2011_SLSNZ_SurfRescueMag

SurfLifeSavingNZ1910

47

nov ‘11....issue

SURF

RESCUE

Nothing dusty about Slim... Quake update... Pool champs action...

a fresh start

the next 100 years


3

from the editor’s desk

Somewhere between it snowing in downtown Auckland and

Stephen Donald helping the All Blacks win the Rugby World Cup, I

decided to add another highly unlikely scenario. My resolution? To

get fit, get motivated and join a surf club.

I’m sure you’ll all agree that one out of three ain’t bad, especially

if it’s the latter and I’m proud to say I’m now a qualified surf

lifeguard. A few of you, however, made thinly veiled comments like

“took your bloody time, didn’t you?” – to which the only response

was, yep, guilty as charged.

It’s been five years since I first started covering sports events for

Surf Life Saving New Zealand, half a decade hanging out at the

beach watching inspirational athletes. Heck, I’ve even watched

the boaties too (just kidding, you lot). My one regret is that I didn’t

find the movement earlier, growing up on a farm in land-locked

Matamata.

The ocean has always held a deep resonance for me but I never

made the mental leap and realised just how much surf lifesaving

could offer. Well, you’ve got me now. When I passed my surf

award, along with a couple of dozen super keen fellow clubbies

one cold afternoon at Papamoa, a sense of belonging settled over

me. In it for Life, indeed.

There will be tough times. The next day at Papamoa, for example,

a tide of putrid tar washed up on the pristine shore (see Rena

feature on page 8) but surf lifesaving in this country has 100 years

of resilience and resolve to call on.

Above all, the movement is brimming with intelligent, warmhearted

folk with a strong sense of public service, everywhere from

the keenest young nippers, right up to our interim chief executive

(see page 7) and to our octogenarian patrollers (see page 39).

The good folk of Sumner know better than anyone there’s more to

a surf lifesaving club than mere bricks and mortar, as you’ll see in

our story on page 30. The devastating earthquake in the Garden

City in February, five months after the initial 7.1-magnitude tremor,

left their clubhouse in the lurch, in every way you can think of.

Did Sumner clubbies buckle with their building? Not on your

life – with a little help from some Gizzy cuzzies, members are

determined to come back stronger and celebrate their own

centenary this season. And speaking of Gizzy cuzzies, we’ve

found some awesome Maori leaders spreading the surf lifesaving

gospel up in Tolaga Bay – read about their innovative tactics on

page 24.

This edition of Surf Rescue is about the people with surf lifesaving

tattooed on their soul, who live and breathe and love in yellow

and red shades every day. Forget brands or buildings or boats or

beaches – those members are our most important resource.

I hope you enjoy their stories.

PHOTO: JOHN ROY

JAMIE TROUGHTON

EDITOR SURF RESCUE MAGAZINE


EDITORIAL:

FEATURES:

Jamie Contents Troughton page

Disclaimer

Surf Rescue is the official magazine produced

by Surf Life Saving New Zealand Incorporated

(SLSNZ), designed and published by MO

Design Co. Advertising and editorial statements

do not necessarily reflect the views of the

organisation, its executives, the board, the

publisher or the staff, unless expressly stated.

Any communication can be forwarded to the

editor (contact below).

Surf Life Saving New Zealand

PRESIDENT Mr Bob Harvey, QSO, JP

Board

Michael Bassett-Foss (Chairman), Warwick Bell,

Andrew Lancaster, Nicki Nicol, Brent Warner,

Colin Weatherall

Staff

INTERIM CHIEF EXECUTIVE

Pat Waite

GENERAL MANAGER - BUSINESS

Paul Read

GENERAL MANAGER - PROGRAMMES & SERVICES

Brett Sullivan

GENERAL MANAGER - CLUB DEVELOPMENT

Matt Warren

ACTING FINANCE MANAGER

Cheryl Lyster

ACTING HEAD OF OPERATIONS

Joanna Matthew

For a full list of SLSNZ staff members, see

www.surflifesaving.org.nz/contactslsnz

Surf Life Saving New Zealand Inc

Level 3, 202 Cuba St

PB Box 9205

Wellington

New Zealand

Ph 04 384 8325

Fax 04 385 4381

INTERNET www.surflifesaving.org.nz

FACEBOOK www.facebook.com/surflifesaving

TWITTER www.twitter.com/slsnz

Surf Rescue Magazine

Surf Rescue is delivered free to

members of Surf Life Saving New Zealand.

EDITOR Jamie Troughton Dscribe Journalism

info@dscribe.co.nz

ASSISTANT EDITOR Jamie Nilsson

jamie.nilsson@surflifesaving.org.nz

DESIGN MO Design Co

studio@modesignco.com

PRINT


5

features

7

THE BOSS

What makes Pat

Waite tick? Take a

moment and he’ll tell

you – SLSNZ’s chief

executive is new to

the organisation but

a veteran of similar

ideals.

THE

BLACK

TIDE

8

Sadly, we’re not talking about the Rugby World

Cup. Papamoa was in the path of a horrible oil spill

from the grounded ship Rena. See how the local

lifeguards responded.

10

OLYMPIC

AMBITIONS

From Ohope to London

– Lisa Carrington tells

us about being a world

champion kayaker and

how much mongrel you

need to win a ski race.

16

NOTHING

DUSTY

ABOUT

SLIM

He’s our youngest-ever

board member but

Andrew Lancaster is

treating his elevation as

just another step in a

remarkable surf career.

18 22

POOLING

TOGETHER

All the action from the

national champs.

A FRESH

START

New surf sport series

set to boost carnivals

and keep our top

athletes charging

before Rescue 2012.

THE COAST

WITH THE

MOST

Tolaga Bay is better

known for its wharf

than its surf sports

but a couple of good

keen men are hoping to

change that.

24

QUAKE UPDATE

After the turmoil, the Sumner Surf Club is getting

back on its feet, thanks to the generosity of the surf

lifesaving movement.

30

PETROL HEAD

PARADISE

All the fun and fumes

from the first round of

IRB racing’s new series.

34

DANNY’S

DOUBLE

ACT

A good start, a stutter and

what’s next for our

Ironman as he battles it

out with the best of

the best.

38

HUEY’S BACK!

The god of surf returns and finds that

Mark Bourneville is often licked but never

beaten.

46

46

Surf Life Saving is grateful for the continued support of our principal

funder the New Zealand Lottery Grants Board.

Over the last ten years the New Zealand Lottery Grants Board has, through their annual grants

process, allocated over $20m to Surf Life Saving. Without this support we would struggle to

sustain the level of service currently provided by Surf Lifeguards throughout New Zealand.

Thank you.

SURF LIFE SAVING | SURF RESCUE | NOV 2011


6

HEADS UP:

News Briefs

Christchurch clubbie/

architect David Hill won

a Canterbury Architecture

Awards category for

designing a lifeguard

tower at Woodend Beach,

which he patrolled as a

teenager. The Chair had

replaced the old lifeguard

tower, which had stood

for more than 30 years.

Awards jury convener

Stephen Crooks said

the project was a simple

but brilliant concept,

superbly executed.

“You can’t help smiling

when you see this little

building sitting amongst

the windswept dunes,”

Crooks said.

PHOTO: Dougal Holmes

Heads up

Surf

Education

We have

launched

a new

education

brand. Check

out the new

website at

www.surfeducation.org.nz

Keep up to date with all the

SLSNZ events this season

at the events section of the

website www.surflifesaving.

org.nz/slsnzevents

STATE OCEAN

SWIM SERIES

To promote health and well being in

our communities, Quantum Events

and principle partner State have

an exciting six-event ocean swim

series on offer this summer. With

five years’ proven event success

this series is founded with pride, an

excellent reputation and a promise

to deliver first-class events. To find

out more visit:

www.oceanswim.co.nz

100 years

Since 1911 the Maranui Life

Saving Club has been actively

training surf lifeguards and

providing voluntary patrols.

Maranui celebrates 100 years this

season. www.maranui.co.nz

Former SLSNZ guru Mark

Weatherall has continued his

winning ways, helping Poverty Bay

win the Lochore Cup in his first

season as Chief Executive.

WEAR YOUR VEST

This season an addition has been made

to our Health and Safety; athletes will

now be required to wear high visibility

competition vests to compete in Regional

and National events.


7

SLSNZ has received

a $250,000

Government

grant, which

will go towards

SLSNZ leadership

programme!

RESCUE OF THE MONTH

information for this season’s

closing dates and more visit:

www.surflifesaving.org.nz/

rescueofthemonth

International win!

Morgan Foster from South

Broghton has won the Japanese

national beach flags title in

Kanagawa, Japan.

Facebook and

www want to

keep up to date

with SLSNZ like

the Facebook

page at www.

facebook.com/

surflifesaving

and get updates

via RSS straight

to your Outlook.

NATIONAL

JANDAL DAY

Slip on your jandals

again this year on

Friday December 2nd

2011. NJD is proudly

supported by State.

Like the NJD official

Facebook page for

your chance to win

www.facebook.com/

nationaljandalday

Midway’s Cory

Taylor finished

fourth, Lyall Bay’s

Tyler Maxwell

ninth and Omanu’s

Dan Hooker 19th

in the under-19

division of the

iconic Coolangatta

Gold race.

LAST SEASON STATS

Total hours

199,078

Rescues

1,317

PHOTO: Harvie Allison

Preventative Actions

101,891

Safety Interventions

524,065

First Aids

2,061

Searches

322

PHOTO: 21 Club

The distinctive voice of our announcer

for 50 years at national and regional

championships is sadly no more. Syd Jago

passed away recently in Hawke’s Bay after

a short illness. Syd had a distinctive style,

a great memory for names and the voice of

change. He had a mellow and unflappable

voice and he was a pioneer of announcing

from the days when many carnivals would

start up a generator to crank up the sound,

to the highly professional sound systems of

carnivals today. Working closely with Reg

Schou, they were a winnable combination

and Syd was the voice of the national

championships. A warm and affable

personality, he will be greatly missed by all

who came to know him and the Surf Life

Saving family sends out deepest sympathy to

Syd’s wife and family.

By Bob Harvey

SURF LIFE SAVING | SURF RESCUE | NOV 2011


8

FROM THE PRESIDENT:

Bob Harvey

Plenty of challenges

for our second century

Our centenary celebrations went off in style last

season but Surf Life Saving New Zealand President

Bob Harvey believes embracing diversity is the key

for the next 100 years.

It is with the greatest pleasure that I welcome you to

our second half, the beginning of our second century

between the flags.

This next era has already started in style. Recently at

Auckland’s Maritime Rescue Centre, Prime Minister

John Key - a great friend of our movement and father

of newly-qualified lifeguard Max - handed over a

cheque for $250,000 as a way of saying thank you.

It was a sincere thank you for 100 years of dedication

and service and this generous gift shows the respect

that we have earned from the people of New Zealand

and the Government.

We go into this new century stronger and, if a little

challenged, we realise we are now one organisation

with a great future ahead. This future needs to be

owned by surf lifesaving and our partners - luckily the

strength of our sponsorship and our relationship with

our communities has never been better.

I’d like to acknowledge the extraordinary rich friendship

that we developed with the out-going Governor

General of New Zealand, Sir Anand Satyanand, and

we look forward to welcoming, as Patron, our new

Governor General Sir Jerry Mataparae.

At the annual meeting in Hamilton in September, we

acknowledged our brightest and greatest pioneers

that are living today in our life membership awards.

I’d like to add a personal congratulations to them

and welcome them to the list of giants who made our

organisation what it is today.

Our newest life members are: Trevor Corkin, Rodger

Curtice, Dave East, Tim Jago, Murray Kemp, Garry

Mace, Dick McAllister, Eoin Waugh, Murray Wilson

and Ron Stack.

In the years ahead, we need to grow our organisation

in new and exciting programmes, like the leadership

innovation that the Prime Minister acknowledged in

handing us the Government cheque.

This outstanding programme will see us growing from

within our organisation, a new leadership profile to

carry our flame well into the next 100 years.

I believe this leadership programme will restart Surf

Life Saving New Zealand and I’d like to think it will

bring more diversity than our last century.

It will grow and deliver a richer organisation and reflect

the changing culture and society we now live in.

We need, through schools and groups that surround

us, to build greater partnerships with the different

ethnic groups that are missing from our clubs.

New Zealand has changed in recent decades and we

need to understand that change and to work with it.

In the Auckland region, we need to see Asian,

Indian and Polynesian involvement and we certainly

need, throughout New Zealand, to grow a Maori

partnership with youth and young leadership.

You can read about the Tolaga Bay innovations

happening right now further into this magazine – it’s a

great example on how we can benefit and grow.

Like the All Blacks, who were once nearly all Pakeha,

we need to recognise change. We need to try harder

as we did in bringing women into our organisation.

We now have to add a welcome to newer voices and

convert visitors to our beaches into lifesavers.

I’m very optimistic this season will be a great one for

us and I welcome every lifeguard in New Zealand to be

part of who we are, what we do and what we can be.

Have a great season!

Bob Harvey, QSO, JP

President, Surf Life Saving New Zealand

LEADING THE WAY: SLSNZ PRESIDENT BOB HARVEY SPEAKS AT THE

MARCH-PAST AT THIS YEAR’S NATIONALS. PHOTO: ROSS MALYON


FROM THE CEO’S DESK:

Pat Waite

New job

old passions

LATEST CONVERT: INTERIM SLSNZ CHIEF EXECUTIVE PAT WAITE PRESENTS MEDALS

AT THE STATE NEW ZEALAND POOL CHAMPIONSHIPS. PHOTO: JAMIE TROUGHTON

He’s the interim head of Surf Life Saving New Zealand

and we thought we’d give chief executive Pat Waite

the chance to tell us a little bit about himself.

I grew up in Taranaki and going to the beach was

part of our family tradition, though I remember with

embarrassment my mother stalking the sand on

Ngamotu Beach, petrified I’d go too far out.

It definitely started a love affair with beaches and

water and now we have a holiday home at Waikanae.

Over the last 30 years, our boys have gone from

paddling pools, to sand castles, to surf boards and

sailing dinghies – and now their children are into sand

castles and mini surf boards.

Though I’ve never been a clubbie or a great swimmer,

one of my sons is a rower who rowed for New

Zealand in the Pan Pacific Games in Sydney. His wife

is a surf lifesaver, while her parents have links to Lyall

Bay and Mairangi Bay.

Through them, I reckon I’ve met nearly every member

of Lyall Bay already!

Our two other sons are firefighters here in Wellington

– I guess pride in public service is contagious.

I’ve spent my working life in the financial sector,

working in jobs across New Zealand, in Tokyo and

Australia.

Accounting has always been my trade - though I’ve

worked across many areas including economics,

retail, corporate and international banking – and a

few years ago, I was elected president of the institute

of Chartered Accountants. At that time, I also joined

Public Trust, initially as non-executive director and

then as chief executive.

