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Arthur Lanyon 'Arcade Laundry'

Fully illustrated online publication for 'Arcade Laundry' by Arthur Lanyon at Anima Mundi, St Ives

Fully illustrated online publication for 'Arcade Laundry' by Arthur Lanyon at Anima Mundi, St Ives

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Arthur Lanyon - Arcade Laundry


“Everything is to be gained from

specifying the sites of thought and

making them more numerous.”

Jean Dubuffet


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3


After spending some time amusing myself

in the games arcade, I wandered out to

the street and crossed the zebra crossing

to the launderette aptly named ‘Arcade

Laundry’. I sat waiting for clean whites

when, quite involuntarily, my vision

distorted, reorganising itself into an

altered state, resulting from a ‘scintillating

scotoma’ - a sort of painless migraine.

It was like tuning in to an invisible data

stream that held comparative visual echoes

of the bright, colourful and gordy computer

games just played. From the street to the

sheet, inner and outer experiences were

bundled together.

The visual processing centre of the brain

sometimes functions abnormally when

adjusting to sensory stimulation such as

bright lights and noise. The field of vision

can then become distorted by a dense

and expanding blind spot which in turn

starts to flicker with activity. Some describe

designs like the ornamentation of a Norman

arch, a dog tooth moulding, ramparts of

a walled city or an aerial view of a star

fort. Other comparisons bear similarity

to Widmanstätten patterns, where figures

of long nickel–iron crystals are found in

meteorites. It also resembles battle ships

camouflaged with ‘dazzle painting’ ablaze

with crystal faced primary colours that

zig zag around cracked and molten seas of

pattern. Burning with artificial intensity

these ‘jazz’ visions, which occur without

sight, are illuminated by inner light. It

is thought that these tessellated fractals

are perhaps mirroring the inner architure

of the human brain itself and may go

some way to explain the source of the

oldest human marks we know of, perceived

now as sacred.

The ancient art of divination suggests a

deliberate practice of cultivating symbolic

imagery and using our primal faculties of

intuition and imagination to derive some

meaning from transient visual phenomena.

Hallucinatory states achieved in the ritual

practices of early humans are believed by

some researchers to have been mentally

projected and traced onto complex relief

structures like the early cave wall. The

surface of which exudes its own suggestive,

poetic sensibility that is likely to act as

a stimulus for mediumistic experiences.

From such beginnings, a wall of images

was built into our abstract consciousness,

a base of archetypal symbols that held

societal significance.

My approach to painting is to define a

sense of illumination. Often my work is

punctuated by pockets of primary colour.

The glowing orb of the sky, a circle can be

an eye or a sun, a bowl of suns or a head

of eyes. A counterpoint, a starting place

and a face. Interestingly it is the sun and

the mandala that often provide stimulus

for a childs first drawings of humans. The

formation of which begins from the core

and radiates out into peripheral limbs. This

kind of contemplation may be tightly

interrelated with explorative and playful

behavior where intention is to understand

by looking at the start of things, and

so awareness must follow action. Naivety

draws out playful lines of thinking, a

clarity of vision that is often blinded

by experience. The character of painting

is atypical to logical reasoning and like

any good conversation it comes in the

form of contrasts. Questions and marks

merely help one remember parts of a

bigger picture.

4


Aged five, my drawings were abstract essences

of what I knew rather than realistic depictions

of what I saw. I would then title these works

with absolute certainty: Footsteps on a beach

with a shark approaching; The country where

Sam does live; A man with ears who walks

about on his knees and those are spectacles;

Plan for Helen’s Digger; Spray tractor with

watering machine and crossbones; Crocodile

eating all the numbers; Switch and wiring

plan; Hotwire; We don’t eat pigs; Crocodile

with water in his rucksack; A picture of

Charlie that pecked me, he wanted to go on

my back; Another dog weed in our house;

Daisy inside poppy’s tummy; Birthday party;

A man with cobwebs on his nose; Tractor

with acrobat; Helen’s grandad’s big wheel;

Dangerous mountains; Horsemarks; Hedgehog

fell into our shit bucket; Dinosaur and baby;

Steps and a church or Joan’s new window.

