RideFast Aug2020

foleyg

AUGUST 2020

FIRST

LOCAL TEST

DUCATI

STREETFIGHTER V4

Exclusive

UPER NAKEDS

HOOTOUT

FIRST RIDE: YAMAHA MT03 TYRE TECH TALK: DUNLOP

BOOK REVIEW: THE WISDOM OF THE ROAD GODS

SA LAUNCH TEST: BMW’S NEW 2020 MACHINES

• KTM 1290 SUPERDUKE R

• APRILIA RSV4 1100 RR TUONO

• DUCATI STREETFIGHTER V4S

• KAWASAKI Z H2

• BMW S1000R


ED’S NOTES: ROB PORTMAN

Diverse and S innovative filters –

S

S

S S S S S S

also for motorcycles.

The largest filter range for maximum workshop performance.

Our filters protect not only the engines, but also the people in the vehicle. With our comprehensive filter range in uncompromising quality and

with maximum market coverage, we ensure that the right product is available for every requirement to keep dirt, abrasion and the finest particles

away from the powertrain and the occupants. With MAHLE, your workshop delivers 100% performance, today and tomorrow.

www.mahle-aftermarket.com

It’s taken me a while to get started

with this editor’s note, for it will

be my last as editor of RideFast

magazine and very emotional for

me to try and put into words the

experience I have had over the

past 10-years.

What an incredible journey it has

been, memories and experiences

I will cherish forever. I have met

some amazing people of this

journey, people who have become

so much more than just reader’s

as friends of myself and RideFast.

I can honestly say that I gave

110% every time I put a magazine

together, and always worked

extra hard behind the scenes to

make sure you the reader, and

the advertisers got their money’s

worth when not only paging

through the magazine but also

interacting with the Facebook

page and anything else to do with

RideFast. I thrived on the challenge

to produce the best magazine in

the land each-and-every month,

and in my eyes, we did that more

often than not.

I’ve managed to build up

resources and contacts that

helped me through this journey

and helped me always bring you

the latest and greatest articles,

tests and features – that’s what

makes RideFast a step above the

rest in my book.

In 2019, I started MCSA

magazine, and in 2013 I was

not happy with that name, so

RideFast was born, and since

then we have been at the

forefront of everything that

makes the world of sport bikes

unique and so fascinating. Sadly,

a few years back when the mag

was in trouble I did not have the

finances to take it over, and this

is where Glenn Foley stepped

in and saved RideFast. Glenn

deserves a huge amount of

praise for taking that step and

that risk, and also for helping

me grow the brand to what it is

today. I wish him and the rest of

the team all the success going

forward and thank them for

everything they have done for

me. I can honestly say I gave

them my everything and leave

them with a brand I poured my

heart and soul into.

The time has come for me to

move on and do my own thing,

and keep trying to grow not only

as a business man, but more

importantly

as a person.

My journey

does not

end here,

and I must

thank each

and every one of you, as well as

all the advertisers who not only

believed in RideFast, but also in

me. Just know that I will forever

be grateful of the opportunities

you helped create for me, and

that adventure in the wonderful

world of motorcycles will always be

ingrained in my heart!

Cheers, Rob Portman

(No, I’m not crying… ok, maybe a little)

Apology to Bike SA magazine.

A few weeks ago I made some unfortunate

comments replying to a reader’s question on

the RideFast Facebook page. The comments

made were absolutely unverified, personal

opinions. They were out of line - and should

never have gone up.

I realized the mistake a few minutes later,

and removed the post.

I did send out a public apology on the RF

page as well as sending this to George

Portman and Diana Richardson from Bike

SA: “I hereby retract the statements made

by myself and promise that this will never

happen again as there is no need for it. I am

disgraced and embarrassed by my stupid,

unprofessional and childish action”

Distributed by Autocycle Centre

PUBLISHER:

Glenn Foley

foleyg@mweb.co.za

ADVERTISING:

Sean Hendley

bestbikemagazines

@yahoo.com

071 684 4546

OFFICE &

SUBSCRIPTIONS:

Anette anette.acc@ mweb.co.za

011 979 5035

Copyright © RideFast Magazine: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed,

or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, articles, or other methods, without the

prior written permission of the publisher.

RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 1


WANT TO OWN A REAL

KTM MOTOGP BIKE?

WELL NOW YOU CAN.

Want to be the coolest guy at a

track day? Well now you can be

the guy (or girl) with all the gear

and no idea as KTM have listed 2

2019 RC16’s for sale

This incredibly exclusive package was

teased back when KTM first brought

their project to life, saying that they will

sell their MotoGP bikes at a later point,

the Austrian factory has stayed true to

their word.

The bike logged eight top-ten finishes

and a front-row start at Misano last

year as well as more than 100 MotoGP

World Championship points in KTM’s

most successful season yet.

It doesn’t come cheap though, if you

want to have the coolest living room

in the world you will have to cough up

£260,000 however it doesn’t stop

at just the motorbike, included in this

package is:

– A full set of Pol Espargaro’s Dainese

leathers

– A signed Pol Espargaro AGV helmet

– A VIP MotoGP Event Pack for any

2021 event. The experience includes a

behind-the-scenes tour, a meet-andgreet

with the MotoGP riders and a

full set of Red Bull KTM Factory Racing

team wear

– Weekend access to the Red Bull

Energy Station unit with full catering

and refreshment options

It is a deal you wouldn’t want to miss

out on! That is unless your name is

Johann Zarco…

SOURCE: everythingmotoracing.com


SA STARS SHINING BRIGHT

ON THE WORLD STAGE!

Steven Odendaal (40) picked up a solid 6th & 8th place finish at the recent Jerez WSS round while

Darryn Binder (40) showed his class once again with a brilliant ride from 21st on the grid to 4th

in Moto3 race at Jerez a few weeks ago. Brad Binder (33) is making huge noise in the MotoGP

paddock with his performances so far, although it did not go to plan in the last race, he has proven

that he belongs in MotoGP and it’s only a matter of time before he is challenging for top spots.


All the NEWS proudly brought

to you by HJC HELMETS

2021 DUCATI

MULTISTRADA 950 S

THE MULTISTRADA 950S RECEIVES GP

TREATMENT WITH ALL-NEW COLORWAY.

RAM AIR INTAKE

NEW TOPFEEDER

INJECTORS

For one reason or another, there aren’t many

white motorcycles out there, save of course

for the occasional police bike and such.

Overall, bike makers steer clear of white, but

over the course of just two weeks, the Italians

from Ducati released two new liveries based

on this non-color.

The first one, called White Rosso, was introduced

at the beginning of July for the Panigale V2, and

now comes the second, GP White, meant for the

new Multistrada 950 S.

Just like the V2, the Italian all-rounder will not be

of course all white, but will mix it with grey and

the Ducati Red to create an effect of “elegance,

fluidity and balance of lines.” We don’t know

about that, but we think it looks cool, and we

don’t even like white all that much, especially

considering how it was inspired by Ducati’s

exploits in MotoGP.

Other than the addition of the new paint

scheme, which should become available at

dealers starting this month, there haven’t been

that many changes made to the stock 950.

The bike is powered by the 937cc Testastretta

11 engine good for 113 hp and 96 Nm of torque–

the unit will be Euro 5 compliant starting with

the 2021 model year – and comes packed with

features like electronic suspension, full-LED

headlamp, 5-inch color TFT display, and Bosch

ABS cornering.

The Multistrada line of V-twin motorcycles was

born in the Italian stables in 2003 as a mostly

road-going machine. Over the years, it had many

incarnations, with the current offering counting 8

models, ranging from the entry-level 950 to the

range topping 1260 Enduro.

12 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020

BREMBO STYLEMA

MONOBLOCK CALIPERS

ALL NEW CHASSIS

GETDUKED

KTM 1290 SUPER DUKE R

Phone 011 462 7796 for your nearest dealer.

Please make no attempt to imitate the illustrated riding scenes, always wear protective clothing and observe the applicable provisions of the road traffic regulations!

The illustrated vehicles may vary in selected details from the production models and some illustrations feature optional equipment available at additional cost.

REAR

LINKAGE

DOPAMINE OVERLOAD

Photo: R. Schedl


All the NEWS proudly brought

to you by HJC HELMETS

2021 BMW F

SERIES MODELS

BMW REVEALS NEW F SERIES MODELS, CHANGES

LIMITED TO VISUAL AND EQUIPMENT UPGRADE

ATTENTION!

Since a little over a decade now,

the motorcycle family over at BMW

Motorrad included the so-called

F Series. The models in this family

are some of the most preferred

choices of riders looking for bikes

equally good for everyday use, but

also packing touring capabilities.

Recently, the German bike maker

announced a series of upgrades

for three of the F Series bikes.

As such, the F 750 GS, F 850

GS and F 850 GS Adventure get

updated with new color schemes,

new standard equipment, and

more choices when it comes to

optional equipment.

From this point onward, all three

models come equipped as

standard with visual upgrades like

LED flashing turn indicators, a USB

charging device at the front right

of the cockpit, but also mechanical

ones, including ABS Pro and

Dynamic Traction Control (DTC).

The engine remains unchanged.

The same powerplant breathes

life in all three models, namely

a 853cc liquid-cooled 4-valve,

2-cylinder, tied to a six-speed

gearbox. Despite being the

same on all bikes, the engine has

different outputs depending on

the model it is used for: 77 hp on

the F 750 GS, and 95 on the two

variants of the F 850 GS.

Visually, there are new colors on

the table as well. The 750 can now

be wrapped in Light White with

tank center cover painted in vehicle

color, and black matt painted rims,

black handlebars and seat bench in

red/black.

The 850 gets Racing Red with

the tank centre cover painted

in the vehicle color, and blackcoated

fixed fork tubes, black

rims and seat bench in black/

grey. For the Adventure, BMW

introduces Ice Grey.

You can have a detailed look at all

the changes BMW has in mind for

the F Series in the press release

section below. At the time of this

writing, pricing and availability for

the models are not known.

14 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020


All the NEWS proudly brought

to you by HJC HELMETS

BMW MOTORRAD

FOURWAYS

If you have never visited this

bustling BMW dealership in

Fourways, then best you hop onto

your bike and go and have a look

this weekend.

