NZPhotographer Issue 34, August 2020

nzphotographer

Whether you’re an enthusiastic weekend snapper or a beginner who wants to learn more about photography, New Zealand Photographer is the fun and informative e-magazine for all Kiwi camera owners. You can always read the latest issue for free or subscribe to the magazine and get unlimited access to all back issues. Find out more: www.nzphotographer.nz

ISSUE 34, August 2020

IS IT PHOTOSHOPPED?

BY RICHARD YOUNG

THE SECRET INGREDIENTS

NEEDED TO CREATE STRIKING

B&W LANDSCAPES

BY SPENCER CLUBB

REACHING FOR THE STARS

INTERVIEW WITH HAYDN PARKES

PHOTOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS

WORTH SWEATING FOR:

LADDER IN THE WILDERNESS

BY PETER LAURENSON

August 2020 1


WELCOME TO ISSUE 34 OF

NZ PHOTOGRAPHER MAGAZINE

HELLO EVERYONE,

In this issue, you'll find articles

covering a wide range of genres to

inspire your photographic journey.

Not only do we have the usual

travel features that we all know

and love but we're also delving

into time-lapse photography with

Brendon Gilchrist, looking at macro

photography in Behind The Shot,

learning the secret ingredients

needed to create striking B&W

landscape photos with Spencer

Clubb and discussing the topic

of Photoshop with Richard

Young who helps us understand the difference between

photojournalism and creative photography and where the

photoshop line should be drawn when post-processing images.

Peter Laurenson is back with another 'Worth The Effort Photo

Location', we're talking astro and portrait photography with

Haydn Parkes who is reaching for the stars in his photographic

journey, and shining the light on another of New Zealand's Rising

Stars; Ruby Millar.

We also have two exciting announcements! The latest NZP

competition opens today and has 3 categories with multiple

prizes to be won plus, Ana unveils the Feel Good Photography

Excio page which will give back to good causes.

So what are you waiting for, click or flick those pages and get

inspired for another month of photography!

OUR CONTRIBUTORS

Brendon Gilchrist

Brendon is the man behind

ESB Photography. He is an

avid tramper who treks

from sea to mountain, and

back again, capturing the

uniqueness of New Zealand’s

unforgiving landscape.

Emily Goodwin

Editor NZ Photographer

NZPhotographer Issue 34

August 2020

Cover Photo

Ice Bubble by

Wendy Pemberton

Publisher:

Foto Lifestyle Ltd

Website:

nzphotographer.nz

Graphic Design:

Maksim Topyrkin

Advertising Enquiries:

Email

hello@nzphotographer.nz

FOLLOW US

Richard Young

Richard is an award-winning

landscape and wildlife

photographer who teaches

photography workshops and

runs photography tours. He is

the founder of New Zealand

Photography Workshops.

© 2020 NZPhotographer Magazine

All rights reserved. Reproduction of any material appearing in this magazine in any form is forbidden without prior

consent of the publisher.

Disclaimer:

Opinions of contributing authors do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the magazine.

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NZPhotographer


CONTENTS

5

8

10

12

18

36

40

50

55

57

BEHIND THE SHOT

with Jan Abernethy

WHY I’M PASSIONATE ABOUT TIME-LAPSE

PHOTOGRAPHY

by Brendon Gilchrist

RISING STAR: RUBY MILLARD

PHOTOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS WORTH

SWEATING FOR: LADDER IN THE WILDERNESS

by Peter Laurenson

MINI 4 SHOT PORTFOLIO

THE SECRET INGREDIENTS NEEDED TO

CREATE STRIKING B&W LANDSCAPES

by Spencer Clubb

REACHING FOR THE STARS

INTERVIEW WITH HAYDN PARKES

IS IT PHOTOSHOPPED?

By Richard Young

INSIGHTS FROM

@EXCIO PHOTO COMMUNITY

EXCIO TOP 10

63 PORTFOLIO

BEST READERS' SUBMISSIONS THIS MONTH

BEHIND THE SHOT

WITH JAN ABERNETHY

40

REACHING FOR THE STARS

INTERVIEW WITH HAYDN PARKES

IS IT PHOTOSHOPPED?

BY RICHARD YOUNG

5

50

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• A chance to be featured

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• Online issue

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SPUN GOLD

F3.5, 1/2000s, ISO200

Behind The Shot

with Jan Abernethy

JAN TELL US ABOUT YOU AND YOUR

JOURNEY INTO PHOTOGRAPHY…

I live in Wairarapa with my husband, two dogs,

two cats, eight chickens, one ram, eighteen

sheep, and currently twelve lambs! I am lucky to

own a lavender farm which is my very calming

and enjoyable day job – We produce lavender

oil and natural lavender products.

Growing up, our family had a box brownie,

I was always playing with it and taking photos

of the animals we had on the property then

when I started work at 16, I saved my money

and bought a Zenit camera. I remember how

solid and heavy it was but I loved owning my

first camera which never left my side. I wasn’t

a creative photographer then, just a weekend

and holiday snapper. Quite a few years later

I upgraded to a Canon and when digital

cameras came out, I bought a Canon T70.

It was at this point that I decided to learn all

about my new camera and take it off auto.

I enrolled in a course with The Photography

Institute and received a Diploma in Photography.

August 2020 5


I also joined the Wairarapa Camera Club –

Talking to members and entering the monthly

competitions helped with my learning and

receiving feedback on my images was priceless.

I’m not your standard landscape photographer

however, I do appreciate seeing beautiful

landscapes, and being in nature is a special

treat that enlivens me. I’d say I enjoy more of a

creative style of photography i.e. ICM, double

exposure, and glass ball images. I started

googling macro images and followed some

macro enthusiasts one day. Being a nature

loving person, I bought a macro lens to see what

I could create. After purchasing the Canon

100mm macro lens my passion of all small things

was enlightened. It took me quite a while to get

the hang of the lens but all of a sudden it fell into

place with macro still my favourite genre.

I still remember the first time I looked through a

macro lens… I was amazed at what I ‘wasn’t’

seeing on a daily basis. The little world of bugs,

webs, droplets, ice, leaves, patterns, plants,

and flowers. The times flies by when I’m outside

photographing small subjects, it’s like I go into

a state of meditation. I can spend hours outside

in the freezing cold and I don’t realise how cold

my body is until I come inside and realise “I’m

freezing!”

WHAT ARE YOU SHOOTING WITH NOW?

Two years ago, I sold my Canon kit due to its

weight and bought an Olympus OM-D Mk1ii with

a 60mm macro, 12–40mm PRO and most recently

a 40–150mm PRO lens. It’s a great camera, much

lighter which has been amazing but I still have

much to learn about it. I use natural light in my

photography, due to not having a flash for my

camera (although I would love to get one!) and

also have two Lensbaby lenses which I never

spend enough time with.

TELL US ABOUT YOUR SPIDER WEB SHOT…

When there is not a breath of wind on a frosty

morning, I can be found outside searching

fences, gates, and trees for spider webs and

droplets. I say to myself, please let there be

lovely webs today and there often are, to my

delight. I prefer if the spider has gone out for

the day as I’m not keen on spiders (and macro

makes them look bigger and scarier!) hence why

not many of my images include spiders in the

web!

‘Spun Gold’ was taken at home on a cold frosty

morning in mid-May 2020 when the temperature

was –3 degrees!

On this particular day, dressed in a warm jersey

and trousers, warm socks and gumboots, woolly

hat, gloves (because my fingers really suffer with

the cold) and my big farm coat, I wandered

the property and found some fully formed webs

which I spent about half an hour capturing.

