS I EUROPE

KOPTER SH09 TEST FLIGHT GO AHEAD IN SICILY

The flight test activities of the third prototype of the SH09 single-engine helicopter (designated P3) have restarted in Pozzallo, Sicily, in

Italy last week. The Kopter flight test & prototype maintenance teams arrived in Pozzallo earlier this month to prepare P3 and perform

all necessary technical checks to resume the flight tests that had been halted since the 10th of March due to the Covid-19 situation.

Richard Grant, Kopter Chief Test Pilot, commented: «We are very pleased to be back in Pozzallo to resume our work on P3. The first few flights

have been used to re-familiarise ourselves with the operation and to complete some essential training for flight crew and ground staff; there

has even been the opportunity to train new team members. Good progress has been made and we are ready to restart our experimental flights».

The new flight testing activities are to further assess the benefits provided by the new main rotor configuration. Since January 2020, P3

has been flying with a modified main rotor head and next generation rotor blades, optimising the dynamic behaviour of the helicopter

and further reducing the pilot workload in all phases of flight. In the forthcoming months, additional advancements in the programme

will also be tested on P3, a new tail rotor hub design, currently being bench-tested in Ennetmoos (Switzerland), the Garmin avionics suite

G3000H, a new aerodynamics package for the Tail Plane, vertical fin and upper cowlings, extensively validated through CFD analysis and

Wind Tunnel testing and the final main rotor configuration with the latest blades and revised flight controls.

During the three-month period without flying, Kopter has continued to maintain a good level of operational activities, while ensuring the

health and safety of its staff at all times. Kopter has been able to leverage its extensive digital approach to operations and organisation

of work to easily implement efficient home office solutions. A close collaboration with partners and suppliers have allowed the progress,

under the restrictions in place, of the SH09’s development and industrialisation processes. Engineering teams continued the design

activities for the upcoming P3 upgrades and for the PS4 (Pre-Series 4) configuration definition, while the Operations and Procurement

teams continued to ensure the delivery of parts for both aircraft.

Under the ongoing integration process with Leonardo, Kopter is already benefitting from complementary skills, resources and tools at

all levels, greatly supporting the SH09 programme development and production of parts. The SH09 is a real game changer addressing

evolving needs and delivering more capabilities at competitive costs. The end-to-end digitalisation of the SH09 programme will be a key

enabler.

MORE ABOUT SH09

HI I 10


©E.Raz

FRENCH AERONAUTICAL RECOVERY PLAN :

10 H160’S FOR THE GENDARMERIE AND MORE.

In order to support the aeronautics industry in France, the government launched on 9 June a vast support plan of 15 billion euros in aid,

investments and loans and guarantees. The military component of this vast aeronautics support plan is based on the anticipation of

orders to the tune of €600 million.

According to the French Minister for the Armed Forces, Florence Parly, this acceleration will «make it possible to safeguard more than 1

200 jobs for 3 years, throughout France, half of which will benefit subcontractors».

Airbus Helicopters and its sub-contractors have been given a boost in particular, since the manufacturer has been notified of an advance

order for eight Caracal helicopters which will replace the Air Force’s Puma helicopters from 2023, instead of 2028-2029. The order is

worth a total of 300 million euros and «the equivalent of 960 jobs preserved for 3 years», the minister said.

Other air fleets benefiting from this support include the Civil Security, which should receive two H145s for a total of 32 million euros to

partially compensate for the loss of four aircraft.

The most important announcement, however, remains the advance order of ten H160s for the Gendarmerie in order to partially renew

the fleet of 26 AS350 Squirrels. These single-engine aircraft have in fact become obsolete, particularly for missions in urban areas, which

have been banned since 2014.

This order, worth €200 million, should enable the Gendarmerie to have a streamlined fleet of fully multi-purpose aircraft. According to

the Ministry, these twelve helicopters ordered (Civil Security and Gendarmerie) should preserve the equivalent of 640 jobs for 3 years.

MORE ABOUT AIRBUS HELICOPTERS

HI I 11


HELICOPTER INDUSTRY I BREAKING NEWS I EUROPE

©Airbus Helicopters

FIVE- BLADED H145 RECEIVES TYPE CERTIFICATION BY EASA

Airbus Helicopters’ five-bladed H145 has been certified by the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), clearing the way for

customer deliveries towards the end of summer 2020. The certification covers the full range of capabilities, including single-pilot and

instrument flight rules (IFR) and single engine operations (Cat.A/VTOL), along with night vision goggles capability.

Unveiled at Heli-Expo 2019 in Atlanta, this latest upgrade of the H145 family adds a new, innovative five-bladed rotor to the multimission

H145, increasing the useful load of the helicopter by 150 kg (330 lb). The simplicity of the new bearingless main rotor design

will also ease maintenance operations, further improving the benchmark serviceability and reliability of the H145, while improving ride

comfort for both passengers and crew. Certification by the Federal Aviation Administration will follow later this year. The certification

for the military version of the five-bladed H145 will be granted in 2021.

Powered by two Safran Arriel 2E engines, the H145 is equipped with full authority digital engine control (FADEC) and the Helionix digital

avionics suite and includes a 4-axis autopilot.

«Our new five bladed H145 is an excellent example of our quest for continuous improvement and providing incremental innovation that responds

to our customers’ requirements“, said Bruno Even, Airbus Helicopters CEO. “This helicopter combines value-added features with the robustness

and the reliability of a tried-and-tested bestseller, making it very competitive in the light twin-engine market.»

MORE ABOUT H145

HI I 12


©NHV

NHV EXTENDS OFFSHORE CONTRACT WITH ITHACA ENERGY

NHV Group has signed a five-year contract extension with Ithaca Energy (UK) Limited, providing aviation services to the Ithaca Energy

Group’s operated FPF-1 installation, Alba, Captain and Erskine fields in the Scottish North Sea. The extension covers seven-day-a-week

coverage out of Aberdeen and will start in January 2021.

NHV will provide two H175 (primary + back-up) aircraft for this operation. The state-of-the-art H175 aircraft, an Airbus Helicopter’s Super

Medium type is specifically designed to meet evolving mission needs in the oil and gas industry.

«We are extremely pleased with this important agreement, further strengthening our solid partnership with Ithaca Energy. This extension is a

direct result of NHV’s continued commitment to safety and top-class service for our client and their passengers. We thank Ithaca Energy for

their continued trust in NHV and we look forward to supporting them in the years ahead», said Jamie John, NHV’s Base Manager in Aberdeen.

MORE ABOUT NHV

HI I 13


HELICOPTER INDUSTRY I BREAKING NEWS I EUROPE

AW159 CONDUCTS FIRST SUCCESSFUL FIRINGS OF THE THALES « MARTLET LIGHTWEIGHT »

Leonardo and Thales announced the first successful firings of the Thales «Martlet» Lightweight Multirole Missile (LMM) from Leonardo’s

AW159 Wildcat helicopter. The firings were conducted as part of the UK MoD’s Future Anti-Surface Guided Weapon (FASGW) programme

and demonstrated the integration of the Martlet onto the AW159 platform. This represents a major milestone for the programme and will

enable this high-end capability to enter service with the Royal Navy later this year.

The firing trials were conducted from 27th April to 21st May 2020 and despite the current COVID-19 situation, Leonardo and Thales were

able to support the UK Ministry of Defence by completing this critical activity. All of the teams involved had to adopt strict distancing

procedures, in some cases having to find new ways of working, in order to make sure that the trials could go ahead. It is a testimony to

the professionalism of those involved that these trials were successfully completed under such challenging and novel circumstances.

“This major milestone demonstrates that the combination of the AW159 Wildcat and Martlet missile will be a flexible and effective

tool for the Royal Navy. Next year the Wildcat fleet will embark on Carrier Strike Group missions with HMS Queen Elizabeth on its

maiden operational deployment. As the only British company to design and manufacture helicopters on-shore, we’re extremely proud

to be equipping the UK Armed Forces with world-beating sovereign capabilities.” said Nick Whitney, Managing Director of Leonardo

Helicopters (UK).

«The successful live firings of the Thales LMM Martlet from the AW159 Wildcat is a key milestone in the programme, delivering a significant

step-change in capability for the platform. LMM Martlet will ensure that the Wildcat has the best-in-class offensive capability to protect HMS

Queen Elizabeth and her task group during her maiden operational deployment next year. With each platform capable of carrying up to 20

Martlet, the Wildcats deployed with the task group will be a significant deterrent to anyone wishing to interfere with UK interests.» said Philip

McBride, General Manager, Integrated Airspace-protection Systems, Thales UK.

In July 2014, Leonardo signed a contract with the UK Ministry of Defence to integrate, test and install the MBDA Sea Venom (heavy)

and Thales LMM (light) missile systems onto Royal Navy AW159 Wildcat helicopters, a programme called Future Anti Surface Guided

Weapon (FASGW).

The FASGW (light) part of the programme has now seen the LMM, with its associated launcher and airborne laser guidance unit,

successfully integrated into the Leonardo AW159 Wildcat sensor, displays and avionics systems. The LMM provides a step-change in

capability for the Royal Navy which, in the maritime environment, faces a major challenge in engaging smaller, fast-moving, asymmetric

threats, due to their high mobility, their small thermal and radar signatures and the severe background clutter encountered. The LMM

is capable of surmounting these issues where traditional electro-optic and radar guidance systems do not provide the certainty of hit

required. On-board the AW159 Wildcat platform, the LMM Martlet could also allow operators to engage air targets such as UAVs and

other maritime helicopters. The launchers are mounted to the AW159 via the new Leonardo Weapon Wing, developed at the Company’s

design and manufacturing facility in Yeovil and first trialled last year. Each weapon wing will be able to carry either ten Martlet or two

Sea Venom missiles and generates additional lift for the helicopter in forward flight, reducing demands on the main rotor.

MORE ABOUT AW159

HI I 14


Helicopter Industry TV,

Everywhere ...

Every month, UJ TV & HI TV takes an in-depth look

at two issues making the headlines of the industry

with a distinctive editorial slant and style.


HELICOPTER INDUSTRY I BREAKING NEWS I INTERNATIONAL

©Airbus

JAPAN’S NATIONAL POLICE AGENCY ORDERS FIVE NEW HELICOPTERS

Japan’s National Police Agency (NPA) has ordered one new H225 and four H135 helicopters as part of its fleet modernisation programme.

Currently operating 12 H135, four H155 and six AS365 helicopters, with one H215 and two H225 already on order, NPA deploys its

growing fleet for missions including law enforcement, personnel and VIP transport, goods transportation, disaster relief, as well as wide

area support. The five new helicopters will complement the agency’s law enforcement capabilities. The new order will take NPA’s Airbus

fleet to 30.

«Airbus Helicopters treasures the opportunity to support Japan’s wide-ranging law enforcement missions for more than 30 years with our light

twin, medium and heavy-lift helicopters. We thank NPA for its continued trust built over the years, and welcome the agency as a new customer

for our Super Puma helicopters. With an enlarged fleet not just in numbers, but also in range and capacity, we are fully confident that the new

helicopters will be a timely addition, reinforcing the agency’s operations,» said Guillaume Leprince, Managing Director of Airbus Helicopters

Japan.

MORE ABOUT AIRBUS HELICOPTERS

HI I 16


©Erickson

ERICKSON WINS IDIQ CONTRACT

Erickson Incorporated won an indefinite delivery/indefinite-quantity, multiple-award contract as subcontractor to Metson Marine

Services,Inc. The Naval Undersea Warfare Center Operational Support Services for Ocean Testing Contract will be performed at

government locations based on each individual task order, all over the world. The contract provides for:

•5-year IDIQ contract with three awardees

•$22,950,296 estimated total value

•Erickson scope focused on fixed and rotary wing services

•Scope includes torpedo recovery, range clearing and special test aircraft

Completion is expected by June 2025.

«This contract builds on a long history of Erickson support to the U.S. Navy. We are thrilled to be working with Metson Marine Services and

are honored to be trusted with this critical U.S. Navy Mission.» add Kevin Cochie, VP and General Manager Defense and National Security,

Erickson

MORE ABOUT ERICKSON

HI I 17


HELICOPTER INDUSTRY I BREAKING NEWS I INTERNATIONAL

©Russian Helicopters

ROSTEC MADE FIRST CIVILIAN MI-8AMT ARTIC HELICOPTER

Russian Helicopters started serial production of Mi-8AMT Arctic helicopters for civilian customers. Ulan-Ude Aviation Plant made the

first rotorcraft which is ready to start operation.