You cannot see the sheer

magnitude of the shop from

the road - and it really is pretty

spectacular. The car section

is really beautiful with a great

coffee bar and delectable BMW

four wheeled offerings liberally

interspersed with even more

delectable BMW motorcycles of all

shapes and sizes.

The Motorrad section is stuffed to

the ceiling with an amazing variety

of new and used motorcycles,

friendly staff and a very cool

motorcycle vibe. Take a look at

the selection of genuine BMW

accessories - and if you need your

BMW serviced, the workshop is

ready for your baby with a crew

of qualified BMW people ready to

look after your baby.

Sales team: Mike, Rodney,Gift and Jenna

Ognar, Ricardo, Dennis, Arthur and Ruben.

BMW Motorrad Fourways.

Cnr Witkoppen and Cedar Road. Fourways, Gauteng. (011) 367-1600

16 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020


All the NEWS proudly brought

to you by HJC HELMETS

BMW MOTORRAD SOUTH AFRICA’S

NEW BOSS IS INTRODUCED AND

REVEALS A NEW BIKE

Recently, at the local media

launch of the new BMW R900R

& XR as well as the all new

S1000XR we were introduced

to the new General Manager

of BMW South Africa, Penny

Sterley. Unfortunately we did not

get to chat to her t a lot, but will

rectify that pretty soon, all we

can tell you is that Penny brings

with her a wealth of experience

Penny Sterley is the new

General Manager at BMW

Motorad South Africa

and knowledge from the motor

industry that will stand her in very

good stead in her new position.

We wish her all success and look

forward to her doing great things

with Motorrad South Africa.

Her first official bit of business

was the unveiling of a completely

new bike in BMW’s range, the R18

Cruiser styled bike. A beautiful

retro looking BMW with designs

and colour schemes harking back

to the 1940’s and 50’s with a lot of

very nice details and a bunch of

new innovations all wrapped up

in the usual BMW technology and

quality. Sadly, we weren’t allowed

to ride it so we can’t say too much

more about it other than we are

looking forward to getting our

butts into the saddle soon.

Recently we got a little bit of the

lock down cabin fever and decided

to sneak out of Gauteng and go

call on dealers in Bloemfontien

and see how we could help

put there businesses back on

the map and quite frankly we

were really surprised to find a

thriving motorcycle industry in the

Our first stop was at BMW

Motorrad Bloemfontein,

still branded Sovereign

Motorrad for now and in

the process of falling in line

with BMW’s new corporate

identity. Headed up by

the very capable Stefan

Muller and his team of

Deon, Hano and Janice

they have absolutely

every new model available

from the Bavarian brand

on their showroom floor

along with all the BMW kit,

accessories and a state

of the art workshop. And,

for all you travelers that

need a bit of assistance

or just want to pop in for

a lekker cup of hot coffee

on your journey, they are

about 1 km just off the N1

at Nelson Mandela road.

The dealership is relatively

newly built with all the

modern amenities one

has come to expect from

the BMW brand and

well stocked with most

WHAT’S HAPPENING IN

BLOEMFONTEIN?

BMW MOTORRAD

BLOEMFONTEIN

“Platteland”. Firstly, it must be said

that the central Free State is a

really beautiful part of our country

and really worth a visit or at least

a day or two stopover on your

mad rush to the Cape for your

holidays, you will be pleasantly

surprised. We often do a one

night stop over in the little hamlet

everything you could need.

The team is is passionate,

very friendly and incredibly

knowledgeable and they

make a mean cappuccino.

Pop in at 8 CP

Hoogenhout street,

Langenhoven Park,

Bloemfontien for a lekker

visit and a chat with the

guys or for your new

Beemer. You can also

give them a call on 051

400 0000. They are quite

happy to do you a deal

over the phone and deliver

countrywide … for a small

fee obviously. You could

even e-mail them detailed

photo’s of your trade in for

a preliminary assessment

at sovereign@bmwdealer.

co.za or just surf the net to

www.Bmw-sovereign.co.za

Also check out their advert

in our magazines to see

their great selection of

high quality pre-owned

machines for sale.

of Gariep heading down to and

coming back from the Cape and it

is possibly the part of the trip that

we look forward to the most and

have always promised to make

the Central free State an actual

holiday destination, rather than

just something to be endured on

our trip to the Cape.

The friendly team at Motorrad Bloemfontien

from left to right is Deon, Hano, Janice and

manager Stephen

18 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 19


All the NEWS proudly brought

to you by HJC HELMETS

AMPHIBIA SUZUKI

M&M, that is what they

call themselves - Not the

“Wrapper” (intentionally

mispelled so I don’t puke …

freakin’ hate that talentless

noise), but like the

candy … eye candy really.

Michelle and Michelle are

the bubbly ladies that

run Amphibia Suzuki and

Michelle tells us that their

secret is a straight up

good relationship with their

customers and excellent

customer service. They

are the official agents for

Suzuki Motorcycles in the

Central Free State as

well as one of two SYM

agencies in town. Besides

the two motorcycle

brands they also stock top

brands like Bridgestone,

Dunlop, Michelin, Pirelli,

DID, Regina, SBS along

with a good range of

helmets, jackets, gloves,

boots and much, much

more. On the service side

they have a well equipped

and staffed professional

workshop that can do

whatever needs to be

done to keep your pride

and joy in tip top condition

and they are willing to

work on just about every

motorcycle under the sun,

they also do dyno tuning,

so you can squeeze that

extra bit of horsepower

out of your steed for the

amazingly good roads in

and around Bloemfontien.

Interesting fact, Michelle

“Boss Lady” Kritzinger’s

brother owns and runs

Amphibia Bethlehem and

are also Suzuki agents

as well as agents for

Honda Wing, Polaris and

Linhai. So biking runs in

the family, and if you’re

into motorcycles that is a

good family to do business

with. Pop in for a visit at

100 Oliver Tambo Road,

Bloemfontien Central, or

give them a call on 051

430 5525

M & M not like the Wrapper, but like the (eye)

candy. Michelle & Michelle the two bubbly ladies

at Amphibia Suzuki & SYM

SALLEYS YAMAHA/

KAWASAKI/SYM

Owned and managed by

the timeless and ageless

Petrol Head Alec Salley

who seems to have found

the proverbial ‘Fountain of

Youth’ and it is called ‘riding

motorcycles’. Alec is one of

the longest standing Yamaha

dealerships in South Africa

and is incredibly well stocked

on everything Yamaha. From

bikes, to golf carts, power

products, jet ski’s, the coolest

Yamaha kit and … I’m pretty

sure if you ask really nicely he

might even be able to sort

you out with some pretty

cool sound equipment and

musical instruments … but

only if you ask really, really

nicely. It goes without saying

that they carry a serious

amount of service parts

and accessories as well

for anything Yamaha and

that they have a top notch

service centre and workshop

on the premises. Now,as if

that wasn’t enough, about

two years ago or so they

also acquired the Kawasaki

and SYM agencies for the

Central Free State. Now

having being employed

within the Kawasaki group

in another life, I can tell you

that they don’t just sommer

award their agencies to just

anybody. You really have to

be a mover and shaker in the

motorcycle industry to be

considered to represent any

of the KMSA groups brands.

And as with the Yamaha

brand, Salleys is well stocked

on everything Kawasaki,

including SYM and Bikewise,

(KMSA’s hot shot aftermarket

division), and a lot more parts

and accessories than you

might believe possible for a

little ‘platteland dorpie’. I have

only seen a few dealers in

Gauteng, the “financial hub”

of our beautiful country, as

well stocked on accessories

as Salleys, to be honest I

was properly gobsmacked

at their stock on hand. Alec

Salleys just shrugged his

shoulders and said, “if we

have it , we will sell” and that

is the truth. I remember

standing in a small dealership

a few years back with very

little stock on the shelves

and the owner bemoaning

how tough the industry is

when a potential customer

stuck his nose through the

security and said, “Oh! I see

you don’t have any stock,

can you direct me the the

closest dealership with stock,

I need to buy a helmet now.”

The owner of the shop told

that customer that he could

have whatever he needed

by the next afternoon but

the customer was adamant

that he wanted to buy

that afternoon. Sadly that

particular dealership closed

down a short while later. But,

I digress, get down to 55

Nelson Mandela Drive, (yup

… the same one that brings

you off the N1), City Centre,

Bloemfontein or give them

a call on 051 430 3326 for

absolutely anything you might

need motorcycle wise.

20 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 21


All the NEWS proudly brought

to you by HJC HELMETS

ORANGE COUNTY KTM/HUSQVARNA

BLOEMFONTEIN

At 51 Nelson Mandela dive, CBD, Bloemfontein. And

if that sounds like it might be really close to Salleys

Yamaha, Kawasaki and SYM, well that is because it is

right next door, in the same building just about. Strange

you might think … again. Well not when you realise that

it is owned by the very same Mr Alec Salley from next

door in partnership with his nephew Dave. Alec is most

of the money and the business acumen behind the

dealership and Dave is the passion driven force behind

the two brands. Walking into Orange County KTM, there

is no mistaking you are in an ‘true orange blooded’

KTM dealership with the full KTM family identity in place

and hoards of orange bikes everywhere, lota of KTM

Powerwear and accessories and perfectly situated close to

the riding Nirvana that is the mountain kingdom of Lesotho.

As per the KTM norm, there is a big glass window so you

can see into the pristine laboratory that is the workshop

and service centre. The staff are all passionate about the

brand, incredibly knowledgeable, efficient and very friendly.

Take a few steps across to the other side of the showroom

floor and a world of pristine white, yellow and blue awaits

you. Salley’s Husqvarna carries all the models in the

Husqvarna range with a good selection of clothing and

accessories and all the service parts you could ever need.

Maybe not as big and a s brash the orange brand, but that

is not Husqvarna’s style, but well stocked and supported

nevertheless. So, if you’re on your way to a great riding

weekend and need stock up on a few bits and bobs you

might have forgotten or are just looking for a really good

deal, give Orange County KTM/Salley’s Husqvarna a call

on 051 447 2658 or pop in at 51 Nelson Mandela drive,

CBD, Bloemfontien.

HONDA WING

CENTRAL

So, Nelson Mandela Drive, Bloemfontein

does seem to be the address to have if you

are a motorcycle dealership in the Central

Free State. After a fantastic day visiting all

the really nice people that keep the wheels

of the motorcycle industry turning in the

heart of South Africa out final stop before

jumping back onto the N1 north and aiming

for the distant smog that is Gauteng we

stopped in at 132 Nelson Mandela Drive in

the CBD of Bloemfontein and the home of

Honda Wing Central. Now! I must say this,

the little corner shop frontage belies the

wonder that hides behind the glass doors.