On my way back to the house I went through

another paddock and saw ‘Spun Gold’ on one

of the farm fences with the sun rising behind it

providing a beautiful warm light. My next half

an hour or so was spent trying to get interesting

angles, shapes, and colours.

I take a small mat with me to kneel on as its

mostly cold and wet, even crispy, underfoot

then I either lay down or kneel down depending

on where the subject is. Our two large French

Briards, Lily and Remy always come with me on

my macro travels. They often get frisky in the

frost and come running at me when I’m trying

to photograph the webs which can be quite

distracting but they do settle down after a while

and play with each other.

WHAT EDITING DID YOU DO TO THIS SHOT?

Post processing consisted of increasing the

temperature to maximise its golden colour, some

slight work with texture, de-haze, and contrast

adjustments and lastly, I reduced the highlights

from the morning sun.

WHY IS THIS SHOT SPECIAL TO YOU?

I loved the pattern that the spider had made, it’s

quite busy (crazy!) but so intricate and it made

me think of the spider scurrying around creating

the beauty overnight while I slept. I have

previously taken similar images years ago but this

was the best I’d seen for a while. I just love the

surprises that nature offers us.

IS THERE ANYTHING YOU’D LIKE TO

CHANGE ABOUT THIS SHOT?

I’d like to learn how to photo-stack, to enable

me to get the whole web in focus however, I’m

pretty happy with this image as it is.

WHERE CAN WE FIND YOU ONLINE?

excio.gallery/jan

www.facebook.com/abbeyphotographie

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August 2020 7


PURAKANUI FALLS SWIRL

F9, 6s, ISO500

Why I’m Passionate About

Time-Lapse Photography

by Brendon Gilchrist

Fast-forwarding time that we can’t see but that exists

in front of us, this is what I love to capture!

It took me a long time to understand why I enjoy timelapse

photography but I ultimately realised that I like

the surprise of not knowing what I’ll get. You see, on

some occasions, I will set up my camera in hope that

the clouds will be going in one direction, then when

I process the stills I find out that the clouds are going

in 2 different directions. Other times I’ll have captured

the aurora but won’t realise how spectacular the

event was and what I missed with my own eyes until

I’m home and viewing what the camera picked up.

I also enjoy the challenge of time-lapse photography

as I always think carefully about where to put the

camera rather than just putting it down anywhere

as so many other people do. Composition is key for

me, working out what I’ll put in the frame, considering

what will be moving into the frame and what I can

hide at first but then show at the end. For example,

I might place the camera low where there is a broken

stump of a tree, the Syrp Genie will then slowly move

up revealing a waterfall.

Time-lapse challenges me to look around and think

‘Where is this water flowing?’, ‘How fast is the tide

rising and how long do I have before the tripod is

underwater’?, Which way are the clouds moving?

There’s also the question of ‘Which way do I want

the motion time-lapse system to go and should I pan

or keep it static? Not panning is great for telephoto

situations such as close ups of mountain tops but

moving in the same direction as the clouds can give

the finished time-lapse a certain wow factor.

It is hard to visualize what you don’t know is going to

happen but over time, you develop an understanding

of what is likely to happen with a hint of surprise still

thrown in to the final sequence.

Another thing I greatly enjoy with time-lapse

photography is that once I have set up the camera

I can relax and enjoy my surroundings, letting my

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TIME-LAPSE IN PROGRESS

F8, 1/160s, ISO100

camera do all the work. This is sometimes the best

part for me, knowing that I can chill out and be in the

moment but still have those 300ish images to show

to you with the 3000 images equating to about 6-10

seconds of finished footage.

A time-lapse taken during the day will generally take

around 30min to capture, give or take some extra

time with setting up, but an astro time-lapse extends

out to 2 hours or even the whole night, depending

on what you are wanting to capture. An interval

between images of around 3 seconds is long enough

for time-lapses taken during the day whilst for astro,

an interval of 20 seconds between each shot is

recommended.

Last but not least, is the enjoyment I get from putting

the time-lapse together when I’m home, selecting

the music, and marring up the sequences to create

a visual and audio story for people to feast their eyes

upon. It’s a complicated and time consuming process

(another challenge!) with one time-lapse video taking

me weeks to complete as I seek to understand the

song, identify the key parts of the song, and place the

sequences in the right place to have people saying

‘wow’.

I think of time-lapse as being an extension of my

photography – Having the skills and understanding of

what time-lapses photography creates has enhanced

my still photographs. It allows me to sit and wait to

see where everything is moving to, from the tides, the

clouds, the stars, and as well as watching streams

and how the water flows. It is such a good thing to

understand all the elements that create a scene in

your image, or in this case, your short time-lapse.

I encourage people to give time-lapse a go, to get

inspired see my 2 films!

Oh Starry Night www.facebook.com/

ESB23Photography/videos/1245874788845031

Earth Whispers II www.facebook.com/

ESB23Photography/videos/1527794640722566

TIPS FOR YOUR FIRST TIME-LAPSE

• Plan your location – Plan where the sun is going to

be and show up early so you can be on-site to set

your gear up.

• A tripod is needed, you will need this to get every

frame the same and is the key to getting perfect

shots with no shake. If it is windy put your camera

bag on the middle leg of the tripod to give it some

weight to hold it down.

• Turn off your auto focus, and focus with live view

instead. This will allow you to focus on what you

think should be the right element in the frame

rather than letting the camera take over. Leaving

auto focus on can lead to lost shots whilst the

camera tried to focus on something moving in the

frame.

• I would encourage you to get used to time-lapse

captured during the day before you start with the

astro time lapses as that’s when it gets a little more

complicated and time-consuming!

August 2020 9


Rising Star: Ruby Millard

Ruby is a 17 year old who lives in Paraparaumu and attends Kapiti College. Now

in Year 13 she is working on her Level 3 photography portfolio for NCEA and has a

Canon 60D which she usually pairs with a 50mm lens.

RUBY, WHAT’S YOUR BACKGROUND?

I grew up in Nashville, Tennessee and lived there for

13 years before moving back to New Zealand (where

I was born) about two years ago. This means that

I have had the privilege of experiencing two different

cultures, even if they are both “Western”, Englishspeaking

countries.

I’ve loved taking photos and capturing moments ever

since I was really little. I’d take pictures on anything

I could get my hands on – my parents’ little digital

camera, my iPod Touch, anything! Then, on Christmas

Day 2014 (when I was only 11!) my parents surprised

me with my very first DSLR camera. I was so happy

that I burst into tears! Even though it took me ages to

actually figure out how to use it on any setting other

than ‘automatic,’ the fact that I had a “real” camera

was super exciting to me even though my photos

weren’t very good at first.

I have three younger brothers who have been my

go-to models ever since I first started taking photos.

Lucky for me, they don’t complain too much when

I ask them to hold still while I try to capture the perfect

photo though sometimes I do have to bribe them with

some chocolate!

TELL US ABOUT TAKING PHOTOGRAPHY AS A

SUBJECT AT SCHOOL…

I took my first photography class last year. I really

loved being able to use our school’s studio, because

it gave me a new kind of creative freedom that I had

never had before. I discovered how much easier

it was to take the “perfect” photo with controlled

lighting and props, which I definitely wasn’t used to.