I loved the spirit of Public Trust - it was the first time

I’d worked in a non-corporate and I discovered the

pleasure in serving people, the pride of public service.

I was also proud to see the organisation return

to profit, after a number of years of poor financial

performance. I won’t claim all the credit – we had a

great team, who shared a dream of returning Public

Trust to its rightful place as the preeminent trustee

company in New Zealand.

In 2007, I took a year out, working as a volunteer with

Rotary International as a district governor.

During that time, my wife Melva and I went to India

to help the polio immunisation programme in the

slums of Firozabad and we returned this year with 30

others, continuing the polio programme in the poorer

areas of Delhi.

My passion for removing the world of the polio curse

has been fired by my father, who had polio as a

young married man. I grew up in a household that

knew sickness very well – dad suffered poor and

failing health.

I learned at a young age that turning a day into a

great day was entirely up to me - if I saw things

positively, others usually joined me.

I’ve found enthusiasm breeds and, while I may not

have the solution to every problem, someone around

me usually does.

The key to success is to surround yourself with

positive people who are not afraid to try, to have a go

and guess what? Magic happens! That’s been my

experience in with SLSNZ, from day one.

So how did I get here? Around two years ago, I

was approached to assist Diabetes New Zealand

as interim chief executive and almost on the day I

finished, I moved to the Stroke Foundation to cover

for their chief executive while he was overseas.

When approached to take up the interim role at

SLSNZ, it seemed like a natural extension of my

previous roles, only different.

I’ve discovered surf lifeguards really are “In it for Life”

and I haven’t worked with such a passionate group

of people before, which is thoroughly inspiring.

As an accountant, I read numbers but I like people

best - people are the most important ingredient in

success. That is the magic that surf lifesaving has;

every member I’ve met is passionate about our cause

(and they usually don’t mind telling me about it!).

Financial challenges are not that difficult to fix – they

just require lateral thinking, using networks to ask for

help and by talking and communicating.

This is exactly what is happening with SLSNZ. We are

back on track financially and we are also rebuilding

trust with clubs and members.

The smiling faces of staff in the national office and

across our regions inspire me and their energy and

commitment knows no bounds. If we’d had that

energy and passion in the banks I worked in, we

could have taken the market by storm.

But mostly I look at the volunteers who, week after

week, go out to patrol the beaches, save lives and

take pride in their public service.

They are truly “In it for Life” and, though I’ve come

into their ranks later than most, I am their latest

convert.

Pat Waite

Interim CEO, Surf Life Saving New Zealand

SURF LIFE SAVING | SURF RESCUE | NOV 2011


10

FEATURE:

Rena spill

How do clubbies respond

when their workplace,

playground and second home

comes under direct assault?

As the Rena maritime disaster

showed us, they calmly roll up

their sleeves and get stuck in,

as Jamie Troughton discovers.

Responding to Rena


11

THE BIG CLEAN: PAPAMOA SURF CLUB MEMBERS SHAUN SMITH

AND ANGE JOHNSTON WATCH VOLUNTEERS CLEAR OIL OFF THEIR

BEACH. PHOTOS: JAMIE TROUGHTON/DSCRIBE JOURNALISM

AS BLACK SLUDGE and men in white boiler suits

descended on his beloved beach, all Shaun Smith

wanted to do was to wake up from this nightmare.

The Papamoa Surf Club senior lifeguard arrived at

his home beach on a Thursday in early October to

a sight he never wants to see again, as oil from the

stricken cargo ship Rena washed onto the sand.

It covered everything, throwing dead gannets,

oily kelp and driftwood into black heaps, painting

picturesque white sand with a hideous shadow.

“It was pretty numbing,” Smith recalled. “I’d gone

down the beach where I live and it was relatively OK –

just a few big splotches here and there. I came down

here to the club and there were waves of black oil

rolling in. There was a stunned feeling as we all stood

there, almost like we were at a funeral. Nobody was

talking – we were all just wondering what on earth we

were going to do.”

Papamoa copped the worst of the initial deluge as more

than 350 tonnes spilled out of Rena’s cracked hull,

12km offshore on the Astrolabe Reef near Motiti Island.

A 3km stretch either side of the Bay of Plenty club

soon became the focal point of New Zealand’s

worst environmental disaster, prompting a massive

response from Maritime New Zealand and armed

forces.

Despite the initial horror, clubbies from Mount

Maunganui, Omanu, Papamoa and Maketu were

among the first volunteers to pitch in and Smith

quickly found himself at the centre of the clean-up

operations.

“We’re so recognisable with our lifeguard uniform that

everyone expects us to know everything. Normally

on a beach, we do – if someone asks us where to

swim or what to do with a jellyfish sting, we generally

know the answer. People were naturally coming to

us, so we’ve had to become a clean-up and logistics

experts pretty quickly!

“At the start, there were a lot of unknowns. We didn’t

have any gear or systems going but within a couple

of days, things were flowing really well. It just took a

bit of time to discover where to put the resources and

how to get them here.”

With two sons at the club, director Ange Johnston

sees Papamoa as a second home over summer and

the oil spill felt like someone had dumped a skip-bin

of sewerage all over the carpet in her lounge.

“To see people all over our beach in white boiler suits

just didn’t feel right. It was the school holidays, the

surf was going off and it was beautiful conditions

but there was nothing we could do,” Johnston said.

“You just couldn’t believe it was a beach - the kids

should’ve been out on their boards after training all

winter in the pool but they couldn’t even get in the

water.”

Anger and frustration quickly turned to action, however.

“We’ve got three clubs along this stretch of beach

that were directly affected and all the clubbies were

in there doing their bit. You’ve got to be positive –

it’s not the end of the world and the only way we’re

going to get our summer back is by helping out and

getting in amongst the clean-up effort.”

SLSNZ Eastern Region Programmes and Services

Manager Mike Lord provided a key link between the

various services enlisted for the clean-up, while nearly

5000 people registered to help within the first week

alone.

Mount Maunganui, Omanu and Papamoa lifeguards

all started patrols a week before the official start of

the season, warning the public of the toxic dangers

of oil and helping emergency services monitor the

containers and debris washing up.

Omanu stalwart Allan Mundy helped the Fire Service,

Maritime New Zealand and the Department of

Conservation set up decontamination units along the

beach and provided important local knowledge to the

agencies coming in from outside the region.

Mundy said the initial stages of the disaster were the

hardest, while the various agencies came to grips

with the enormity of the task, but he was fiercely

proud at how the local surf lifesaving fraternity has

responded.

“The three clubs have all come together so well,”

Mundy said. “We’ve been doing a lot of planning

around after-hour emergency response squads and

working closer along the coast but one of the real

positive things about this situation has been the

professional way we’ve all pulled together.

“We were in the public eye and we’re pretty wellknown

so some pretty searching questions came our

way from locals during the early stages, as to what

was being done at an official level but we’ve handled

it really well.”

Smith also believes, despite the environmental

horrors, there will be positive spinoffs.

“We’ve all taken this pretty personally which goes to

show how much our beaches mean to us and we’re

experts at this now but we hope it never happens

again. The community has come closer together -

the oldies are coming down with cakes to feed the

troops for example – and you’re meeting people that

you wouldn’t normally have much contact with. It’s

a major disaster for me personally and the club but

that’s the good stuff you’ve got to take out of it.”

SURF LIFE SAVING | SURF RESCUE | NOV 2011


THE INTERRVIEW

Lisa Carrington

flat out

and female

Lisa’s voyage from Ohope to London

It’s been a big year for Ohope’s Lisa Carrington

after winning the ski race title at the State New

Zealand championships in March with the

Mount Maunganui club, the 21-year-old vaulted

onto the biggest stage of all, winning the K1

200m title at the world kayaking championships

in Hungary and qualifying for the London

Olympics.

She’ll follow a long and proud tradition of

kayaking clubbies when she lines up in London

and faces an exhausting training schedule in

the buildup but still found time to sit down with

Surf Rescue and talk about her achievements.

SR: Congratulations on your world title Lisa.

Has it been full-on since you got back from

Hungary?

Yeah, it’s been a bit chaotic doing interviews

here and there - I’m enjoying it but there will be a limit

though!

SR: You qualified for London a full 11 months out

from the start of the Olympics. Has that made it

easier or harder?

It’s easier in that I don’t have to worry about

qualifying next year and can focus entirely on peaking

for London. It’s also tough because it is a long way

off and there’s some pretty intense training to get into

before then. We’ve also got to mix it up so it doesn’t

get boring or stale and having that big goal –such

as the Olympics – means you can get worn down

because of the nervous energy. Luckily we’ve got a

good structure and good coaching and we’ll have

really good plan working with us.

SR: Does it help having another clubbie, Erin

Taylor, alongside you in the K2 crew, knowing

she has already had Olympic experience?


13

“We’ve never had any females do

as well and it’s mainly been a maledominated

sport so it’s awesome to

boost that up as well.”

SKI STAR: LISA CARRINGTON STARRED AT THE NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS IN

MOUNT MAUNGANUI EARLIER THIS YEAR, WINNING HER FIRST OPEN SKI RACE TITLE.

PHOTOS: JAMIE TROUGHTON/DSCRIBE JOURNALISM

Because she’s been in kayaking longer than

me and is a couple of years older, she does have a

bit more knowledge. She’s also a really good surf

athlete and she’ll be awesome once she gets a whole

year of training under her belt without injury. We’ve

got so much more potential in our K2 because we’ve

only been together for about five months. The sky

is the limit. We’ve just got to get fitter and stronger

and the key to making us go faster is having a really

good environment and teamwork. We’ve never had

any females do as well and it’s mainly been a maledominated

sport so it’s awesome to boost that up

as well.

SR: Tell us about your early life and how you got

into surf lifesaving?

I was born in Tauranga but my family has been

all around the Bay of Plenty. Mum and Dad are

teachers and we eventually settled in Ohope. I joined

the Whakatane Surf Club when I was eight or nine

and definitely wasn’t a swimmer but I was alright at

board paddling – I competed for a couple of years at

the Under-14 national championships. But our club

coach Graham Burt was more of a ski paddler so

when I was around 14, I started getting into that.

SR: Did you know straight away that ski was

what you were going to focus on?

As a young surf athlete, I did well in the Bay of

Plenty championships and my board paddling was

good but once I discovered ski paddling, that event

became a lot better. I remember the days when you

had to do all the events because the coach said it

was “good training” – man, I don’t know if I could go

back and do that these days! While I was under-16,

I was third in my first year in ski and the following

year third in the under-16s board, won the ski and

was second in the under-19 ski. From there, I’ve

won plenty of team medals – at the Mount, we’ve

got loads of talent and a great number of females so

sourcing teams is never a problem – but I hadn’t won

another individual titles until the open ski this year.

SR: How did you make the move into flatwater

kayaking?

I was pretty reserved and quite shy and I didn’t

really go outside my comfort zone so dad pushed me

into it – he thought it would be good for me. I went

to my first kayaking regatta when I was 16 and the

first regatta was the nationals! I turned up, paddled

a K1 the day before and it was a real dunga old

thing. I didn’t fall out – I don’t think – but it was pretty

interesting! I guess that’s how I got into it – I didn’t

really want to do it but I kind of had to. I went to a

regatta the following year, having bought a K1 and

having done a little bit more training, and that’s when

I got chosen for the Youth Olympics.

SR: Did those opportunities help convince you to

really focus on your kayaking?

Yeah, I’ve always loved the beach and I’ve

always come back to surf because they’re really

awesome people. It’s a big family. In surf I found I

couldn’t really get much further - if I worked at it, I

probably could’ve made national squads but when

you can get the opportunity to go the Olympics

in kayaking, it definitely becomes a little more

fascinating.

SURF LIFE SAVING | SURF RESCUE | NOV 2011


14

THE INTERRVIEW

Lisa Carrington

interview continued...

SR: Tell us about the difference between, say, a K1

200m race and the ski race final at the nationals?

It’s more about mongrel in the ski race! You don’t

necessarily have to have the best technique on a surf

ski but in a K1, technique is king. We don’t have chop

and we don’t have waves in kayaking and it’s just you

and your boat in the water – it’s all about efficiency. In

surf, you can just go out and smash it without the best

technique and still get through, plus there are a lot more

tactics in surf, with things like getting around the cans

and knowing the right wave to chase.

SR: What about life outside sport? Are you still

studying in Auckland?

Yeah, but I’ve put them on hold for the moment.

I haven’t studied during the last semester and I’m not

sure if I’ll do summer school and I probably won’t pick

it up until after next year. I’ve got one more year to go in

a Bachelor of Arts, majoring in politics and Maori. I’m

not sure where it’s going to take me but I’m just finding

it really interesting and I really enjoy it. That makes it a

lot more achievable when you’re combining it with sport

because otherwise it would just get put to one side and

never finished.

SR: Are you pretty comfortable being a role model

for aspiring Maori athletes?

Dad is from Gisborne with Ngati Porou heritage

and it’s something that can be lost through the

generations so it is important for me to get back to my

roots, acknowledge it and learn about it. I definitely

don’t mind being a Maori role model – I’m really proud

of that.

SR: We realise the Olympics are going to be a

huge focus for the next nine months but will you

still find time to jump back on a ski?

Yeah, I think so, but we’ll see. I’ll do the odd race

I think but I couldn’t put it in writing. You never know.

I was just at home a couple of weeks back and went

for a paddle which was really nice but being based in

Auckland where my weeks are so hectic, it does get a

bit of tiring.

SR: I guess it can be pretty full-on having to be so

disciplined and training so hard?

Kiwi kayakers

hunt Olympic glory

New Zealand surf lifesavers have a proud record of

sitting down and going fast at Olympic Games. Now

a quartet of Kiwis are set to continue in the footsteps of

the likes of Ian and Steven Ferguson, Grant Bramwell,

Alan Thompson and Paul MacDonald.

Lisa Carrington (Mount surf club) started

proceedings with her brilliant K1 200m world

championship win in Hungary in August, setting

her up as a medal contender in London next

year. Carrington and Erin Taylor (Red Beach)

then qualified in the K2 500m, finishing ninth

in the final. Within a month, the flatwater pair

had been joined by a couple of canoe slalom

specialists, also with links to Mount Maunganui.

Luuka Jones qualified for her second Olympics

at the world slalom champonships in Slovakia

by finishing as the 14th-fastest nation in the

K1 women’s division. She’s been a member

of Mount Maunganui for the past two seasons

and raced at the 2010 national championships

in Ohope.

The 23-year-old finished last in Beijing after a

frantic last-ditch qualifier but her performances

in Slovakia – with a raw time that would’ve

been good enough for seventh – have given her

confidence.

“My raw time showed the improvements I’ve

been making and a jump up in speed,” Jones

said. “While it would have been a great end to

the season to get through to the finals, I know

that I’m fast enough and can take some really

positive things from this race. The hard training is

paying off.