Fatigued from being on the road since 5am

and still a little astounded from last stop, I

really wasn’t really expecting too much when

I pulled up in front of the ‘little’ Honda shop

on the corner. Most Honda Wing dealerships

are attached to their car dealerships, and

seemingly under duress by the way some

of them are stocked and shoved into a

corner with little to no accessories, soul or

personality in a lot of instances which is

really quite sad for such an iconic brand and

the passionate team that is the driving force

behind Honda Wing SA.

Smiley, happy people ... are waiting

to help you at Honda Wing Central,

from left to right is Marinus the

manager, Johan and Moses

22 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 23


All the NEWS proudly brought

to you by HJC HELMETS

K&N Style Filters

Available sizes 28, 35, 39, 42, 48,

52, 54 and 60mm R125.00

8000Ma

Jump Starter & Power Bank R1299.00

18L / min

RAC610 Inflator R449.00 RTG5 Gauge R249.00

Bike and ATV Covers

Available sizes S - XL

From R270.00

Ring Globes

H7 150% Power R330.00

H4 150% Power R290.00

EMGO Top Box

R990.00

FIRE IT UP! CELEBRATES 4TH

BIRTHDAY WITH HUGE BASH

A Grand Carnival at Fire It Up: Satrurday the 1st

of August 2020 and the weather is more akin

to a mid summer’s day, perfect weather for a

carnival to launch the new, bigger, better Fire It

Up! on Main Rd, Bryanston and the entire biking

community came out to play. The last time we

saw a bike shop this busy was many, many years

ago which bodes well for the Industry. Craig and

his team pulled out all the stops with some great

specials on the day, lucky draws on the hour and

just a lot of good and exciting things going on the

whole day. The specials were that good that the

queue to the till was longer than any we had seen

outside our local bottle stores a few months ago.

Congratulations to Craig and the entire Fire It Up!

team, we wish you all success I your new home

and we do hope that this carnival becomes an

annual event on the biking calendar.

24 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020

DESCRIPTION PART NO. SRP Inc. Vat

SMART CHARGER 1 AMP DFC150 R599.00

SMART CHARGER 3.5 AMP DFC530 R899.00

SMART CHARGER 4 AMP PSA004 R999.00

SMART CHARGER 8 AMP PSA008 R1349.00

SAFE.

AFFORDABLE.

QUALITY.

SMART CHARGER 4 AMP PSD004 R1199.00

SMART CHARGER 8 AMP PSD008 R1499.00

R110.00 R465.00

Tubeless Puncture Kits

RRP R3299 incl

License Disc Holders

R168.00

RRP R4499 incl

Bar Ends

R100.00

GAUTENG

ZEEMANS GAUTENG MOTORCYCLES 011 435 7177

BIKING ZEEMANS ACCESSORIES MOTORCYCLES 012 011 435 342 7177 7474

FAST BIKING KTM ACCESSORIES 011 012 867 342 0092 7474

GAME FAST KTM MOTOR SERVICES 011 849 867 7000 0092

MOTO-MATE GAME MOTOR RIVONIA SERVICES 011 234 849 5275 7000

MOTO-MATE EDENVALE RIVONIA 011 234 027 5275 0545

MOTO-MATE KCR MOTORCYCLE EDENVALE FANATIX 011 975 027 5405 0545

PRIMROSE JUST BIKING MOTORCYCLES 011 016 828 421 9091 1153

RANDBURG KCR MOTORCYCLE MOTORCYCLES FANATIX 011 792 975 6829 5405

OFF-ROAD CYCLES 012 333 6443

PRIMROSE MOTORCYCLES 011 828 9091

MPUMALANGA

RANDBURG MOTORCYCLES

BIKE CITY

011 792 6829

013 244 2143

MPUMALANGA

BIKE CITY 013 244 2143

Hand Guards

Various Colours available

ABS Plastic R470.00

Alloy R990.00

Scooter V Belts

From R110.00

Tyre Levers

From R95.00

Rim Locks Front and Rear

From R48.00

Jerry Cans

From R450.00

Fork Boots

from R120.00

RRP R4999 incl

AVAILABLE NOW FROM DEALERS BELOW.

PBA DEALER LISTING

PBA DEALER LISTING

NORTHWEST

BIKERS NORTHWEST PARADISE 018 297 4700

INSANE BIKERS PARADISE BIKERS 014 018 594 297 2111 4700

MOTOS INSANE @ BIKERS KLERKSDORP 014 018 594 468 2111 1800

MOTOS WATER RITE @ KLERKSDORP MOTORCYCLES 018 468 771 1800 5050

WATER RITE MOTORCYCLES 018 771 5050

LIMPOPO

K.R.MOTORCYCLES LIMPOPO

015 297 3291

K.R.MOTORCYCLES 015 297 3291

KZN

ROCKET RACING PINETOWN 031 702 2606

PERRY’S M/CYCLES BALITO 031 110 0056

ROCKET RACING MARITZBURG 033 264 3240

ROCKET RACING PINETOWN 031 702 2606

RBS YAMAHA 031 701 1311

ROCKET RACING MARITZBURG 033 264 3240

UMPLEBY SUZUKI 031 303 8323

RBS YAMAHA 031 701 1311

UMPLEBY SUZUKI 031 303 8323

PART NO. DESCRIPTION PRICE

50081406/L CARB CLEANER 400ML 50.00

50201414/L TERMINAL PROTECT RED 50.00

50201415/L TERMINAL PROTECT BLUE 50.00

50320400/L BRK,CLTCH,CHAIN CLEANER 44.00

50500192/L CHAIN LUBE 150ML 34.00

50500193/L CHAIN LUBE 400ML 69.00

50510403/L CHAIN WAX 400ML 71.00

50510404/L CHAIN WAX 150ML 34.00

51528262/L PETROL INJECTOR CLEANER 10.00

53203200/L AIR FILTER SPRAY 55.00

53203500/L AIR FILTER OIL 500ML 55.00

53204005/L BIO FILTER CLEANER 5l 325.00

53204400/L BIO FILTER CLEANER 400ML 47.00

53780300/L SPARK 300ML 44.00

55000314/L TYRE FIX 200ML 45.00

56000001/L FORK OIL SYN 5W 125.00

56000002/L FORK OIL SYN 10W 125.00

56000003/L FORK OIL SYN 2.5W 135.00

56000400/L MOUSSE LUBRICANT 100.00

RIDE HIGH WITH YAMAHA 035 789 1851

RIDE PERRY HIGH M/CYCLES WITH YAMAHA GLEN ANIL 035 031 789 566 1851 7411

PERRY’S M/CYCLES UMHLANGA 031 566 7411

PERRY’S CAPE PROVINCE M/CYCLES HILLCREST

CRAIGS M/CYCLE FITMENT

031 765 2560

021 939 8944

CAPE TRAC-MAC PROVINCE BELVILLE 021 945 3724

CRAIGS TRAC-MAC M/CYCLE PAARDEN-EILAND FITMENT 021 939 510 8944 2258

TRAC-MAC BELVILLE WYNBURG

021 945 761 3724 4220

NEVES TRAC-MAC MOTORCYCLE PAARDEN-EILAND WORLD CC 021 930 510 5917 2258

TRAC-MAC WICKED CYCLES WYNBURG 021 510 761 2968 4220

MIKE HOPKINS MOTORCYCLES 021 461 5167

NEVES FREESTATE MOTORCYCLE WORLD CC

SALLEYS YAMAHA

FREESTATE

021 930 5917

051 430 3326

SALLEYS YAMAHA 051 430 3326


PADDOCK NEWS

Brought to you by

MARQUEZ SETS ESPARGARO

PODIUM TARGET AS HRC TEAMMATE

Repsol Honda’s reigning MotoGP

champion Marc Marquez has

suggested Pol Espargaro will have

to be a podium finisher when he

joins Honda Racing Corporation

(HRC) in 2021, replacing rookie

brother Alex Marquez in the

factory organisation.

With Alex shifting across to the

LCR Honda team as part of a

factory contract extension in place

of Cal Crutchlow next year, Marc

Marquez welcomed the arrival of

Espargaro from KTM to Honda,

but has set high expectations for

him to avoid ‘a disaster’.

“I always respect Honda’s decision

because they try to choose the

best for the team and the riders,”

Marquez commented. “Next year

I will have a different teammate,

last year I had a different

teammate but, of course, the

special moment that we had in

Valencia with Jorge [Lorenzo],

Honda was looking for the best

rider available – the Moto2 world

champion, Alex.

“This year he’s in the Repsol Honda

team, but next year in LCR. That’s

a good move for him because

being in a Repsol Honda team

means being on the podium. For

a normal rookie rider the normal

step is to start with a team like

LCR and good for him that he’ll get

all the support from HRC.

“And I’m happy to share the

team with Pol next year. It will

be interesting to see the level

of KTM and Honda and being in

the Repsol Honda team means

being on the podium. If not, it’s a

disaster, so I’m happy with the

situation.

“Cal gives a lot of input to Honda

and HRC. He’s been in the HRC

family for many years with all

the official support. It’s Honda’s

decision, but it’s always sad when

you see somebody moving from

the team but in this case it’s my

brother, so it’s okay.”

Espargaro won the 2013 Moto2

World Championship after finishing

runner-up to Marc Marquez the

previous year, but has one single

podium in the premier class that

he picked up in Valencia at the

end of 2018. His best finish in the

MotoGP standings was eighth with

Yamaha’s satellite effort in 2016,

prior to transferring to the works

KTM project in 2017.

“It’s been a long confinement with

a lot of up and downs, quite big

decisions and a lot of emotions in

between,” Espargaro explained. “In

the end, to ride against or with the

best rider currently on the grid, it’s

difficult to say no. And in a world

champion team and factory, it’s

difficult to say no.

“I’m 29 years old and, like

everyone, I want the maximum

from MotoGP. I think in the short

term to move in this factory is

going to be super-exciting, but at

the moment we are just at the

beginning of this year, so it’s time

to start racing and enjoy this last

year with KTM where I still think I

can do something very great.”