Mi-8AMT helicopter in its Arctic version completed the flight-test program and the procedure of acceptance by an independent

commission of the Federal Air Transport Agency (Rosaviatsiya). The rotorcraft’s main features include a unique system for heating

transmission parts, designed by JSC «National helicopter center Мil & Kamov». The system provides for quick start of engines in

extremely low temperatures, even if the helicopter is deployed without a hangar for a long time.

The system for heating transmission parts is complemented by an improved system for thermal protection of the cargo cabin and

special thermal insulation shutters in sliding doors and cockpit doors. Special cover protects the helicopter from low temperatures, high

humidity and strong wind, if it is deployed without a hangar for a long time. The helicopter systems have teflon hose, which is resistant

to freezing temperatures, instead of rubber hose.

MORE ABOUT MI-8

HI I 18


«New Mi-8AMT helicopter will be sought after by many Russian companies and government agencies implementing projects and tasks in the

Arctic. The first rotorcraft is ready to start operation, and negotiations with several potential Russian customers are underway» stated Director

General of Russian Helicopters Andrey Boginsky. «The holding company is making every effort to provide operators with reliable and modern

helicopters, which is irreplaceable when many important tasks related to work in the region are carried out.»

The helicopter is equipped with two additional fuel tanks, which allow it to fly long distances. This in very important for northern districts

with low population density. The Arctic version of Mi-8AMT can fly up to 1,400 km. An emergency floatation system can also be installed

on the helicopter to fly over a vast area of waters in the Arctic.

«This helicopter is necessary for air medical services, maintenance of facilities of the fuel and energy complex, and for meeting the needs

of polar expeditions. It may also help organize transportation in northern regions,» emphasized Managing Director of Ulan-Ude Aviation

Plant Leonid Belykh.

When the helicopter was designed, great attention was given to ensuring that it is capable of flying over the Arctic terrain with few

features, in the conditions of polar night, harsh weather, and when satellite and radio signals are lost. For that purpose the rotorcraft is

equipped with a special navigation complex.

The complex includes several navigation systems for locating the helicopter, a radar with horizontal and vertical sweep of information

on the weather, a digital autopilot, and radio stations with a wide range of frequencies. The helicopter is capable of automated hovering,

flying a planned hovering route, and landing. The navigation system considerably reduces the load on the crew, and ensures greater

safety of the flight.

HI I 19


HELICOPTER INDUSTRY I BREAKING NEWS I INTERNATIONAL

©Bell

BELL & BOEING DELIVER 400TH V-22 OSPREY

Bell Textron Inc. and Boeing have delivered the 400th V-22 Osprey to the United States Department of Defense. The U.S. Air Force

Special Operations command received the CV-22 on June 2, marking a milestone for the world’s first production tiltrotor aircraft.

«The delivery of the 400th V-22 represents the demand for this platform’s unique capabilities. It is a testament to the diligence of the men and

women from Bell, Boeing and our entire supply chain who build and deliver this incredible aircraft to our customers,” said Kurt Fuller, Bell V-22

vice president and Bell Boeing program director. “For over 30 years, the people who support the Bell Boeing V-22 have been the foundation in

bringing tiltrotor capabilities to the world.»

The CV-22 is the Special Operations Forces (SOF) variant of the V-22 Osprey. The CV-22 Osprey is a tiltrotor aircraft that combines

the vertical takeoff, hover and vertical landing qualities of a helicopter with the long-range, fuel efficiency and speed characteristics

of a turboprop aircraft. Its primary mission is to conduct long-range infiltration, exfiltration and resupply missions for Air Commandos

around the world and at a moment’s notice.

«It’s been over 20 years since the first production V-22 was delivered, and we are proud to reach another milestone in our 400th delivery.

V-22s continue to be in high demand, protecting our country and our allies around the world through combat operations, international training

partnerships and humanitarian missions,» said Marine Corps Col. Matthew Kelly, program manager for the V-22 Joint Program Office

(PMA-275). «This platform’s impact can’t be overstated.»

MORE ABOUT V-22 OSPREY

HI I 20


BELL UNVEILS INDUSTRIALISTS ON THE INVICTUS PROGRAM

In his latest press release, Bell Textron Inc. has announced agreements with nine premier aerospace industry leaders to form

Team Invictus. The companies are producing the Bell 360 Invictus prototype submission as part of the U.S. Army’s Future Attack

Reconnaissance Aircraft (FARA) program. Each industry partner brings unique experience and technological expertise to provide a

low-risk path for the Army’s acquisition of a lethal, affordable rotorcraft with advanced mission systems to modernize aviation for multidomain

operations (MDO). «Team Invictus is working together to show how cutting-edge technology will give soldiers the ability to confidently

operate in the complex and contested battlespace of multi-domain operations,” said Chris Gehler, vice president and program director for FARA

at Bell. “Future Vertical Lift is critical for the Army’s ability to win in multi-domain operations with FARA defeating defensive layers and the Future

Long-Range Assault Aircraft (FLRAA) exploiting opened areas to achieve operational objectives.»

Team members are working closely together to deliver the Bell 360 Invictus prototype using a configuration that emphasizes operational

availability, sustainability, and maintainability. The members of Team Invictus include:

• Astronics Corporation for a modular framework of airframe power generation, conversion, and distribution products

• Collins Aerospace for integration of a new generation of avionics hardware and software featuring cyber-hardened and digital backbone

solutions to configure and integrate mission systems

• GE Aviation for the 3,000-SHP T901 engine and working on the aircraft Health Awareness System (HAS)

• ITT-Enidine Inc. for the passive Liquid Inertia Vibration Eliminator (LIVE) units for all modes of operation including high speed

• L3Harris Technologies for the WESCAM MX-15D, an advanced, stabilized multi-sensor, multi-spectral imaging and targeting system

• Parker Lord for rotor dampers, the main rotor CF bearing, the tail rotor tension torsion strap, and the Active Vibration Control (AVC) System

• Mecaer Aviation Group, Inc. for a fully retractable, tail dragger landing gear system

• MOOG Inc. for flight control computer (FCC) electronics, software, and flight control actuation, critical components of the Bell fly-by-wire, Flight

Control System (FCS)

• TRU Simulation + Training for a high-fidelity flight simulator that gives pilots a true sense of the aircraft flight controls

Team Invictus is applying digital design and manufacturing technologies, including maintenance as part of the design process, and use

of emerging commercial practices to bring a holistic view of digital models, processing and analysis to reduce lifecycle maintenance

and servicing requirements—and thus reducing sustainment costs.

«Each team member brings a capability that is vital to the success of the Bell 360 and we are honored to have proven, capable, and wellrespected

industry partners on Team Invictus,» stated Gehler. «This is an outstanding industry team, and we are working diligently to produce

a FARA weapon system that is operationally effective and affordably sustainable, as well as complementary and in many ways common to the

FLRAA program.» Following the selection of the Bell 360 Invictus for the competitive prototype in March 2020, Team Invictus continues

to rapidly move forward. Team Invictus’ collective expertise reduces program risk while preserving the Army’s FARA schedule leading to

a first flight targeted for the fourth quarter of fiscal 2022.

MORE ABOUT BELL 360 INVICTUS

HI I 21


HELICOPTER INDUSTRY I FOCUS I

BY FRÉDÉRIC VERGNÈRES & FRANÇOIS BLANC

©HIOWAA

HI I 22


HI I 23


HELICOPTER INDUSTRY I FOCUS I

©ALAT

OPERATION RESILIENCE:

ALAT IMPLEMENTS ITS NH90S

After the French Air Force, it is the French Army’s turn, and

its’ Aviation Légère de l’Armée de Terre (ALAT) -Light Aviation

Army – to implement its air assets. On March 28th, three

transfers were administered at the benefit of six patients

suffering from Covid-19. The transfers were carried out by

two aircrafts from the 1st Regiment of Helicopter Combat

(1st RHC) in Phalsbourg, in order to relieve hospitals in

the East of France. Flights were carried out in the morning

hours from Metz to Essen (Germany), and from Mulhouse

to Geneva (Switzerland) in the afternoon. On Sunday the

29th, the same aircrafts were also used to evacuate 6 other

patients from Besançon to Grenoble and Clermont-Ferrand;

and from Metz to Essen in Germany. At the end of the daily

missions, the two aircrafts left for Phalsbourg to undergo a

complete decontamination phase.

In order to establish the procedure for transferring intensive

care patients, the 1st RHC worked on the implementation

of an operational protocol in cooperation with GAMSTAT

– Groupement Aéromobilité de la Section Technique de

l’Armée de Terre – Aeromobility Group of the Ground

Army Technical Section, the units of the SAMU – Service

d’Aide Médicale Urgente / Emergency Medical Assistance

Service – and the 2nd Dragon Regiment Régiment de

Dragon, a unit specialized in nuclear, biological and chemical

(NRBC) threats. «The idea was to be able to adapt the existing

equipment to that of the SAMU, thus, limiting as much as

possible the manipulations during the transfers between the

ambulance and the helicopter, but also to preserve the initial

containment of the patient,» said a spokesman of the Alat.

To do so, the teams had to reinvent the NH90 cargo bay to

be able to integrate the two conditioned stretchers and the

resuscitation systems. Models, which are not normally used

on these devices during EVASAN missions abroad.

In addition to the integration of the medical equipment,

all stakeholders had to take into account the isolation

of the cockpit from the rest of the teams in the hold, by

integrating a protective device between the two zones.

The implementation of basic procedures between the crew

and the EMS medical teams were also defined. Through

the integration of military medical personnel and bunker

personnel, they were capable of guaranteeing, not only the

handling of the helicopter’s safety elements (door, cargo

hold, etc.), but also the autonomy of the batteries for the onboard

medical equipment.

HI I 24


Despite the complexity of implementing such a system, the

mission testing and certification phases were completed

in a very short period of time. They were validated the day

before the first mission. However, from the very beginning

of the epidemic and the subsequent containment measures,

GAMSTAT had already envisioned a working hypothesis of

this type of mission, and visualizing the action plan with

the airborne elements available in the territory. Already

particularly solicited by external operations, the 1st RHC in

Phalsbourg remains, after a very busy weekend, on high alert

for new transfer missions. At the moment, there are none

planned, but they can be triggered at any time, based on the

needs of the hospitals. For the General Staff, «these missions,

and the air assets committed to them are used to meet the

needs of the health services, and are carried out on the orders of

the President of the Republic and the Ministry of Solidarity and

Health». The fact remains however, in the event of a crisis

escalation the helicopter system could without problem be

reinforced on other sites in the hexagon, from the Caymans

base at the CFIA – Centre de Formation Inter Armées – in

Le Cannet des Maures and those of the 5th Regiment of

Helicopter Combat (5e RHC) in Pau.

MORE ABOUT ALAT

HI I 25


HELICOPTER INDUSTRY I FOCUS I

©Armee Air

FRENCH AIR FORCE INFLATES

THE « RÉSILIENCE » OPÉRATION

WITH EC725 CARACAL

After the ALAT – Aviation Légère de l’Armée de Terre -, it is

the French Air Force’s turn to use its heliborne assets. As of

April 1st, the French Air Force set up a plot of three Caracals

and six crews of the EH 1/67 Pyrénées at the Villacoublay

Air Base 107, south of Paris. Operations began just a few

hours after the arrival of the machines, as two EC725s each

transferred two Covid-19 patients from the Ile-de-France

region from orly to Caen and Angers.

To keep up with the pace of the missions, the squadron

will also operate the EC225, rented from RTE, for logistical

purposes between the Cazaux base and the Villacoublay

site. Two SA330 Puma from the EH 1/44 Solenzara should

also reinforce the Paris operation in the coming days.

The request for reinforcements for this type of mission is

in fact not really a surprise for the crews from the Pyrenees

who have been preparing for several weeks to be put on

alert for Covid missions of inter-hospital transfers. As soon

as the virus became more powerful, the squadron and the

CEAM – Military Air Test Centre – worked on the possibility

of converting the EC725‘s hold into a medical «cluster»,

following the example of the modifications carried out on

the Army’s NH90.

The hold, which houses the medical equipment, should not

have any electronic interaction with the cockpit in order to

remain fully autonomous. In addition, the crew should be

separated from the rest of the hold by the installation of a

protection system.