There is a defining place in Vietnam where

humid and dense green pinnacles of mountain

pop-up and swelter amongst flat crop plains

tethered to an oily blue sky. One of the

mountains contains ‘Paradise Cave’ which

is of vast proportions, artificially lit and big

enough for a Boeing 747 to fly through the

heart of it. A blanket of life sizzles all the

way up to a hidden hobbit sized entrance.

Plummeting temperature ensues when

following a few raggedy steps inside, then

the vista opens out and literally takes your

breath away. The sense of scale reverberates

right through you, from the ground up, right

through your feet, hitting the roof of the

skull. There is a proportion of magical realism

within this spectacle. A cathedral contained

within a mountain, the floor and the ceiling

reaching out to one another in arms of

stalagmites and stalactites. The lighting rakes

across the surface as if chipping away at the

texture of deep, buried, time and geology.

You are dancing with the shadows inside

your head and filled with a sublime sense

of magnitude and insignificance in a place

where the parameters of space can be felt as

if it were a tangible part of your own body.

My works harbour these cave-light-arcade

experiences as symbolic counterpoints but

also share similar dense and chunky motifs

of what I call ‘seilschaft’ (a climbing term

for rope-team). It feels counter-intuitive

to paint with white over light ground but

denying the clarity of contrast can actually

help to free up grand gestures. Half visible,

this undercoat cures in the sun just long

enough to gain tack. Upon which the tar-like

surface is dressed with dry pigment forming a

smooth bond which is burnished like leather.

This process covers entire surfaces of some

paintings. In a balance to define positive

and negative space I then carve, scrape

and lift out slabs of action from favourite

memories and two-faced drawings; a flaming

sun wheeled monster truck upside down as a

bowl of suns, the combined tin-man-icarusspace-car,

a praying mantis which attacked

the camera on the steps to the archaeological

site of Ancient Olympia, and two jealous

curs haunched on their hind quarters in an

intense stand-off.

The experience in ‘Arcade Laundry’ was the

trigger that’s positioned my painting practice

on a ‘zebra crossing’ like a belay between four

visual pinnacles. A progressive link between

the arcade, the scintillating scotoma, altered

states of consciousness, the mountain cave

and the essence of child’s drawing.