Joining her will be fellow Tauranga-born paddler

Mike Dawson, a former Mount clubbie who

trains with the club’s Squad X whenever he’s

back from overseas.

Dawson finished 16th in the K1 semifinals in

Slovakia, good enough to qualify as the 11thbest

nation, capping a remarkable year for the

25-year-old, who funded much of his European

campaign through prize money won in various

extreme races.

He won the multi-discipline freeriding world title

at the Teva Outdoor Games in Italy earlier this

year and has featured prominently in extreme

races in the United States over the past three

years. He also finished second in the world

extreme kayaking championships, behind fellow

Kiwi Sam Sutton.

“I’m stoked – it’s been a huge season and I’m

really ecstatic with 2011,” Dawson said. “I’m

looking forward to getting back to the Mount

for summer, doing a bit of ski paddling and then

really getting stuck into my Olympic buildup.”

Yes it is, but I’ve been doing it since I left school.

You start off by making heaps of sacrifices but eventually

they don’t become sacrifices, it’s just what I do.

You create your whole life around kayaking and training

so everything you do won’t compromise that. We also

have really good people around us that keep us wellrounded,

which is really important.

SR: Awesome Lisa – thanks heaps for your time

and good luck!

Thank you!

TWO IN A ROW: LUUKA JONES WILL COMPETE AT HER

SECOND OLYMPICS IN LONDON. PHOTO: JAMIE TROUGHTON/

DSCRIBE JOURNALISM

WATER WIZARD: MIKE DAWSON MIXES WHITEWATER SLALOM

WITH EXTREME PADDLING. PHOTO: PETER BRICHTA


2 DEC

Proudly supported by

love

your

lifeguards

SURF LIFEGUARDS RESCUE 1,500 PEOPLE EACH YEAR

AND PREVENT A FURTHER 350,000 FROM GETTING

INTO DIFFICULTY, BUT ALARMINGLY NEW ZEALAND

STILL HAS ONE OF THE WORST RATES OF DROWNING

IN THE DEVELOPED WORLD. WE NEED YOUR HELP!

Mark Adam - rescued earlier this year by Mangawhai

Heads volunteer surf lifeguards at Northland Beach.

WEAR YOUR JANDALS

ON FRIDAY 2 DEC 2011

Follow National Jandal Day on Facebook and

Twitter to keep up to date and for chance to win!

www.facebook.com/nationaljandalday

www.twitter.com/jandalday

Pulling on a pair of jandals will have other surf lifeguards around the country,

special meaning for school teacher Mark shaking buckets to ask for donations.

Adam on December 2.

Now in its fifth year, National Jandal Day

Earlier this year, Adam was resuscitated is proudly supported by State. Donations

by surf lifeguards from Mangawhai Heads received will go to clubs throughout New

Volunteer Lifeguard Service, after he got Zealand, allowing them to train more

into trouble swimming at the Northland lifeguards, increase patrols and buy

beach.

essential equipment to help save lives and

prevent injuries.

He’s adamant that without their quick

actions and skills he would not be here “As a charity we rely on the big-hearted

today – now he’s urging the public to get support of the public and we hope Kiwis

behind National Jandal Day on the first will wear their jandals and dig deep to

Friday in December to donate to Surf Life donate to such an important cause,”

Saving’s national appeal.

Kannemeyer said.

“When the lifeguards got to me I was The public can register their workplace for

in a really bad way. I had no pulse and National Jandal Day and choose which

was unconscious,” Adam said. “They club they’d like to receive all the money

did CPR and gave me a series of shocks raised.

with the heart defibrillator – they literally

The registered workplace will get a

brought me back to life. Just before the

supporter’s pack, to help get everyone in

ambulance arrived I began to respond. If

the mood to celebrate the start of summer

it wasn’t for those lifeguards on the beach

and wear their jandals.

that day, I would not have survived.”

There’s also a new jandal for jandal

Patrol captain Richard Kannemeyer was

promotion, where businesses can match

one of the lifeguards who rescued Adam

their employees contribution and go in to

that day and the pair will join thousands of

win special prizes for each size category.

www.nationaljandalday.co.nz


16

PARTNER UPDATE

Without the

continued support

of our partners the

valuable work we

do in and around

New Zealand

communities would

not be possible. From

our large corporate

sponsors to our local

event coordinators

and supporters

- our partners’

commitment to

helping us prevent

drowning and injury

in New Zealand is

invaluable and we

thank them all.

Protecting our Kiwi way of life for

over 100 years

State proudly joined the Surf family in 2010 and like Surf Life Saving New

Zealand, State has been protecting Kiwi’s and what’s important to Kiwi’s for

over 100 years.

Spending time at the beach with family and friends is a way of life for many

of us. We’re helping Kiwi’s stay safe at the beach this summer by giving Kiwi’s

the skills they need to help keep them safe in the water. Like Surf Life Saving

we’re committed to reducing and preventing risk at the beach.

In just our second year of sponsorship, we are gearing up for a very

successful National Jandal Day on Friday 2nd December. We are supporting

Clubbies around the country through fundraising activities from our 28

State stores and three call centres. We’re also offering ‘Cash for your club’

to any Surf member who takes out an insurance policy with State before 31

December. State will give their club $50 for every new policy, plus they will

personally collect 100 Fly Buys Bonus Points. Check out the ad in this edition

of Partner Update.

Many of our staff have a close association with Surf Life Saving either having

been lifeguards themselves or having required the help of surf lifeguards at

the beach. Our staff will be proudly supporting Surf Life Saving on National

Jandal Day so keep an eye out for them as they shake a bucket on the streets

or take part in other fundraising activities.

State and Surf Life Saving - we’ve been protecting the kiwi way of life for over

100 years and we’re proud of it.

Regards

Mary-Jane Daly

Executive General Manager

State

SUPPORTING OUR CLUBS

State will be supporting Surf Life Saving Club’s this season with:

• ‘Beach condition’ signs, including hazard signage

• A new set of lifejackets for each club

• Subsidising Competitor Vests

State are also our partner with the new find-a-beach website going live in

December, including webcams for clubs and providing considerable support

as principal partner for National Jandal Day. Get your National Jandal Day

t-shirt through Mr Vintage toady. 25% of the sale price is donated to SLSNZ.


17

The longest known sponsorship

in New Zealand history

Now the Rugby World Cup’s over…

You and all the other clubbies across New Zealand are part of an organisation

that has been keeping Kiwi’s safe while they enjoy their favourite beaches

across the country for over 100 years. All of us here at BP are proud of our

ongoing association with SLSNZ, which began in 1968 with a replacement

boat for the Worser Bay SLSC and still going strong 43 years on.

BP has been serving New Zealanders for 65 years. During that time we've

developed strong connections with the people and places we work in.

We believe we have a responsibility to support these communities. Our

partnership with Surf Life Saving is a natural fit; you are the people on the

beach every summer keeping safe the people and families that make up our

communities.

We have great respect for the hard work, training and organisation that goes

on behind the scenes at your clubs to keep these communities safe. The

beach is the favourite playground of many Kiwis, including me, my family and

my team’s families. We think it's important to help keep them safe while they

are enjoying their weekend and holiday outings. Many of our staff are also

active Surf members and we think it's important to support them in something

they are so passionate about.

DHL has been proud supporters of Surf Life Saving Australia and New

Zealand since 2003. It’s more than having the same colours yellow and

red, it’s always been about a commitment to assisting in the delivery of safer

beaches in New Zealand and Australia. The lifeguards we support are the

heart and soul of the surf lifesaving movement. It will always be people we

look to in an emergency.

This year we want to continue our programme of support to clubs with our

volunteer days, club grants and opportunities for us to help educate the

public about beach safety.

Part of the passion we have for Surf Lifesaving is the professionalism I

witness every time I visit a beach. The systems and skills honed from hours

of training, learned from each generation that came before are an inspiration.

As a global logistics organisation with over 500,000 staff world-wide, we share

the same values in professionalism, service and being part of something

great.

Stay safe and I wish you all the very best for the coming summer.

At BP safety is our number one priority. Our mantra is ‘no accidents, no harm

to people and no damage to the environment’. Supporting Surf Life Saving

re-enforces that commitment.

Regards

Mike McGuinness

Managing Director

BP Oil NZ

Regards

Gary Edstein

Senior Vice President, Oceania

DHL

SUPPORTING OUR CLUBS

BP will be supporting each Surf Life Saving Club this season with:

• A BP Gift Card worth $300 to go towards a club’s fuel costs

• $4,000 worth of Fuel Prizes for the new BP Surf Rescue Series

BP are also running a major fundraising summer promotion for Surf Life

Saving New Zealand in over 200 of their BP stores nationwide. Get your

friends and family to support this campaign by purchasing an IRB keyring

and go into the draw to win a year’s worth of fuel.

SUPPORTING OUR CLUBS

DHL will be supporting Surf Life Saving Club’s this season with:

• Club Grant’s programme – bigger and better than last year

• Summer safety campaign in the media to educate the public and support

the efforts of lifeguards

We are still finalising some plans with DHL after their busy efforts at the

Rugby World Cup so more information to come.

SURF LIFE SAVING | SURF RESCUE | NOV 2011


18

PROFILE:

Andrew Lancaster

No slim-pickings

for new board

SETTING

SAIL: NEW SLSNZ BOARD MEMBER ANDREW

LANCASTER, RIGHT, WITH MURIWAI CLUBMATE ASH

MATUSCHKA AT THE START OF THEIR EPIC VOYAGE AROUND

NEW ZEALAND. PHOTO: PAUL ESTCOURT/NZ HERALD

Lifeguard, adventurer, leader and athlete - now Andrew Lancaster

has become Surf Life Saving New Zealand’s youngest-ever board

member. Jamie Troughton profiles the remarkable 26-year-old.

ANDREW LANCASTER IS LIVING proof that

you get out of surf lifesaving what you put in. In

the 12 short years since he sat his surf award as a

14-year-old, Lancaster has accumulated virtually

every qualification possible and attended nearly every

course.

He’s competed a national level, jumped out of

helicopters and helped circumnavigate New Zealand

in an IRB.

Now he’s about to contribute at the highest level

of the movement, having been elected onto Surf

Life Saving New Zealand’s board. At 26, he’s the

youngest ever, but having youth on his side certainly

doesn’t faze the Muriwai clubbie.

“I’ve crammed a lot in since I got stuck into surf and I

don’t have a lot to go but this is the biggest challenge

of them all and I felt it was the next step,” Lancaster

said. “It wasn’t until about a week before applications

closed that a few of my peers convinced me to have

a go and put my name down – now I’m looking

forward to helping at a national level and growing the

organisation and improving some of these challenges

we’re facing.”

Lancaster has joined a new-look board, which will

be chaired by Hawke’s Bay’s Mike Bassett-Foss.

Former Highlanders rugby chairman Colin Weatherall

and Mount Maunganui identity Brent Warner are the

other new faces, joining incumbents Warwick Bell

and Nicki Nicol.

Lancaster is adamant his youth will be an asset to

the new group. “My youth and the representation

I bring from a younger group of the membership is

very valuable but also I’ll bring a fresh way of looking

at things and a new set of eyes.”

It was entirely appropriate Lancaster was on hand

in Auckland recently when Prime Minister John Key

handed over a government cheque for $250,000 to

SLSNZ, which will be used to run young leadership

programmes within the movement.

“This special grant will allow us to develop effective

leaders and grow our own talent,” SLSNZ President

Bob Harvey said. “We are an organisation passionate

about preventing injury and drowning and we are

lucky to have so many outstanding, charismatic and

talented people who make up our membership.”

Harvey could well have been talking specifically

about Lancaster, who was a member of a leadership

development group from 2006-08.

“The skills have been handed to me through surf – it’s

an organization that once you’re in, you don’t want

to leave and you just follow a pathway that’s been

stepped out by others in previous years,” Lancaster

explained. “You learn along the way and there’s such

a superb support network in clubs and at national

level that allow for that learning and development.”

And it’s not like Lancaster has limited his

achievements to surf lifesaving either. He’s a qualified

chartered accountant with a Bachelor of Commerce

from Auckland University, now working as an

investigator for the Inland Revenue Department.

He’s also been an Auckland agegroup rugby

representative, while the loosehead prop has helped

Ponsonby win eight consecutive Auckland club titles.

And to top it off, Lancaster was one of the driving

forces behind the Six Surf Lifeguard campaign,

circumnavigating New Zealand in IRBs earlier this

year.

That outrageous ambition came after reading a book

by British adventurer Bear Grylls, who completed a

crossing of the North Atlantic in an open-hulled rigid

inflatable.

Lancaster and Muriwai teammate Ash Matuschka

were joint leaders of the team of six drivers, which

included Auckland-based Jason Harvey, Blake

Ingram and Matt Buswell and Antony Morgan of

Papamoa.

In two IRBs, the group traveled 5200km around the

coastline, taking 34 days. As project leader and

manager, Lancaster

“It really was an eye-opener and we just wanted to

do something here for our organisation that we know

and love so much. Looking back now, it seems like a

long time ago but we were phenomenally lucky in the

weather we got, especially down the West Coast. In

saying that, we’d done a huge amount of planning

to ensure we got the best possible run and we’d

studied the maps over the last 10-15 years to get

that window that we chose. We rested at the right

times and a lot of our planning came off – it ran a lot

smoother than any of us predicted.”


19

New crew in charge

Surf Life Saving New Zealand has a fresh new

board. They tell us a bit about themselves.

HEAVYWEIGHTS: PRIME MINISTER JOHN KEY GREETS ANDREW

LANCASTER AS HE PRESENTS A $250,000 GRANT TO SURF LIFE SAVING

NEW ZEALAND. PHOTOS: SHANE WENZLICH

They originally allocated 40 days to make

the trip but caught up huge chunks of time

by making the most of benign conditions –

including a remarkable 440km day that took

them around Cape Reinga and right down the

West Coast to Muriwai.

But the success of the trip wasn’t a fluke – it

came down to an intense 18 months of hard

work and detailed preparation.

“As a team, we were working anywhere from

20-30 hours a week, especially over the last six

months or year. We were doing huge amount

of hours and our families and girlfriends got a

little bit sick of the project.

“For the last eight weeks, we’d go into the

shed after work and be working on the gear

until 10pm or midnight most nights. We’d

go to bed and get up and do it all over again.

There were also six months of physical training

in the gym to get our bodies right.

“We need to work on strength in our core and

upper body, just so we could take the beating

we’d end up getting. That served us well –

we’d be about two inches shorter if we hadn’t

done all that work!”

Now Lancaster wants to take the same

approach – thorough research and hard work –

to his board duties.