With this new mission, the human element should find itself

particularly solicited on several fronts. Currently engaged in

external operations, in particular for «special forces», the EH

1/67, which operates a total of nine EC725 Caracal aircraft,

will also continue to maintain an aircraft and its crew on H24

alert for the public service search and rescue mission.

MORE ABOUT RESILIENCE

HI I 26


CAESAR AT THE BEDSIDE

OF THE ITALIANS

While Italy is paying a heavy price against the Covid-19, with

more than 6,000 deaths to date, the country has set up a

health alert with the Caesar HH-101s from the 9th Stormo

of Grazzanise and the 15th Stormo of Cervia.

On March 6th, the regional emergency and rescue agency

of Lombardy called upon the Italian Air Force to evacuate

a 62-year-old patient suffering from the Coronavirus,

transporting her from Cremona to the Morelli Hospital in

Sondalo (Sondrio). This first mission was carried out from

Cervia, headquarters of the 15th Stormo, specialized in SAR

missions. The helicopter, with a specialised medical team

on board for bio-containment transport, took off from Cervia

shortly after receiving the mission order and reached the

hospital in Cremona, where it loaded the patient. The aircraft

then left again for Bormio, where a subsequent transfer was

completed to the Morelli Hospital in Sondalo.

for possible health surveillance, military infrastructures

spread over the entire peninsula. From Valle d’Aosta to

Sicily, about 2200 rooms and approximately 6600 beds,

including their own medical staff from the Army, Navy, Air

Force and Carabinieri, have been provided at the request of

the Civil Defense in order to meet the needs of the Lombard

territories. According to the Italian Ministry of Defense, «this

operational alert is expected to last more than a month. »

Initially dedicated to search and rescue missions in support

of special operations, the 11 HH-101A Caesar aircraft of the

Italian Air Force are also capable of loading and transporting

special insulated stretchers, A.T.I. (Aircraft Transit Isolator),

designed specifically for air transport in bio-containment of

highly infectious patients. This modular system, equipped

with respiratory equipment, allows the transport of patients

in bio-containment mode. In addition to the HH-101A, the

ATI modules have also been certified for use on the C-130J,

C-27J and KC-767 of the Italian Air Force.

In the last two weeks of march, five such transports have

been carried out by 15° Stormo, with the support of crews

from 9 Wing Grazzanise, who also depart from the Cervia

base to intervene in various locations throughout the Italian

territory.Since the first cases of the contagion were observed

in the north of Italy, the Armed Forces have provided,

MORE ABOUT ITALIAN AIR FORCE

©Aeronautica Militare

HI I 27


HELICOPTER INDUSTRY I FOCUS I

©F.Lert

HEALTH CRISIS: THE FRENCH

GENDARMERIE AIR SUPPORT

Along with army, air force, Sécurité civile and air ambulance

helicopters commitment, rotary-wings aircrafts of the

Gendarmerie nationale, in France, participate in many types

of missions related to the current health crisis. As for the

armed forces and the Sécurité civile, their actions have

multiplied over the past few weeks, as their usual role had to

be maintained in full epidemic.

Since 1953, the Forces Aériennes de la Gendarmerie

nationale, or FAGN (national Gendarmerie air forces), in

France and in French overseas territories, are the only

internal security air forces. In 2020, they consist of 56

helicopters and 32 drones, divided into 23 units in France and

6 units overseas. The rotary-wings aircrafts implemented

by this particular Corps of the helicopter state fleet are of

three types: AS350 (for 26 of them), EC145 and EC135 (15

aircrafts of each type). All those units are commanded by

the CFAGN (Commandement des forces aériennes de la

gendarmerie nationale) from the Vélizy-Villacoublay air

force base, located a few kilometers of Paris. The fleet is

operational 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

It flies between 18 000 and 19 300 hours per year, depending

on the year. In total, 152 pilots are assigned to it, on a global

workforce of 483 officers and non-commissioned officers.

The helicopters operational availability rate is «greater than

80 %, thanks to our mechanics and to the Groupement de

maintien en condition opérationnelle (GMCO) based at Orléans

and Nîmes. The GMCO perform maintenance operations every

1200 hours for the benefit of the AS350s, every 1000 and 800

hours, respectively, on the EC135s and EC145s», said colonel

Emmanuel Sillon, FAGN commander.

Three action frameworks

Deployed year round in the French airspace, Gendarmerie

helicopters work in three areas: information gathering and

decision support tool, intervention and crises management

and, finally, assistance and rescue. The first part includes

policing and judicial police mission. «Air assets allow us

to cover large spaces, to anticipate the evolution of events

on ground and to provide valuable insights to ground units.

Thanks to its on-board advanced equipment, the helicopter is

facing more and more complex internal security missions. The

aforementioned equipment includes a thermal camera able to

film day and night with optimal optical resolution (it allows to

read a licence plate one kilometre away); loudspeakers and a

spotlight capable, for example, of lighting a soccer filed from

300 m high; a winch and a rope jib used for quick commandos

drop-off, such as the GIGN (Groupement d’intervention de la

gendarmerie nationale) or the national police RAID (Recherche,

assistance, intervention, dissuasion).»

In addition to this equipment, a crisis mapping system is

used: the SC2. «SC2 is a complex system which aims within

a few hours to establish a cartography of a possibly modified

environment. In crisis management, time is a strong constraint.

Images acquisition of the situation and associated cartography

acquisition are essential for the conduct of operations. In

crisis, the map becomes obsolete. Satellite images are slow

to come. The crisis upsets usual references: it induces a

change of landscape and of values. However, it is essential

to understand the crisis in all its dimensions (intrinsic nature,

intensity, extent, kinetic). Thus, the SC2 crisis cartography

system brings real operational added value in order to plan,

HI I 28


prepare and conduct operations, both for the military authorities

and for administrative or judicial authorities. Let’s keep in mind

that this cartography system had provided valuable services in

the framework of the French Var department flood occurred in

2019», said colonel Emmanuel Sillon.

Intervention and crisis management

The judicial police mission consists in supporting ground

units looking for, or in pursuit of criminals. On-board

equipment provides forensic evidence.The second part

of the role played by Gendarmerie nationale helicopters

consists in intervention and crisis management. «Helicopter

is a valued ally of counterterrorism capacities and of illegal

immigration control. This was the case during Trèbes hostage

taking, on 23 march 2019, for the projection of intent elements

and intelligence gathering. In the French overseas territories,

in particular in Mayotte, the Gendarmerie air section (SAG:

section aérienne de gendarmerie) peforms administrative police

missions focused on the fight against illegal immigration from

Comoros islands.»

Finally, in terms of assistance and rescue, gendarmerie

helicopters are implemented «at sea and in the mountains

to protect human lives, to ensure the judicial processing of

claims and, thus, to protect victims interests. Where access is

impossible for men and when particular technique is necessary

(hoist), helicopters are taking over.» The health crisis related

to Covid-19 epidemic has required the transfer of many

patients (more than 600 on mid-April) to French hospitals

able to accommodate new patients, but also to care facilities

located in Germany, Switzerland, Luxemburg and Austria.

FAGN were called upon for this. «Vélizy-Villacoublay, Lyon and

Hyères SAGs contribute to these transfers, in order to decongest

saturated hospitals.

The Vélizy-Villacoublay SAG had been integrated in the Paris-Orly

hub.” More precisely, “In the early days of April, seven missions

of this kind had been performed, essentially from the sanitary

hub established at Paris-Orly and Lyon. Two Gendarmerie aerial

units have been solicited: the Vélizy-Villacoubaly and Lyon

SAGs.»

The anti spread fight

Like the other state and private operators called to transfer

infected patients, FAGN has to adapt helicopters layout.

«Our aircrafts are prepared in accordance with the rules issued

by the Ministry of Health for the air ambulance fleets. Those

rules were taken over by Airbus Helicopters through two of

its recent publications. Otherwise, each aircraft is disinfected

after each mission: headset microphone, flight controls and

handles are carefully cared for. The facilities are disinfected

with every crew change. Individually, during these missions,

crews wear protection’s masks, gloves, protective gown, also

in accordance with the standards established by the medical

authorities.» Along those missions, FAGN aircrafts participate

in the support of the internal security forces territorial action,

in relation to the containment measures, «just like vital points

of interest security operations aiming to preserve the people

energy, food and sanitary supply chain.»

MORE ABOUT

GENDARMERIE NATIONALE

HI I 29


HELICOPTER INDUSTRY I FOCUS I

©Leonardo

LEONARDO AT THE HEART

OF COVID-19 TRANSPORT

Faced with the pandemic, manufacturers are adapting and

striving to find new solutions to effectively support the work

of caregivers, particularly during the transfer of patients

from one hospital to another by helicopter.

Italy, which has been particularly affected by Covid-19

in Europe, has been able to benefit from the technologies

introduced by Leonardo in this field. In order to limit the

risk of contagion for the crew and medical personnel,

biological containment solutions specifically developed by

the manufacturer were used for patient transfers. These biocontainment

“cells” have been developed in collaboration

with the aeronautical authorities (ENAC – Italian Civil Aviation

Authority and EASA – European Aviation Safety Agency) and

comply with European standards for air ambulance services.

In addition to its equipment, Leonardo provides in parallel

real-time technical assistance and sanitation procedures

before and after patient transport and specific measures to

be followed when loading patients in order to limit the risk of

Covid-19 contagion.

Adaptation according to the cabin

The installation of the biological containment solution

developed by Leonardo not only optimises the space on board

the helicopters but also completely isolates the pilots and

passengers, while ensuring functionality and airworthiness.

To integrate this solution, Leonardo had to adapt its systems

to the constraints on board the helicopters, such as power

supply and ventilation systems, to make them as efficient as

those used in hospital intensive care units. If the integration

of such a system seems at first sight easy for a heavy

military aircraft with a large cabin, type HH-101 “Caesar”,

the same cannot be said for private operators. In fact, the

manufacturer has proposed specific solutions developed

especially for civil air ambulances, with smaller cabins and

short distance flights of 20 to 30 minutes.

The helicopter: a precious asset for the Covid-19 emergency

According to Leonardo, the devices have thus been integrated

in Italy, on the AW139 and AW169 models – used for medical

aid by several regions – as well as on the HH-101A “Caesar”

helicopters of the 15th Cervia Wing of the Italian Air Force

patient transport, since the beginning of the epidemic. For

its part, Babcock Aviation has obtained approval from the

Italian civil authorities and the British National Health Service

to use specific stretchers with the biological containment

system. Their deployment was also possible on the AW139

and AW169 helicopters in order to guarantee maximum

protection for the medical staff and crew. In the face of the

crisis, Leonardo recalled that helicopters are proving to be

an indispensable asset. More versatile than other types of

transport, the rotary wing remains to this day the safest

and fastest means of transferring patients with Covid-19.

The manufacturer pointed out that its range of aircraft had

carried out numerous missions of this type throughout the

world: from the United Kingdom with the AW159 Wildcat

and AW101 Merlin of the armed forces to the United States

with the operator Bristow Group, via Brazil and the company

Omni Táxi Aéreo, which both operated their AW139s to

evacuate patients potentially affected by the Covid-19.

Activity was also sustained in many other countries,

including Chile, Canada, Malaysia, Australia and Spain.

MORE ABOUT LEONARDO

HI I 30


HELICOPTER INDUSTRY I FOCUS I

©HIOWAA

HAMPSHIRE AIR AMBULANCE JOINS

FORCES WITH THE RAF

While the United Kingdom East has just announced a threeweek

extension of the containment to cope with Covid-19,

air evacuation of patients is intensifying, particularly in the

south of the country. The operator, Hampshire and Isles of

Wight Air Ambulance – HIOWAA – has unveiled that it is one

of the first air ambulance services to work with the Royal Air

Force (RAF) to transport Covid-19 patients. On Tuesday 7

April, members of the HIOWAA Intensive Care Unit were able

to carry out the emergency transfer of a patient from Jersey

to Southampton University Hospital in an RAF Chinook.

Training with the RAF

A mission previously prepared during an exercise carried out

in particular with units from Odiham Air Force Base housing

the Chinooks last week on the Thruxton site of HIOWAA base.