Doing photography through NCEA requires a lot of

planning and using artist models. At first, this was

difficult for me to get used to – I was accustomed

to more spontaneous photo moments. But, while

this sometimes ends up restricting the creative

freedoms of the students that partake, I found that

attempting to recreate images taken by professional

photographers really stretched my abilities and has

ultimately improved my photography skills. It has also

given me a new appreciation for going into a shoot

knowing exactly what shots I’m going to take or at

least what I want the outcome of the shoot to be.

Currently, I’m working on my level 3 photography

portfolio for NCEA. So far, my portfolio is composed

of a mixture of still life and portrait images inspired

by Sara Morris, Leta Sobierajski, and other famous

photographers. I’m super excited to complete the

project next term. One of my favourite parts of doing

photography through NCEA has been seeing the

finished boards and how all the pieces fit together.

WOULD YOU SAY YOU HAVE A FAVOURITE

GENRE OR HAVE FOUND YOUR STYLE?

I love taking photos with simple composition and

colour schemes that help the main subject shine, but

I definitely wouldn’t say I’ve found my style. I am really

enjoying experimenting at the moment, so hopefully

I’ll stumble upon a style or genre that I really love.

WHAT IS IT ABOUT PHOTOGRAPHY THAT LIGHTS

A FIRE INSIDE YOU?

Photography has given me the opportunity to

capture my experiences in a way that can be

universally translated by many different people

from many different cultures. Beautiful images

can be appreciated all over the world, even if the

viewer doesn’t speak the same language as the

photographer. On top of that, photography is a

wonderful form of expression and a creative outlet.

I love how it gives anyone and everyone a way to

speak their mind with no boundaries and today,

thanks to social media, those messages can spread to

all ends of the earth. That’s super exciting to me!

HOW HAS BEING FEATURED ON THE KAPITI

COLLEGE EXCIO ACCOUNT AND IN NZP

MAGAZINE HELPED YOU?

It has really validated my art and inspired me to

dream bigger about where my photography might

one day lead.

SO, WHAT ARE YOUR DREAMS AND PLANS FOR

THE FUTURE?

I’ve always looked at photography purely as a hobby,

but you never know, right? Next year I am planning

on starting a design degree at Victoria University, so

hopefully I will be able to combine the graphic design

skills I learn with photography to create some really

special stuff.

WHERE CAN WE FIND YOU ONLINE?

www.instagram.com/capturedbyrubymillard


A CUP OF ANGER

F2.6, 1/128s, ISO160

MY CUP OVERFLOWS

F4.3, 1/100s, ISO250

ALWAYS WATCHING

F4, 1/195s, ISO400

OUT OF CONTROL

F2.3, 1/165s, ISO160

August 2020 11


Photographic Locations Worth

Sweating For:

Ladder In The Wilderness

by Peter Laurenson

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August 2020 13


For the fourth article in this series

we’re still in the Tararua Ranges.

There are plenty of striking places in

the Tararuas, but the ladder at the

steepest section of the Tararua Peaks,

just west of Maungahuka Hut, stands out to

me. As photographers we’re always on the

lookout for a striking angle. Well, the ladder

offers that, but you need to be willing to put

in at least two hard days, or more commonly

three solid days of tramping to get in and

out, via one of several approaches.

The most common approach is the circuit

from the Otaki Forks carpark, up past Field

Hut to Bridge Peak, then along the main

range past Maungahuka Hut, Anderson

Memorial Hut and over Junction Knob,

then plunging down to Otaki River and

Waitewaewae Hut, before returning to Otaki

Forks. I’ve done this travelling light in claggy

Easter conditions in two very demanding

days; and another trip with two of my

teenage sons in fine conditions over three

days. I recommend the latter, not only to

avoid exhaustion, but also to allow time to

photograph some spectacular landscapes.

The trail from Otaki Forks (80m) all the way

up, pretty much, to Bridge Peak (1,421m) is

in very good condition these days, allowing

quick progress. From Bridge Peak the poled

route heads eastwards down towards

Boyd Wilson Knob, at 1,138m, the first of

four named high points that steadily climb

again to the Tararua Peaks at 1,325m. This is

engaging terrain, often requiring hands as

well as feet and in fine conditions it’s really

enjoyable. To the west you can clearly see

Kapiti Island and Wairarapa to the east.

You’ll know when you’re nearing the ladder

by the heady ambience and a steep, two

hands required, partially cable protected

drop to a small notch. Beyond that is ‘the

void’.

It was in the 1930s that intrepid trampers

first pushed a route through the Tararua

Peaks. Using climbing ropes for protection,

they took several attempts to crack it. Later,

the Tararua Tramping Club installed a wire

cable, which I imagine would have been

a fairly focusing ascent or descent tool,

especially in wet conditions. The cable was

later upgraded by the Forest Service to a

chain ladder. Pictures reveal a wobbly affair

that, at least, would be preferable to a single

cable. DOC fixed the current aluminium

ladder in place in the early 2000s. About 25m

high, with over 70 rungs, it’s an impressive

and very effective way to get up or down

the crux section. For photographers, it

challenges your imagination and courage to

get the very best angles.

At the bottom of the ladder, a dramatic,

chain-protected section skirts underneath

the summit of Tunui, before rejoining the

main ridge. Back on the ridge, the route

leads over Maungahuka (1,330m), then drops

to Maungahuka Hut.

The twelve-bunk Maungahuka Hut, nestled

into the tussock hillside beside a pretty

tarn at 1,280m, deserves its reputation for

being situated in one of the Tararua’s most

spectacular spots. This became even more

apparent, when I looked back from the ridge

north of Anderson Memorial Hut the next

afternoon, to see the main range unfold in

clearing cloud. Right in the middle, at what

appeared to be near the highest point, sat a

tiny red dot commanding unimpeded views.

And those views are wonderful at both dawn

and dusk, so Maungahuka Hut is definitely

worth an overnight stay.

From Maugahuka Hut, the poled route

continues along the main ridge in the

direction of four more named high points,

the first being Simpson down at 1,138m.

There is some more quite exposed, steep

terrain between Simpson and Aokaparangi

(1,354m). Beyond Aokaparangi is Kahiwiroa

(1,320m) and, a little further north, the route

drops back into the bush.

Immediately after breaching the bush line,

you’re confronted with an unexpected and

dramatic contrast – some of the finest Goblin

forest I’ve ever seen – another excellent

photo stop.

The terrain beyond Anderson Memorial

Hut, up over Junction Knob (1,375m) and

down off the main ridge via Shoulder Knob

(1,320m), is considerably easier, though there

is still a relentless 1,000 metre drop through

forest, over slippery roots and mud, to the

Otaki River and Waitewaewae Hut. From

there it’s just another four or five hours bush

walking to lug your pack and hopefully a

pixel-packed memory card back to the Otaki

Forks carpark.

If you’re keen to reach this ‘worth the effort

location’ you can find more details and a

route map at:

www.occasionalclimber.co.nz/browseimages‐2/new-zealand-north-island/

tararuas-browse/15159–2/

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NZPhotographer


INTO THE VOID

F8, 1/250s, ISO125, 24mm

BEST VIEW IN THE TARARUAS

F8, 1/100s, ISO125, 24mm

MAUNGAHUKA TARN

F8, 1/320s, ISO125, 24mm

August 2020 15


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August 2020 17


Mini 4 Shot Portfolio

Our 4x4 feature showcases 4 mini portfolio’s of both

professional and up and coming New Zealand

photographers. The 4 images are linked in some way,

allowing you to get an understanding of what each

photographer is most passionate about capturing.