26 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020


PADDOCK NEWS

Brought to you by

RETURNING MELANDRI NAMED CAMIER

REPLACEMENT AT BARNI RACING

Veteran Italian Marco Melandri

will come out of retirement to

replace Leon Camier at Barni

Racing team aboard Ducati

machinery when the Superbike

World Championship (WorldSBK)

resumes next weekend.

Camier sustained a shoulder injury

during winter testing at MotorLand

Aragon, unable to complete

any of the three races at Phillip

Island’s opening round of the 2020

season earlier this year.

The extended break has given

Camier a chance to recover, but

following on from the Misano

test, both rider and team felt he

needed more time to get back

to 100 percent fully fit. With a

condescended calendar of six

races in just over two months, both

Camier and Barni Racing decided

to part ways given the lack of

recovery time between rounds.

That move has instead opened

the doors for 37-year-old Melandri

to return, less than a year after his

send-off at Qatar’s 2019 season

finale in October. He finished ninth

in the final championship standings

with GRT Yamaha last season.

“The situation was quite surreal,”

Melandri admitted. “In normal

conditions I never thought I’d

come back, then it seemed like

fate chose me. This long and

quiet period has regenerated me

and made me slip away all the

negative things I was focusing on

before. Then one by one, almost

incredible situations lined up – not

having had the chance to ride the

Ducati Panigale V4 R was a regret

and now the opportunity is there.

“On the Barni Racing Team’s bike

there is Showa suspension and

since MotoGP period I always have

felt great with those products. It’s

going to be a championship with

only six rounds, all in Europe on

tracks that I like, so it’s going to be

a limited and time-focused effort.

“If there was anyone who could

convince me to come back it was

Marco Barnabo. I think the Barni

Racing Team is the right team for

me, a small family where there

is a desire to grow, but also to

have fun working with passion. I

would also like to thank Claudio

Domenicali, Paolo Ciabatti, Gigi

Dall’Igna and the whole Ducati

team for this opportunity.”

Team principal Marco Barnabo

added: “After all that happened,

we needed an experienced rider

who already knew the tracks, the

tyres and the championship. Marco

showed great enthusiasm and

a great desire to get back in the

game, this approach persuaded us

that he’s the right choice.

“His value is not debated and,

tests aside, he only did one race

less than the others – it is as if he

never stopped. We believe that in

a strange scenario like that, he can

be an added value and Ducati also

supported us in this choice.”

The MIE Racing Althea Honda

Team have also made a change

to their line-up for the remainder

of the season, as Italian rider

Lorenzo Gabellini will join the team

alongside Takumi Takahashi in

place of Jordi Torres, who had

been signed for 2020.

In addition, reigning World

Supersport champion Randy

Krummenacher recently made

the shock decision to quit the MV

Agusta Reparto Corse. Swiss rider

Krummenacher had tested the

Barni Racing Ducati at Misano in

late May with promising results,

but didn’t secure the seat vacated

by Camier.

28 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020


TYRE TECH TALK

by Bruce de Kock, owner of Bike Tyre Warehouse Midrand

ALL THE PREMIUM BRANDS

THAT COUNT UNDER ONE ROOF

I wrote a couple of months back about

the new Dunlop Trail Max Mission

50/50 adventure tyres and while busy I

made a mental note to do a scribble on

their road range as there has not been

much written on their road range which

is not small by any means we are just

restricted to what the distributor brings

into SA from the full range of offerings.

Again, I have not personally ridden or

tested any of the four that I am going

to include in the spread I have chosen

to kick off with their basic road product

the Sportmax GPR300 to the high end

Q4 hyper sport tyre.

The GPR300 is described as a radial

tyre that offers well balanced sport

performance for a variety of sport bikes

featuring an optimized construction to

enhance handling and responsiveness

for street going sport commuter riding.

The advanced belt design and (JLB)

jointless band construction utilizes a

continuously would belt for smooth

performance and a consistent tyre

contact patch, the aggressive sport

derived tread pattern for enhanced on

- bike appearance. A product ideal for

your everyday commute.

GPR300 Sportmax

Moving onto their Sport Touring

Sportmax Roadsmart 111 an offering

Dunlop says offers sport touring riders

ultra-high mileage with sport bike

level grip. Outstanding wet weather

performance and great overall handling

add to this tyre’s versatility. Dunlop’s

exclusive MT (Multi Tread) design binds

a high – mileage compound to the

centre and high-adhesion compound to

the lateral flanks for cornering grip.

The new side wall construction helps

provide superior shock absorption and

precise handling, the new compounds

include an innovative resin that

increases wet weather grip, so maybe

a tyre to look at when you are next

fitting rubber to your sport tourer.

Sportmax Roadsmart 111

Now onto the high-speed knee down

rubber that starts to get me excited

namely the Sportmax Q3+ a tyre

Dunlop reckons is the ultimate in hyper

sport tyre performance for serious sport

and track day riders. Obviously written

before the launch of the Q4 but we will

get into that tyre just now.

Dunlop really pushes the tyre life

point on this tyre as with all hyper

sport tyres mileage is not one of the

attributes for obvious reasons. The

Q3+ was designed and is produced in

the Buffalo plant in the USA using the

same high-tech production equipment

as Dunlop’s racing tyres. The Carbon

fibre technology (CFT) employed in the

Q3+ uses carbon fibre reinforcement

in the tyre side walls for exceptional

cornering performance and feel.

The Q3+ rear tyre uses a silica-infused,

long wearing compound in the centre

Tel: 011 205 0216 • Cell: 073 777 9269 / 083 467 1349

Unit 9 Sable Park, 997 Richards Drive, Midrand

Facebook @BikeTyreWarehouse • Twitter @biketyrewhse

www.biketyrewarehouse.com


TYRE TECH TALK

by Bruce de Kock, owner of Bike Tyre Warehouse Midrand

ALL THE PREMIUM BRANDS

THAT COUNT UNDER ONE ROOF

of the tread for longer tread life and

special lateral grip compounds o the left

and right shoulders for outstanding grip.

Q3+

The Sportmax Q4 a bold look, bold

performance for riders with balls, this

is a proven purpose-built track day

tyre that achieves lean angles up to 62

degrees. A Big Win it is DOT approved

for street legal use so for the road racing

boys a logical choice, why because you

don’t require tyre warmers, you run

them at street inflation pressures which

eliminates the need for electronic or

chassis adjustments.

The carbon fibre reinforcement in the

side walls creates exceptional cornering

performance and feel.

The rears contain carbon black like

Dunlop’s race slicks for maximum grip

at full lean angle and with Dunlop’s

claimed IRP i.e. Intuitive Response

Profile which is like the tyre knowing

what you are thinking.

Anyway four Dunlop tyre options

available whether you are a sport

commuter, sport tourer, sport rider or

a fast gun track / road racer there is a

tyre in this article for you and with Bike

Tyre Warehouses Dunlop Campaign

kicking off on the 1st August you are

guaranteed to get any of these tyre

set ups for a great price as well as

standing in line to WIN one of four lids

just by buying a set during August or

September so get down to a Bike Tyre

Warehouse branch – Midrand; Port

Elizabeth or George and stake your claim

on some Dunlop rubber.

Its getting warmer and more bikes are

getting back out onto the roads around

the country, so if your bike has been

standing in the garage for a few months

make sure you give it a full inspection as

well as checking the condition of your

tyres and tyre pressures before you ride

out and open up the throttle.

Take care out there…

Bruce

Tel: 011 205 0216 • Cell: 073 777 9269 / 083 467 1349

Unit 9 Sable Park, 997 Richards Drive, Midrand

Facebook @BikeTyreWarehouse • Twitter @biketyrewhse

www.biketyrewarehouse.com


||| PRODUCTS FEATURE ||| PRODUCTS FEATURE

TRICKBITZ HAS A

FEW CLEARANCE

ITEMS FOR

SUPERBIKES:

Visit www.trickbitz.co.za to check out all the really cool

and handy bits and bobs they supply for most bikes

on the market or give them a call on 011 672 6599.

In the meantime, here are a few great items we

thought were quite handy:

IRC Tyre Warmers at never to be repeated prices.

With this winter being a particularly cold one it

is difficult to get your tyres up to track Riding

temperatures, especially early in the morning and

this is where a decent tyre warmer comes into play.

Generally a pricey item for the average man in the

street to buy, however Trickbitz has a few IRC tyre

warmers left in small, medium, large and extra large

sizes and are selling at never to be repeated prices....

R2600 gets you these top-of the line items, perfect

for track use. Spend more time riding and less time

worrying about tyre temperatures and the impact on

your wallet …

GPT Speedo’s and gear indicators to clear:

GPT digital gear indicators are compact lightweight

module which gives a bright display of the gear you

are currently in. The system works on any vehicles

with electronic rpm and speedometer or with analog

tachometer dashboard and can be fitted easily in

a convenient position. We looked at 2 models, the

SP2001 Universal with speed sensor and the SP2001

GPS Universal with GPS module which are both

universal fitment speedometers for a very diverse

and wide application on anything from all types

of motorcycles and ATV’s, cars, boats and even in

industry on cranes, fork lifts and basically anything

that has a power source. Some of the devices use a

speed sensor with Hall effect that means you don’t

need a magnet on the wheel to count, or they use

the GPS antenna at 10 Hz and are very easy and

simply to use and fit requiring only a power supply.

From a basic speedometer to multifunctional unit

to suit any application. They are also designed to

be waterproof for use on all Motorcycles, Cars and

boats. The SP2001 and SP2001GPS Speedo’s are

a universal in their application for speed and can

be set to either Kmh or Mph with total trip distance

and trip master. They also have a re-settable digital

‘watch speed’ alert as well as a maintenance/service

reminder alert. It has a white back light and comes in

12 volt and 24 volts options and available with speed

sensor Hall effector GPS antenna at 10Hz. The unit

is reasonably compact at the following dimensions

102mm wide x 57mm high x 18mm deep with a

very nominal weight of only 90 grams and is really

easy to mount using 12 or 24 volts DC using a 3 wire

connection requiring a permanent live, a switched live

and a negative/ground wire.

Then, last but not least. Are you tired of battling to

find the correct sprockets and chain combinations?

Trickbitz also stocks the Chiarvalli range of sprocket

and chain sets. The kit includes the correct standard

front and rear gearing as well as a high quality chain

that is sized to exactly the correct length which means

there is no need to cut the chain making the kit very

convenient and easy to use. Available at dealers.