«Our intensive care teams have been working alongside military

personnel to prepare to provide increased support to patients

in the Isle of Wight and other more remote areas during the

Covid-19 pandemic,» said the teams from the Charitable Care

Unit. During the exercise, the doctors and nurses simulated

the loading of critically ill patients and provide constant care

support within the cargo holds of the rotary wing aircraft

currently in service with the RAF, namely Chinook HC6,

Puma HC2 and Merlin HC3. The operational procedures

practiced during this exercise have been incorporated into

new operational procedures being developed to oversee the

collaboration between military crews and air ambulance

services across the country.

For Alex Lochrane, President and CEO of HIOWAA, these

missions are vitally important because «It is absolutely our

duty to do everything we can to ensure that patients on the Isle

of Wight, and other more remote areas, receive the critical care

they need during the current pandemic. This is an extremely

impressive and vitally important collaboration with the RAF

and I am immensely proud of our intensive care clinicians and

the Group Care Management team at Southampton University

Hospital, who have responded with flexibility and total

disinterest to the rapidly evolving health crisis, demonstrating

their usual professionalism, dedication and teamwork».

The units on board the Odiham Chinooks

Following this initial operation, the charity’s ambulance and

medical teams are now expected to be integrated de facto on

board military helicopters, particularly Chinooks operating

in the region to provide urgent critical care to patients who

will be transferred to the country’s major trauma centres,

including Southampton University Hospital and the new NHS

Nightingale Hospital at the ExCel centre in London. To meet

the need for emergency medical evacuations in the south

of the country, three Chinook helicopters, each capable of

transporting up to two ventilated patients each, have been

placed on standby at the Odiham base in Hampshire. The

use of these helicopters is proving to be particularly vital

as Dr Simon Hughes, HIOWAA’s senior consultant in prehospital

emergency medicine for over 10 years, who led the

joint training session, points out: «The Chinook not only has

the advantage of range and speed, but also offers more cabin

space than the EC135 operated by HIOWAA, allowing us to

continue treating patients who could potentially be positive on

the Covid-19, while maintaining a safe distance from the military

crew».

In addition to the Covid missions, the charity’s teams

continue to respond to critically ill patients throughout the

region, implementing the EC135 that the charity received in

2015 to replace an identical aircraft delivered in 2010.

MORE ABOUT RAF

HI I 32


©HIOWAA ©Charlotte Cotronis

FRENCH EMERGENCY MEDICAL

SERVICE HELICOPTERS

IN THE FRONT LINE

Helicopter medical rescue, in France, switched in “Covid-19

mode”. A business manager of SAF Hélicoptères, one of

four companies beside Babcock, MBH and NHV serving

the Service d’aide médicale urgente (SAMU) in the

country, including French overseas territories, recalls the

arrangements made the benefit of hospitals and their

patients.

Basically, their mission doesn’t change beyond measure.

Transporting patients from one hospital to another in suitable

safety and sanitary conditions is, indeed, their daily tasks.

Since the appearance of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, helicopter

transport companies under contract with care facilities, in

France, saw evolve the order of priorities. «Apart from any

crisis situation, SAF Hélicoptères transports 5 500 patients per

year, carries out 7 000 missions in about 6 000 flight hours.

In full Covid-19 epidemic, it’s impossible for the time being to

predict if this activity level will be matched or exceeded. But it is

certain that the mobilization of crews and helicopters is total»,

said Marc Latour, helicopter pilot, business development

manager at SAF Hélicoptères. Total, indeed, and everybody

knows why. From the French people point of view, the peak

of the epidemic seems to be in the process of being reached.

In other words, the crisis took unseen proportions until then.

In Paris area, where healthcare infrastructure is known as

the largest in Europe, facilities are saturated.

To free up space in intensive care units

The medical rescue helicopter is called to play a new role,

in addition to the one he usually plays. It’s implemented to

free up beds in saturated intensive care units, transporting

patients to more or less distant facilities able to accommodate

them. «Our other activity areas, such as aerial work, passenger

transportation (both VIP and tourists) and training, record a

sharp decline. The usual medical transportation also tends

to decrease, because the medical emergency isn’t managed

as it usually is», said Marc Latour. In these dark hours,

the 16 helicopters deployed by SAF Hélicoptères from

their ten air bases (most of them are located south of a

Toulouse-Besançon line) are now solicited on a new field of

operations. «Crews must serve hospital platforms they aren’t

necessarily used to go to.» History will perhaps remember

that at the start of the epidemic, doctors didn’t plan to use

helicopters to transport patients infected with SARS-CoV-2.

But the speed of virus propagation as well as the number of

registered cases in a to short period of time changed their

minds.

Protected crews

Simultaneously, this unexpected transportation mission

required new measures: the crew protection – pilot and

flight attendant. «Crews wear protection masks at least. When

it comes to transport people infected with the Covid-19 virus

and showing signs of acute pathology, we erected a separation

barrier between the cockpit and the cabin where doctors,

nurses and patients take place. This barrier is materialized by

a kind of plastic transparent tarpaulin. As it is confirmed that

the patient is infected with the SARS-CoV-2, in addition to the

mask, our staffs wear a cap covering the hair and the ears,

protection glasses and gloves.» It is clear that the culture of

medical emergency, year after year accumulated experience

in association with the medical staff greatly facilitates the

task of all the professionals involved in a fight that no one

expected.

MORE ABOUT SAMU

HI I 33


HELICOPTER INDUSTRY I FOCUS I

©Pecchi.

SÉCURITÉ CIVILE:

THE « DRAGONS » IN THE EARLY

HOURS OF THE EPIDEMIC

Very discreet in the major French national media, Sécurité

Civile was nevertheless the first to intervene in missions to

transfer patients with COVID-19.

At the end of February, the helicopters Dragon 75 unit carried

out the first medical evacuation for a patient infected in the

Oise, who unfortunately died a few days later. This mission

was carried out, even though the WHO had not yet qualified

COVID-19 as a pandemic. «The data at the time was very

random concerning the risks related to the epidemic. Therefore,

at the completion of the first mission, the command ordered

a quarantine of the crew, whose screening fortunately proved

to be negative,» said the spokesman for the Sécurité Civile.

Moving ahead, they would be the first heliborne unit to be

called upon because of its daily experience and its ability to

carry out such missions, as the spokesman emphasizes once

again: «Unlike the army helicopters, which require an adaptation

of the cargo bay layout for medical transport, the Sécurité

Civile EC145s are already planned to receive a configuration

with specific medical equipment, in particular for the transfer

of patients suffering from serious pathologies. Moreover, the

cargo compartment is perfectly autonomous, and there is no

electronic interaction between the cabin and the cockpit. Our

aircraft have been designed from the outset to carry out several

missions, including the vital mission of medical evacuation». In

addition to its first intervention in the Oise at the beginning

of the epidemic and before the crisis developed in the East,

Sécurité Civile had already gone to the front by intervening in

French Guiana on the cluster of Saint-Laurent du Maroni in

order to carry out transfers to Cayennes.

Grand Est district

Since the beginning of the confinement, the Dragons of Grand

Est district units based in Strasbourg and Besançon have

been particularly solicited. They had to respond very quickly

to the first requests for inter-hospital transfer missions in

order to relieve congested hospitals in the region. These

were first-rate missions, which did not, however, escape

certain conflicts between the various administrations

concerned. Paradoxically, solidarity and teamwork do not

always seem to be appropriate in an emergency context.

Despite these few pitfalls, the missions proved particularly

intense in this region for the two helicopters, which had to

call on a third machine from Haute-Savoie, as the Sécurité

Civile command emphasised: «Following the confinement,

activity in the mountains was almost nil, which enabled us to

disengage a helicopter from Haute-Savoie to the Grand Est

plot. Today, the fleet in the area has three helicopters, and the

possibility of a fourth, if necessary».

Second wave

Extremely connected with the Eastern sector, Sécurité Civile

also had to deal with the first interventions in the Paris

region. These transfers, which begun on March 29th, have

helped to relieve congestion in certain Parisian hospitals,

to those in the Tourangelle and Indre-et-Loire regions. As

with previous COVID missions, procedures remain strict

during flights, including suitable equipment for the crews

(waterproof gowns, masks…) even when they are returning

HI I 34


from missions. Some units have reinforced their measures,

such as Dragon 20 based in Ajaccio, which has installed

plastic protection to isolate the cockpit from the cargo, thus

helping to limit the risks of contamination during COVID-19

transfers. The disinfection protocol for both crews and

machines is particularly strict and can take several minutes.

maintain our crews’ condition, in order to preserve them as long

as possible.» An objective that we hope will be sustainable,

as we cannot forget those hidden units during the daily

national applause to say thank you.

Despite a spike in the epidemic, which does not seem to

have reached a peak point according to the authorities, the

Dragon 75 site at Issy Les Moulineaux could nevertheless

accommodate new machines. «But nothing is set in stone,»

said the spokesman. The daily management of helicopters

is being carried out by the SAMU, according to the needs

and regions, but also based on the availability of an aircraft,

whether it’s operated by the Sécurité Civile, the SAMU, the

ALAT – Light Aviation Army, or the Air Force. In order to

plan flights, the Sécurité Civile staff and the different

heliborne units, such as: the SAMU, the Army, and recently

the Air Force, should evaluate and determine the different

hypotheses concerning the distribution of helicopters, along

with the possible reinforcements needed at certain locations

throughout the hexagon, according to the spread of the virus.

The Dragons recorded their 100th mission on March 29th,

proving their effectiveness. And, the number of operations of

this type, across the across the territory, has not weakened.

According to the Sécurité Civile spokesman, an average of

eight to twelve flights a day are now conducted for patients

suffering from COVID-19 throughout the territory. In total,

more than 180 hours have been logged in the last 15 days

for this mission alone. And, the pace of crews is not slowing

down. In fact, the staff says, they have to «readjust the

workload of the crews and maintenance mechanics according

to their needs.» For the moment, according to the spokesman

of the entity, «The objective is to last throughout the period, and

MORE ABOUT

SÉCURITÉ CIVILE

©Ministère de l’intérieur

HI I 35


HELICOPTER INDUSTRY I INTERVIEW I

HI I 36


EXECUTIVE VICE-PRESIDENT

CUSTOMER SUPPORT AND SERVICES

AT AIRBUS HELICOPTERS

BY FRANÇOIS BLANC

©AIRBUS HELICOPTERS

HI I 37


HELICOPTER INDUSTRY I INTERVIEW I

C

hristoph Zammert, executive vice-president of

customer support and services at Airbus Helicopters,

describes the events of the last four months of the current

year. He talks about the role of the manufacturer in the

development of specific technical solutions in the midst

of the health crisis. He also explains how the spare parts

supply intended for its customers never stopped.

HI: When did Airbus Helicopters take into account the arrival

of a global pandemic?

Christoph Zammert: We went through two phases. And I

imagine that we did as others have done, because the crisis,

or pandemic, has its origins in China. We have a strong

presence in China. We were confronted with this virus for

the first time on our premises there; and confronted with the

way China handled it. Early on, containment measures were

taken, which disrupted our Chinese customers. But I imagine

that like many people, we first saw it as a local phenomenon.

Unfortunately, it didn’t stay that way. Quite early on, from

the end of February, at the very beginning of March, when

we saw the first cases in Europe, we understood that we

had to face a global, worldwide pandemic, as we may have

experienced during the SARS era, for example. We launched

an internal reflection on the scope of the phenomenon, both

for us, our business, but also for the business of our clients.

At the same time, we were contacted by customers who

started asking us questions. We have a tool that i allows

us to capture all the questions asked by our customers, so

we are able to see themes that appear, that are out of the

ordinary. And we recorded several types of questions. In the

beginning, everything was related to the means, products

and procedures for disinfecting cabins. We started thinking

about it. We talked to our colleagues in the group, both

Airbus Defence & Space and Airbus Commercial, because

they were facing the same problems. The theme itself was

not new. So we were able to concentrate all this in a first

information note that we distributed to our customers on

March 10, 2020. As we went along, we updated tis notice,

because we heard from operators that the recommended

products were not readily available, or that the procedures

were not necessarily suited to their operations. We have

therefore took the opportunity to issue an update. After this

period, the need arose to separate the cockpit from the cabin

to exclude, or minimize, the risk of infection to the pilots.

So we have undertaken several things. We looked at what

was already on the market, in terms of STCs [Supplemental

Type Certificates], and where this was not possible, where

there was no solution adapted to the platforms in question,

we developed solutions with some of our customers: we

collected some good ideas from our engineers or from our

customers. Thus, we have developed quick solutions, which

we have subsequently certified with the authorities.