For a change to get your own 4x4 feature in a future

issue of the magazine, become a subscriber of the

magazine here.

ANITA ROONEY

In The Moment

DAVID MCPHERSON

Imaginary Dunes

DEBBIE SUTTON

Majestic Monochrome

EMMA HISSEYE

Ocean Sunsets

18

NZPhotographer


ANITA ROONEY

20

NZPhotographer


I am an amateur photographer, living in Sydney, Australia.

Since retirement, I have become immersed (some would

say obsessed) in exploring photography. I love learning new

techniques and experiencing different cultures and locations.

I am generally eclectic in my interests and genre but currently

have embarked on a project to define a coherent vision and

style. Photography allows me to be creative, be present in the

moment, and to see the world with fresh eyes.

excio.gallery/anitarooney

IN THE MOMENT

These four images were taken on NZ's North Island last November,

late in the evening. I consciously tried to capture images with

high emotional resonance and a stripped back composition. I

was interested in capturing subtleties of light, colour, and tone

rather than dramatic, highly intense bursts of sunset colour so used

the vehicle of minimal long exposure to create strong contrasts

between the land elements and water and sky elements.

I experimented with different angles and horizon lines to vary the

visual flow and tension in the images. I deliberately left details on the

foreground as another point of contrast of colour and texture and

as a reminder of the continual ebb and flow of objects on the tide.

My aim with this series is to give a sense of serenity, of a slowing of

time, of capturing one moment of changing light among many. I

found it wonderfully liberating to be fully immersed in the creative

process, to be quietly and patiently reflective and to almost let the

final product take care of itself.

August 2020 21


DAVID MCPHERSON

24

NZPhotographer


Living for some years in South East Asia and having time to travel

means that much of my photography has been about documenting

experiences, people, and places. However, I’ve always liked the idea

of abstraction in photography, especially landscapes, where elemental

forms can emerge and connect with the viewer somewhat differently

to more traditional images. Now back in New Zealand I feel like I’m

starting all over again, this time exploring composition and processing to

represent landscapes in different ways.

dvdmcp1.wixsite.com/mix-media-photo

IMAGINARY DUNES

This 4x4 collection is made from photos taken off the back of a

camel in central China in 2014. At the time it didn't feel particularly

amazing, but taking the time to see them again is interesting.

The ‘shots’ morph into shapes in a landscape of the imagination.

Forms and features take on symbolic and metaphoric significance,

markers on how life is or can be.

I notice lines that divide as well as layers of tinged smoothness, all

atop a flat bedrock. These layers, like the folds of some piece of

well-worn clothing nonchalantly cast on the land, seem to be an

effortless staging of a still life. The camera captures that moment of

stillness, a thin slice of time. You can lose yourself if you zoom in too

much to the subtle gradations of light and colour. The sharp lines

and distinct edges that separate and mark out the windward side

provide form and structure but we know that even these shift and

drift on a whim.

August 2020 25


DEBBIE SUTTON

28

NZPhotographer


Growing up in Australia’s Snowy Mountains gave me an appreciation of

the rugged terrain and beauty of the high country and great outdoors.

Photography is a hobby that challenges and provides a creative outlet,

allowing exploration of a range of different genres. Most of all I enjoy

travelling, exploring and photographing landscapes and continuing the

development of my creative and technical skills and knowledge. With

travel curtailed during the pandemic I’ve used the time to continue my skill

development through ‘at-home’, ‘tabletop’ and ‘still-life’ photography.

excio.gallery/debbie

MAJESTIC MONOCHROME

These images were captured during an autumn trip to New

Zealand’s South Island. The weather was unpredictable, often

providing great drama. I like monochrome landscape images as

they accentuate the textures and forms in the image, giving a sense

of the drama and unpredictability of the environment. The choice

of monochrome removes the distraction of colour, allowing the

viewer to focus on the form and mood of the image.

Two of the following images were captured in Lindis Pass. It was very

moody, cold and just beginning to snow on the uppermost section

of the pass. The soft lighting accentuated the shapes of the ridges,

each with different colour and texture. As we made our way down the

pass there were beautiful beams of light illuminating the ridges and

valleys, highlighting the contrast in both light and texture between the

incoming clouds, snow-capped hills and soft grassy fields.

Sunrise overlooking the lake at the end of the Tasman Glacier was a

remarkable experience with dramatic lighting accentuating a very

threatening sky. Last but not least is my photo showing the Tasman

River valley, looking towards Aoraki/Mt Cook. Again, captured at

sunrise with morning light and shadow accentuating the forms of

the mountains, foothills and river.

August 2020 29


EMMA HISSEYE

32

NZPhotographer


I’ve always enjoyed exploring new places and getting out in

nature, documenting my travels via ‘happy snaps’. Originally it

was just an added bonus if I managed to captured an image that,

not only recorded a place for my memory books, but also evoked

emotion or wanderlust in others. Two years ago, I finally purchased

my first DSLR and signed up for a community college course.

I’m still working on establishing my own style, but am having fun

learning and trying out different techniques along the way!

excio.gallery/hisseye

OCEAN SUNSETS

The ocean is my happy place, guaranteed to boost my mood no

matter the weather (or how dark the mood!). There’s something

very refreshing and humbling about waves gently lapping on the

shore or crashing against cliffs or rocks and there’s nothing better

than sunsets at the beach. From dusky, cool pinks, violets and

blues, to bold and vibrant yellows, oranges and reds - I love them

all. There’s also a certain mystery to sunsets: you never quite know

what you’re going to get. What can start off as unpromising and

mediocre can shift and surprise you.

Not every sunset is traditionally beautiful though. This 4x4 set is a

collection of ocean sunsets taken on, what others might consider

less than optimal days, when I just enjoyed a moment of peace and

captured what came.

August 2020 33


The Secret Ingredients Needed To

Create Striking B&W Landscapes

by Spencer Clubb

It’s a fact that black and white photographs don’t

receive as many likes as highly saturated landscape

photographs on social media sites. If that is your

primary aim, then walk on, this article will only bring

you disappointment! However, if you are looking to

diversify your portfolio, create some fine art prints or

have almost any other photographic motivation over

and above clicks, then I strongly encourage you to

spend some time working on your black and white

photography, from conception to print. You will be

rewarded with some great images and it might even

improve your colour photography too!

The first thing to say is that black and white photography

is not for your leftovers, your failed colour images or poor

compositions. A bad colour photo will rarely make a

good black and white one unless you happen to have

lucked out and captured one of the key ingredients of

black and white by accident. I’m going to share a few

of these secret ingredients with you today. You should

look for them when planning and executing your next

shoot. And just maybe, you will have some images in

your archives that you can pull out and give a second

life to. Just like a good pizza, you don’t have to, or even

want to, combine all the ingredients into one photo!

B&W PHOTO INGREDIENTS

The first secret ingredient is form. Simple, graphic

images work really well in black and white. Messy,

complicated scenes are much harder to pull off. So

my first tip would be to simplify. Dig out that telephoto

lens. Compose with a clear subject in mind. Try and

find enough contrast so that you have some really

MOONSET OVER NGAURUHOE

F5.6, 1/640s, ISO200, 300mm


dark areas and some illuminated elements in the

scene. Mid tones can be boring. I personally love

using the moon or even the sun to create a graphic

scene with high contrast.

My image of the moon setting behind the flanks of

Ngauruhoe just after dawn is one of my favourites.