MICHAEL BASSETT-FOSS - CHAIRMAN

I am passionate about Surf Life Saving because it

involves kids and families and turns youngsters into

well rounded young adults, with excellent networks,

strong leadership skills, enduring friendships, a strong

sense of values and social responsibility. Most of all it

is fun, active, and is at the beach!

I became a pool swimmer at nine when juvenile

arthritis kicked me out of traditional rugby and softball

teams. We moved from Hamilton to Otaki when I was

13 but there was no heated pool so a strong surf

club got me hooked and I’ve never looked back.

My earliest memory was the cold spring mornings

and needing to get into a cold pool for swim training.

Also, at the Christchurch nationals when I was 14, I

sprained my ankle playing tag in the sand hills with

the older clubbies and then had to swim the surf race

with a bandage dragging along behind me!

COLIN WEATHERALL

Surf Life Saving is the greatest community service

and sporting organisation in New Zealand. I really

enjoy being able to give a little to our community and

I love to feel the sand between my toes!

It all started over 30 years ago, when my son Mark

turned five. He started nippers at Brighton Beach and

we were then lucky to have all the family follow on.

Scott and Tracey are also active lifeguards and have

held many other roles over the years at club, regional

and national level.

My wife Ann and I have made friends all over New

Zealand, all because of our mutual passion for Surf

Life Saving.

BRENT WARNER

I love the people in Surf Life Saving - they are the

true heart and soul of the organisation. They are

passionate and driven to deliver an outstanding

community service, which is combined with the

lifestyle that goes with being a lifeguard and the

feel-good factor of saving a life. Contributing to the

community drives my passion for the organisation

and all the people involved.

I have been an active lifeguard and competitor at

Mount Maunganui for 29 years, during that time

I have meet a significant range of people and

developed lifelong friendships, I thrive on the people,

the lifestyle and the competition.

My earliest memory? We were competing in the interdistricts

in Whakatane in huge surf with a massive

drift. When the gun went, four of us Bay of Plenty

athletes took off on a 1.2km run to the west end of

the beach and went out by the rocks. We swam as

a group, made it out 20m from the first buoy and

were the only team to finish. The moral of the story?

Always check the conditions!

WARWICK BELL

Growing up in Gisborne, it was impossible not to

have an affinity with the beaches and surf and, once

involved, I became hooked. The friendships and

camaraderie gained remain for life.

I qualified in 1975 after spending a couple of years

hanging around, moved to Auckland in 1978 and

immediately got involved in the club management

whilst completing and patrolling. This progressed

to district level before taking a break. After being a

director for the world championships in Auckland in

1998, I came back in 2006 as a surf trustee on the

Marine Rescue Centre in Auckland.

My earliest memory of surf lifesaving was in school,

walking to Midway beach in 1969 to watch the New

Zealand champs and Waikanae win the Nelson

Shield for the fourth consecutive year – a huge event

for Gisborne.

NICKI NICOL

I am passionate about Surf Life Saving because of

the contribution it makes to the New Zealand way of

life, providing a safer environment for communities

at the beach. There are some fantastic people who

have made immense contributions to our community

and it is rewarding to see when they are recognised.

I joined Red Beach in the early 1980s as a nipper,

as my family had a bach near the surf club, and the

friendships and fun have kept me involved ever since.

My own kids are now nippers and the cycle starts

again. I’ve got a lot out of my involvement and feel

very privileged - I’m also enjoying being on the board

and see that as a very tangible way to give something

back.

My earliest memories are of hours and hours at the

club at Red Beach every weekend and just hanging

out with mates. Hours in the water patrolling, training,

helping out with nippers, handicap surf races, IRB

rides – I just loved getting involved in everything.

SURF LIFE SAVING | SURF RESCUE | NOV 2011


20

SURF SPORTS:

Pool Champs

Hind’s timely reminder

Finally something for Papamoa to cheer about

She’s hardly clipped a tube in anger over the last four years

but Natasha Hind gave a timely reminder of her skills at the

State New Zealand pool championships recently.

The Lyall Bay 21-year-old was in imperious form,

winning the open women’s 100m rescue medley,

200m swim with obstacles, 200m super lifesaver and

the 50m manikin carry.

She also announced her desire to have a crack

at the national team for the Rescue 2012 world

championships, after missing the last two worlds

campaigns because of the Beijing Olympics and Delhi

Commonwealth Games.

“The last two worlds have clashed with the major

competitions – this time, if I do make the Olympics,

there will be time to focus solely on swimming but

then also have a big enough build-up to Rescue

2012, if I was lucky enough to make the team,” Hind

said. “That’s definitely in the back of my mind heading

into next year.”

Her Olympic selection hinges on whether she can

whittle 0.5secs off her 200m freestyle time, down

to the Olympic A standard of 1:58.33. She’s also a

strong chance to make it in a relay, after helping the 4

x 200m relay squad to a silver medal in Delhi.

Hind didn’t have it all her own way in Hamilton, which

was hosting the pool championships for the first time,

with Lyall Bay teammate Sam Lee pushing her hard in

the 100m rescue medley and the 50m manikin carry.

Lee was just 0.44secs behind Hind’s 1:15.02 medley

time and even closer in the manikin carry, clocking

38.52secs compared to Hind’s 38.23.

But in the longer distances, Hind was in another

realm, clocking 2:07.87 in the 200m swim with

obstacles and 2:29.07 in the super lifesaver. Orewa’s

Rachel Clarke, fresh from a stint in police training in

Porirua, was second in the latter event in 2:40.38.

“I was really happy with the times because I hadn’t

competed seriously for a couple of years,” Hind

said. “The last serious pool competition I did was the

2007 German Cup so it’s been nearly four years - I

didn’t know what to expect but I was quite pleased

with the results. A couple of weeks out, I got hold of

Steve Kent and did a bit of training with him but it was

surprising how much I remembered.

“I definitely lost a little bit in the manikin carry but the

basic skills were all still there.”

Kent missed the second day to attend a wedding

but he won the two events he entered – blitzing the

100m manikin carry in 53.21secs, ahead of Piha’s

Steve Ferguson and Dylan Pahina (both 1:03.71) and

edging Glenn Anderson in the 100m tube swim.

Midway’s Chris Dawson booked himself a trip to the

German Cup with wins in the under-19 100m rescue

medley and the open 200m super lifesaver, while

Papamoa teenagers Mason Pickering and Natalie

Peat also impressed.

Away from the elites, it was the open men’s line throw

that captured one of the stories of the meet, when

41-year-old Papamoa stalwart Greg Akroyd paired

with 12-year-old clubmate Marshall Wells to win.

Their 15.94sec time was well clear of Oreti (17.22)

and Piha (17.29), though they had an anxious wait

before their golds were confirmed.

“Marshall was so excited after the event but because

of the manual timing, we had to wait six hours for

the results to be confirmed,” Akroyd explained. “He

was excited about the possibility of winning a medal

but he was out of his skin when we found out it was

gold. He’s one of those kids who is at the club every

weekend and always gives 100 percent, wins a few

things here and there but was pretty excited about

doing the line throw.”

Akroyd, whose last national title was on the beach

“a long time before Marshall was even born!”, was

originally set to compete in masters but Papamoa

manager Ange Johnston convinced him to enter the

open division for extra points.

Not that they needed it – when the final points were

tallied, the Bay of Plenty club had bolted clear, ending

Lyall Bay’s five-year winning streak.

Papamoa finished with 948.5 points, with Lyall Bay on

746 and Mount Maunganui on 722, providing a nice

boost to the club after the dramas of the Rena oil spill

disaster on their beach.

“This is certainly a timely boost for the club and

community,” Papamoa coach Kurt Wilson said.

“We’ve been training in the pool since May and, while

it’s been tough keeping them out of the ocean for the

last month, at least they’ve had something else to

focus on.”

A 16-member Australian under-20 team also

competed at the championships, including Devon

Halligan, daughter of former Waikato rugby player and

Kiwis league star Daryl.

Anderson, Kent and Lee formed the backbone of the

New Zealand team selected for the German Cup,

with Dawson, Ayla Dunlop-Barrett, Andrew McMillan,

Madison Boon and Dannielle O’Connor.

See sport.surflifesaving.org.nz

for full results.


21

COMEBACK KID: NATASHA HIND’S PERFORMANCE AT THE STATE NEW

ZEALAND POOL CHAMPIONSHIPS WAS A TIMELY REMINDER OF HER TALENTS.

PHOTOS: JAMIE TROUGHTON/DSCRIBE JOURNALISM

TOP 10

PAPAMOA 948.5

LYALL BAY 746

MT MAUNGANUI 722

WAIKANAE 564.5

N.P.O.B 358

MIDWAY 287

PIHA 281.5

SUMNER 215

ST CLAIR 164

PAEKAKARIKI 138

POOL PARTY: ACTION FROM THE STATE NEW ZEALAND

POOL CHAMPIONSHIPS IN HAMILTON.

OPEN STARS: WITH 29 YEARS BETWEEN THEM, PAPAMOA

12-YEAR-OLD MARSHALL WELLS AND 41-YEAR-OLD GREG

AKROYD MADE FOR UNLIKELY OPEN LINE-THROW CHAMPIONS.

ON THE FLY: AUSTRALIA’S DEVON

HALLIGAN SHOWS SUPERB TECHNIQUE

IN THE 200M OBSTACLES SWIM.

AT THE READY: PAEKAKARIKI’S

JAKE ALLEN GET SET FOR THE

START OF THE MANIKIN TOW.

SURF LIFE SAVING | SURF RESCUE | NOV 2011


22

HIGH PERFORMANCE:

Coach’s corner

Build-up begins

for a big year in surf

New Zealand coach Scott

Bartlett is looking forward

to a huge summer of

events. He tells Surf Rescue

about his plans for world

domination next year.

THE NEXT 12 MONTHS are going to be massive for

surf lifesaving in New Zealand and beyond.

With the world championships on our doorstep in

Adelaide next year, a lot of the progress our athletes

can make on the beach or in the pool this summer will

define how well we do at the worlds.

It all starts now. We’ve got teams going to the German

Cup pool competition and also a couple of beach

carnivals in Australia.

The German Cup is the strongest pool competition

outside of worlds, if not a little bit stronger because of

the athlete depth.

It’s a long way to go to Europe but we just can’t

replicate that sort of competition in the Southern

Hemisphere – from that perspective, the value of

the German Cup is just massive and it’s also a great

opportunity to test our athletes in an international

environment.

“From the overall High

Performance program,

I’m really happy

because we’ve got a

really good tracking

system in place now

and we’ve also got a

lot of good events on

offer for them to train

and trial for.”

SCOTT BARTLETT PHOTO: JAMIE TROUGHTON/DSCRIBE JOURNALISM

That’s also the case for our 12 athletes heading to

Australia. We would normally have sent a team to

the Sanyo Bussan competition in Japan but it was

cancelled this year because of the Japanese tsunami.

When we looked around, there were a few options

available to us. With a bit more research, the Coffs

Harbour carnival turned out to be just craft racing

which a lot of the Queensland clubs go to.

It also coincides with one of the rounds of the Fastest

Man on Sand series up in Redcliffe so eight athletes

will compete on both Saturday and Sunday in Coffs

Harbour, while four will do the first day at Coffs Harbour

and then head to the Fastest Man on Sand carnival on

the Sunday.

From an exposure point of view, the likes of beach

sprinters Kodi Harman, Chanel Hickman and Paul

Cracroft-Wilson will get a lot of benefit out of it.


23

As we head into a huge season of

surf sport, we profile four of our high

performance squad members as they

chase dreams of representing their

country and winning a world title.

Athletes like Kev Morrison and Mike Janes were left

out of the New Zealand team because of injuries over

winter and we didn’t want to put any more pressure on

them from a selection point of view but they’re likely to

use the Coffs Harbour carnival to see where they are in

terms of preparation.

After that, we’ve got a full New Zealand trial in

Whangamata on December 17, the first of four key

beach selection events. All the selectors will be there

and we’re encouraging any athletes who aspire to

international level to come along.

That trial will also see the debut of our new six-round

surf series, which is a great concept and something the

athletes have been requesting for a while.

Next year’s world championships aren’t until November

and that gives us a bit of breathing space.

We’ll announce the high performance and development

squads at the end of nationals, with the Rescue

2012 team to be selected from these. Rescue 2012

organisers may also include an under-20 team

competition for the first time, which could mean a

fantastic opportunity for younger lifesavers to represent

our country. We’ve fully supported this and have

committed to sending a team if the event is confirmed.

Most of the high performance squad will build their

season from May until November - that will be their big

six months of base and training.

We’ll give the athletes a bit of time off after the trials in

early April but the challenge for them is to come back

down after our summer so they can build back up.

They’ve got to do a fair bit of work with their coaches

and the High Performance squad to make sure they

can peak twice in a big year. It can be quite difficult.

The other aspect involves any of our athletes -

particularly the swimmers - who make the London

Olympics. We won’t have any access to them until the

end of July but that still gives us nearly four months to

bring them back into the surf environment.

Australia will be in the same boat - they’ve got athletes

who could be going to the Olympics, like Megan Nay,

an outstanding backstroker and freestyler, who could

come into the mix for them.

We could have as many as three or four in contention

for both the Olympics and Rescue 2012 so there could

be a few minor hurdles to jump.

Steve Kent

One of our current national team members, Steve is the current Commonwealth champion

for the 50m manikin carry in the pool and at the recent Australian Pool Championships,

Steve walked away with four individual gold medals.

The Titahi Bay club member also broke the New Zealand record in the 50m manikin at

the same championships, beating Australian arch-rival Andrew Baildon. Steve has been

training 12 sessions a week in his bid to qualify for the German Cup and Rescue 2012

teams.

Chanel Hickman

She’s the current national beach flags champion but Chanel really burst onto the

international scene 12 months ago when she beat at star-studded field in both flags and

sprint at the Sanyo Bussan Lifesaving Cup in Japan. The South Brighton flyer was then

picked for the New Zealand team for the International Surf Challenge, where she won her

event in all three tests.

Currently training on the Gold Coast, Chanel willl compete at the Fastest Man on the Sand

series in Australia, honing her skills in preparation for the summer surf season here in New

Zealand, with a clear goal of making the Rescue 2012 team and winning both the sprint

and flags golds for New Zealand.

Sam Lee

Sam is another current national team member, who won two individual silver medals at the

last world championships in 2010, plus a gold medal in the 200m obstacle relay.

At the recent Australian Pool Championships, she collected two gold medals amid a fast

and growing women’s field in the open ranks, while her times in the 200m obstacle race

placed her in the top-two performances in the world this season.

Sam is currently training in Wellington with the Lyall Bay club, training 10 sessions a week

in the pool and two sessions a week in the gym. She’s also eyeing the German Cup

Rescue 2012 campaigns with interest.

Cory Taylor

Rising ironman star Cory Taylor is fast making his presence felt on the international stage,

with his recent third-place finish at the junior Coolangatta Gold race in Australia making a

lot of people sit up and take notice.