Check out www.trickbitz.co.za for plenty more

speedo’s, gear position indicators, chain and sprocket

options, tail guards, screens and son much more. Or

follow them on Facebook @trickbitzz or on Instagram

at Trickbitz_cc

KTM

RADICAL

SCOOTER

This super cool little scoot is a official

KTM product and is now available

from RAD KTM for only R2322. It

features Height adjustable handlebar,

Foldable aluminium handlebar, Nonslip

tread with Griptape, Foot brake

and side stand and can be loaded up

to approximately 100 kg. Oh yes, and

it fold up nicely.

34 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 3 5


||| PRODUCTS FEATURE

NASIOL - NANO TECHNOLOGY

FOR YOUR BIKE, LID AND KIT

We came across some really cool products recently and

decided to try a few of them out. They are various forms

of surface protection based on nano technology and just

that fact intrigued us.

The first product that grabbed our attention is the NASIOL

GoGlide which is a product that can be applied to goggles,

visors and even your favourite pair of sunshades and etc.

to keep your vision absolutely clear while riding. GoGlide

should significantly extend the life of your goggle lenses,

helmet visors and even your sun shades and spectacles as

it adheres to the surface and protects it from the abrasive

nature of cleaning off bugs, dust, mud and etc … We have

only just applied the product, so we will report back in a

few months.

Next up, we tried the NASIOL GlasShield nano rain

repellent on our windshields. We haven’t had much rain

lately but did try simulate rain with a hose pipe and it

does seem to work. The label on the box says that one

application should last at least 2 years or 45,000km’s of

driving. So, what does it do? Well, its stops moisture,

rain and etc sticking to your windshield allowing the

airflow over your windshield to disperse most of the

water without having to use the wipers, even in a serious

downpour apparently. We will wait for the rainy season

to test it properly and report back.

And our finally we tried the NASIOL BugFilm temporary

liquid film treatment .It is a temporary plastic based film

that protects your vehicle or motorcycle from bug stains

and minor stone chips during long trips. Now, this is very

interesting to us, especially with demo bikes. Very often

we will do longish trips on the bikes and inevitably end

up murdering millions of bugs on the front of the fairings,

mirrors and etc. And after a day out on the bike they dry

and almost fuse into the shiny new paintwork making

it almost impossible to clean the bike properly without

scratching the paint. Meaning more often than not we

generally hand the test bikes back still quite dirty from the

ride in fear of scratching the paintwork while trying to clean

it, so I think this product is going to get a good work out

with us. We will be putting these products through their

paces in the next few weeks and will report back.

For more info and plenty of other interesting products surf

the net to www.nasiol.com or give the local guys a shout

on 079 878 4487, (Jenny) or 084 267 2422, (Hennie) or

drop Jenny a line on jenny.pike@epiktrading.com. Dealer

inquiries are also welcome on the same contact details.

Nice bunch of people with great products, give them a call.

36 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020


What happens when you take

the fairings off one of the

best superbikes in the world

to date? You get one of the

best naked sportbikes in the

world to date - welcome to SA

Ducati Streetfighter V4.

Words: Donovan Fourie | Pics: Beam Productions

38 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 3 9


“On paper and in the flesh

the new Streetfighter

is a true beauty and

as expected from just

looking at it, and reading

the specs sheet, it’s

everything I expected it

to be - sensational!”

Rob says

When Ducati unveiled the first Panigale 1199

in 2012, the question that emanated shortly

afterwards was: “When the hell are we getting a

Streetfighter version?”

The same words were repeated in 2015

with the 1299 Panigale and again with the V4,

although more feverishly because at that stage

the Streetfighter didn’t exactly exist anymore.

The previous incarnation of this model ran from

2009 until 2012 with the 1098 motor and, as far

as performance is concerned, it was shockingly

good – a claimed horsepower output of 192 put

it well in the lead of the naked world.

Where it was somewhat lacking was

everywhere else. It had much the same seating

position as a superbike combined with zero

wind protection, so it missed the performance

of a superbike on the grounds of having the

aerodynamic efficiency of a brick while having

the comfort level of a breezy superbike. It’s no

wonder Ducati cut its production lifeline in 2015.

And now we have a new one, graced with the

Desmosedici Stradale motor that is the lovechild

of a MotoGP bike and Thor, the god of thunder.

The thought of a massive 208hp shoved into a

frame that would previously have been deemed

the size of a buzz bike is enough to ignite many

happy feelings in many happy places in all semisane

human beings.

Although, the previous model also led the way in

naked nuclear bravado, yet saw declining sales and

an untimely death. Even more so here in Sunny

South Africa where we don’t live in cupboards

stacked upon each other and must travel more

than 10km before we find another language. Would

the V4 version suffer the same fate?

And so, after what seems like an age, the

Streetfighter V4 graced the pits of Red Star

Raceway, idling angrily. Much like the Panigale

superbike version, the Desmosedici Stradale

has a twin quality to its sounds, harking back to

a couple of years ago when Ducati was still all

“Where it was somewhat lacking was

everywhere else. It had much the same

seating position as a superbike combined

with zero wind protection, so it missed the

performance of a superbike on the grounds

of having the aerodynamic efficiency of a

brick while having the comfort level of a

breezy superbike.”

40 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 41


about twins. It’s idling gets even

more twin-like when it gets hot,

and the rear bank of cylinders

stops firing – making it a literal

twin – in an attempt to curb legscorching

heat from the motor

while riding through town.

The looks of the Streetfighter

resemble artistry from a decade

ago when Photoshop design

gurus attempted to predict how

futuristic motorcycles would look.

The angry, robotic headlights glare

out of the shadows of the pits,

accompanied by the silhouette

of double wings spiking out of its

shoulders.

It looks homicidal but not

exactly beautiful. We suspect

some heated negotiations were

going on, accompanied by loud

voices and arm waving as is the

way with effervescent Italians,

between the design department

and the engineers. Engineers are

hellbent on creating the highest

performance possible while the

designers want unrivalled beauty.

Very often, the two are somewhat

mutually exclusive, especially with

a naked bike that displays more

engineering than design.

With that, South African backsides

rested upon its svelte, racing seat

and it set off down pitlane.

Where Ducati has undoubtedly

paid attention is with the

complaint that the previous

Streetfighter tended to leave its

rider permanently disabled, and

have graciously sought to avoid

such things. The handlebars on

the SF V4 are graciously high while

the footpegs have been lowered

slightly compared to the superbike

equivalent, creating a gloriously

“Where Ducati

has undoubtedly

paid attention is

with the comfort

complaint that

the previous

Streetfighter

tended to

leave its rider

permanently

disabled, and

have graciously

sought to avoid

such things.”

42 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 43


Images flash across the mind

of the little Scottish men running

the motor fleeing for cover

as the conrods lose the fight

against physics and send the

pistons smashing into the overworked

valves.

With these horrors seemingly

inevitable, the ears nudge the

eyes, who take a moment away

from the pending doom before

them, to glance at the revcounter

only to find it nudging just

11,000rpm.

“While the seating

position is void

of bodily harm,

the engine might

cause damage,

both physically

and emotionally.

It redlines at

14,500rpm; near

orbital in the

world of lowerspeed

naked

tomfoolery.”

upright position and a

noticeable lack of permanent

spine injury.

It was a cold morning, one

that would have been a

problem for the likes of Pirelli’s

Supercorsa tyres but a doddle

for the Rosso Corsa 2s that

adorned the SF’s wheels. A

rider would have to push to

near lap record pace to find

their limit when hot, however,

it is when they are cold that

miracles happen; head out

of pitlane sans tyre warmer

assistance and put your knee

down in the first corner –

thank you Pirelli.

Beyond the first corner is the

back straight of Red Star – the

SF is fitted with gearing 10%

shorter than the Panigale, so

the hairpin preceding the back

straight can be handled in

second gear without snatching

and still supplies a massive

chunk of acceleration.

While the seating position is

void of bodily harm, the engine

might cause damage, both

physically and emotionally. It

redlines at 14,500rpm; near

orbital in the world of lowerspeed

naked tomfoolery.

Full throttle in second gear

overcomes the grippy seat and

sends the rider sliding helplessly

backwards as the electronics

battle to keep the front wheel

earth-bound as the speedo

shoots towards 200km/h. It’s

at this tense moment that the

rider’s eyes are concentrating

more on the ever more blurred

world in front of them, and less

on the TFT-colour rev-counter

bar filling up. The ears, however,

are still very much in sync with the

goings-on of the motor, and soon

reach the point where the revs

sound so high that bits of grey

matter begin leaking out, teeth

grind off chunks of enamel, and

every neurone in the body starts

screaming blue murder.

“Images flash across

the mind of the

little Scottish men

running the motor

fleeing for cover as

the conrods lose

the fight against

physics and send the

pistons smashing

into the overworked

valves.”

44 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 45


There’s still 3,500rpm to go.

Nervously trusting the Italian

engineers, the rev-counter carries

on its plight to redline without

the motor shooting pieces of

conrod out of the exhaust, and

the quick-shifter slips the gearbox

seamlessly into third gear where

the whole process starts again.

All the while, the front wheel

mostly behaves itself. In most

cases, this level of acceleration

would send it into uncontrollable

loop-de-loop spins and yet, here,

it merely hops now and then.

Much of this is down to the wheelie

control and its unnoticeable

intervention, but some of the

credit should surely go to those

double wings, similar to the ones

found on the current MotoGP bike,

gracing the side panels.

At 270km/h, the wings are

exerting 81Nm of torque

downwards. That’s a little less than

a Monster 821 at full tilt.

At the end of the straight, pull

the Brembo braking system and

let the auto-blip handle the downchanges,

while the Ohlins semiactive

suspension soaks up the

load on the front wheel.

Tip the bike into the turn and feel

the benefits of just 201kg.

Like most Super Nakeds, the SF

feels small – the bars sit close to

the rider and seem to disappear

from consciousness as the

rider gets busy dealing laps. It’s

a strange paradox, but usually,

when motorcycles feel small, light

and compact, they are implicitly

unstable. Either the compactness

is merely an illusion caused by

genius ergonomics or Ohlins is

at such a level that physics no

longer apply, but the bike tips in

effortlessly and then sits firmly in

the middle of the corner to such

a degree that the slightly lowered

footpegs start kissing the ground.