Not just because of the final image but because of

the fact that a lot of planning went into me being in

the right place at the right time to pull it off. In fact,

it nearly didn’t work out at all because I woke up

to thick fog. It was tempting to just roll over and go

back to sleep but luckily mind over mattress prevailed

and I made the hike from the hut to the correct

location just as the fog cleared. The long lens, graphic

composition, and high contrast nature of the scene all

help to make it successful.

The second secret ingredient is the right kind of sky. Just

like colour photography, grey overcast days rarely work

and fluffy clouds require a lot of skill or luck to pull off a

decent fine art image. Stormy skies are the holy grail.

Preferably stormy skies clearing at sunset! Unlike colour

photography, clear blue skies can also work well.

My image of a church in Iceland was taken on one

of those disgusting weather days, with rain and

wind making me glad for the shelter of the car and

regretting the decision to save money by camping.

We were driving across country when I spied this lovely

little church sitting in front of some hills, just as the next

major downpour approached. We quickly pulled off

the road and I lined up this shot hand held. You can

create a sky like this in post by applying a grad filter,

and it can be successful in black and white, but you

can’t recreate the rain and the overall mood of the

image. Naturally dark skies always work best, and real

weather always beats post production.

The third secret ingredient is long exposure. Time

creates movement and movement creates leading

lines. Because black and white photography

emphasises form, the shapes and patterns created by

long exposures just work really well. I love a windy day.

Normally standing exactly upwind or downwind works

best, as the clouds streak into the centre of the frame,

but crosswinds can work if your composition has some

balance to it. With little or no wind it can be a long

wait for a boring image. Try a different ingredient.

My seascape was taken in Dorset, England in the

middle of the day. It was quite windy so I used a long

exposure to blur both the waves and the clouds. Even

though the clouds are heading across the frame,

there is enough balance from the sea to lead the eye

around the image and back to the main subject of

the white cliffs. Although I don’t own one, there is a

reason why the Lee Big Stopper became so popular a

few years ago!

ICELANDIC STORM

F5.6, 1/1000s, ISO400, 70mm


DORSET COASTLINE

F8, 271s, ISO100, 100mm

TARANAKI

REFLECTIONS

F8, 1/200s, ISO200, 18mm


Failures – this is the lucky secret ingredient that you

can’t really plan for. Sometimes when you get up

early for that sunrise or hike up that mountain for

sunset the clouds look great but the light just… dies.

You are left with nothing but broken dreams. Don’t

despair when this happens because the lack of colour

doesn’t matter if you have a really nice composition

and some good high clouds. If you are a keen

landscape photographer you will probably have had

lots of shoots that didn’t come off as planned and

images that you never bothered processing. Go back

and take a look. Just maybe you got lucky.

The image of Mt Taranaki from the Pouakai tarns

was taken one evening. There was a gorgeous sky

and it was building to quite a spectacular sunset.

Unfortunately, just as the action was hotting up, the

sun dropped below a cloud bank on the horizon and

never reappeared. I was gutted. It’s a decent hike

up to the tarns and a long way from Wellington for a

return visit. However, luckily for me, the clouds in the

sky had excellent form and this combined really well

with the mountain and the reflection to make a very

satisfying black and white image. The colour version

was not even a keeper.

So that’s a wrap. Now it’s your turn to go out and

shoot some black and white landscapes. No more

excuses and don’t be a slave to the like button!

Spencer Clubb is a a keen landscape photographer currently living in

Edinburgh, UK. He has been taking photography more seriously over

the last 10 years, initially while living in New Zealand, but more recently

in Scotland. He loves spending time in the mountains, hiking, camping,

and photographing while enjoying the wonderful scenery.

www.spencerclubb.net

19th - 25th

November 2020

Seven day North Island Volcanic Photo Tour

Join Ken Wright and Shaun Barnett on this seven-day, round-trip

photography tour from Auckland. Take in many of the most magnificent

volcanic landscapes of New Zealand, including the World Heritage

Tongariro National Park and Mt Taranaki — arguably the country’s most

shapely mountain — before looping back around to Auckland.

www.photographyworkshops.co.nz

info@photographyworkshops.co.nz

021 0845 7322

August 2020 39


Reaching For The Stars

Interview with Haydn Parkes

put 10/10 effort into everything I do but as you can

imagine, I wish to eventually get to the stage where

I can afford for photography to be my fulltime job as

it's currently a hobby.

HAYDN, EXCIO MEMBERS WILL KNOW YOU

FROM YOUR BLOG INTERVIEW BUT CAN YOU

REMIND US WHO YOU ARE, WHAT YOU DO,

AND WHAT MAKES YOU TICK?!

I am 27 years old and I am from the UK originally but

I have been living in Queenstown for a few years now.

From a very young age I always dreamed about living

in New Zealand and now its finally happened I never

want to leave!!

I absolutely love the outdoors and everything that

goes with it like hiking and camping in the summer,

snowboarding in the winter and obviously the

fantastic scenery!

I have done many different jobs over the years, am

a qualified mechanic by trade, however I am now a

full time roofer. I thoroughly enjoy my job and always

WHAT ARE YOU SHOOTING WITH AND HOW

DID YOU GET INTO PHOTOGRAPHY?

I have a Canon R which I purchased towards the end

of last year and a few different lenses but the main

two lenses I use are the 24–70mm 2.8 Canon lens and

the 14mm Samyang 2.8.

Photography first came about when I stepped out of

my hometown of Wolverhampton, England (a place

without many landscape photo opportunities and that

you’re unlikely ever to have heard of unless you’re a

football fan!). When I first started travelling, images

were just taken on my phone, however, as I started to

see more and more cool places I decided to buy my

first camera which was a Canon 700D. I taught myself

from Youtube videos and just went out and about

practicing. When I showed my photos to friends they

told me to start an Instagram page and photography

has just ballooned ever since.

If you’d asked me 5 years ago if I thought this was

going to happen, that I was going to develop a talent

for photography, I would have laughed. I just can’t

believe the response I have had regarding my photos,

it's great. Now I have started selling a few prints, have

done my first wedding shoot, been asked to capture

more weddings, and am also taking friends out and

showing them what I know about astro photography.

WHAT HAS CHANGED WITH YOUR

PHOTOGRAPHY SINCE YOUR EXCIO BLOG

INTERVIEW?

I feel that a lot has changed over recent months since

I have tried a lot of new things. I’ve gained a lot more

confidence and I think my standard in photography

has shot up thanks to spending more time and putting

more thought into each shot. My editing skills have

greatly improved too due to practising most evenings

during lockdown.

As I mentioned, I have done my first wedding shoot

which was my first real big test and was very different

to what I am used to but was a lot of fun and the

bride and groom loved the pictures! I have tried to

start experimenting a bit more and recently bought

a couple of accessories including a flash which has

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NZPhotographer


opened the doors to trying new thing especially with

my astro work.

YOU SHOOT LANDSCAPES, EVENTS, ASTRO,

AND WILDLIFE… WHICH DO YOU FIND THE

MOST FASCINATING?

Although shooting events brings me great satisfaction,

I love the astro side of my photography as it involves

a lot more technicality and I feel that capturing the

stars and milky way is fascinating but I also love the

challenge that comes from people asking me to

capture them under the milky way after having seen

my work, even if it means me staying out all night!

I usually get these small jobs through word of mouth

from friends or people that have seen my work on

Instagram. As I said before, any job at this point is an

absolute bonus to me as this is still really only a hobby.