HI I 38


HI: Are you talking about the European Aviation Safety Agency

(EASA)?

CZ: Yes, absolutely. So the first question was about

disinfection. Then came the segregation of the cabin. But

cabin segregation also means separation of ventilation flows

in air conditioning systems. We have therefore developed

solutions to block or segregate air flows where possible. Then

we received questions related to the operators’ operations.

Wherever possible, we proceeded to validate their technical

solutions. For example, there is a need for electrical current

transformers. In order to be able to transport patients with

their ventilators, solutions had to be found to allow them to

operate on 220 volts AC, not 28 volts DC. Either we proposed

solutions that exist on the market or customers proposed

solutions that they wanted to implement. We did analyses

and then issued what we call “No technical objections”,

technical approvals.

HI: Still under EASA?

CZ: Yes and no: through our Authorized Designer Approval,

we can give a “No Technical Objection”. It’s covered by our

approval. Between the first questions and the first structured

answer, generalized to all operators, we took less than two

weeks.

HI: Another sub-question: From which regions of the world did

the first questions from come?

CZ: Europe. It was kind of like tracking the virus. The

questions arrived in Europe from French, Italian and then

German operators. Two to three weeks later, they came

from North America. Faced with these demands, we have

undertaken several things. We have published briefing notes

through which we can easily reach all of our clients. But we

have also reinforced our usual communication flow to our

customers that we considered critical in this pandemic: EMS

operators (patient transport), para-public operators (police)

and military operators, in order to understand their needs

and pass on a certain amount of information to reassure

them, for example about our supply chain or our logistics

situation at the moment. We also heard their questions and

considered solutions to their problems, because being close

to the customers is something that is important to us. This

led us to update the briefing notes we had developed. Finally,

we reached our critical customers at least once every two

weeks through our network of customer support managers.

So we’re dealing with about 450 questions a week. Many

of them concern the world of medical transport – EMS,

protection, disinfection, separation. Now the customers are

changing. Because the implementation of these solutions

proves to be costly. Secondly, we received more and more

questions about what they call PID (Patient Isolation

Devices), those kinds of cocoons that completely isolate the

patient. Here again, we have issued technical approvals and

given advice on the integration of this equipment in the cabin,

power supply, oxygenation. All this concerns professionals

who are fighting the pandemic directly. But there were also

other requests, in connection with the French operation

“Résilience”, when the government fleets began to be used.

We’ve seen the NH90s, the Cougars and the Caracal come

on the scene. Through our organisation, which manages

the French customer, we have developed solutions adapted

jointly with the operators. We have also received comparable

requests from Germany and Sweden. In their case, we do not

have the same airworthiness constraints, because it is often

the customer himself who is his own authority in this area:

he can more easily, not certify, but qualify the solution. At

the same time, we have all other customers to manage – we

follow 420 EMS, parapublic and military operators. We have

noticed, through the questions asked, that an evolution is

taking place: we are dealing with more and more questions

about the temporary immobilization of machines. For

example, in the United States, almost all tourist flights are

banned by the government. Customers then want to place

their machines in temporary storage. They sometimes show

a willingness to anticipate some maintenance tasks. We are

therefore taking a lot of questions into account in this sense.

All this leads us to think about how we can be proactive in

the prospect of deconfinement of helicopters, because if

customers have immobilized machines for several weeks or

even months in sometimes hostile environments (extreme

cold, heat, humidity, salty air), we must be proactive in order

to limit the risks associated with return to service as much

as possible.

HI I 39


HELICOPTER INDUSTRY I INTERVIEW I

HI: What is the profile of the suppliers of the equipment you

approve, in particular for separating cabin and cockpit?

CZ: These are companies we know. Usually, a supplier who

has developed something, who has his own Supplemental

Type Certificate (STC), wants us to validate this solution, to

label it. We are in contact with a number of suppliers who

hold a STC. On our Airbus World portal, we give access to

a very large number of STCs, those that we have labelled.

Sometimes large customers have developed their own

solutions and submit them to us for approval.

But the vast majority were like us – they took the time to

reconfigure themselves. Where difficulties have arisen, and

we need to be agile and innovative, is in the area of logistics

solutions. Because with all the commercial flights that have

all but disappeared, we have lost a lot of capacity to transport

parts. But we always find solutions, even if this remedy has

become very expensive. It is also a way of supporting our

customers: we do not pass on these increased transport

costs in our invoices.

HI: 8% down, that seems very little. How can I explain it?

HI : From an aerospace manufacturing industrial point of view,

has this health crisis event changed the situation?

CZ: Everything works! All our production sites, assembly

lines, spare parts, are running, but at a slightly slower pace.

Why? A number of staff have to keep their children as long

as the schools are or were closed. On the other hand, we

have people who are more or less in poor health, so they

can’t take the risk of coming to work. Let us add that last

March, for four days, we significantly reduced our industrial

activities, the time it took to reconfigure the workstations,

in other words, to put in place a system of team relief and

cleaning procedures to limit or avoid the risk of infection as

much as possible. We are quite proud of the fact that we

have not had any cases of infection in the workplace. Our

entire customer support business continues to operate.

This is also important for us; and reassuring: activity in

terms of spare parts orders and deliveries has not declined.

Because in terms of global flying hours, we are seeing a

slight decrease (by about 8%), because there are people who

are flying less, or who cannot fly at the moment. But we are

lucky: for the moment, we are very little affected. Suppliers

have experienced some problems because they also have

concerns about the presence of staff, or supply problems.

That’s why we monitor our supplier network very closely

to pick up any weak signals that could indicate a problem.

CZ: Already the Airbus Helicopters fleet is very diversified.

The parapublic, military, EMS sectors continue to fly –

sometimes even more than before. The Oil & Gas sector is

very much affected by the consequences of the fall in the

price per barrel. However, because it also has exceptional

passenger separation provisions, operators have to operate

more machines with fewer people on board. We will see how

the flight hours will evolve over time.

HI: Does that mean that the share of tourist flights is quite low

in any case ?

CZ: Yes and no. For example, when we look at Hawaii, the

Grand Canyon in the United States and these kinds of air

operations in the northern hemisphere, they tend to be more

active in the summer. So the season is still to come. In

Europe, we were rather at the end of the heli-skiing season.

The consequences of the health crisis have therefore been,

and are still being, weighed.

MORE ABOUT AIRBUS

HELICOPTERS

HI I 40


HI I XX


HELICOPTER INDUSTRY I MILITARY I

HI I 42


APRIL THE 16TH OF 2020 MARKED THE 75TH ANNIVERSARY OF 298 SQUADRON

WHICH IS CURRENTLY OPERATING A FORCE OF TEN CH-47D ‘CHINOOKS’ AND IS

AWAITING DELIVERY OF TWENTY CH-47F MY II CAAS CHINOOKS (US ARMY MULTI

YEAR II PROGRAM, COMMON AVIONICS ARCHITECTURE SYSTEM) AS REPLACEMENT.

X DUE TO THE COVID-19 CRISIS THE PLANNED 75TH ANNIVERSARY IS POSTPONED

TO A LATER MOMENT.

BY CARLO KUIT & PAUL KIEVIT

© PAUL KIEVIT

HI I 43


HELICOPTER INDUSTRY I MILITARY I

E

specially this Covid-19 and the introduction of the new

Chinook fleet is on top of the mind of Lt Col. Niels van

den Berg, the current Commander of 298 squadron. Niels

transitioned from 300 Squadron during 2011 and is 298

Commander since September 2018. «My main focus is to

have stability in the squadron. We worked very hard over the last

seven years implementing new procedures, quality assurance

and improve operations which has shown to be successful.

There is no need to change». Niels continues «The big challenge

for the squadron is implementing the new CH-47F fleet and

remain open for business to support international missions. The

moment we have both the new CH-47F and legacy CH-47Ds in

use with the squadron this will be a turning point in potentially

briefly impacting availability for operations. We expect under

the current Covid-19 situation to be completed with the

conversion by 2022». The first new CH-47Fs are expected

to arrive in Royal Netherlands Air Force during December

2020. As Boeing Philadelphia has been identified as Critical

Infrastructure the impact by Covid-19 has been minimal. The

total number of new CH-47F MYII CAAS Chinooks within the

Royal Netherlands Air Force will be twenty. Fifteen will be

assigned to 298 Squadron at Gilze-Rijen Air Base while five

remain with 302 Squadron at Fort Hood in the United States.

HI I 44


COVID-19 CRISIS IMPACT

“After the announcement by Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte

on the 16th of March, in which the intelligent lockdown was

announced in the Netherlands, we took a week and a half to

rethink how we as squadron would move forward” according to

Niels. “We decided to focus on crew checks, flight currencies

and certification flights to safeguard our basic skillset and

readiness status as we are not able to set up complex exercises

with our sister squadrons (300 and 301 Squadron) and the 11

Air Mobile Brigade. We have about half of the squadron working

from home and rotate personnel every other couple of days to

avoid risks of virus infection. Luckily 2019 has been a very good

year for us in terms of training and flight hours. Therefore, we

can absorb a bit before we are being negatively impacted” Niels

adds. The Helicopter Weapons Instructor Course (HWIC) which

was taking place at that moment in Germany was cancelled

mid-March. “Currently we only allow four persons for planning

and the execution of flights. Therefore, we work in solitude as

squadron”.

DEFENSE HELICOPTER COMMAND (DHC)

The Heavy Rotary Squadron is one of four flying squadrons

which are part of the Defense Helicopter Command

(DHC). Since the establishment of the DHC in July 2008,

298 Squadron transferred to Gilze-Rijen Air Base from

Soesterberg Air Base. The purpose of the DHC is to integrate

all of the Helicopter Units of the Royal Netherlands Air Force

(AH-64Ds, AS532U2s, CH-47D/Fs and NH90s) under one

Central Command structure across two airbases and save

costs. Only the NH-90 fleet of 860 Squadron is based at Naval

Air Station De Kooy in the Northern part of The Netherlands.

The other three units reside at Gilze-Rijen Air Base.

HISTORY OF THE 298 SQUADRON

The squadron has its heritage dating back to April the 16th,

1945 when the squadron was operating at Gilze-Rijen Air

Base as «No. 6 Dutch Auster Squadron» with six Auster’s. Soon

after the end of World War 2 the Squadron was transferred to

the Dutch West Indies. On March the 1th, 1950, 298 AOP (Air

Observation Post) was established. Over the years, ‘298’ has

flown various types of aircraft and helicopters. The Auster’s

were replaced by L-18C «Piper Cubs» and L-21B ‘Super Cubs’

to support the role of artillery spotters. The first Helicopter

arrived in 1955 (H-23B «Raven»). The Alouette II followed

in 1959 for ‘Search and Rescue’ (SAR) missions. These

were replaced by Alouette IIIs from 1964 onwards. Twelve

Bo-105C «Bolköw» helicopters were also part of the 298

Squadron from 1975 to 1979.

THE NEW CH-47 MY II CAAS

CHINOOK

In the period 2010-2015, The Netherlands prepared for

the replacement of the ageing 11 D-models as well as the

expansion of the Chinook fleet with three helicopters. After

extensive deliberations, the standard US Army MYII CAAS

configuration was considered to be the most efficient choice

for a successor. The Netherlands was able to utilize options

in the existing MYII production contract between US Army

and Boeing. For that, the Letter of Offer and Acceptance

(LOA) with the US Army for fourteen new CH-47F MYII

CAAS Chinooks was signed on November the 12th, 2015.

On April the 14th, 2016 the US Department of Defense

awarded Boeing a contract to build 12 CH-47Fs followed by

an additional order on April the 28th, 2017 for the remaining

two new CH-47F’s.

HI I 45


HELICOPTER INDUSTRY I MILITARY I

In order to prevent a “mixed fleet” of CAAS and ACMS Chinooks,

which would have been costly during the sustainment

of the fleet, it was then decided to renew and modernize

the six ACMS F-models. On December the 14th, 2017 The

Netherlands and Boeing signed the Direct Commercial Sales

contract for the Renew Program, converting the six ACMS

F-models into the exact same configuration as the 14 new

Chinooks.