The Midway club member has just spent the winter months kayak racing throughout

Europe in a bid to transfer this gained power back to his ski paddling and enhance his

ironman even more. He’ll test that training with the New Zealand A team in the Coffs

Harbour Carnival, alongside Dan Moodie and Chris Moors.

He’s a fast swimmer and keen board paddler - this combination could form a potential

weapon, which he hopes can one day challenge that of his coach and fellow Midway

member, Cory Hutchings, who won 11 national ironman titles in a glittering career.

SURF LIFE SAVING | SURF RESCUE | NOV 2011


24

HIGH PERFORMANCE:

Coach’s corner

CONTINUED

Fortunately, the Individual Performance Plans for each

athlete have shown us exactly how they’ve been

tracking for the last six months and will continue to

do so over the next year.

Most of them are in pretty good shape at the

moment, which is great, although there are a couple

just getting over injuries.

From the overall High Performance program, I’m

really happy because we’ve got a really good tracking

system in place now and we’ve also got a lot of good

events on offer for them to train and trial for. Things

are looking good at the moment.

Things have been pretty busy for me as well

- I started up Bartlett’s Swim School in Mount

Maunganui in August and we’ve got nearly 400 kids

enrolled for the last term.

New sport series

boost for NZ

The athletes have demanded it -

now they’re going to get it.

The most exciting thing for us is that we’ve got two

local schools and two local kindergartens involved,

which allows us to get kids who haven’t swum before

into the program. There are around 50 kids who

haven’t had any previous swim training before, which

we’re stoked about.

It’s an absolute treat on a daily basis - I get to deal

with the very top end and I get to deal with the kids

who are just starting out. It’s a great cross-section of

kids to coach.

That’s it from me for now – see you on the beach!

The new Sonic Race Series will kick off in

Whangamata on December 17, offering prizes

and bragging rights to New Zealand’s top surf

lifesaving talent.

The series will feature five rounds of top-end

ski, board, swim, sprint and flags racing, with

ironmen and iromwomen getting six rounds,

including a grand final at the Oceans 12

under-14 national championships.

“After the success of the centenary season,

it’s important to keep moving in the right

direction and add an edge and something

new to the surf sports calendar,” SLSNZ sport

development manager Brad Edwards said.

“Athletes have been asking for this sort of

thing and we’ve managed to introduce it in a

way that will boost the existing events in the

process which has also been identified as a

strong priority for the sport.”

The series will start with the joint Northern/

Eastern region carnival in Whangamata – which

also doubles as a national trial – and will take

in each of the four regional championships,

starting with the Central Regionals at Oakura

on January 15.

The Eastern Regionals – formerly the NRCs –

will follow at Mount Maunganui on January 28

and 29, followed by the Northern and Southern

championships on February 18 and 19.

Athletes will need to compete at three of

the five rounds, with the top-10 ironmen

and women qualifying for the decider during

lunch time on the third day of the Oceans

12 championships at Mount Maunganui on

February 25.

The winners of the grand final races will receive

Sonic paddle boards valued at $2250 each.

A working group including John Bryant, Matt

Sutton, Travis Mitchell and Andrew Newton

brought ideas from athletes and clubs to help

shape the race series concept.

With Rescue 2012 just one year away the

introduction of more top level racing couldn’t

be more timely.

Edwards is confident the series will have double

benefits – as well as providing more high quality

racing and the added incentive of series titles

and prizes for athletes, the events themselves

will get a boost with elite-level racing.

“In the past, the NRCs (now the Eastern

Regionals) have been right up there with the

nationals, for our top athletes. Ultimately

we’d love to lift the standard and profile of the

Central, Northern and Southern championships

to get them up to the same level.”

After each round, points will be tallied and

posted on the SLSNZ sport web site,

sport.surflifesaving.org.nz

YOUNG GUN: MIDWAY’S CORY TAYLOR WILL BE CLOSELY WATCHED THIS

SEASON. PHOTO: MARK DWYER/LAVA MEDIA


2011/12

Summer of Surf Sport

www.surflifesaving.org.nz/slsnzevents

October 2011

State New

Zealand Pool

Championships

28 – 30 October

Hamilton

November 2011

BP Surf Rescue

Series #1:

Northern Region

12 – 13 November

Omaha

December 2011

NZ Surf Boat Series #1:

Wellington Super Surf Boat Event

BP Surf Rescue Series #2:

Eastern Region

3 December

Paekakariki

10 -11 December

Whangamata

January 2012

February 2012

NZ Surf Boat Series #2:

Whangamata Surf Boat Spectacular

2 January

Whangamata

NZ Surf Boat Series #3:

North Island Surf Boat Championships

4 – 5 February

Waihi

BP Surf Rescue Series #3:

Central Region

Central Regional

Championships

14 January

Oakura, New Plymouth

15 January

Oakura, New Plymouth

Lion Foundation New

Zealand Surf League

(U14, U16, U19, Open)

9 – 12 February

Mount Maunganui

Eastern Regional

Championships

(formerly NRCs)

28 – 29 January

Mount Maunganui

Northern Regional

Championships

Southern Regional

Championships

18 – 19 February

Ruakaka

18 – 19 February

New Brighton

U14 New Zealand

Surf Life Saving

Championships

(Oceans 12)

23 – 26 February

Mount Maunganui

NZ Surf Boat Series #4:

Piha Big Wave Classic

25 February

Piha

March 2012

BP Surf Rescue Series #4:

Southern Region

3 March

Warrington

State New Zealand

Surf Life Saving

Championships

15 – 18 March

Gisborne

BP Surf Rescue New

Zealand Championships

30 March – 1 April

Warrington


26

FEATURE:

Tolaga Bay

PIECE OF PARADISE: THE BOTTOM STORY

OF THE ORIGINAL CLUBHOUSE IS NOW THE

TOLAGA BAY GEAR SHED. PHOTO: JAMIE

TROUGHTON/DSCRIBE JOURNALISM

Cunning Coa

leading surf re


27

Famous for its wharf

and as a piece of

East Coast paradise,

Tolaga Bay is also

becoming a centre

of surf lifesaving

innovation thanks to

a pair of enterprising

locals, as Jamie

Troughton discovers.

IF YOU NEEDED PROOF that things have

always been done a bit different up the Coast,

listen to some of the patrolling stories from the

Tolaga Bay Surf Lifesaving Club.

Impromptu ironman races across the Uawa

River to the end of the iconic wharf and back,

mussel-gathering expeditions via IRB and long

patrol lunches involving roasted lambs tails on

driftwood bonfires.

Sheltered from the serious southerly swells,

the sleepy slice of paradise has a perfect

golden curve and you can see why scoring a

festive season patrolling stint would be one of

the best gigs around.

That sleepiness in the small settlement,

60km north of Gisborne, has also been one

of the biggest challenges for the local surf

club, however. Founding member Ray Dever

reckons there’s virtually 100 percent attrition in

their ranks – himself excluded – as all the young

talent eventually heads off for work or study.

sters

vival

SURF LIFE SAVING | SURF RESCUE | NOV 2011


28

FEATURE:

Tolaga Bay

“ Our kids don’t see

rowing or surf sports and

you’d never get them

into speedos – they don’t

identify with that side of

surf lifesaving – so we’ve

got to bring in the water

sports that they do and

identify with.”

REGAN FAIRLIE

ALL ABOUT WHANAU: TOLAGA BAY LOCALS KEREHAMA BLACKMAN (LEFT) AND REGAN FAIRLIE HAVE BEEN LEADING A SURF

LIFESAVING REVIVAL IN THE EAST COAST SETTLEMENT THROUGH SOME INNOVATIVE RECRUITMENT STRATEGIES.

PHOTO: JAMIE TROUGHTON/DSCRIBE JOURNALISM

Now a couple of keen locals have taken up the

challenge. Kerehama Blackman, 33, and 32-year-old

Regan Fairlie are determined to rebuild the club back

up to its heyday in the late 1980s, when they had

more than 30 active members.

And in true East Coast style, they’re bringing their

own spin to how a surf club should work in their

community.

Skis and canoes? Nope. The club has just got

funding to buy a handful of new stand-up paddle

boards. Fairlie grew up surfing in and around

Tokomaru Bay and knows this coast intimately.

He’s an accomplished waterman - who could

probably go to sea on a strainer post with a pair of

crutching shears as paddles – and points out there’s

a good reason they’re putting their faith in the SUP

movement.

“Our kids are right into waka ama and it’s a nice

transition from waka ama to stand-up, then into

surfing and surf lifesaving,” Fairlie explains. “Our kids

don’t see rowing or surf sports and you’d never get

them into speedos – they don’t identify with that side

of surf lifesaving – so we’ve got to bring in the water

sports that they do identify with.”

Burly Blackman, a combative former lock for Ngati

Porou East Coast who still plays for the local Uawa

Rugby Club, admits they’ve had to get cunning to

attract interest to their surf ambitions.

Instead of rocking up to the rugby club with our surf

lifesaving hats on, we’ve joined the rugby team and

got ourselves in a position to put surf lifesaving on the

table as part of their off-season training,” Blackman

said. “The fullas had visions of lying on the beach in

speedos but once they got down there and started

some surf training, they had nothing but respect for

the sport.”

For the first time in nearly two decades, surf lifesaving

in Tolaga Bay is on the rise again, with Blackman

crediting Surf Life Saving New Zealand’s Groundswell

Project as playing a major part.

“From when we first started three years ago, it was

just talk around the table. We were in survival mode

with a two-man committee. We’re now educating in

the school, running programmes after school, helping

out at community events and we’re just trying to fly

our colours anywhere. Our view is that our whanau

don’t want to compete but they want to be active so

we’re trying to get activities going for them under the

club umbrella.

ON THE RISE: THE NEXT GENERATION OF

TOLAGA BAY SURF ATHLETES TRY OUT THEIR NEW

STAND-UP PADDLE BOARDS. PHOTO: TOLAGA

BAY SURF CLUB

“That’s why Groundswell was good for us because

we were able to change things to suit our community.

What works in the urban areas doesn’t necessarily

work in the rural areas.”


29

IN THE PRESS: HOW THE GISBORNE HERALD REPORTED

THE WILD WEATHER ON JULY 1 1996.

IN RURAL TOLAGA BAY, Ray Dever wears so

many hats, sometimes it’s just easier for him to go

around bare-headed. The amiable 59-year-old, a

rumbling laugh never far from his throat, is currently

a fisheries officer but spent a long stint as the solecharge

policeman in the town. As well as his surf

lifesaving duties, he’s also a volunteer fireman and

member of the coastguard.

As a teenager, Dever was one of the surf lifesaving

pioneers when Tolaga Bay campground manager

Jack Clark started patrols down the southern end of

the beach near the iconic wharf in the mid-1960s.

“We only had a reel and a line and that’s about all – it

was just a matter of getting over there and having a

whole lot of fun on the beach, while keeping an eye

on things,” Dever recalls.

“It went defunct for a few years but Eugene Paea

(Tolaga Bay’s policeman before Dever) and I kicked it

off again in the mid-80s because our kids were just

starting to play down the beach. We bought a bit of

gear off Midway – a few boards and bits and pieces –

and then added our first IRB.”

The club survived the devastation of Cyclone Bola in

1987 and two years later, after intensive fundraising,

members opened a new two-story clubhouse on the

foreshore at the northern end of the beach. Things

were looking great for the small but enthusiastic

group of volunteers.

Then, disaster. A blustery Sunday afternoon in June

1996 intensified into a gale-ridden evening, as a

fierce north-westerly wind blew down the Uawa River

valley. It knocked over power poles, left trees strewn

all over the neighbouring Tolaga Bay Golf Course and

lifted the top story off the seven-year-old surf club

and deposited it 150m out into the surf.

“It blew our building out to sea – we could see it

in the breakers for quite a while and bits of it kept

coming ashore,” Dever recounts sadly. “It was a bit

of a heart-breaker for us and we had a helluva battle

with the council over whether the building should’ve

been there in the first place. We had to start

fundraising again and put the building back up on the

hill behind, where it is now.”

The bottom level of the surf club remains as a gear

shed, with the new building 100m further back

from the beach. The freak winds that day didn’t just

damage the clubhouse, however. “Everyone had

the wind knocked out of them and it took a while to

crank it up. It’s never really gelled having the building

separate like it is now – it needs to be down on the

beach. My argument is the rugby club is in the rugby

grounds, the golf clubrooms are on the golf course

and the surf clubrooms are in the cemetery. It’s all

cemetery reserve land – you could say it’s a bit of a

dead end!”

A DAB HAND: RAY DEVER HAS BEEN A PILLAR OF

THE TOLAGA BAY COMMUNITY FOR NEARLY 50 YEARS.

PHOTO: JAMIE TROUGHTON/DSCRIBE JOURNALISM

SURF LIFE SAVING | SURF RESCUE | NOV 2011


30

ON THE RISE: THE NEXT GENERATION OF TOLAGA BAY

SURF ATHLETES TRY OUT THEIR NEW STAND-UP PADDLE BOARDS.

PHOTOS: TOLAGA BAY SURF CLUB

THE HEYDAY: THE OPENING OF THE NEW CLUBHOUSE IN 1989. PHOTO: GISBORNE HERALD

“ Once we get it sorted

here, we can take this

model up the coast and

show other communities

how we did it. We’re

chucking our nets out

and seeing what we can

gather in.”

KEREHAMA BLACKMAN

BLACKMAN STARTS CHUCKLING when he

recalls his introduction to surf lifesaving, by none

other than Dever. It was in the early 1990s when the

movement in the area was reaching a crescendo

and, as Blackman explains, club stalwart Dever had

some hard-case recruitment strategies of his own.

“He used to head down the beach with a trailer on

the back of his truck with all sorts of old boards on

it. He used to drive through town telling at us to

get down to the beach and we’d all go out surfing

on them. He’d be on the beach yelling at us to

stop standing on them and to get on our knees and

paddle properly. But that engaged us, introducing us

to surfing, and he slowly got us into surf lifesaving.”

Blackman and Fairlie used to compete against each

other as kids, when Tolaga Bay and Tokomaru Bay

squared off in surfing carnivals. These days, both

have kids of their own and, when Fairlie moved back

into the area four years ago, he joined in with a group

of teenagers and sat his surf lifesaving award.

Now he’s keen for the club to take a holistic view of

Tolaga Bay. “We’re not just a surf lifesaving club, we

look after the environment and the community as

well,” Fairlie explains. “We’re trying to move more to

being a kaitiaki for the area. We’re starting to get a

lot of rubbish coming down the river from the farms

and forestry so we’d like to raise awareness of that,

by using the surf lifesaving club to start driving it.

We want to work better together with the logging

companies and it gives us some authenticity.”