LOCKDOWN ASTRO

F2.8, 25s, ISO6400

August 2020 41


MT COOK

F2.8, 25s, ISO6400

42

NZPhotographer


STARLIGHT TREES

F2.8, 25s, ISO6400

August 2020 43


BROW PEAK PANO

F2.8, 1/4000s, ISO500

TELL US ABOUT PHOTOGRAPHING PEOPLE

ENJOYING THEIR HOBBIES…

This mainly came about through having a connection

with ultra and trail running as one of my closet friends

is a trail runner. People want to be photographed

doing what they love as it shows them in all their gear

achieving something. As I am a keen hiker I also have

many friends that like to come out with me on hikes,

taking photos. I mean who wouldn’t want a photo of

themselves after a tough hike or on the top of a high

cliff edge or mountain – what an achievement! Finally,

now that the ski and snowboard season has started

I have already been approached by snowboarders

wanting some cool pics with their boards coming

down the mountain or showing off their skills.

I love shooting people doing what they love, it’s a winwin

for both of us. I get the enjoyment, practise, and

the satisfaction at the end when I see how excited

they are when they see themselves on a large canvas

print on their wall at home. Knowing I created that

makes it all worth it.

WHAT ADVICE CAN YOU SHARE WITH READERS

FOR PHOTOGRAPHING EVENTS?

Don’t be nervous, just go for it! Before the wedding

shoot I was super nervous, worrying if it was going

to go okay. Obviously getting everything right for

their big day is very important, but confidence is key

and believing in yourself is crucial – and it couldn’t

of come out any better. Pushing yourself to try new

things will always come with improvement.

WEDDING

F2.8, 1/125s, ISO100

44

NZPhotographer


ULTRA RUNNER

F2.8, 1/5000s, ISO100

August 2020 45


REMARKABLES

F2.8, 25s, ISO6400

LENS BALL

F6, 20s, ISO800

46

NZPhotographer


REMARKS VIEWPOINT

F5.6, 1/12500s, ISO100

MT COOK VIEWPOINT

F9, 1/640s, ISO100

August 2020 47


A good tip is to try going out with some friends before

and trying to recreate a situation where it will help with

the event you’re photographing. Personally, someone

recommended to me that I shoot in aperture priority

mode rather than manual mode which I was so used

to doing as this would be quicker with less risk of missing

the special moments so I spent lots of time practising

shooting in aperture priority mode before the big day.

HOW DO YOU PROMOTE YOUR WORK AND

GET YOURSELF ‘OUT THERE’?

Honestly, I feel at this stage it’s mostly word of mouth,

Queenstown is not the biggest of towns so it's quite

easy to get your name out there. There's also my

Instagram page where I gain more and more followers

each day whether that’s other keen photographers

or just people genuinely interested in my work. I also

have a website which I try to promote around town.

WHAT PHOTOGRAPHY PROJECTS DID YOU

WORK ON DURING LOCKDOWN?

Lockdown was an interesting time to try new things.

I am so fortunate to have amazing views from my

balcony in Queenstown which is also situated right

on a walking track on the lake so I had a lot to work

with. I found I put a lot more practice into my sunrise

shots, spent more time with my lens ball, and also had

a go at shooting astro in a light polluted area which

actually turned out very well!

My favourite landscape to date is actually the one

I took from my balcony during lockdown called 'Swept

Remarks'. I’d had an idea of how I wanted this image

to look in my head for so long, with the clouds swept

on the ridgeline of the Remarkables and then one day

I looked outside and the shot was there. I’ve actually

got it printed on a large canvas on my own bedroom

wall and have sold a few prints of it too.

Lockdown also gave me the chance to have a look

through old photos that I forgot existed, have a play

around with them and it turned out great! Out of all

the new photos I ended up editing there were lots

that I took at the Milford track earlier in January, but

the one that really stood out to me was the reflection

of a small lake that I took up the Clinton Valley.

WHAT HAS YOUR EXPERIENCE BEEN AS AN

EXCIO MEMBER?

Excio has helped me a lot, giving me the opportunity

to see other photographers work and to gain new

ideas. I never get bored of looking at other people’s

photos, especially astro and long exposure shots. I love

reading the interviews on the Excio blog about other

photographers, learning what they get up to, the different

types of photography and reading the various tips. It’s

definitely an encouraging and supportive community.

I haven’t had chance to try one of the weekly challenges

yet but that is definitely on my to do list!

WHAT’S NEXT FOR YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY

JOURNEY?

I really want to start shooting more photos that show

people in my landscape or astro shots. I want to take

people to experience what I do and to be able to

provide them with an amazing memory at the end

with a large print of themselves stood beneath the

milky way for example.

I recently took my girlfriend out with me and we got

a shot together under the milky way (page 42) which

created great memories for us both! I’d also like to

start teaching people astro photography and taking

them out at night with me.

ANYTHING ELSE WE SHOULD KNOW ABOUT

YOU OR YOUR WORK?

Just watch this space really!! I am really going to be

focusing on getting out more, carry on improving and

just generally enjoying photography to the max!

WHERE CAN WE FIND YOU ONLINE?

excio.gallery/wanderingwolf

instagram.com/wanderingwolf.photography

www.wanderingwolfphotography.co.uk

SWEPT REMARKS

F7, 1/800s, ISO100

48

NZPhotographer


CLINTON VALLEY

F2.8, 1/1000s, ISO100

THE OPEN ROAD

F9, 1/320s, 30mm

August 2020 49


Is it Photoshopped?

By Richard Young

“You don’t take a photograph, you make it.” – Ansel Adams

Photoshopped images have become somewhat

of a taboo among the general public. With

today’s technology, artists can manipulate

reality so convincingly that viewers have learned

to assess the integrity of an image by asking “Is it

Photoshopped?”. In post-processing, it’s easy to

cross the line between just enough and too much,

and this is how we lose the sense of realness in an

image. But using Photoshop doesn’t automatically

mean you’ve crossed that line. Photoshop serves

many purposes; the goal is not always to confuse

50

NZPhotographer

or deceive. We must ask ourselves what our

intention is. Are we aiming to capture an exact

representation of the scene in front of us? Or to

create something different? Do we want to be

journalists or artists?

The work of Ansel Adams was “Photoshopped”,

though his adjustments took place in a darkroom

rather than with modern photo manipulation

software. A comparison of his final prints against the

negatives reveals the edits Adams made, resulting

in images that were not an exact representation


of the landscape he photographed. With the use

of heavy dodging and burning, he gave more

presence to his subjects and reduced distractions.

Despite these liberties, Adams’ work still feels

“real” and does not face the same stigma that

manipulated digital images face today.

NO IMAGE OFFERS A TRUE REPRESENTATION

OF REALITY

“There is a difference between what feels real and

what is real.”

Although viewers tend to mistrust “Photoshopped”

images for manipulating reality, it must be

acknowledged that no image offers a true window

into reality; it can only offer a photographer’s

interpretation of reality. As photographers, we

can present a photograph as “straight from the

camera” or “unprocessed”, but this does not give

the image any more value, or make it “real”. All

images manipulate reality to some degree, and this

is part of the nature of the art.

Some might argue that shooting on film creates

an accurate representation of what’s real, but this

is not the case either, as I know from experience.