Operating the standard MYII CAAS Chinook will allow

for further optimization of operations, training and

maintenance. «We have had a lot of contact with the US Army

and the Australian MOD being existing operators, to understand

potential challenges we might encounter when fielding the

new Chinooks. When we deliver them to the RNLAF (Royal

Netherlands Air Force), we want to make sure that there are no

obstacles and that they will be able to operate and sustain the

helicopters during the first three years. This period will allow

the RNLAF to become self-supporting when it comes to inservice

support» according to Colonel Koen van Gogh, Senior

Project Manager Defense Material Organization (DMO)

who is responsible for the Replacement and Modernization

programme Chinook.

«At around 2500 parts of the legacy CH-47Fs will be reused.

These parts will be overhauled (zero hours status) before

being installed on brand-new MYII CAAS airframes. This option

turned out to be more efficient and affordable than modifying

the legacy CH-47F fleet. The first idea was to just replace the

ACMS cockpit of the legacy Fs by a MYII CAAS Cockpit. We

concluded the risk was too big in terms of certification and

costs» according to Colonel van Gogh. «The legacy CH-47Fs

are now sent to ‘Summit Aviation’ who are tasked by Boeing

under the Renew contract to remove the usable parts from the

helicopters and have them delivered into the overhaul process.»

Summit Aviation is an Industry Leader in Aircraft

Maintenance, Repair, Avionics upgrades, Mission System

Integration, Modifications and Aircraft sales.

The new CH-47F MY II CAAS Chinook comes with the

short nose, which differs from the current «F» version in

appearance. This meant there is no room for our current

Weather Radar. Also, the FLIR system under the nose will

not be implemented. Another striking difference is the

Woodland Desert Sage Color Scheme, instead of the current

grey scheme.

«Although the main goal was to stay common with the US

Army, Dutch operating intent and national legislation led to the

addition of some unique modifications. Fortunately, there is no

need to integrate these into CAAS, so commonality will not be

affected.» The additional Dutch requirements such include

Crashworthy Crew Seats with ballistic protection, leading

to modified MFCUs (MultiFunctional Control Units), a LH

Removable escape Hatch, a Hook Load Measuring System,

an Ice Detection System, a Pitot Heater Failure Indicator,

FRIES (Fast Rope Ingress and Egress System), including

external hardpoints, and a minor change to the electrical

system, all which can be implemented during the production.

A Fall Protection System to protect maintainers, and an

Emergency Locator Transmitter are implemented by «SES-I»

(Science and Engineering Services) in Huntsville, Alabama

as ‘Post Production Modifications’. «We choose for ‘SES-I’

because they did similar work for the US Army and to make

sure we do not interfere with the work performed on the Boeing

production line» explains Colonel van Gogh.

On March the 20th 2020, the first Royal Netherlands Air Force

CH-47Fs have made their maiden flight during acceptance at

Boeing Philadelphia (registration D-472 and D-473).

HI I 46


These two helicopters left Boeing Ridley Park to be ferried to

Huntsville in Alabama on the 5th of May 2020 for validation

and verification by the US Army and the Post Production

Modifications by «SES-I». «These two helicopters are planned

to be the first CH-47s to be send to The Netherlands by

December 2020. After arrival in the Port of Antwerp, Belgium,

the helicopters will be transported to Woensdrecht Air Base in

The Netherlands where they will be prepared to be transferred to

298 Squadron with an expected arrival at Gilze-Rijen around mid-

January 2021» according to Colonel van Gogh. These two CH-

47Fs will have all our additional requirements implemented

and will have the Digital Automated Flight Control System

(DAFCS) 3.5 software and CAAS 9.4 installed. The Colonel

continues «In order to support a tight conversion schedule

of our flight crew to the MYII CAAS Chinook, we decided that

the next six CH-47Fs coming from the production line will not

undergo the Post Modification until a later date. These six

Chinooks will go to Fort Hood, TX (USA) directly to be used for

conversion training. The next batch of CH-47Fs will be delivered

after the Post Modification. The earlier unmodified CH-47s will

then be rotating through ‘SES-I’ to complete the process of

modification as well. During January-February 2021 we have

planned the arrival of another two CH-47s to the Netherlands,

these will be airframes built with retrofitted parts of the legacy

CH-47Fs». Concludes the Colonel.

To support the transition and difference training, a

Transportable Flight Proficiency Simulator (TFPS) has

been procured from NAVAIR (Naval Air Systems) Manned

Flight Simulator Enterprise Team which is stationed at NAS

Patuxent River (US). «The procurement of a TFPS, stationed

at Gilze-Rijen, will be more efficient for the Squadron as there

will no longer be a need to train in the simulator at the Royal

Air Force at RAF Benson Air Base» continues Koen van Gogh.

«The TFPS has already arrived at Gilze-Rijen Air Base and we

are awaiting a team from NAVAIR to do the final acceptance

testing of the Simulator. The TFPS will need to be ready before

the first group Instructor Pilots is scheduled to receive their

Conversion Training at Fort Hood, since the TFPS will be used

for the crew’s Ground School/ Academics training at Gilze-Rijen

Air Base before they head to Ft. Hood for the flight training.

Each Aviator will undergo a three-week training on the Simulator

before attending a three-week course with 302 Squadron in the

US and participating in an American Falcon exercise, held four

times a year. Upon return to the Netherlands the Aviators will be

Fully Qualified Pilots on the MYII CAAS Chinook».

Lt Colonel van den Berg adds «We had planned to send a socalled

Class 0 to Fort Hood in the US during the June-July 2020

period for the Instructor Course on the MY II CAAS variant. As

we have five flights with five crews, we have fifty pilots and fifty

loadmasters to train, resulting in five training classes at Fort

Hood. This Transition Training is planned to be executed over

an eighteen-month period. We will have a team from the US

Army to support the Conversion, a so-called NETT Team (New

Equipment Training Team)”, both locally at Gilze-Rijen as in Ft.

Hood. Expectation is to achieve Full Operational Capable status

by mid-2022 with the Initial Operational Capability (IOC) by

October 2021».

HI I 47


HELICOPTER INDUSTRY I MILITARY I

MISSIONS OF THE PAST

«Nihil Nobis Nimium» or «Nothing is too much» is the motto

of the 298 Squadron. The Squadron has been involved

in many missions and oversea deployments since it has

been operating with the CH-47D/F. Kosovo (KFOR, 1999),

Allied Harbor in Albania and a year later for UNMEE (United

Nations Mission in Ethiopia and Eritrea). From January 2001

till May 2004, the Royal Netherlands Air Force detachments

contributed to NATO’s Stabilization Force (SFOR) in Bosnia.

From July 2003 to November 2005 they served in Iraq. The

detachment provided transport for the Stabilization Force in

Iraq (SFIR) for the Dutch military personnel from the Security

Forces. From May 2005 to June 2006, three Chinooks were

deployed for the Dutch Special Forces deployment for

Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF). Two Chinooks were

lost due to accidents in 2005 during these operations. As

of 2007 to October 2010, 298 Squadron was regularly active

from Kandahar Airfield in Afghanistan in support of NATO

Operation ISAF (International Security Assistance Force).

And lastly from April 2014 to April 2017, three Chinooks

participated in the «Minusma» Mission. This UN Mission was

designed to restore Peace and Stability in Mali.

TRAINING IN THE US

«The initial training for new crews is conducted at Fort Rucker

Air Base (US) as part of the Chinook Aircraft Qualification

Course. After completing the course new crews are continuing

their training with the Squadron at Gilze-Rijen Air Base». 2 nd LT

‘Frank’ explains. «We were planned to travel to Fort Hood to

have a ten-week training period with 302 Squadron as part of

the Mission Qualification Training (MQT)». This squadron

provides Joint Air Assault Training for Helicopter Crews of

the Defense Helicopter Command (DHC) and ground units of

11 Airmobile Brigade, this will take place during four times

a year with the ‘American Falcon’ exercise to conclude the

training. In addition, Pilots and Load-Masters follow the Initial

Mission Qualification Training twice a year. The squadron is

staffed with personnel from the Royal Netherlands Air Force,

Army, and the US Army. Frank continues «our group consists

of a mixture of a CH-47 loadmaster, Pilot, but also AH-64 pilots.

Just before we would travel it became clear that we would not

go to the US. Due to the Covid-19 situation the original schedule

will require revision as currently 302 Squadron stood down

with no training activities. We are now being trained within

the Squadron here in The Netherlands. This means we all have

to be flexible to cater for the further Education as Training is

conducted alongside daily operations». Captain Booze details

further «The Defense Helicopter Command is a more complex

organization to cater for this ad-hoc additional training. Luckily,

we managed to be flexible and had a fast resolution in place.

The focus for training is now on Tactical Exercises, Navigational

Skills and Planning of Flights. In order to provide best possible

training, we need to have Instructor Pilots and Ground Forces

to act as Enemy Forces. As we cannot fully focus on the MQT

training the duration will be longer than the 10-week period at

Fort Hood”.

HI I 48


FIREFIGHTING

The Netherlands have been confronted with the largest wild

fires in 40 years in the Southern part of the Netherlands,

Deurnsche Peel and Herkenbosch, during the third week

of April 2020. Starting off with one supporting Chinook it

resulted in a combined FBO (Fire Bucket Operations) effort

of four Chinooks, an AS 532 Cougar, Mobile Air Operations

Teams (MAOT) and the Local Fire Brigades. ‘In case we are

asked to support Firefighting Operations the Tasking Order

is provided by NASOC (National Air and Space Operations

Center) to the Staff of DHC’ adds Niels. «The week before the

fires started, we already had been asked to have one helicopter

on standby”. Christiaan Velthausz, on-scene Commander and

part of the Fire Department: “Under normal circumstances,

the Ministry of Defense generally supplies Helicopter Capacity

within 24 hours of the request. Although in practice this is a lot

faster, usually about 3 to 4 hours. In the event of an increased

risk of wildfires, FBO and therefore the Helicopters can be put

at 2 hours’ notice to move». «During the Firefighting we had

on average five to ten MAOT (Mobile Air Operations Team)

personnel to support the FBO operations». The main lessons

learned have been to work on a large-scale bases for a long

period in a complex setting’ according to Sergeant-Major

Rob van Mierlo, Commander MAOT. From the 1st of April

2020 onwards MAOT has a team on standby continuously,

ready to set off within 2 hours.

«In the event of very large or difficult-to-combat fires, the

(Civil) Heli-Team Fire Team with Helicopters and the Mobile

Air Operations Team (MAOT) of DHC form the so-called «Fire

Bucket Operations (FBO) Team». This team works together

with the Local Fire Brigade on site. “About 10 years ago, the

Defense Organization requested a single Point of Contact for

extinguishing operations; that became the Heli-Team Fire

Brigade», according to Christiaan Velthausz, the on-scene

Commander.

«We have a total of 10 Bambi Buckets which can hold in theory

10,000L of water. “During FBO operations we only drop 8,000L

each time as with full capacity to prevent engine over torque as

we demand all power available with full fuel load so it is safer to

carry less without a risk having to return due to potential over

torque”. adds Captain Boezen. One of the loadmasters, who

was involved in the firefighting is ‘Jimmy’ explains “We had an

observer of the Fire Department joining our flights who had a

map showing coordinates where to drop the water. My task was

to inform the Pilots on the coordinates where to drop water.

After each drop, we received direct feedback by Local Observers

on the ground if our drop was successful. This worked out

perfectly». Over a 5-day period more then 3,2MIO Liters of

water was dropped during 540 individual drops.

MORE ABOUT CH-47D CHINOOK

HI I 49


HELICOPTER INDUSTRY I NEW TECHNOLOGIES I

NEXT SUMMER, THE MARS 2020 PROBE IS SET TO LEAVE FOR THE RED PLANET FOR A NEW

ROUND OF EXPLORATION. ON BOARD WILL BE A ROVER AND... A HELICOPTER! AFTER HAVING

TESTED MANY VEHICLES ON THE MOON AND ON MARS, THIS IS THE POINT WHERE MANKIND

WILL SEND THEIR FIRST FLYING MACHINE TO ANOTHER PLANET.