Arthur Lanyon, 2020

5


Clay Thurch

oil, oil primer, oil stick, acrylic, charcoal powder, collage on linen

217 x 190 cm

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7


8


Beach Samba

oil, oil stick, oil primer, charcoal on linen

166 x 195 cm

9


Match

oil, oil stick, charcoal, gesso, acrylic on linen

110 x 120 cm

10


11


Bandito

oil, oil stick, acrylic, charcoal on linen

100 x 90 cm

12


Cassidy

oil, oil stick, acrylic, charcoal on linen

100 x 90 cm

13


Futile Escape

oil, oil stick, oil primer, charcoal powder on linen

190 x 200 cm

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16


Jaguar Nights

oil, oil stick, oil primer, charcoal powder on linen

190 x 200 cm

17


Ti Sento

oil, oil stick, oil primer, charcoal powder on linen

190 x 230 cm

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20


Keep Herder

oil, oil stick, oil primer, charcoal powder on linen

195 x 200 cm

21


Push Cat, Truck Nap

oil stick, charcoal powder on paper

30 x 47 cm

22


Little Boxer

oil stick, charcoal powder on paper

30 x 47 cm

23


Tin Man Icarus

oil stick, charcoal powder on paper

30 x 47 cm

24


Tin Man, Space Car, Icarus

oil stick, charcoal powder on paper

30 x 47 cm

25


Calipo Wings

oil stick, charcoal powder on paper

30 x 47 cm

26


Rattle

oil stick, charcoal powder on paper

30 x 47 cm

27


Tread from Delhi

oil, oil primer, acrylic, collage, charcoal on linen

190 x 260 cm

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30


Lapper

oil, oil stick, oil primer, charcoal powder on linen

150 x 190 cm

31


Mining for Lemons

oil, oil stick, acrylic, charcoal on linen

9o x 100 cm

32


Many Suns

oil, oil stick, acrylic, charcoal, collage on linen

90 x 100 cm

33


Telegraph Hill

oil stick, charcoal on hand made paper

59 x 41 cm

34


Dolly Corner

oil stick, charcoal on hand made paper

76 x 56 cm

35


Morris Bulb

oil stick, charcoal on hand made paper

76 x 56 cm

36


Nose Thief

oil stick, charcoal on hand made paper

76 x 56 cm

37


Barko

oil, oil stick, oil primer, collage, charcoal powder on linen

170 x 270 cm

38


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40


Trunk of Blue

oil, oil stick, oil primer, charcoal powder on linen

150 x 190 cm

41


Tractor with Acrobat

oil, oil stick, acrylic, gesso, charcoal powder on panel

62 x 47 cm

42


Keys

oil stick, acrylic on panel

61 x 46 cm

43


Four Candles

oil, oil stick, charcoal, collaged paper on panel

61 x 46 cm

44


Gemshorn

oil, oil stick, charcoal, collaged paper on panel

61 x 46 cm

45


46


Paradise Cave

oil, oil stick, oil primer, charcoal powder on linen

200 x 190 cm

47


Broken Hours

oil, oil stick, oil primer, charcoal powder on linen

190 x 145 cm

5248


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50


Rink-Rik

oil, oil stick, oil primer, charcoal powder on linen

160 x 120 cm

51


L Before M

oil stick, ink on paper

59 x 42 cm

52


Spa Day

oil stick, ink, charcoal powder on paper

59 x 42 cm

53


Cannon

oil stick, ink on paper

42 x 59 cm

54


Corner Shop

oil stick, ink, charcoal powder on paper

42 x 59 cm

55


Tin Man

oil, oil stick, oil primer, spray paint, wax, charcoal powder on linen

195 x 250 cm

56


57


Caped Crusader

oil stick, charcoal on panel

46 x 61 cm

58


Running Shop

oil, oil stick, charcoal, collaged paper on panel

46 x 61 cm

59


Two Thoughts

oil, oil primer, acrylic, spray paint on panel

47 x 61 cm

60


Horsemarks

oil stick, charcoal, collage on panel

49 x 61 cm

61


Gone Fishing

oil, oil stick, acrylic, collage, charcoal on panel

74 x 61 cm

62


A Man With a Cobweb on His Nose

oil, oil stick, oil primer, charcoal powder on linen

45 x 50 cm

63


Gold Tap

oil, oil stick, acrylic, gesso, charcoal powder on linen

58 x 68 cm

64


Two Moon Keeper

oil, oil primer, oil stick, charcoal on panel

62 x 58 cm

65


Token Man

oil stick, charcoal powder on paper

30 x 47 cm

Giants Head

oil stick, charcoal powder on paper

30 x 47 cm

66


Doors that Bind

oil stick, charcoal powder on paper

30 x 47 cm

The Muskats Mother

oil stick, charcoal powder on paper

30 x 47 cm

67


Arthur Lanyon is a British artist born

in Leicester, England in 1985. He

lives and works from a studio near

Penzance, Cornwall.

Born in to an artistic family, his father

was the painter Matthew Lanyon and his

grandfather the celebrated, influential and

world renowned modernist painter Peter

Lanyon. He won the Hans Brinker Painting

Award in Amsterdam in 2007 and gained a

first class degree in Fine Art from Cardiff

University in 2008. Upon graduating he

was featured in Saatchi’s ‘New Sensations’

exhibition. In 2014, his work was in the

long-list for the Aesthetica Art Prize and was

included in the award’s published anthology.

His debut Anima Mundi solo exhibition

‘Return to Whale’ opened in 2016, which

was followed by ‘White Chalk Lines in

2018. His latest exhibition ‘Arcade Laundry’

opens in 2020. Works have been exhibited

extensively notably including Untitled Art

Fair in Miami; Zona Maco, Mexico City; the

Saatchi Gallery London; The House of St

Barnabas, London; CGK, Copenhagen; Tat

Art, Barcelona and Herrick Gallery, Mayfair.

Arthur Lanyon paintings are held in private

collections worldwide. He is represented by

Anima Mundi.


Published by Anima Mundi to coincide with Arthur Lanyon ‘Arcade Laundry’

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or

by any means electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior permission of the publishers

Anima Mundi . Street-an-Pol . St. Ives . Cornwall . +44 (0)1736 793121 . mail@animamundigallery.com . www.animamundigallery.com


www.animamundigallery.com

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