I used to shoot on film with a Velvia 50, favoured by

many landscape photographers for its saturated

colours. It had a limited exposure latitude (dynamic

range) of only 5 stops, producing rich contrast

even when shooting subtly lit scenes. The wideangle

lens on my Mamiya 7 altered reality as

well: under certain conditions, light falloff around

the edge of the frame created a beautiful soft

vignette. Compared to a RAW file from my Nikon

D850 (with its 14 stops of dynamic range) a film

transparency capture on my Mamiya 7 would look

far different, it would have much more punch with

deeper contrast and increased saturation. The

digital image would look flat, and it would take a

lot of processing to achieve the same “straight from

the camera” effect. Additionally, the unprocessed

JPEG files on my D850 differ drastically depending

on the picture control (shooting profile) and

August 2020 51


white balance settings I have selected. One can

therefore argue that these, too, are forms of editing

reality.

TO BE ARTISTS, WE MUST CREATE

“To create something, we must bring it into

existence.”

An image is not a true representation of reality,

but it doesn’t need to be. Being a creative

photographer requires creation, which is to bring

something new into existence, rather than simply to

present what exists already. As discussed, even “unprocessed”

photographs do not present a scene as

is – we control so many factors that make the image

what it is. If we leave out an electrical pylon, for

example, the viewer will never know it was there.

The choices we make in the field (using telephoto

lenses to compress distance between objects or

using wide-angle lenses to create distortion etc)

are acts of artistic deception, just as much as the

choices we make in post-processing.

Processing is a valuable tool we can use to

challenge the viewer with our art. In my own work,

I want to challenge the viewer while maintaining a

sense of “realness”, so my processing boundaries

are set by the question “does it feel real?”. Not all

photographers work this way, however; you may

wish to present your own work with highly saturated

colours not found in nature, or to highlight detail

to an extreme extent using HDR. Choices such as

these will not create a feeling of “realness”, but

this does not make them wrong. It can take just

as much time, technique, and vision to create a

surreal aesthetic as a realistic one, and neither style

lessens a photograph’s artistic value.

52

NZPhotographer


HOW FAR IS TOO FAR?

“There is a difference between what looks

Photoshopped and what has been Photoshopped.”

Not only do photographers have to consider how

real they want their images to feel, they also have

to consider how much is too much in terms of

directly altering image content. Is it acceptable to

remove something from a photograph during postprocessing?

Is it acceptable to put something in, or

to move something around? This is a question only

you can answer for yourself. It depends on what

you’ve set out to create, and on the end-use of the

photograph.

For me personally, if I find a small twig poking into

the corner of my frame, I’ll happily edit it out when

producing a fine art print. You could even argue

this is more acceptable than snapping off the twig

to remove it during capture. I have no hesitation

removing small distractions, like rocks that account

for 1% of the total image area. But I don't feel

comfortable editing out a permanent part of the

landscape – something you’d see no matter when

you visited. I also don’t feel comfortable replacing

the sky in a photograph, although some feel

differently in that regard.

Regardless of where you draw the line, there’s a

point at which alterations turn a photograph into

more of a digital creation, and this is not what I set

out to produce in my own work. Heavy alterations

are appropriate if your images are presented as

digital creations, but if you’re presenting your work

as photographic, there is a grey area in terms of

how much altering is too much. Also keep in mind

that when entering photo competitions, the rules

may state “nothing added or removed” – in that

case, even the little twig must remain in the frame,

unless it can be cropped out

August 2020 53


Seven day South Island

Beaches & Bays Photo Tour

23rd - 29th September 2020

The top of the South Island offers a variety of fantastic and easily-accessible

photography locations. Richard Young and Ken Wright will guide you on

a seven-day workshop, where you will photograph stunning limestone

formations, lush native forests, ever-changing sand dunes, and the place

where the mountains meet the beautiful South Pacific Ocean.

You will spend multiple days exploring photographic locations and

marine wildlife by boat in the world-famous Abel Tasman National Park,

Marlborough Sounds, and the Kaikoura Coast. Travelling by boat allows us

to access beaches and bays that take days to access on foot; on this tour,

the most secluded and stunning spots are right at our fingertips.

www.photographyworkshops.co.nz

info@photographyworkshops.co.nz

(0064) 21 0845 322

54 NZPhotographer


INSIGHTS FROM

@excio photo community

We all know that looking

at photographs makes

you feel good – it evokes

emotions, feelings, triggers

curiosity and can be a source of

inspiration. What you didn’t know is

that simply by looking at photos you

can actually do good for others!

Our goal at Excio is to discover

talented photographers and bring

their work and #PhotographyForGood

efforts to the forefront. Instead of

adding to the billions of images on

social media that simply stagnate on

news feeds or remain stored on our

hard drives gathering terabytes of

dust, our members choose to publish

their work on Excio knowing that their

stories and images make an impact

around the world.

There are many ways photographers

can do good. They can donate their

photos, contribute to a good cause,

share their experience and tips with

other photographers, buy camera

gear from environmentally friendly

suppliers and so on. But we thought

there should be a way to make a

difference through the power of our

Excio Photo Community, the power

of photography, our contributing

members, as well as our viewers,

followers, and readers. Great news –

we found the solution!

We are very excited to launch our

new ‘Feel Good Photography’ page

which is open to everyone who

enjoys photography. For every 100

visitors to this page, who look through

the gallery of the latest featured

photographs from Excio, we will

make a donation to a good cause.

By being a member of Excio and

publishing your photos to your Excio

collections you will now be able to

see how your photos are making a

real impact! No extra fees, payments,

or transactions involved, making it

a brand-new concept of helping a

good cause you care about through

photography.

Receiving a notification every time

your latest photos are featured on

the “Feel Good Photography” page

and seeing the impact they do will no

doubt make your day! We've started

with photos from previous "In The

Spotlight" blog posts and Excio Top 10

features, so if your photographs were

featured previously you are likely to

see them on the new page. We’ll

upload new featured images on a

regular basis.

This month we are supporting the

Mental Health Foundation of New

Zealand right in time for Mental Health

Awareness week in September. We

are working on partnering with other

charities so our members will soon be

able to select a cause to support that

they care about the most.

We hope you enjoy this new initiative

and welcome your comments and

suggestions at hello@excio.io. If you

want to make an impact with your

photography, no matter your skill

level, we can’t wait to have you join

us. Find out more about the benefits

on www.excio.io/membership.

If you are not a member or simply

enjoy looking at photos more than

sharing them we would love for you

to visit our “Feel Good Photography”

page and for you to share it with your

friends and family!

Ana Lyubich

Co-founder of Excio,

Ana's photography

journey started many

years ago with one of the

first Kodak film cameras.

She loves exploring the

unseen macro world

and capturing people's

genuine emotions.

@excionz

www.excio.io

August 2020

55


PASSIONATE ABOUT PHOTOGRAPHY?

We have dozens of opportunities for you to showcase your work.

Let's prove that photography is more than selfies, likes or influencers.

PHOTO COMMUNITY

FIND OUT MORE

Photos (left to right): Marina de Wit, Lee Ann Waddell, Haydn Parkes, Kim Free, Paula Vigus, Peter

McIlroy, Pamela Johnstone, Brendon Gilchrist, Lex Rudd.