BY FRÉDÉRIC LERT

©NASA

HI I 50


HI I 51


HELICOPTER INDUSTRY I NEW TECHNOLOGIES I

T

he Mars Helicopter Scout, named Ingenuity, is

scheduled to take off from Earth on July 17 aboard

the Mars 2020 probe. If the launch were to be postponed,

the launch window would move to February 18, 2021. The

one-way trip to Jezero Crater on Mars will take about six

months. The objective of the Mars 2020 mission, with a

total cost of about $2.5 billion, is to determine how Mars’

natural resources could be exploited to prepare for future

human settlement. The main tool on board the probe will be

a six-wheeled land vehicle, a rover, called Perseverance. The

American rovers Sojourner, Spirit and Curiosity have already

been seen on Mars. With Perseverance, NASA is changing

scale, this time sending a spacecraft the size of a small

car and a mass of one ton. Another novelty, therefore, is

the presence of a helicopter that will arrive on Mars in the

luggage of this rover.

EXTRATERRESTRIAL AND

EXTRAORDINARY CONSTRAINTS

Ingenuity is a miniature helicopter, weighing only 1.8 kg,

which will be called upon to play a scouting role. It will be

used to find the best possible route to avoid dangers and

to find points of interest for Perseverance, which could then

fly over larger areas during its lifetime. The images provided

by Ingenuity will have about ten times the resolution of

those of the orbiting Martian probes. Ingenuity will also help

determine whether or not the use of flying machines for

extraterrestrial exploration is a good idea.

The first studies for sending a helicopter to Mars began in

2015. In view of the positive results obtained, the formal

decision was announced May 11th, 2018 to entrust the

project to a mixed team of varying skillsets from the

Aerovironment Company, Nasa’s Ames Research Center, and

Langley Research Center.

The first of the constraints that were faced by the designers

of the aircraft were that of flight automation: there is no

question of flying the aircraft in real-time at a distance of

more than 50 million kilometers. Ingenuity, which deserves

its name, will therefore have to fend for itself once the flight

order has been given: take off, flight, orientation, image

recording, and landing, in order to recharge the batteries and

wait for the next flight. After all, many drones perform this on

Earth, although the constraints of the Martian atmosphere

are far more complex.

HI I 52


A HELICOPTER AT LEVEL 900!

Composed of carbon dioxide, Mars is incredibly tenuous,

with an average pressure of 6 millibars, or 1/170th of the

Earth’s atmosphere. At about ten meters from the Martian

ground, which is the maximum flight altitude that Ingenuity

will attain, as it is equal to the density of the Martian

atmosphere and that found at... 30 kilometers from the

Earth’s surface. Flying a helicopter in these conditions

was not easy. In short, it was first necessary to model the

dynamics of flight in these particular conditions, before

designing a very light helicopter with a large rotor diameter

to obtain the desired lift. However, the helicopter will be

able to rely on the help provided by gravity, which is about

three times weaker than on Earth, since Mars’ mass is onetenth

that of Earth. In May 2016, a first 850g demonstrator

was tested in an environmental chamber just under 8m in

diameter, reproducing the near vacuum on Mars. The chosen

formula used a contra-rotating rotor, eliminating the need for

an anti-torque rotor while providing a very compact design.

The results obtained were positive, and allowed the

development of the final version of the device, by the use

of the counter-rotating rotor formula with an electric motor.

Ingenuity therefore weighs 1.8 kg and has two rigid

counter-rotating rotors with a diameter of 1.21m rotating

at a maximum speed of 2800 rpm. Its power comes from

an electric motor coupled to a set of six lithium-ion microbatteries

recharged by a solar panel. Its payload includes

a high-resolution colour camera for navigation, another for

studying the terrain, and a communication system enabling

it to relay the images obtained to the Perseverance rover.

Despite its minimalist weight, the Martian helicopter was

designed to withstand the rocket’s high level of vibration and

acceleration during launch. Its’ electronics, which include

gyroscopes, motion and orientation sensors, accelerometers

and an altimeter, are also protected against solar radiation

and the intense cold that reigns on the planet (-63°C on

average). In regards to its’ navigation, the aircraft uses an

inertial navigation system that can be readjusted using a

star sight that is pointed at the sun.

HI I 53


HELICOPTER INDUSTRY I NEW TECHNOLOGIES I

MODESTY AND AMBITION

Once configured, Ingenuity will have to make several flights

of two to three minutes each, rising a few meters from

the Martian surface. The aircraft could then travel several

hundred meters each time. NASA’s ambition is to carry out

five flights over a total period of 30 days.

These figures are as modest as they are ambitious: Ingenuity

will venture into « terra incognita » and could pave the way, if

successful, for more efficient air vehicles. After all, many of

the planets being explored by probes have atmospheres that

could be used by flying machines. NASA is already talking

about future plans for a multi-kilogram aircraft capable of

communicating directly with a space probe, in order to move

it and transmit its observations. Complete and increase the

Earth’s displacement capacities to increase speed, autonomy

and observation capacity are undoubtedly some of the

logical evolutions in the conquest of space. Today, Ingenuity

is only scratching the surface of the capabilities that will be

brought by a new breed of extraterrestrial helicopters. It’s a

great adventure that’s just beginning!

MORE ABOUT NASA

HI I 54


74, rue Georges Bonnac

Tour 74, rue 6 - Georges Etage 3Bonnac

33 Tour 000 6 - Bordeaux Etage 3 - France

74, rue Georges Bonnac

33 000 Bordeaux - France

Tour 6 - Etage 3

33 000 Bordeaux - France

24/7 Operations Center

+33 24/75 Operations 57 85 81 11 Center

operations@flyops.net

+33 5 57 85 81 11

24/7 Operations Center

operations@flyops.net

+33 5 57 85 81 11

operations@flyops.net

WWW.FLYOPS.NET

WWW.FLYOPS.NET

WWW.FLYOPS.NET


HELICOPTER INDUSTRY I MILITARY I

HI I 56


THE FRENCH NAVY IS MODERNISING AND GIVING NEW CAPACITIES TO ITS PUBLIC SERVICE

DOLPHINS (SP) WHICH CAN NOW BE EMBARKED AT SEA. A GAIN IN CAPACITY THAT ALSO

REPRESENTS FOR THE NAVY AN IMPORTANT STEP IN THE WORK OF HOMOGENISING ITS

HELICOPTER FLEET.

BY FRÉDÉRIC LERT

©MARINE NATIONALE

HI I 57


HELICOPTER INDUSTRY I MILITARY I

IN

this month of May 2020, the French Navy has a very

diverse helicopter fleet, combining Alouette 3, Lynx,

different types of Dolphin, Panther and Caiman. However,

Lynx will be retired from service this summer and by 2022

it will also be the turn of the latest SA319 Alouette. By that

time, the French Navy will have a slightly less heterogeneous

fleet of Dolphin, Panther and Caiman. The next step will

come around 2035, when the Cheetahs (H160M) will have

totally replaced the different fleets of Dauphin and Panther.

An important milestone was thus reached last month

with the first boarding on a Stealth Light Frigates (FLF) of

a Public Service Dolphin N (SP Dolphin SP). The Navy has

six such aircraft that were previously based solely on land.

The Dauphin SPs have been in service since the early 1990s

as part of the 35F fleet based in Hyères. These aircraft had

then been acquired on the civilian market by the Navy to

carry out rescue missions at sea, being based in several

coastal towns: Le Touquet, La Rochelle, Cherbourg, Lanvéoc

and Hyères have welcomed over the years these Dolphins,

which have become in the meantime “Public Service and

Intervention”.

HI I 58


IN 2020, ONLY LE TOUQUET AND

LA ROCHELLE ARE STILL ARMED

The reduction in the number of land-based units has

therefore enabled us to envisage other missions for these

aircraft, explains Commander (CF) S. «We are now able to use

the Dauphins for other missions. To anticipate the withdrawal

of Lynx and Alouette aircraft from service and limit the risk

of capability failure before the arrival of the first Cheetahs,

the decision was taken to navalize these public service and

intervention dolphins. Embedded on the naval action force

ships, the aircraft will be able to carry out sea support, sea

rescue and fleet lighting missions, as well as minimum surface

situation awareness».

The navalization of the aircraft began with administrative

work between Airbus Helicopters and the DGA to technically

demonstrate that the aircraft, originally of civilian

manufacture, could meet the demands of the landing. The

technical file written by the helicopter manufacturer allowed

the DGA to approve this navalization of the Dauphin on a

case-by-case basis. However, a modification yard was

carried out by Heli Union to adapt the Dauphin to its new

role, including in particular the modification of the rotor

head to enable the blades to be folded manually and the

installation of gripping rings. Independently of navalization

issues, the Dauphin has also been equipped with a «low light»

instrument panel allowing JVN flight and a GNSS capability

allowing breakthroughs and IFR flight with satellite means,

in accordance with civil regulations.

It was not necessary to equip the aircraft with a landing

harpoon, notes the CF S. «It was not necessary to equip

the aircraft with a landing harpoon. The shipyard would have

been too heavy and out of proportion with our real needs: our

Dolphins will mainly operate on vessels without a landing grid,

and in any case in sea states that do not justify this accessory».

The modification of the devices was accompanied by a

CEPA homologation work (verification of the implementation

equipment on the vessels, validation of the field of use…)

and by the constitution of the technical autonomy batches

for boarding. From 20 to 25 April, the Pre-deployment

Operational Refit (RANO) of the frigate La Fayette was the

occasion for the first embarkation off Toulon with a Dauphin

and its standard detachment of 9 people (two pilots, a cargo

chief and six technicians).

This embarkation is an important step in the perpetuation of

our know-how in terms of embarkation at sea, emphasizes

the CF S. «We are very pleased to be able to offer this service

to the French Navy. The use of a helicopter on a ship involves

a complete chain of skills, from piloting and maintenance to

the operation of the ship, which is important to maintain. The

SPI Dolphins will take part in this effort alongside the other

helicopters while awaiting the arrival of the first Cheetahs».

HI I 59


HELICOPTER INDUSTRY I MILITARY I

THE WORLD OF THE DOLPHIN

This embarkation is an important step in the perpetuation of

our know-how in terms of embarkation at sea, emphasizes

the CF S. «We are very pleased to be able to offer this service

to the French Navy. The use of a helicopter on a ship involves

a complete chain of skills, from piloting and maintenance to

the operation of the ship, which is important to maintain. The

SPI Dolphins will take part in this effort alongside the other

helicopters while awaiting the arrival of the first Cheetahs».

There are about 40 different species of dolphins, all of which

are marine mammals. For the French Navy, the number of

different models is limited to six, with as many complex

micro-fleets to manage. Here are the details :

• 6 Dolphin N public service and intervention (fleet 35F)

• 3 “Pedro” dolphin used for flight safety on the aircraft

carrier Charles de Gaulle. (flotilla 35F)

• 4 Rented N3 dolphin used for training missions

(implemented within 22S squadron)

• 2 Dolphin N3+ (detachment of the 35F flotilla in Tahiti)

• 12 N3 dolphins are expected to be rented from December

2020 by a consortium of Heli Union and DCI. These aircraft

will constitute an interim fleet to wait for the entry into

service of the Cheetah.

• Finally, let us mention a close cousin, the Panther, of which

16 examples are in service in the 36F flotilla.

MORE ABOUT FRENCH NAVY

HI I 60


... Ultimate Jet TV,

Same same but different

A perfect blend between short and long stories: we will bring

on-the-ground reports, expert analysis and original

perspective in a snackable format, social media ready.


HELICOPTER INDUSTRY I INTERVIEW I

BY FRANÇOIS BLANC

©RUSSIAN HELICOPTERS

HI I 62


HI I 63


HELICOPTER INDUSTRY I INTERVIEW I

T

he Russian Helicopters holding, partner

of around 100 countries all over the world

operating civilian and military Russian manufactured

helicopters, saw its industrial activity maintained throughout

the health crisis. Mr. Andrey Boginsky, Russian Helicopters

CEO, answers a few question from Helicopter Industry.

Are the Russian Helicopters industrial/production and selling

activities affected by the governmental measures? If so, how

far and on which particular points?

Taking into account our obligations within the state defense

order and military and technical cooperation we did not stop

the manufacturing process. Starting from mid-April, up to

70% of our staff were involved, depending on the instructions

of local authorities and epidemiological situation in a

region, and by now, we have returned to a regular working

schedule. At the same time, working conditions meet all the

requirements of the Ministry of Health and other regulatory

authorities. We provided all employees with personal

protective equipment, their condition is regularly monitored,

and workplaces undergo regular disinfection, as maintaining

health of our staff is one of the top priorities

for Russian Helicopters at this difficult time.

Moreover, we aim to maintain a high level of

business activity, retaining contact with our civilian

partners, and that it proved to be successful: during the

pandemic, several Mi-8 and Ansat helicopters have already

been handed over to customers.