Most of the medium-paced

corners can be handled in either

second gear if the rider is very

precise with the throttle, or in

third gear for a smoother flow.

While the dimensions of the

motor remain the same as the

Panigale, the throttle mappings

have received a thorough go-over,

resulting in six horsepower being

knocked off the top of the dyno

curve but a big chunk more torque

being thrown in the midrange.

At the peak of the torque curve,

the SF pushes out 123Nm, but

70% of that is available from as

low as 4,000rpm. Compared to

some of its Super Naked peers,

the SF’s motor has an almost

gentle feel through the long bends

with the full fury being awakened

only when the throttle is full tap.

The concerns about the

Streetfighter was that Ducati is

making the same mistakes as

before, creating a motorcycle

that tops every performance goal

in the class, and yet is entirely

horrid to ride. Ducati has relied

on the Monsters range for years,

a product line that has been the

bread and butter for the Bologna

brand since the 90s.

The Monsters have embraced

the joy of twins combined with

a sporty attitude and liveable

character. The Streetfighter

was about naked sportiness

at all costs. It appears that the

philosophy has now changed – the

Monsters will continue making

people smile, continue serving and

continue the V-twin happiness.

The Streetfighter will now do

the same, except with that mad

MotoGP engine.

46 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 47


We put the new Ducati Streetfighter V4 up against its

main rivals in Super Naked category. Or are they now the

real “Superbikes” of the real world?

Words: Donovan Fourie | Pics: Beam Productions

48 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 4 9


“Here we have five of the

most exciting, liberating,

mischievous and downright

mental machines ever to

display a number plate at

Red Star Raceway.”

Who remembers a few years ago,

somewhere in the early 2010s,

2000s and before when had

things called naked bikes? Simply

put, a manufacturer would build a

cutting-edge superbike, strip the

fibre-glass clothing off of it and

present it as a naked bike.

Well, that’s what they should

have done. Instead, the

manufacturers took the sublime

engine out, removed the passion,

the joy and the fire from it,

frosted the press release with the

words “re-tuning the motor for

more torque” and then released

this soulless, empty shell of a

motorcycle to the public.

During one launch in the late

2000s, a manufacturer was

explaining how much better

this naked motorcycle with its

“re-tuned” motor was, and to

prove it they brought along the

superbike equivalent to compare

back-to-back, a mistake they

regretted when all 30 journalists

threw praise at the superbike

and ridicule at the vanilla naked

contraption.

That was until the Super Naked

was invented.

Here we have five of the most

exciting, liberating, mischievous

and downright mental machines

ever to display a number plate

at Red Star Raceway. We have

five experienced riders – Rob

Portman who you might have

heard of, Rob’s big little brother

Shaun, the glam of the racing

world Zoé Bosch and Sean Powell

who, despite working for Aprilia,

managed to stay genuinely

unbiased. And of course,

Donovan, who was charged with

hours of typing.

Enjoy.

KTM Super Duke

Rob made an interesting

comment when asked about

KTM’s Beast 3.0; he said:

“Surprising”.

Add a touch of awe to his

tone, and you may begin to

comprehend what this means.

Some context might help too –

usually, when we ride the Super

Duke, it is in isolation. We pick it up,

ride it for a few days on its own

with mounds smiles and giggles,

and then take it back.

The time spent with it is joyous

in every way – it touches you in all

happy places, both spiritually and

bodily. With mild tantrums, the SD

is returned to KTM, and then, as

time passes, doubt about its glory

seeps in. You feel Tuono’ surefootedness,

the ass-kicking of the Z

50 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 51


“Ever since its release all

those year’s ago, the KTM

1290 SD R has been the unruly,

naughty, never listens child in

the pack. Now, it’s had some

proper schooling and is the

teacher’s pet” Rob says.

makes little work of blasting

through them. With the renewed

throttle mappings, these blasts

do your bidding rather than

acting like an overactive Saint

Bernard on a weak leash.

Turning into corners has

renewed joy, too, thanks to

the reworked chassis. Previous

Super Dukes were better known

for their public road-handling

rather than as track weapons.

Turn-in was a touch hefty, and

the front had a somewhat vague

feeling that didn’t quite inspire

the confidence needed to test

old Newton his limits.

For 2020, such concerns are

not only gone but replace with

sublimity. It feels lighter on turn-in

than even the Streetfighter and

challenges both the Streetfighter

and the Tuono for mid-corner

supremacy.

The Super Duke was previously

an animal whose back only the

brave dared jump aboard. The

3.0 still keeps its animalistic

genetics, but they are now

meticulously trained to do

the rider’s bidding, making it a

formidable package indeed.

Never doubt the Super Duke.

KEY SPECS

Engine type: 1,301cc,Liquid

cooled, V-twin

Power: 180 horsepower

Torque: 140Nm

Wet Weight: 198 kg

Seat height: 835 mm

Base price: R265,999

H2, the S1000R’s competence and

the Streetfighter’s wonder, and

uncertainty raises its ugly head.

Even more so when you begin the

day at Red Star riding everything

else first – they all feel so good.

Perhaps the Super Duke is merely

a holiday romance, a love-filled

moment that cannot cope with the

transition into the real world?

Even with its new looks, that

give the alluring impression of a

predator waiting to pounce upon

its unsuspecting prey, that doubt

still manifests.

Finally, with heart-breaking

trepidation, you climb aboard the

Super Duke…

…and the rain of doubt

subsides, the clouds of insecurity

dissipate, and the sun of joy and

giggles returns.

As suspected, those 1301cc,

V-twin lungs feature heavily in its

arsenal of joy. A formidable 180hp

has its perks, but it isn’t classleading.

What makes the SD shine

is the 140Nm of torque, more

than 120Nm of which is available

from a little as 4,000rpm. The

result of this is profound – in Track

Mode, mileage from the front

tyre is drastically increased by it

very rarely touching the ground.

If you are unhappy with a triggerhappy

throttle, click the buttons

on the left handlebar to turn the

electronics up, and the problem

goes away.

The bits between corners –

largely known as straights – are

a joy, even the incomprehensibly

short ones within the flowing

Dogbone section at Red Star

where the vastness of torque

52 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 5 3


“Well the Z H2 is a treat

out on the road, it was

very much out-of-sorts

on the track - It’s like

putting Mike Tyson in a

beauty pageant.”

Rob says.

builds up to 208hp at 14,500rpm,

the Z H2 seemingly throws 197hp

and 137Nm of torque at you the

moment you open the throttle.

The only bone Kawasaki throws

you – like hunters giving their prey

a one minute head start – is the

eerily good wheelie control. Of the

five, it is the only motorcycle that

can be revved to the limiter in first

gear and still gain forward motion

– the rest are all the better with a

short-shift to second.

The impact of this was evident

during the speed test down the

back straight where the Kawasaki

was a full 7km/h faster than the

Streetfighter with accurate speed

measurement.

The ZH2 will not win any awards

for track prowess, but it might

take the crown for

road-going dominance. Here, that

mental motor comes into its own,

and the tall seating position, soft

suspension and lowered pegs

make it the least taxing on your

flesh and bones.

Foxes may be quick and

cunning, but that means nothing

when they are under the mighty

paw of a grizzly bear.

KEY SPECS

Engine type: 998cc, 4-stroke,

4-cylinder LC, supercharged

Power: 200 horsepower

Torque: 137Nm

Wet Weight: 239 kg

Seat height: 830 mm

Base price: R329,000

Kawasaki Z H2

There has to be a pang of

sympathy for the Z H2 because

it is not, in fact, a Super Naked.

Technically, it’s a Hyper Naked,

the one and only in its class, and

bringing it to a sinuous circuit like

Red Star among the other four

cornering elite is nothing less

than cruel – it’s like competing

with a group of wily foxes using a

grizzly bear.

While the others dart and skip

through corners on ballerina toes,

the lumpy H2 trips and rolls. As

Sean and Shaun put it: “While the

front wheel is exiting the turn, the

rear wheel is still on entry.”

Or as Zoé asked: “Did somebody

put Vaseline on these tyres?”

It’s big, it’s heavy, it’s soft, and

the footpegs touch the ground

before your knee does. It deserves

sympathy.

And all the while, the Z H2

couldn’t give a toss about you

and your stupid feelings. It’s a

Kawasaki, the maddest of all bike

makers, and it is a supercharged

Kawasaki at that. It doesn’t come

with sympathy, compassion or any

other emotion apart from pure,

liquid malice.

It’s about opening the throttle

and creating a vast quantity of

forwardness. The H2 is mega, the

H2 SX is mega in comfort mode,

while the Z H2 spits on your opinion,

and throws you a finger. The motor

has had some fettling designed

to offer more midrange torque. In

many cases, especially ten years

ago, this is code for “ruin it”.

Not in Kawasaki Land where the

engineers rub their hands together,

cackle to themselves and plot the

end of humankind. The H2 and

H2 SX will win a top speed race,

but until the top speed is reached,

the Z H2 will thunder forward with

its engine bare for all to see, its

supercharger whistling wildly and

its front wheel hovering.

It produces 197hp, a sizeable

11hp down on the Streetfighter, but

where the Ducati girds its loins and

54 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 55


Aprilia Tuono V4 1100RR

The Tuono has repeatedly won

awards for The Best Naked Bike of

the Year time and time again from

publications all over the world. It

was praised for the usability of its

65º V4 motor, the sharp handling

from Aprilia’s famous chassis knowhow

and electronics that were

celebrated as the Best in the World.

Times have changed, the

competition is afoot, and yet the

Tuono might still retain the King of

all Naked Bikes crown. Although, it

depends on who is providing the

accolades.

Based on the spec sheet, the

Tuono is taking nothing home but

a participation award. It produces

175hp and 121Nm of torque, figures

that beat only the BMW S1000R

on this day. The wet weight of

209kg is also some distance from

class-leading and can draw a sigh

of relief that the Z H2 was present

with all its extra metal, and a

weight of 239kg or it would have

been in trouble.

Even the outward appearance

of the Tuono is a little outdated – it

looks like an RSV4 superbike with

bits of fairing chopped off, and

that hasn’t changed for five years.