For his part, Blackman doesn’t mind if Tolaga Bay

members never win a national beach flags title, tow a

manikin at withering speed or snaffle a taplin crown.

The measure of his success will be in a generation of

water-confident, pro-active kids coming through.

“Look at all these kids around here – we don’t

want to be a statistic on the New Zealand map for

drownings. We want to grow it so everyone’s proud

to be a part of the scene and all our kids are qualified.

Once we get it sorted here, we can take that model

up the coast and show other communities how we

did it. We’re chucking our nets out and seeing what

we can gather in.”


31

Real life rescue

shows LFA’s value

Lifesaving First Aid Ltd recently celebrated

its first birthday. Surf Rescue looks at the

innovative program with heavy links to the

surf lifesaving movement.

It proved to be the ultimate piece of on-the-job

training – exactly what Lifesaving First Aid was set up

to achieve.

In late September, Lifesaving First Aid instructors Hira

Edmonds (Bethells Beach), Claire Carrington (Bethells

Beach) and Ellie Gain (Spencer Park) were teaching

senior surf lifeguards from all over the country at

Christchurch’s North Beach.

Christchurch surfer James Tuhikarama, 47, was

competing in a North Wai Boardriders Club event at

the same beach, when he had a heart-attack and

was dragged out of the water, face-down, by fellow

competitors.

Up in the North Beach clubrooms, Edmonds saw

a make-believe rescue scenario turn into a real life

drama.

He quickly mobilised the six students, who were

completing Pre Hospital Emergency Care (PHEC)

training, and they provided CPR until emergency

services arrived.

Tuhikarama spent a week in intensive care in an

induced coma and nearly three weeks in hospital but

has now recovered. He has no doubt he owes his

life to Lifesaving First Aid, and later caught up with

the six teenaged surf lifeguards who had learned their

lessons so well.

“That’s the only thing that kept me alive,” Tuhikarama

said. “They were so happy to see me as well. They

know their stuff and they know how to save people.”

Lifesaving First Aid training manager Rob Howes

believes it show-cased the worth of taking training

into the workplace and tailoring courses to suit

needs.

“The oxygen levels in the patient were extremely low

and therefore good compressions and re-oxygenation

were vital,” Howes said. “The greatest benefit to this

patient was the fact that the responding lifeguards

were very skilled in effective CPR which gave the

patient the best possible chance of survival.”

Lifesaving First Aid was set up officially in September

2010 but its roots go much deeper - specialised

first aid training was started by Surf Life Saving New

Zealand a decade ago in Wellington.

Surf lifeguard training accounts for a large slice of

current clientele – LFA runs 8-12 courses per week

from June and December and 6-8 courses per week

for the rest of the year – but the corporate market is

steadily growing.

Tauranga gym Bodyzone recently got LFA to run

a workplace first aid course at their premises and

general manager Matt Adsett said it was invaluable

on-the-job training for his staff.

“Hira’s delivery was humourous, with good learning

objectives and above all, it was relevant to our

work environment,” Adsett said. “We all came away

feeling very positive and enthusiastic regarding our

training and I would highly recommend them to other

businesses.”

Lifesaving First Aid administrator Keri James said

the incredible North Beach rescue showed first aid

was rarely needed in a typical classroom learning

environment.

“Accidents rarely happen in a training room and each

and every workplace is difference,” James said. “It

is crucial that businesses and their staff have the

knowledge and confidence to administer first aid to

work colleagues or the general public in a range of

environments and circumstances.

Training for Life

www.lifesavingfirstaid.co.nz | 0508 teach us


32

FEATURE:

Christchurch update

Spirits still high for

Sumner clubbies

It’s been a year of upheaval across New Zealand and

no-one felt it more than the residents of Christchurch. The

Garden City’s surf clubs have been hit particularly hard

but, as Jamie Nilsson discovers, generosity and support

from fellow clubbies is already helping heal the scars.

THEIR BUILDING MAY be cracked and broken and

their city ravaged but their spirits are unbroken.

Sumner surf lifeguards, after more than eight months

of horrible upheaval following the February 22

earthquake in Christchurch, are more determined

than ever to celebrate their centenary in style.

Though nearly 80 percent of the clubhouse remains

unusable and lies squarely in the ‘white zone’ -

meaning members are not allowed to fully rebuild or

repair their base until they get into the ‘green zone’ -

the usable chunk of the building has been converted

into a patrol operation base and first aid room, ready

for the season.

And with the help of a monumental fundraising drive

from the good folk of Gisborne, there’s more hope on

the horizon.

“We bought a tent with some of the money raised

in Gisborne and we don’t have any showers but the

council will put up portaloos for us.,” Sumner funding

manager Alastair Malcolm explains. “Things are

starting to look really positive.”

Sumner, one of the first surf life saving clubs in New

Zealand, kick-started their centenary season with

a formal dinner, march past display and junior surf

display. The celebrations could not have come at a

better time, giving Sumner surf lifeguards something

to look forward to and looking back with pride on 100

years of service.

The club has been blown away by the amount of

support they have been receiving, not only from the

wider surf life saving family but the outstandingly

generous members of the public as well.

“We are overwhelmed with the kindness from

Gisborne, Surf Life Saving New Zealand, PALMS

Shopping mall, ASB, the Lion Foundation and

members of the public,” Sumner club secretary Pip

Ives says. “We are so very humbled and thankful.”

The Gisborne earthquake fund has made a huge

difference, with over $38,500 raised already. Money

has been donated from the Gisborne Mayoral

account and Gisborne Chinese Association - “the

whole area has really got in behind the fund”,

Gisborne Herald editor Jeremy Muir points out.

Gisborne’s own love for surf lifesaving and the beach

was motivation for sponsoring a damaged community

facility in Sumner but the inspiration to help Sumner

came from Gisborne Salvation Army major Graham

Medland.

“It was what we in the Army call a ‘God moment’,”

Medland recalls. “I was standing outside the club

(after the quake), taking photos when this guy ran

past and said ‘mess isn’t it?’. Turns out, that man

was Alistair and on the club’s committee. He stopped

to chat and told with me about every hurdle they now

faced. We exchanged names and contact details

and it went from there.” The club is a worthy focus

for Gisborne’s fundraising efforts, says Mr Medland,

who has been to Christchurch twice since the 6.3

earthquake.

“I think the fund for the club is brilliant. Human nature

says we like to have something solid to invest in, so

it is great. Just to be able to give a group of people a

bit of encouragement, to show them that the rest of

country hasn’t forgotten about them, is so important.

We see the devastation on TV and we can turn it off

when we have had enough.

“But the people of Christchurch can’t walk away.

They are going to live with this for an entire

generation, that’s how big it is.”

Sonic Surf Craft, the Gisborne-based surf life saving

equipment manufacturer, also came on board by

supporting the Christchurch clubs at this year’s

Oceans 11, where they donated a blank canvas

paddle board for all the under-14 athletes to write

their messages of support on.

“We are all thinking of you” and “hope you can use

your beach soon” were reoccuring themes.

At the end of Oceans 11, all the Christchurch club

names were put in to a hat and Sumner’s name was

pulled out.

“Giving away the board was really special,” Sonic

owner Matt Sutton says. “In the grand scheme of

things, it was nothing after what they had all been

through, but knowing that we played a part in making

Sumner’s event memorable was awesome. We

have always had the attitude of really trying to help

the smaller clubs throughout New Zealand as much

as we can, so for Sumner to win the board was

amazing. SLSNZ is a tight-knit organisation - it was

awesome to see the whole movement rally around

particular clubs when they need help.”

AFTER OCEANS 11, organisers had the huge task

of sadly shifting the State New Zealand Surf Life

Saving Championships, originally planned for New

Brighton beach as part of the centenary celebrations.

And it wasn’t just the event that needed moving -

SLSNZ also wanted to help all South Island clubs

with the unplanned costs of transport to the new

Mount Maunganui venue.

Offers of help came flooding in. A message on the

SLSNZ Facebook page saw more than 25 people

offering billet accommodation to South Island

clubbies and numerous offers of gear were also

received.

The earthquake rumbles are fading in Christchurch

while the rebuilding of homes and lives ramps up.

Although they face a lot of work, Sumner members

are excited by the possibilities for the club and the

community.

They’re keen for an open-minded approach from club

supporters, especially for the management of the

club and future economy.

Christchurch-based club development officer Scott

Roberts says the resilience of surf club members is

now shining through, long after the dust has settled.

“It has been incredible over these months, watching

people rally together and look after their wider surf life

saving family,” Roberts says. “I still struggle to look

at town and think of what has gone and the amount

of people that were lost that day but it makes a lot

of the smaller things seem insignificant now and it

makes you appreciate your friends even more.”


HEALING HANDS: UNDER-14 NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP

COMPETITORS SENT MESSAGES OF SUPPORT THROUGH TO

THEIR BELEAGUERED FELLOW CLUBBIES IN CHRISTCHURCH.

PHOTO: JAMIE TROUGHTON/DSCRIBE JOURNALISM

TERRIBLE TIMING: THE SUMNER SURF CLUB’S

CLOCK STOPPED AT 12.51PM ON FEBRUARY 22 AND

LEFT THE CLUB WITH A MASSIVE REBUILDING JOB.

PHOTO: JAMIE NILSSON

Donate to the Gisborne Quake

Relief Fund at Westpac.

account number

03 0638 0743399 00

The club is registered as a charity and

donations to the fund are tax deductible.

Follow Sumner SLSC on Facebook at

www.facebook.com/sumnersurf

or their website www.sumnerslsc.co.nz

SURF LIFE SAVING | SURF RESCUE | NOV 2011


34

SLSNZ Awards :

In it for life

Surf’s best

on show

A celebration of Surf Life Saving took place

in Hamilton recently, with national honours

awarded to past and present clubbies at the 2011

DHL In it for Life Awards. More than 65 of New

Zealand’s elite Surf Lifeguards and members

were officially recognised for their hard work

and dedication.

1. RODGER CURTICE

Haxton, Gardner and Morse – now another 10 names

have been added to the ultimate honours board

at Surf Life Saving New Zealand. The 10 new life

members were included at a prestigious luncheon in

Hamilton recently, with eight more major awards and

a number of service awards celebrated at the DHL In

it for Life Awards.

The awards celebrate volunteer work spanning many

decades, with one of the highest honours going to

Piha lifeguard Rodger Curtice. The 71-year-old was

made a life member for 54 diligent years with the

West Coast club. “I’m very humbled and honoured

to get the award,” Curtice told his local paper, the

Western Leader, recently.

He’s held numerous roles with Piha in his time, from

social convener to president, and in 1992 the club

crowned him a life member. The father-of-two has

taken a behind-the-scenes role within the club after

a serious car accident but has always thought it is

important to do something for the community for

nothing.

“My father was club captain for a while and my

uncle was involved too. Growing up in that kind of

environment you learn from it.”

East End’s Trevor Corkin has been involved with his

club since 1957, and has been a SLSNZ coach and

selector and had huge involvement in sport within the

Taranaki area. As well as his Taranaki involvement,

Corkin has held various club roles including club

president.

North Beach’s Dave East has been heavily involved in

surf officiating at a local level and nationally.

East was awarded life membership of North Beach

in 2000 and has been right through member hoops,

surf sport competitor, patrol captain, club captain,

team manager and committee member.

Muriwai’s Tim Jago has had a huge involvement with

the Northern Region on the board, as president and

as operations manager and chief executive.

He’s has recently been the driving force behind the

construction and developments of the new club

house at Muriwai, a $4million project.

Waikanae’s Murray Kemp has proved himself a huge

asset to the Gisborne area. He’s been involved in

the national surf official group and has officiated at

numerous high level national and international events.

Kemp is a life member of Waikanae and has held

been on the committee, served as chairman, has

been a competitor and also a club coach.

Garry Mace’s contribution to the surf lifesaving

movement has involved several clubs, including New

Plymouth Old Boys and Lyall Bay, but latterly has linked

with Mairangi Bay, where he has been club president,

club chairman, club captain and club coach. As a

competitor, he was also a New Zealand team captain.

Levin-Waitarere’s Dick McAllister has been a huge

asset to the Western District, having also served on

the SLSNZ board. He’s held various club roles like

chairman, club captain, patrol captain and president.

Lyall Bay’s Ron Stack started lifeguarding in 1959

and since then he has been involved in the success

of many North Island clubs, including Castlecliff,

Levin-Waitarere and recently Lyall Bay.

He’s always been a fixture at local carnivals,

officiating and chatting to the young clubbies. Stack

was crowned a life member of Lyall Bay in 2000 and

has been involved in the committee, coaching and

lifeguarding.

Eion Waugh has also been a member of many of the

‘Bay’ clubs in the Wellington area but since 1984, he

has been with Lyall Bay assisting wherever he can.

Waugh was a life member of former surf life saving

club Island Bay and vice president of Worser Bay.

St Clair’s Murray Wilson has been a member since

1966 and since then he has been awarded a club life

membership after stints as chairman, club captain,

president and coach. He’s been a huge asset to the

Otago area.

In other major awards at the function, New Plymouth

Old Boys scooped two big ones with Glenn

Anderson named Coach of the Year and his partner,

Ayla Dunlop-Barrett, named High Performance

Athlete of the Year.

Dunlop-Barrett’s international performances included

winning a gold medal in the surf race at the 2010

World Championships in Egypt, while she also

became the first New Zealander to win a belt race

title at the Australian Championships in April.

Waimarama’s Phil Harman won Instructor of the

Year and the award for Innovation of the Year went

to Pacific Surf Life Saving Club. The club’s roving

patrols, using bicycles, have been recognised as

an environmentally friendly, cost effective and low

maintenance patrolling method.

The bikes were engineered to carry essential patrol

equipment including rescue tube, fins, VHF radio

and first aid kit and helped to extend the club’s patrol

capability to high-risk areas around the beach.

Craig Todd from Sumner Surf Life Saving Club will

take home the DHL Volunteer of the Year Award

for his outstanding contribution to the club as

chairperson, carnival controller and building and

development manager.

The title of Official of the Year will go to Johnny

Clough, from United North Piha Lifeguard Service for

his huge participation in surf sports.

SLSNZ spokesman Brett Sullivan said the awards

were highly sort after in the Surf Life Saving

community.

“The DHL In it for Life Awards Luncheon pays tribute to

the significant time and effort our members devote to

keeping our beaches safe during the summer months,”

Sullivan said. “Many of them dedicate summer after

summer to support our cause and we are delighted

to formally recognise their huge commitment and

enthusiasm. We are very proud of all the winners.”