56 NZPhotographer


EXCIO TOP 10

BETH CHAPMAN

OYSTERCATCHER WHANAU

Family of Oystercatchers at Mt

Maunganui on a busy summers day.

excio.gallery/beth

TONY GORHAM

DANCING IN THE DUNES

I have been working with Anita van

der Mespel for over a year now on a

series of portraits.

excio.gallery/nztonez

August 2020

57


RAM SUBRAMANIAN

(MIND & SHUTTER)

SUNSET AT WHARARIKI BEACH

With windspeeds getting to 60km/hr I was lucky

to step into the cave to take shelter from the

turbulent winds to secure this shot framed from

inside the cave.

excio.gallery/ram

CONNULL LANG

RAINDROPS ON A NEW FLOWER

Macro photograph of a daisy closing up at the

end of the day. My first winter in New Zealand in

nearly 20 years and I love it, so mild and flowers

everywhere.

excio.gallery/connull

58 NZPhotographer


ISAAC

KHASAWNEH

ST PAULS’ CHURCH, TE

AWAMUTU

There was a clear sky here in

Auckland but I wanted to try a

new spot so I drove all the way to

St Paul's Church in Te Awamutu

but unfortunately the weather

wasn't on my side.

excio.gallery/isaac

JUDI LAPSLEY MILLER

THE SWEETHEART

This sweetheart shows all that I love about

kākā - she's curious, engaging, and gentle -

as interested in me as I am in her. And she's

just so beautiful that I have kept the photo

as simple as possible to let her personality

shine through without distraction. 10% of

the artist's proceeds goes to Zealandia

EcoSanctuary to support their

conservation efforts.

excio.gallery/artbyjlm

August 2020

59


CARMEN THERRIAULT

COMET AND STARS

The NEOWISE comet is being called the

comet of the decade and is visible with

the naked eye! It was truly spectacular on

this evening of rare clear skies over Alberta,

Canada this summer.

excio.gallery/carmen

LISA YATES

STARING DOWN A PREYING MANTIS

I had the pleasure of attending a macro

photography class at Orokonui Ecosanctuary in

Dunedin at the weekend. We had the chance

to photograph a few things but the star of the

show had to be the Preying Mantis.

excio.gallery/lisa

60 NZPhotographer


SARA

PETERCOKELEYSON

GONE

It's all gone, but still there.

Wellington 2019. Abandoned New

Zealand series.

excio.gallery/sara

LYNN FOTHERGILL

PIWAKAWAKA IN FLIGHT

These fellas are so hard to capture!

This is my best effort to date.

excio.gallery/serendipity

August 2020

61


YOUR

CITY

READERS' SUBMISSIONS

Submit photos that showcase your

city - from people to architecture

to nature we want to see it all.

Submit by 15 August for a chance

to be featured in the next issue of

NZPhotographer.

62

NZPhotographer

Submit at www.nzphotographer.nz


PORTFOLIO

BEST READERS' SUBMISSIONS THIS MONTH

'BEST 2020 PHOTOS SO FAR'

HIT AND MISS

F4.5, 1/2500s, ISO250

Taken at a polocrosse event in February, I love the chaos and somewhat

comedic vibe of this image, of the players all going for the ball after a

restart.

Lynn Fothergill

August 2020 63


SHELLEY BAY

This building is part of the old NZDF base at Shelley Bay, close to Wellington. There

are developers keen to develop the site and some contention around these plans.

It does have a lovely view of Wellington City.

Ann Kilpatrick

64

NZPhotographer


JEWELLED GECKO

The jewelled gecko is an endangered and threatened species in New

Zealand. Primarily home to the South Island, their numbers are rapidly

declining. Lizards and amphibians are an indicator of an ecosystem's

balance - They are critical for ecosystem processes and pollinate native

plants and disperse plant seeds. The more we tamper with, and destroy our

environment, the more endangered species are becoming.

Yuri Chetty

August 2020 65


FANTASY ISLAND

F5, 1/160s, ISO280, 170 mm

Photographer / Retoucher: Anupama S. Wijesundara

Model/ Makeup Artist / Costume Design: Agne Sumskyte

Anupama S. Wijesundara

66

NZPhotographer


SUNRISE FISHERMEN

Mangawhai Surf Beach

I was hoping to get the sunrise over the howling wolf rock at the surf beach

but the sun came up slightly to the left, rising right above this couple

fishing. I changed to my 70-200mm lens and changed my plan of what to

shoot, wanting to get this couple in silhouette. As the sun rose it came right

up behind the guys head.

Gary Ashton

August 2020 67


LAKE CRUISER

Loved the light reflected in the water to complement the natural subject cruising in

its environment on Lake Te Koutu, Cambridge.

Derek Teague

68

NZPhotographer


STANDOFF

F5, 1/500s, ISO100, 24mm

When you get the opportunity to spend some time on a farm in Waitomo,

you take it! I was lucky enough to spend a night in the midst of the New

Zealand countryside, being battered by the elements from all angles. It's

very easy to watch the world pass by here, where problems of the outside

don't seem real anymore. Im going to make sure that I spend a lot more

time near here.

Jack Kingston

August 2020 69


OVER THE HILL AND FAR AWAY...

F5.6, 1/1600s, ISO100, 85mm

I love living in The Waikato. The daily lives of farmers are always on show.

I'm constantly looking out the window on my drives and seeing these

amazing rolling hills with tractors and quad bikes making their way through

them. I think I might be extremely jealous, but for now, I'm happy to watch

them and capture them as they live their lives.

Jack Kingston

70

NZPhotographer


SOUTH ISLAND SNOW

A family day out to see the snow on New

Zealand's South Island.

Kim Lingham

August 2020 71


LAKE HERON

Family day out seeing North Canterbury, South Island

Kim Lingham

72

NZPhotographer


NGAWI END OF DAY

I had a really pleasant weekend break at Ngawi during the summer. I

spent the last evening sitting on the beach watching the sun go down and

being in awe of the changing light on the landscape. I hope I captured its

real beauty, and the little tractor on the beach is pretty cool too!

Peter Maiden

August 2020 73


ISOLDE

A botanical medley of tulips, succulents and other

various florals and greens.

Marina de wit

74

NZPhotographer


APHRODITE

Close up of a dahlia, my favourite flowers to photograph.

Marina de wit

August 2020 75


KAKA ZEALANDIA

F5, 1/160s, ISO280, 170mm

Zealandia offered free access in June 2020 after the Covid-19 lockdown. A friend

and I visited on a good day and we were lucky to see all the Kaka at the feeding

station. This one must be wild, he has no bands on his legs, and his wing feathers are

a bit bedraggled. It was a real treat to see them on my first visit to Zealandia.

Ann Kilpatrick

76

NZPhotographer


VIETNAM VETERANS MEMORIAL – WASHINGTON, U.S.A

F6.3, 1/500s, ISO200

I was shocked by the vast number soldiers who had died and impressed

by the architectural monument. The original of this picture is in colour, but

I could not see it so - I feel I have achieved depth and perception of third

dimension by converting it to black and white.

Nick Kabzamalov

August 2020 77


MY FEATHERED FRIEND

We have been encouraging birds into our back garden by hanging fruit in

a tree. These cute little Waxeyes are quite comfortable letting me get a bit

closer now - they know where that yummy fruit comes from!

Raewyn Smith

78

NZPhotographer


ICE BUBBLE

F6.3, 1/500s, ISO200

This is the first time I have captured an ice bubble. Out early one morning

in -3.1degrees I was blowing bubbles over my car and trying to capture

the beautiful patterns that were created by the frost before they burst. Lots

burst instantly but a few remained for me to capture.

Wendy Pemberton

August 2020 79


“THERE IS A BRIEF

MOMENT WHEN

ALL THERE IS IN A

MAN'S MIND AND

SOUL AND SPIRIT

IS REFLECTED

THROUGH

HIS EYES, HIS

HANDS, HIS

ATTITUDE. THIS

IS THE MOMENT

TO RECORD”.

YOUSUF KARSH

80

NZPhotographer

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