Moving off the spec sheet and

onto the race track, the Tuono

finds itself once more riddled with

problems. The first being that

it’s a little dull compared to its

whacky peers. The second is that

it clearly isn’t the fastest – down

the straight, it is 3km/h slower

than the Super Duke (that had to

short shift for two gears to stop

it flipping), 6km/h slower than the

Streetfighter V4 and a massive

13km/h slower than the Z H2. And

these bikes, with their standard

road gearing, struggled to reach

even fourth gear on Red Star’s

back straight. Top speed runs on

longer straights will reveal even

more significant gaps.

The handling is still excellent,

but the competition has caught

up – both the Streetfighter and

the Super Duke have raised the

bar somewhat, and thus tip into

corners at the slightest nudge of

the handlebar, something that

was previously the domain of only

the Tuono.

In these scenarios, things might

not look great for the Aprilia’s

faithful nudie, but as we said at

the beginning of the story, it might

yet take the crown.

Aprilia is famous for its chassis

design, a trait provided by the

university near the factory that

is world-renowned for its studies

in motorcycle frame design –

they wrote the book, literally.

Fittingly, then, the Tuono is ever so

confidence-inspiring, especially on

the front end; the most important

end on a motorcycle.

The motor helps too because

the Ducati needs to be revved to

the heavens and the Super Duke

still requires some delicacy with

its throttle. The Tuono is like Baby

Bear’s porridge – just right.

It’s very likely that, in the

right hands, the Super Duke

and Streetfighter will produce

quicker lap times. In the hands

of everyone else, the easygoing,

confidence-inspiring Tuono should

be King.

KEY SPECS

Engine type: 1077cc, Aprilia

longitudinal 65° V-4 cylinder

Power: 175 horsepower

Torque: 120Nm

Wet Weight: 185 kg

Seat height: 825 mm

Base price: R289,011

“Always a crowd-pleaser, and

the same can be said for the

new 1100 Tuono. Just all-round

satisfactory.” Rob says

56 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 57


BMW S1000R

Where we had sympathy for

the Z H2 and its steam train

handling, we can save a dollop

of compassion for the BMW

S1000R, the old man of the

group. It saw its last upgrade

way back in 2017 – an age in the

fast-paced world of motorcycle

updates.

Fittingly, the old man lacks

some modern tackle – the dash

has this weird round thing with an

odd pointy thing that moves to

indicate the revs, accompanied

by a black and white LCD screen

showing other bits like the speed.

There’s no sign of colour or TFTness

anywhere.

The wonky headlights were all

the rage in 2009, but nowadays

they seem a little silly, especially

next to the futuristic LED

illumination fitted to the 2020

S1000RR superbike.

The spec sheet, too, shows

little promise – the inline-four

motor pushes 165hp and 112Nm

of torque, putting it at the

bottom of the output table.

Things look dismal so far, but

it does take home one significant

award – the brains award.

On the track, the S1000R is

competent – the motor feels

stronger than the spec sheet

depicts, the handling is still very

much competitive, the electronics

package works with typical

German efficiency and the

ergonomics are some of the best.

It’s missing some of the latest

bells and whistles adorning the

kids, but it will show those little

whipper-snappers a thing or

two! And it will do it for a long

time, long after some of its other

European contemporaries have

long turned to dust because

that’s the German way.

And here’s the really brainy

part – it costs, in full spec,

R233,000, a massive R50,000

less than the next samespecced

motorcycle on the

day. More so, it could probably

be ridden incident-free for

five years and then sold for

something like R232,000.

It’s a new concept to the

speed-mongers that we are, but

maybe there’s something to this

whole brains thing.

KEY SPECS

Engine type: 999 cc Liquidcooled

4-stroke in-line

4-cylinder engine

Power: 165 horsepower

Torque: 114Nm

Wet Weight: 202 kg

Seat height: 820 mm

Base price: R233,000

“As far as value -for-money

goes, it’s hard to beat the

S1000R, but yes, the looks are a

bit dated now. Rob says

58 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 5 9


So in conclusion

Before the conclusion, a few

apologies – missing from this

list of extreme nakedness is

the Yamaha MT-10 and the MV

Agusta Brutale. The Yamaha,

despite its competency against

the full might of Europe, never

quite took off in South Africa and

is no longer available here. There

is a brand new 2020 MV Agusta

Brutale sitting on the showroom

floor of Fire It Up and it is a thing

of exquisite beauty and grace, so

much so that we couldn’t possibly

taint it by riding it around a track in

this test. Also, it costs in the region

of R500,000 and the thought of

crashing it is too much for the soul

to bear.

The others in the naked world

are affordable, dependable,

enjoyable and not quite super

enough. Apologies.

And so we dive headfirst

into the thankless world of

conclusions, where we answer

the fundamental question – which

Super Naked is best? The answer

is the same as whenever we are

asked the “which bike is best’

question – it depends on what

you want from it.

If you want lap times, the Ducati

Streetfighter is your best bet.

Ducati is a racing company –

even the janitor, we are sure, is a

club racer. The head of PR puts

photos on his Instagram account

of him elbow sliding around tracks

– true story! The MotoGP-inspired

motor will fill your soul and shorten

each straight, while the chassis will

carve up the corners. It is a naked

racer’s delight.

The KTM Super Duke wins the

giggle award. That amount of

torque and anger in a chassis that

is now one of the best in its class

will leave you chuckling for days,

both on the track and on the road.

The Everyday Man’s Bike Award

goes to the Aprilia Tuono with its

confident chassis and fast but not

overwhelming motor. Other bikes

will do quicker times at the hands

of a pro-racer, but your average

Joe will warm to the Tuono.

The Head-Case Award goes to

the Kawasaki Z H2 – seriously, a

supercharged 1000cc motor in a

naked bike? Only Kawasaki would

think that’s a good idea, and we

are eternally grateful for it. On the

track, it is a handful, but on the

public road, you are rewarded

every time you open the throttle.

And, lastly, the Brains Award

goes to the BMW S1000R. It’s due

for an update (and spy photos

are circulating), but it still holds its

own against its modern peers.

And it’s by far the cheapest,

probably the most reliable and will

get you the best return when you

sell it again.

Rob’s final thoughts

The Ducati Streetfighter was

exactly what I thought, and what

it promised to be. It’s a Ducati

V4 superbike with no fairings,

so of course it was going to be

brilliant. When rumors surfaced

of a naked Ducati V4 we held our

breaths hoping it would literally

just be a stripped-down version

of their class leading superbike

machine, and that’s exactly what

we got. While this is brilliant news

for experienced riders and track

riding freaks like myself, who

love powerful aggression, the

Streetfighter V4 might prove to

be a little too much for some to

handle, compared to some of the

others we had on test here.

All I can say about the KTM

1290 Superduke R is well done

KTM – you have truly made a

proper machine, one that can

be enjoyed out on the road and

more so now on the track, and by

a wider audience. No more does

the Superduke want to scare you

with it’s pure rawness. It now has

a softer side, a more welcoming

side, a more refined side, but

underneath all that that tarrying

beast still lurks waiting and

willing to come out and play at a

second’s notice.

The Aprilia gave me that good

old tried and trusted Tuono

greatness – nothing spectacular,

just great. It’s so easy to get onto

a Tuono and enjoy it, and Aprilia’s

decision to add the extra 100cc

now makes it an even better

machine to enjoy. Everything

works great, my only gripe being

we have seen it and enjoyed it

all before, it might be time for a

crazy change, even if it’s just in the

60 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 6 1


design department. Nevertheless,

what a great machine – Tuono

put naked bikes on the map and

it continues to show off just how

good naked bikes can be.

If this test was out on the long

road there is no doubt that the

Kawasaki Z H2 would be the

clear winner. That supercharged

motor is a pure gem and the way

Kawasaki have made it so easy

to handle and smooth deserves

a big pat on the back. It’s ultracomfy,

ultra-smooth and ultraenjoyable,

but that’s out on the

road. Around the track it’s beefy

body did not enjoy itself, just like

any beefy person doesn’t like

going to gym.

If you are one of those riders in

the market for a new sportsbike

and ultimately just want valuefor-money

and don’t really care

about specs etc, then the BMW

S1000R is the bike for you. It’s a

proper good all-round machine

in every aspect, and is built for

all kinds of riders with its great

electronics, heated grips, and solid

all-round feel. It takes the cake

as far as value for money goes

there is no doubt about that, but

in my eyes, it is in serious need of

an update, especially now that its

stable mates, the S1000RR and

S1000XR, have gone under the

knife and look better than ever.

Let’s see what BMW comes up

with next for the S1000R.

62 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020


KTM’s new 1290 SuperDuke R

impresses and surprises us everytime

we ride it. As you have just read in

the Naked Bike shootout, it certainly

is worth all the hype surrounding it,

but it gets even better than that. On

the test, we also had the RAD KTM

demo bike, which truly is Superduke

Unleashed, as Rob found out.

Words: Rob Portman | Pics: Beam Productions

64 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 65


“The fueling map

installed by Maestro

Mike in the RAD KTM

kitchen was smooth

as silk, but still

packed that punch

– it’s Tyson Fury in a

Louis Vuitton gown.”

I get many people asking me how good the new KTM

1290 SuperDuke R is, and my answer is always the same;

“It surprises me every time I ride it.” It really does. I’ve

spent a bit of time on the bike now out on the road and

on track, short and long, and every time I find myself

surprised with just how good KTM have stepped up the

overall performance of the bike – from engine to chassis –

the complete package is simply spectacular!

The team from RAD Moto KTM in Sandton then asked

me to take their demo bike for a test ride. Me being one

that never shy’s away from riding any sportbike I gladly

accepted and took their 2020 demo model out to RSR to

test along with the other 5 naked bikes we had on test.

The RAD KTM demo model is equipped with a host

of stunning official KTM Powerparts, but the main

improvement comes from the full Akro pipe and map

installed to the bike. Up till now, I had not tested a new SD

1290 R with this fitted so was keen to see if it made the

big difference the team from RAS had promised me it did.

Simple answer, it did make a massive difference, and it

truly opened up the machine and gave it its true powers –

it was true SuperDuke fully unleashed!

Power all through the rev range was stronger and more

responsive, while the roaring sound from the LC8 motor

was amplified to a very satisfying

and seductive sound, one to which

my ears and body reacted to with

sheer delight!

The extra punch out of the

corners was huge, compared to

a stock 1290, and the one we

featured in the naked bike test

with just the slip-on fitted. The

fueling map installed by Maestro

Mike in the RAD KTM kitchen was

smooth as silk, but still packed

that punch – it’s Tyson Fury in a

Louis Vuitton gown.