35

Major Awards

DHL SURF COACH OF THE YEAR

Glenn Anderson, New Plymouth Old Boys SLSC

DHL INTERNATIONAL PERFORMANCE

OF THE YEAR

Ayla Dunlop-Barrett,

New Plymouth Old Boys SLSC

DHL INSTRUCTOR OF THE YEAR

Phil Harman, Waimarama SLSC

DHL VOLUNTEER OF THE YEAR

Craig Todd, Sumner SLSC

DHL OFFICIAL OF THE YEAR

Johnny Clough, United North Piha

INNOVATION OF THE YEAR

Pacific SLSC

LONDON TROPHY

Awarded to the club with the greatest number of

surf lifeguards qualified in one season per capita

of members

Riversdale

GUDSELL TROPHY

Awarded to the club with the greatest number of

surf lifeguards qualified in one season

Mairangi Bay and St Clair

Service Awards

Justin Barr, Muriwai VLS

Damian Burden, Brighton SLSC

Pauline Butt, Muriwai VLS

James Coombes, St Clair

Jessica Costello, Mangawhai Heads

Murray Dix, Mangawhai Heads

Michael Ferguson, Mangawhai Heads

Gordon Finlayson, Mangawhai Heads

Timothy Green, Orewa SLSC

Stuart Handford, Orewa SLSC

Debbie Hutchings, Waikanae SLSC

Rob Jones, Mairangi Bay

Sam Julian, East End SLSC

Alan Kindred, Muriwai VLS

Sue Smith-Kindred, Muriwai VLS

Ewan Lang, Titahi Bay SLSC

Malcolm MacDonald, Brighton

Byron Malcolmson, Titahi Bay SLSC

Brian Maney, Red Beach

Glenda Mann, Kaka Point

Liam McDowell, Titahi Bay SLSC

Peter McInnes, Mangawhai Heads

Paul McVicar, Titahi Bay SLSC

Ken Middleton, Titahi Bay SLSC

Kim Nilsson, Waimarama SLSC

Brad O’Leary, Otaki SLSC

Daniel Russek, Mangawhai Heads

Andy Shaw, Kare Kare SLSC

Brian Sullivan, Piha SLSC

Nicholas Tomkins, Orewa SLSC

Jamie Torrance, St Kilda SLSC

Faron Turner, Orewa SLSC

Ariki Vertongen, Otaki SLSC

Brendan Barry-Walsh, Muriwai LS

Scott Weatherall, Brighton

Distinguished

Service Awards

Gordon Finlayson, Mangawhai Heads

Alan Franich, Orewa SLSC

Deborah Handford, Orewa SLSC

Dick McAllister, Levin-Waitarere

Graeme Newton, St Clair

Stephen Pye, Kare Kare SLSC

Shane Radovanovich, Paekakariki SLSC

Andrew Sekula, Piha SLSC

Brian Sullivan, Piha SLSC

Graeme Trevor, North Beach SLSC

Colin Weatherall, Brighton SLSC

Scott Weatherall, Brighton SLSC

Brian Webber, Piha SLSC

Jonathon Webber, Piha SLSC

Jocelyn Wright, Whangamata SLSC

Life Membership

Trevor Corkin, East End

Rodger Curtice, Piha SLSC

David East, North Beach SLSC

Tim Jago, Muriwai VLS

Murray Kemp, Waikanae SLSC

Garry Mace, Mairangi Bay SLSC

Dick McAllister, Levin-Waitarere

Ron Stack, Lyall Bay SLSC

Eoin Waugh, Lyall Bay SLSC

Murray Wilson, St Clair

2. GLENN ANDERSON

3. AYLA DUNLOP-BARRETT

4. CRAIG TODD

5. JOHNNY CLOUGH

1. LONG-SERVING: PIHA STALWART RODGER CURTICE WAS ONE OF 10 NEW

LIFE MEMBERS ANNOUNCED AT THE DHL IN IT FOR LIFE AWARDS. PHOTO: NICOLA

MURPHY/WESTERN LEADER

2. SHOWING THE WAY: GLENN ANDERSON’S WORK WITH NEW PLYMOUTH OLD

BOYS SAW HIM WIN THE COACH OF THE YEAR TITLE. PHOTO: JAMIE TROUGHTON/

DSCRIBE JOURNALISM

3. THE REEL DEAL: AYLA DUNLOP-BARRETT’S BELT RACE WIN AT THE

AUSTRALIAN TITLES WAS PART OF A VINTAGE INTERNATIONAL SEASON FOR THE

TARANAKI STAR. PHOTO: JAMIE TROUGHTON/DSCRIBE JOURNALISM

4. HARD WORKER: SUMNER’S CRAIG TODD IS THE VOLUNTEER OF THE YEAR.

PHOTO: SLSNZ

5. IN CONTROL: THE UNFLAPPABLE JOHNNY CLOUGH (UNITED NORTH PIHA)

WAS AN EASY CHOICE FOR OFFICIAL OF THE YEAR. PHOTO: JAMIE TROUGHTON/

DSCRIBE JOURNALISM


36

SURF SPORTS:

IRB Series

TOP CLUBS

(first round)

Waimarama 24

Sunset 21

Mt Maunganui 16

Muriwai 16

United Nth Piha 11

Mairangi Bay 7

Papamoa 7

Ruakaka 3

Kariaotahi 3

PICK-UP LINES: WAIMARAMA’S CAMERON RITCHIE REACHES

FOR HIS PATIENT, BEN CROSS, UNDER THE WATCHFUL EYE OF DRIVER

MIKE HARMAN. PHOTOS: JAMIE TROUGHTON/DSCRIBE JOURNALISM

PLEASE BE PATIENT: A BOAT FULL OF

PATIENTS HEAD OUT THROUGH THE OMAHA SURF.


37

LAUNCHED: SUNSET’S ROBBIE SHRIMPTON, LEWIS POWELL (OBSCURED) AND

BRYCE NICHOL POWER HOME OFF THE BACK OF AN OMAHA WAVE.

New crews rising for Sunset

The new BP Surf Rescue series, which kicked off at Omaha Beach recently, will see smaller clubs

like Sunset Beach reaping the benefits of regular competition, as Jamie Troughton writes.

Not many people know where Sunset Beach is and

when they do, it’s often for the wrong reasons.

But thanks to the efforts of the club’s burgeoning IRB

crews – who patrol the isolated West Coast beach at

the mouth of the Waikato River - that awareness is

starting to change.

Sunset sent five crews to the opening round of the

inaugural BP Surf Rescue series at Omaha Beach

recently, with the green and gold caps bringing home

a cluster of medals.

No wonder Mal McGuire was excited – the bubbly

Sunset 18-year-old took out the women’s top prize,

pairing with Alana Ibbs to win the assembly rescue and

teams race and coming within a DQ of getting a clean

sweep.

“We won all three single rescue races but I drove to

the wrong gate – it was a bit of a rookie mistake to

make!” McGuire laughed. “But this was my first-ever

competition and I’m proud of everyone - I reckon we

did really well.”

Just three weeks earlier, three fishermen were swept

out to sea and drowned while setting a net at the river

mouth at Sunset and six days later, another perished

and two more fishermen had to be rescued.

McGuire was involved in the search and rescue

operations for the first incident, which also involved

crews from nearby Karioatahi, in a devastating start to

the season but the Tuakau farmgirl was well prepared

to deal with it.

“I’ve had a gap year this year so I’ve used it to really

get involved in surf lifesaving – I’ve even taken over as

Jandal Day coordinator so I’ve kept pretty busy. We all

pretty much live out there at the beach – it’s our home

away from home, through winter and summer.

“We all enjoy racing and even just the training – it’s

social and competitive at the same time. We were

down on the beach training when the first rescue

initiated and we already had the boats out. We headed

straight out to the mouth of the river where it was all

happening and all that training just kicked in.”

That’s where the four-round BP series has immediately

shown benefits. It’s given smaller clubs like Sunset,

Karioatahi and Ruakaka a viable and hard-fought

racing series to hone their rescue skills.

Further rounds will be held in Whangamata from

December 10-11, Oakura on January 14 and

Dunedin’s Warrington Beach on March 3, which will be

the ideal buildup to the BP Surf Rescue New Zealand

championships at the end of March.

Top Hawke’s Bay crew, Mike Harman and Ben Cross,

are hoping to get to every round of the series and

SURF LIFE SAVING | SURF RESCUE | NOV 2011


38

CONTINUED

started off by finishing second in the premier

division, behind Muriwai’s David Butt and

Brent Matuschka.

“It’s a bit of a shame that a few other top

teams couldn’t make it to this round but

we’re looking forward to the rest of the

series when they should be there,” Harman

said. “It’s just so good to be racing at

this time of year and there are so many

more competitions to aim for with this new

series.”

The Waimarama senior team of Timothy Cox

and Jason Harman also won their division,

holding off Mount Maunganui’s Jason Watts

and James Roy, with United North Piha’s

Leif Neilson and Miles Regal third.

Mount Maunganui twins Kirby and Chad

Wheeler were the pick of the under-21

crews, winning the teams race and

rewarded for consistency, placing second in

the assembly rescue and third in the single

rescue.

Papamoa’s Mitch Brady and Nick Oldham

were second overall, ahead of another

Sunset Beach crew, Sam Dwen and Shane

Edwards.

At 19, Edwards is the oldest of Sunset’s

young crews, still rookies on the racing

scene but fast making waves.

“We had three teams in one of the finals

at Omaha – that’s pretty cool considering

people still don’t know who we are. They

think we come from Australia – I tell them

‘Y’know the Waikato River? We’re at the

end of that!’

“We’ve come a long way in a short time -

we didn’t know what we were doing at the

start and used to bug the officials at the first

events we went to but we loved driving boats

and thought we may as well race them.”

For full results, see

sport.surflifesaving.org.nz

Top tips from

Dave Hickey

If there is anything Dave

Hickey doesn’t know about

IRBs, it’s probably not worth

knowing. Surf Life Saving

New Zealand’s resident gaspowered

guru gives some

helpful advice about getting

the best out of your boat.

Rack it or lack it

An IRB storage rack is a great idea. It keeps them stacked

neatly out of the way, dry and off the ground. PSP

Engineering are your rack specialists – get hold of them on

09 624 1004 or email psp@pl.net

Give your valves some lovin’

There’s nothing more annoying than a faulty inflation

valve but some simple TLC can go a long way. Clean and

lubricate the valve at least once a season, using silicone

grease or similar and the tool supplied in the IRB repair

kit. Be careful not to cross-thread it and always leave the

valves in the closed position when transporting. This will

stop damage to the pin. If your valve is leaking, check the

O ring seal for grit. Use a bit of WD40 to clear it.

Avoid gauge rage

Got a dodgy inflation gauge? No worries - faulty gauges

can be sent to the manufacturer for re-calibration. Teltherm

Instruments will take care of it. They’re at 295 Neilson St,

Onehunga, in Auckland. Ring them on 09 633 0040 or

visit www.teltherm.co.nz

Got plumbing problems?

You can recycle your Covertex fuel bladders by cutting the

fittings out of a faulty bladder and sending to Covertex.

Get the 15 litre black fabric bladder for best performance.

Contact 09 836 8255 or email sales@covertex.co.nz

Having a parts party?

The good folk at Arancia have all the parts you need, from

fuel bladder attachments to foot straps, from valves and

gauges to auto-bailers. They’ll supply repair kits, knives

and pouches, foot pumps and paddles. Just give them a

shout on 09 815 0469 or email info@arancia.co.nz

Time to say goodbye?

Just remember, if you’re selling your IRB to a private user,

you need to remove all the sponsor signage. We’ll hook you

up with some orange IRB paint, at no charge. Drop me a

line 027 2806420 or david.hickey@surflifesaving.org.nz

Happy boating!


40

PROFILES:

Members making waves

Danny’s double-act

He’s the ultimate poacher turned game-keeper. Danny

Morrison is transferring his athletic prowess into the

world of officialdom, as Jamie Troughton writes.

Most athletes would be content with one long and

rewarding playing career and be stoked with two.

But Danny Morrison isn’t the type to drift off in search

of a couch and a bucket of KFC. As he retires from

rugby and edges his way into surf lifesaving’s masters

scene, the 31-year-old is already plotting ways to

stay heavily involved in both sports.

He began the first phase four years ago when he

volunteered to help officiate the Oceans under-14

national championship carnival in Mount Maunganui

and has since branched out into the Lion Foundation

Surf League and refereeing rugby.

“I had 10 years with the Auckland Surf League team

and when I finished, (former SLSNZ sport manager)

Mark Weatherall rang me up and suggested I stay

involved as an official,” Morrison said. “My thoughts

were I was going to be there anyway and I could

either sit in the grandstands and watch and have a

good time or I could get in and help out. I’m quite

happy to rip into it.

“The Surf League pretty much runs itself – all the

guys there know what they’re doing and the officials

know how the systems work - so I’m getting more

into the commentary side and with the under-14

championships, it’s more about creating a really cool

event for the athletes.”

The Mairangi Bay club member, who won two golds

at the IRB world championships in 2008, admits

his competitive instincts may keep him out of the

officiating ranks at the national championships for a

few more years to come.

“I’m the director of surf sports at Mairangi Bay so

I’m effectively a team manager. And because I’m still

racing in teams, there isn’t much I can do from an

officiating point of view because I’m still trying to look

after the club.”

That’s OK – he’s still got plenty of time up his sleeve,

if his family involvement is anything to go by. Parents,

Grant and Val, have been involved at club, regional

and national level for 44 and 47 years respectively,

while brother Kevin is a New Zealand representative,

also with 10 years experience in the Surf League.

Cousins include Olympic swimmer Dean Kent and

brother Steve, both national surf representatives, and

noted Titahi Bay surf athletes Martyn, Danny and Will

McDowall.

Morrison’s pedigree even goes back one more

generation – grandfather Tom Morrison was a threetest

All Black wing in 1938, later becoming All Black

selector/coach and then NZRU chairman in a long

and distinguished career.

The younger Morrison even has his grandfather’s

whistle that he used to coach the All Blacks with –

though he’s saving it up for his first big appointment.

“I’ve told Dad I’ll use that whistle for my first-class

refereeing debut and I’m using a plastic one until

I make it. I’m really enjoying the refereeing side of

things – part of the motivation is to stay involved with

the sport, just because I love it. “From a selfish point

of view, I’m looking long-term and trying to make a

career out of it. There’s only a certain shelf-life for a

referee and the reality is I’ve got about 10 years to

have a crack and see how much I can make of it.”

The former Thames Valley halfback and North

Harbour Marist stalwart hung up his boots at the end

of the club rugby season for the final time.

“I started dabbling in reffing last year but I’ve been

full-on this season - I was doing schoolboy rugby in

the mornings and then playing premier rugby in the

afternoons. That’s been really beneficial to get both

sides of the story on the same day and it’s shut me

up a little bit on the field as well. I’ve been yelling

more at my own players than the referee, which has

been a bit different. You could say it was a bit of a

guilt trip – I’ve spent the last 20-odd years trying to

tell the referee what should be happening at a ruck

and it’s probably about time I picked up a whistle and

saw it from his side of the fence.”