How many civilian and military Russian Helicopters

customers/operators worldwide are potentially affected by

the crisis? Through what missions are Russian Helicopters

rotary wing aircrafts most involved during this health crisis?

All countries have been affected by the pandemic to a

greater or lesser degree, including over 100 countries that

use Russian-made helicopters. Due to restrictions, the

total volume of operations has certainly been reduced.

However, some specialized helicopters, such as those for

EMS missions, are much sought-after now: we see that in

Russia and in other countries which are actively developing

air medical services.

HI I 64


Was Russian Helicopters approached by those operators to

answer their questions, especially in terms of special cockpit

and cabin design? Did Russian Helicopters design new

equipment and develop original procedures the benefit of its

customers?

Our Ansat and Mi-8 helicopters are widely used during

the pandemic in many countries that fight COVID-19.

For instance, Mi-171 helicopters were used in Wuhan for

delivery of supplies and medicine, and Indian Air Force Mi-

17V-5 performed same missions in Himalayas. Our Mi-8 and

Ansat in EMS configuration are equipped with ventilators

that allow transporting patients with COVID-19, which

they do all over Russia, especially in central and southern

regions of the country that faced a difficult epidemiological

situation. Still, we understand that coronavirus pandemic

certainly lays down new requirements for medical helicopter

equipment, and the holding company is working in that

field. For instance, the Russian Federal Air Transport

Agency approved the installation of an isolation module

for patients with infectious diseases in Ansat helicopter,

which is currently one of the main helicopters used for air

medical services in Russia: about 30 such helicopters have

been supplied, and they are being operated in more than 10

regions of Russia. This unit will not require redesign of the

cabin, therefore, all previously supplied Ansat helicopters

in the medical version can be equipped with it. The module

will significantly improve efficiency of EMS-missions, which

now require additional crew protection and disinfection

measures.

Do Russian Helicopters approved maintenance centers

worldwide operate normally during this period? Do they

operate at a normal activity level, or at an increased or

decreased activity level?

The service centers of Russian Helicopters are functioning in

accordance with regulations of local authorities and following

all instructions and restrictions. The epidemiological

situation varies depending on a region. Therefore, in some

places a rotating work schedule is possible, while in other

countries all work has been suspended.

HI I 65


WORLD POINT

DISTRIBUTION

COUNTRY

DISTRIBUTION LIST

AUSTRALIA

AUSTRIA

BELARUS

BELGIUM

BULGARIA

BRAZIL

CANADA

CHILE

CHINA

COLUMBIA

CROATIA

CYPRUS

CZECH REPUBLIC

DENMARK

FRANCE

(mainland & Corsica)

GERMANY

GREECE

HONG KONG

HUNGARY

ICELAND

INDIA

IRAN

IRELAND

ISRAEL

ITALY

JAPAN

LIBYA

LUXEMBOURG

MALLORCA

MARTINIQUE

MEXICO

MONACO

MOROCCO

NETHERLANDS

NEW ZEALAND

NIGERIA

NORWAY

PAKISTAN

POLAND

PORTUGAL

RUSSIA

SINGAPORE

SLOVAKIA

SLOVENIA

SOUTH AFRICA

SPAIN

SWEDEN

SWITZERLAND

TUNISIA

TURKEY

UAE

(Dubai, Abu Dhabi)

UKRAINE

UNITED KINGDOM

(England, Northern

Ireland, Scotland,

Wales)

USA

VENEZUELA

HI I 66


AVIATION SHOW

HI I 67


SUBSCRIBE NOW

ABONNEZ-VOUS

EUROPE - MIDDLE EAST - AMERICAS - AFRICA - ASIA - RUSSIA

#101

SINGLE SUBSCRIPTION

ABONNEMENT SIMPLE


HT*

50year

an

*TVA 20% - 60€ TTC

6issues

numéros

EUROPE - MIDDLE EAST - AMERICAS - AFRICA - ASIA - RUSSIA

#102

CORPORATE OFFER

SPÉCIAL ENTREPRISES

MULTI-COPIES SUBSCRIPTION PACK

PACK ABONNEMENT MULTI-EXEMPLAIRES

Get several copies of each issue at a discount price.

Recevez directement plusieurs exemplaires de chaque parution et bénéficiez de tarifs avantageux.

6 issues per year - 6 n°/an

Helicopter Industry

1 year - an

1 copie per issue - 1 ex / n° 50 €

5 copies per issue - 5 ex / n° 225 €

10 copies per issue - 10 ex / n° 400 €

20 copies per issue - 20 ex / n° 700 €

EUROPE - MIDDLE EAST - AMERICAS - AFRICA - ASIA - RUSSIA

#99

Ms. / Mme Miss / Mlle Mr. / M.

Company / Société :

Surname / Nom :

Name / Prénom :

Address / Adresse :

City / Ville:

Postal code / Code Postal :

Country / Pays :

Tel.:

E-MAIL :

Société UJ MEDIA

Tick appropriate boxes - Cochez l’option choisie

Please find enclosed my payment of _______ € to UJ MEDIA

Ci-joint mon règlement de _______ € à l’ordre de UJ MEDIA

Payment method: Check(Euros) Credit card

Bank Transfer (please contact us)

Je règle par : Chèque Carte bancaire

Virement (nous contacter)

Credit Card: following credit cards accepted : Visa, Mastercard, CB.

Carte bancaire : nous acceptons les cartes bancaires : CB, Visa, Mastercard.

Please complete the form - Remplir obligatoirement toutes les rubriques ci-dessous :

Card Number

N° Carte Bancaire :

CVC Code - Les 3 derniers chiffres figurant au verso de votre carte :

Expiration - Date d’expiration : /

Date : Signature :

Aéroport de Toussus-le-Noble, Bât 216 - Zone sud, 78117 Toussus-le-Noble - FRANCE · Phone: +33 (0)1 30 84 13 32 - subscribe@ujmedia.fr

En application de l’article L.27 de la loi du 6 Janvier 1978, les informations demandées ici sont indispensable au traitement de votre commande

et aux services qui y sont associés. Elles ne seront transmises qu’au service assurant le traitement de votre commande et des services associés.

Vous avez le droit d’accéder à ces informations, de demander éventuellement les rectifications nécessaires et de vous opposer à ce que vos

noms, adresse et e-mail soient communiqués à d’autres entreprises en le demandant par écrit au service abonnements de Callixo.


H130 T2

www.aircraftformula.com

www.aircraftformula.com

contact@aircraftformula.com

AIRBUS HELICOPTERS FOR SALE

contact@aircraftformula.com

contact@aircraftformula.com

Two 2017 units available

T FORMULA ®

t & Acquisitions

ormula.com

H130 T2 T2

AIRBUS

AIRBUS HELICOPTERS

HELICOPTERS

FOR

FOR

SALE

SALE

Two 2017 units available

AiRCRAFT FORMULA ® ®

Aircraft

Aircraft

& Acquisitions

& Acquisitions

AiRCRAFT FORMULA ®

Aircraft & Acquisitions

Two Two 2017 2017 units units available available

contact@aircraftformula.com

LICOPTERS FOR SALE

Two 2017 units available

Manufactured in 2017

Atlantic Blue Metallic paint

Manufactured in in 2017

515 hours & 875 hours ea.

Atlantic Blue Metallic paint

515 hours & 875 hours ea. ea.

red in 2017

ü

Glass cockpit - Garmin G500H

e Metallic paint

875 hours üea.

Glass cockpit - -Garmin G500H

ü

Thales AHV16 Radio Altimeter

ü üEmergency Floatation Floatation Gear Gear – Complete – Complete installation installation

ü Emergency ü Thales Floatation AHV16 Radio Gear – Altimeter

Complete installation ü üCargo Cargo Sling Sling – Complete – Complete installation installation

Note: Including Capabilities for extended cargo sling

cockpit - Garmin G500H

ü Improved Heating System

ü Emergency Floatation Note: Note: Gear Including Including – Complete Capabilities installation

for extended for extended cargo cargo sling sling

ü Cargo ü Sling Improved – Complete Heating installation System

AHV16 Radio Altimeter ü Cargo Sling – Complete installation

Note: Cargo Sling mirrors

üIncluding Dual controls Capabilities for extended cargo slingü

üDual Dual external external Cargo Cargo Sling mirrors Sling mirrors

ü Dual controls

Note: Including Capabilities for extended cargo sling

ed Heating System

ü

Heavy Duty Blade Pins Pins

Dual üexternal Landing Cargo light Sling mirrors ü Dual

in in external

site and

Cargo ü Heavy Sling mirrors Duty Blade Pins

ontrols

ü Landing light adjustable in site and

ü Heavy Duty Blade ü

Starter Pins Starter Generator Thales Thales Avionics Avionics 150A 150A

üg light Heavy adjustable Duty azimuth

Blade in site Pins and

ü Starter Generator Thales Avionics 150A

azimuth

ü Starter Generator

th

ü üDART Thales DART Bear Avionics Bear paws paws 150A

ü Starter ü Generator Eight seat Thales executive Avionics configuration

150A

ü DART Bear pawsü

DART Bear paws

eat executive ü

with configuration

8 EA Energy-absorbing seats seats

ü Washable floor-cover

ü

DART

Eight

Bear

seat

paws

executive configuration

ü Washable floor-cover

EA Energy-absorbing seats

ü Washable floor-cover

ü Washable

with 8 EA

floor-cover

Energy-absorbing seats

Best Best deals deals worldwide worldwide

Best deals worldwide

Aircraft in operation, availability subject in to prior sale or removal, subject without to prior prior sale notice.

Aircraft in operation, availability subject to prior sale or removal, or removal, without without prior notice. prior notice.

mponents times, configuration & equipment subject to verification by the Buyer upon inspection.

Components times, times, configuration & equipment & equipment subject subject to verification to verification by the by Buyer the Buyer upon upon inspection. inspection.

Located Located Best in Norway deals in Norway worldwid

www.aircraftformula.com

contact@aircraftformula.com

ect to prior sale or removal, without www.aircraftformula.com

prior notice.

Aircraft in operation, availability subject to prior contact@aircraftformula.com

sale or removal, without prior notice.

ent subject to verification by the Buyer upon inspection.

Components times, configuration & equipment subject to verification by the Buyer upon inspection.

contact@aircraftformula.com

Best deals worldwide

Located in Norway

www.aircraftformula.com

ü Emergency Floatation Gear – Complete installa

ü

Cargo Sling – Complete installation

Located in Norway

contact@aircraftformula.com

Located in Norwa


EUROPE - MIDDLE EAST - AMERICAS - AFRICA - ASIA - RUSSIA #102

Est édité par/is published by : Société UJ MEDIA

www.ujmedia.fr

Siège social/Corporate headquarters :

Société UJ MEDIA

Aéroport de Toussus-le-Noble,

Bât 216 - Zone sud,

78117 Toussus-le-Noble - FRANCE

Phone: +33 (0)1 30 84 13 32

Email : contact@ujmedia.fr

SAS au capital de 6 000 €

RCS : 815 195 300 00026

Gérant/Legal Representative & Executive Director

Arnaud Devriendt

adevriendt@callixo.com

Comité de rédaction/Editorial board

Directeur de Publication/Executive Director

Arnaud Devriendt

Redacteur en Chef Adjoint/Assistant Editor

Frédéric Vergnères

fvergneres@callixo.com

+33 (0)6 64 02 08 84

Co-rédactrice/Co-Editor

Sylvie Péron

speron@ujmedia.fr

Direction Artistique/Art Direction

Aurélien Milon - amilon@callixo.com

+33 (0)1 30 84 13 30

EUROPE - MIDDLE EAST - AMERICAS - AFRICA - ASIA - RUSSIA #102

Chef de rubriques/ Section Editor

François Blanc

Chef de rubrique « Marché civil »

Section Editor « Civil market »

Frédéric Lert

Chef de rubrique « Secteur militaire »

Section Editor « Military sector »

Marketing, Communication &

Business development

Lamar Williams : lwilliams@ujmedia.fr

CPPAAP : 0607 K 88197

N°ISSN 2495-1188

La rédaction ne saurait être tenue responsable des textes

et photos qui lui sont transmis.

Ceux-ci engagent la seule responsabilité de leurs auteurs.

Hooray! Your file is uploaded and ready to be published.

Saved successfully!

Ooh no, something went wrong!