DANNY MORRISON IS MAKING THE TRANSITION FROM ATHLETE TO

OFFICIAL, BOTH ON THE BEACH AND THE RUGBY FIELD. PHOTO: JAMIE

TROUGHTON/DSCRIBE JOURNALISM

“I’m really enjoying

the refereeing side

of things – part of the

motivation is to stay

involved with the

sport, just because I

love it.”


41

surf’s late bloomer

MASTERFUL: SID SALEK PERFORMED WITH APLOMB AT THE

NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS EARLIER THIS YEAR. PHOTO: JAMIE

TROUGHTON/DSCRIBE JOURNALISM

Most people his age have trouble walking to the local shops but

Sid Salek is still swimming, running and reveling in his late-life

infatuation with surf lifesaving, as Jamie Troughton discovers.

At 81, all Sid Salek wants these days is to feel useful,

to know that he’s still got some relevance. Little does

the Omanu Surf Life Saving Club member realise that

he graduated from the useful ranks some time ago

and ventured into the realm of inspirational.

Affectionately known far and wide as ‘SupaSid’,

the leather-bound octogenarian has already begun

another season of patrolling. And when the long

season starts to wind up - with his 82nd birthday in

sight - Salek will once again line up in the State New

Zealand Championships in Gisborne, hunting more

masters medals and challenging his body to keep up

with his brain.

“It’s not a state of body, it’s a state of mind and

of attitude,” Salek, one of New Zealand’s oldest

patrolling lifeguards, muses. “It’s as simple as that.

I’m always discovering new things about myself and I

like pushing the limits.”

The former Wellington optometrist only qualified as a

lifeguard in 1985, though his links with the lifesaving

movement stretch back much further.

His dad Lou was an early member of both the Lyall

Bay and Maranui clubs in the Capital and Salek

gained his Royal Lifesaving Society certificate of

attainment in 1942.

Six years later, he put it to magnificent use, saving a

drowning man in Wellington Harbour and winning the

Royal Humane Society bronze medallion for rescue

at sea.

He’d always loved the water but it wasn’t until a

marriage breakup in 1982 that he moved to Lyall Bay

and eventually wandered over to the club his father

helped start.

When he sat his surf lifesaving award in 1985, he not

only became the oldest person at the club to sit the

award for the first time but he stunned instructors by

busting out a 6min 20sec effort for his 400m freestyle

swim.

He moved to the Bay of Plenty in 1992, but linking

with Omanu in the last decade was when he really

started feeling like he belonged in the movement.

“The informal respect and support I’ve had from the

club has been fantastic. Older people value being

able to assist and being involved. We don’t like to just

sit around and being treated as a piece of furniture.”

Sitting around just isn’t Salek’s style. He’s competed

at a number of world masters swimming carnivals

all over the globe, typically picking on the toughest

disciplines – like the 200m butterfly, the 800m

freestyle and the 400m medley.

He gets around town on his pride and joy, a 1969

Lambretta scooter, and loves nothing more than

enjoying long, languid afternoons aloft in a glider.

He competes each year in a number of ocean swims

and enters triathlons with his renowned “Old Farts”

team.

At the 2011 State New Zealand Surf Life Saving

Championships, Salek completed a massive masters

day, taking part in the surf race, run-swim-run, the

beach sprint and the beach flags. And most Sunday

mornings through last winter, Salek headed down

to the Wairoa River near Tauranga for Omanu’s skitraining

sessions.

His only concession to advancing years? Rather than

a club ski, he paddles his new light-weight sea kayak

up and down the river. “They’ve been chiding me that

I need to learn how to surf ski … I don’t think I’ll quite

manage that,” he laughs ruefully. “But they’re all very

supportive and they really are my extended family.”

It’s a family Salek is growing to love more and more

with every passing season.

“One of the great skills that surf lifesaving gives you

is the trust and knowledge that you are part of an

effective, capable team who will always have systems

of back-up and assistance. That’s huge.

“I’m a firm believer that older people have an array of

life skills and experiences and there’s no reason why

we shouldn’t stop utilising those skills, just because

of age. They can be invaluable from a logistical point

of view or working behind the scenes.”

SURF LIFE SAVING | SURF RESCUE | NOV 2011


Two great kiwi summer icons – partner up

We’re delighted to confirm, Coca-Cola Christmas in the Park is again teaming up

with Surf Life Saving New Zealand to ensure Kiwis have the best summer ever. As

the official charity of Coca-Cola Christmas in the Park, we are part of the world’s

largest free annual event. Millions of people have experienced this great event over

the past 17 years, either at the park or via television.

Surf Lifeguards will be out in force at both the Christchurch and

Auckland events selling light-sticks and Santa hats and giving

away Jelly Belly treats for a gold coin donation.

For Surf Life Saving, it is a wonderful opportunity to partner with

such a high profile event leading into New Zealand’s summer

and helps ensure beach safety is top of mind over the busy

holiday season.

Surf Life Saving will also benefit from funds raised at the events.

Surf Life Saving New Zealand would like to express sincere

thanks on behalf of all its members and clubs to Coca-Cola for its

continued commitment and support helping keep New Zealand’s

favourite playground safe.

Hagley Park 26 th November & Auckland Domain 10 th December

AVAILABLE SOON!

Stocked through

BP Service stations

and Rebel Sports

stores nationwide.

BEACH SPORTS

BALL RANGE

KEEP YOUR EYES PEELED

FOR SLSNZ’S EXCITING NEW

RANGE OF BEACH SPORTS BALLS!

The range includes a beach footy

ball, soccer ball and soccer set,

volleyball, frisbee, high bounce

ball and cricket set.


Lifeguards Wanted

in the USA

Highest Paid

Salary on the

market!

Summer Camp USA

Are you 18-35 years old and love kids? You

could be escaping NZ’s winter in 2012 and

heading over to a job at a warm Summer

Camp in the USA with IEP.

Kiwi’s are in high demand and we are looking

for camp counsellors with lifegaurding skills, as

well as a variety of other watersports, landsports

and more.

Apply NOW at www.iep.org.nz

so we can get your job organised ASAP!

Apply by 31/12/2012 and you could win a free

7-Day Trek America Tour! Conditions Apply.

advertise in our next issue please contact

communications@surflifesaving.org.nz

www.iep.org.nz | 0800 443 769

Surf Life Saving IEP.indd 1

31/10/2011 3:20:11 p.m.

ADVERTISING SPACE

To


ARANCIA RESCUE CRAFT

designed & developed for surf life saving

Proud to be associated with Surf Life Saving for over 33 years

Wilsco fuel tanks also available to order visit our website

www.arancia.co.nz for global & local shots of arancias in action

arancia industries LTD

PO box 56585

Dominion Road

Auckland

ph +64 9 815 0469

fx +64 9 815 0468

mb +64 21 774 867

EM info@arancia.co.nz


* Minimum 6 people per course, applies for Workplace First Aid

Courses and refreshers only. Visit our website for full terms and

conditions. Lifesaving First Aid Limited is affiliated with Surf Life

Saving New Zealand and is backed by over a century of experience.


48

HUEY GOD OF SURF:

Huey interviews Horse

Huey God of Surf

Straight

from the

Horse’s

mouth

A man swaggers into the

St Helliers café with a

confident cowboy strut,

head held high and

looking like he is looking

for someone (which he

is). He’s got the sort of

physical look you expect

to see standing at the

door, turning away underage

patrons and enjoying

it. He scans the café, goes

straight past the water

cooler and gives me the

raised-eyebrows salute.

Aaarggh.... so it’s true.

You can lead a horse to

water but you can’t make

him drink.

HSG: “Horse, nice to meet you. But why the

long face?” I thrust out my hand and prepare for

the Piha boatie death grip. He looks about as

comfortable at this café as Mike Tindall will be at

the next family Christmas gathering.

H: Nice to meet you too. [Clearly he misses my joke

and blurts out.] Just worried about my crews some

of them aren’t as fit as I would like them to be at

this time of year. [Wow, that’s up there with global

warming - no wonder he looks worried.]

HSG: “Right then let’s get down to this interview.

Who would you most like to meet?”

H: Vladimir Klitschko. [What a way to kill a

conversation. Best I move on, and quickly… I am not

going to even ask why. I may wake up with a horse

head in my bed.]

HSG: “What do you do to relax - let’s call it

horsing around?”

H: Sometimes I play the guitar! Oh yeah, and I like

a vino! [Nice. Thinking as a musician he would be a

cross between ZZ Top and Jack Johnson on uppers.]

HSG: “If you were reincarnated as any part of the

surf boat, what would it be and why?

H: The sweep oar. It’s the most important part of the

equipment, without it the crew and boat go nowhere!

HSG: “Who do you most admire in surf

lifesaving? Why?”

H: Pete Brown, the president of Piha SLSC, my

rowers and my fellow sweeps at Piha. Have to

mention Knoxy & Brooster, rowed 20 years for Piha.

They are all part of ‘the Family’. [He actually said


49

FULL NAME: Mark Trevor Bourneville

NICKNAME: Horse AGE: 48

FAVOURITE MOVIE: LOTR or Matrix, plus all the surf boat videos we do at Piha

FAVOURITE SAYING: ‘The Big Show!’

FAMILY: Wife Nathalie and four beautiful children; Ariane, Cedric, Ludo, Audrey-lise

FAVOURITE BAND: The Who or Pink Floyd

OCCUPATION: Managing Director BFG (Bourneville Furniture Group)

this in a Marlon Brando impersonated voice just

reconfirming my earlier thoughts...] The Piha club has

so many important people that all put so much into

the club. Also have to mention Dan Harris from Waihi,

the guy is 70-something, still sweeping and has been

for decades and decades. [Little does he know Dan

is only 48. Stay out of the sun kids!]

HSG: You get such a strong sense of pride from

the horse. It’s humbling just to be around. “Who

do you most admire outside of surf lifesaving?

Why?”

H: Bluey McClennan, a good mate of mine. [Oh you

are such a mane dropper.] The man is a league

coaching guru, I love talking to him, he is a coaching

god, the man inspires me and is always looking at

how to win. If only I could get him to sweep! Oh and

I have to mention the Crusher! Don’t ask why! [Ok, I

won’t then].

HSG: “You are pretty outspoken about certain

issues... where has this outspokenness come

from?”

H: It’s just in my character. [Breeding don’t you

mean.] I know there are times when I probably should

keep it shut, but I am passionate and driven about

all that I do, if something gets in my way I will move it

out of the way.

HSG: “What is it about surf lifesaving that you

really like and keeps you involved?”

H: The people, the history, the passion and the fact

that we save people’s lives, the large majority of

people are all volunteers and they put so much in to

what we do. And this sport called ‘Surf Boats’ - it

is the single most greatest sport ever, in a boat with

my two twin sons, or my daughter, at Piha beach in

a 3m swell and you catch a wave back to the beach

and you experience that together!! You tell me what

other sport in the world can do that? You can’t touch

it. [Bonanza was a pretty cool TV programme? Not

even that?]

HSG: “What is your current training regime?”

H: Crikey. [?? who says that these days? This saying

went out of fashion when Mr Ed did.] Where do I

start, running multiple crews and also trying to do

my own thing to stay in shape, training the crews is

a multiple nights/mornings a week job, for myself,

cycling, boxing training, some gym work, evenings/

mornings. [No wonder he looks like he could tie me in

a knot and back leg kick me into next week.]

HSG: “Do you reckon you could beat up SBW?”

H: YES, don’t think he is great on the boxing. Neither

am I for that fact – I think what I do in the ring is

an insult to boxers ! But I have a crack! Somehow

manage to connect my fists to my passion and

energy and then just let them go! Plus I am good

at pushing the angry button!! [You are like a faulty

Tom Thumb (olden day firework) unpredictable and

dangerous. Disrespect at your peril.]

HSG:“Did you enjoy your involvement in Piha Surf

Rescue? Why?”

H: It’s great for educating the public and trying to

teach people about what not to do at Piha (some

don’t learn very quickly though). Plus it’s great for my

sponsors involved in our boat program! [The perfect

mix of altruism and capitalism. Just like Richard

Branson flying to Ethiopia with bags of rice in his

private Apollo 14.]

HSG:“Would you ever get into politics? Why or

why not?”

H: I have an interest but the time it would take would

interfere with my passion for sports (surf boats in

particular).

HSG: “What will you be doing in 20 years’ time?”

H: Hopefully still sweeping like Dan Harris is! I want to

help surf boats in Europe (particularly) take off, they

are moving already but need a hand.

HSG: “Do you have any regrets?”

H: YES, should have started doing surf boats many,

many years ago! [I can’t help thinking if surf boats

had a god, it would be the Horse.]

In summary, I am left feeling like the Horse is a bit

like a shopping trolley. Pragmatic, dependable,

strong, some rough edges and the hardest of

work ethics. Occasionally he loses direction and

focus but with the direction of a good woman

and a well thought out ‘to do list’ he will go all

day and help many many many people over the

course of his life with humility and take-it-orleave-it

honesty. He has a lot of life to go yet so I

certainly don’t want to be responsible for putting

the horse before the cart… just yet.

PHOTOS: JOEL FORD PHOTOGRAPHY

SURF LIFE SAVING | SURF RESCUE | NOV 2011


50

THE FINAL WORD:

Clubbies in action

FROZEN MOMENTS

MADDY DUBBER HAD ALREADY CAUGHT a couple of decent waves

at Mount Maunganui’s Main Beach earlier in the day, with Mairangi Bay

stalwart Duncan McKenzie giving her some helpful tips. But nothing could

prepare her for this monster swell rearing up behind her during her board

heat at the Oceans 11 under-14 national championships earlier this year.

“I sort of just panicked when I saw it coming – I stopped paddling and

panicked,” the now-14-year-old recalls. “Then I went over, and the fin hit

my leg and it really hurt. I went under a few waves and then got taken in by

the IRB. It was the biggest wave I’ve ever nearly caught but I think I went

over a bigger one on the way out!”

She wasn’t alone. Dozens of under-14 athletes had similar stories on the

epic first day at Oceans, when training and courage shone through. Plenty

had great stories to tell classmates the following Monday.

“My form teacher thought I was pretty crazy and Mum used some bad

words at the time when she saw it,” Maddy laughs. “You don’t get many

waves in Mairangi Bay - it didn’t put me off surf but it might’ve put me off

big waves for a while!”

PHOTOS: JAMIE TROUGHTON/DSCRIBE JOURNALISM


Whether you’re a

Lifeguard, Instructor,

Coach, Official or

Administrator the

time you give is your

investment in the

safety and wellbeing

of all New Zealanders.

It’s an investment in

life whatever your level

of involvement.

protecting our community

in the water

For further information about Surf Life Saving or for

contact details of your nearest Surf Life Saving club visit

the Surf Life Saving website

www.surflifesaving.org.nz

More magazines by this user