The KTM Track Pack had also

been installed on this bike, so there

was less interference from the

electronics, but still just enough to

help keep everything in check and

keep my “I’m Brad Binder and can

do anything” feeling while riding this

bike in check.

Overall, another incredible job

done by the team at RAD Moto

KTM who really know how to get

the best out of their products. On

top of that, they also managed

to crack the indicator dilemma.

When the full pipe is fitted, the

ECU does not allow the indicators

to work, as installing a full system

is actually not allowed in most

markets around the world, but

here in SA, we don’t mind loud,

roaring machines. So, Maestro

Mike once again put his skills to the

test and was the first to crack the

code so to speak, and they can

now install the full pipe and have

the indicators working. Well done

guys, great job all-round!

If you are in the market for a

new sportsbike and are keen

to test ride the new 1290 SD R

then give RAD KTM a call and

arrange a test ride on not only

this marvelous 1290, but they

also have a 890 Duke R demo

available, which is also a real treat

having had the RAD Touch!

Tel 011 234 5007

66 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 67


As you may recall, earlier this year our Glenn Foley went

off to the international launch of these beautiful new

motorcycles and fell in love with the F900R in particular.

So, why would we be running another article on these

bikes you may ask? Well, for one, we all like different

bikes and different styles of riding and thus have

differing views on the bikes. For instance, I personally

enjoyed the F900XR a lot because of my build and

riding style. And two, our roads and riding conditions

are vastly different to Europe, so the bikes handle and

perform a bit differently here.

Words: Sean Hendley | Pics: Rob Till (BMW Motorrad SA)

68 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 69


The local media launch

Naturally it was a bit of a

subdued affair due to the national

lock downs restrictions.

Just a great meet and greet

at Gemelli’s, a local Bryanston

restaurant for breakfast, a ride

out through the countryside

for a milkshake at the Wimpy in

Magaliesberg and then onto the

Cradle for lunch at the Cradle

Moon restaurant before heading

back to Gemelli’s and going home

in the rush hour traffic. And,

instead of hoards of people we

were down to a few mates.

Basically a Sunday morning

breakfast run, it’s all about the

bikes. I was quite glad to get to

ride the bikes back to back locally,

on roads I know well, gives me

a real world perspective on the

bikes and not through the rose

tinted glasses of a fancy riding

holiday somewhere nice.

BMW F900R

The BMW F900R was this first

bike I got to ride, the full spec

version with all the fancy plugins

which made it quite fun. On

first arrival I barely even glanced

at the 900R, I am a big bloke

and it appeared to be a very

little bike, so I kinda swung my

leg over it a bit begrudgingly and

hit the starter button … still not

particularly impressed and trying

to keep an open mind.

Heading out onto the road I

started to mess with the ‘nav

wheel’ and play with the settings

and immediately got rid of all the

electronic nannies by switching off

the ABS, traction control and etc

and setting everything else into

‘Dynamic Pro’ mode.

Now, one tends to forget that

900cc’s is only a mere 100cc’s

below a 1000cc’s and even though

it is only a parallel twin the “little”

900 picks up her skirts and tears

off into the distance fairly rapidly,

especially when you are being a

bit blazé about about the bike.

Now, that I like. Of late a lot of

colleagues have come back from

one of the fancy riding holidays

going goo-goo-ga-ga over the

bikes and really hyping them

up, so when I get onto the bikes

I have really high expectations

and have generally been quite

underwhelmed by them, and

have thus deduced the fancy

holidays are designed to do just

that. So, I would rather not have

any expectations and be really

impressed by the bike for it own

virtues, which I really was with the

little 900R.

Besides being very quick off

the bottom end, to the point that

when accelerating past slower

traffic another journo on the

S1000XR behind me said that he

could not get the 1000 to keep

up with the 900R on acceleration

from low to mid range revs, and

only when the 1000cc started

coming on song in the hi mid rev

range that it would start reeling

the 900R in. This seemed a bit

unlikely to me until we swapped

bikes and I experienced the

same phenomenon. The 900R is

incredibly well planted and stable

on the road and great fun in the

twisty stuff where it was so easy

to flick through corners, giving great

feedback to the rider so you know

exactly what the bike is doing and

can predict how it will handle the

next situation or corner.

However, my bulk did come into

play once or twice on high speed

freeway runs. Being an unfaired

bike I took all of the wind, which

usually isn’t a problem, but in this

instance, with the shorter wheel

base it unwieghted the front

wheel and made the bike quite

twitchy, even in a straight line. To

make sure I wasn’t imagining it I

did a couple of top end runs and

wiggled the bars a bit and had my

naught biting onto the seat quite

seriously. Anything under 180kmh

was fine, anything above for me

was achievable but not without a

goodly amount of adrenalin. But, I

assume that can be easily rectified

with a bit of suspension set up and

a less lazy riding position.

I mentioned just now that the

motor did impress me with its

acceleration, however it also

impressed me just as much with

it’s engine braking power without

locking up the back wheel. Another

journo mentioned that the brake

lights were quite difficult to

see and I answered that it was

because I was barely using the

brakes,the engine braking is that

good and the bike is that light,

balanced and planted that I barely

had to touch the brakes … which

work extremely well by the way.

All in all the F900R impresses,

it’s got all the electronic nannies

which I really like turning off,

electronically adjustable

suspension, has a TFT display that

is really easy to read in most light.

Another little gadget I really enjoy

70 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 7 1


on all the latest BMW’s is their

navigation wheel to run through

the menu and make adjustments,

it is simple and easy to use and

one becomes quite instinctive in its

use, definitely a market leader with

that. This one had 4 riding modes

- dynamic pro being the best fun.

Then my 2 other favourite bits of

technology, the shift assist system

on gear changes both up and

down - still a little bit klunky low

down in the gears and rev range,

but really smooth under hard

acceleration and the cruise control

just because I am lazy and like

to sit up and take in the scenery

every so often.

So, for a bike that I wasn’t that

excited to ride it quickly made

good friends with me and I would

really like to ride more often, a

track day or two, a nice little run

along the fabled ‘22’ or Valley of a

Thousand Hills or some such bit of

riding Nirvanna.

The F900R is much, much better

than I initially gave it credit for.

It really is a great little bike. Get

down to your local BMW dealer

for a test ride, they should all have

a demo some time soon.

BMW F900XR

and immediately felt at home

on the XR. The bike feels slightly

longer and the bars are definitely

taller suiting my 2 meter chassis

quite nicely and the little shorty

windscreen gives adequate wind

protection.

The model I rode seemed to be

a bit lower spec than the 900R

only having 2 riding modes and

no heated grips, but the power

shifter, cruise control ABS and

etc were all there, along with the

easy navigation wheel and the

TFT screen and I think the the

basic simplicity of not having to

make a whole bunch of decisions

on set ups and riding modes

really appealed to me. Without

question this was my favourite

bike for the day and possibly the

one I would buy … but the 1000XR

is also just so good. Also, if I had

to buy every bike I ever fell in love

with I might need deeper pockets

or need to be president of a once

prosperous country with my hand

firmly in the cookie jar.

I’ve learned a very valuable,

(and almost fatal) lesson on

these launches when one day,

fully committed to following some

other guys at high speed into a

bend to overtake a lorry and they

backed out at the last second

and I nearly plowed into the

back of them and said lorry, get

out ahead of the pack and stay

I have seen the new BMW F900XR

lurking in dealerships around the

country and thought to myself,

“What a pretty looking bike, I am

really looking forward to getting a

leg over that one”. And it is pretty,

gorgeous even, nice slender hips,

sexy ass, athletic build with all the

bumps and curves in the right

places and a beautiful face …

yes, I am still referring to the bike.

Every now and then a bike comes

out that really just appeals to me

and the 900XR is just one such

bike. I swapped onto this bike at

the Wimpy Magaliesberg stop

72 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020


ahead of the pack. Which I duly do

now, unless I know and really trust

the guys I am riding with. And,

this day was no different and on

occasion our route marshal had

to peddle hard to catch up. And

all the while the 900XR was barely

straining under the exertions of

my input and made me look like a

far better rider than I pretend to

be. Not having all the riding modes

in no way detracted from the fun

factor of riding the 900XR, it just

meant that I could use more of

the bikes talents without running

the risk of getting myself into any

serious trouble.

The 900XR is light, nimble and

so flickable with a very natural

riding/sitting position that it

encourages you to seek out the

twisty roads and have a bit of

fun. Then, it also lends itself to

touring and taking in the scenery

at a slightly more sedate pace

over long distances. The motor

is hugely torquey for a 900cc

parallel twin but also revs out very

easily allowing for a very relaxed

riding style and feel to the bike.

The term ‘adventure bikes’

gets chucked around very loosely

these days in reference to tall

suspensioned bikes with knobbly

tyres intended for primarily

off road use with a good road

attitude as well, and in most

instances the closest these

bikes get to dirt is the grass on

the sidewalk they park on from

time to time. So, why can’t a fully

road biased bike not be called

an ‘Adventure Bike’? The 900XR

has the sitting position, the taller

suspension and all the power

you could ever want and stick it

in rain mode and you could easily

tip toe down a good dirt road - I

have done that on a new Gold

Wing with a pillion at about 80kmh

without too much concern. The

advantage that the 900XR has

is the stability of 17 inch wheels

and firmer suspension at higher

speeds, making high speed, long

distance road adventure tours

an absolute pleasure. I really

recommend you that you take

a long hard and honest look at

where you ride and ask yourself

do I really need a dual purpose

adventure bike and then go

borrow a 900XR for a day from

your local dealer.

BMW S1000XR

This is a superbike made

comfortable. no other description

required.A I jumped onto one the

lunch stop in the Cradle of Human

Kind. “Do you really have to have

a full on tupperware torpedo to

have fun on the tar?”. This new

S1000XR is possibly the best of

both worlds with stupendous

power coming form that almighty

4 cylinder power plant, fantastic

74 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 75


sports bike derived suspension

and the comfortable upright

sitting position of a tourer come

adventure bike.

I must mention though, jumping

off the light, slender and nimble

900XR onto the S1000XR was

quite an adjustment. The 1000

feels big, very big even for more

and quite intimidating until you

get used to it, which takes about

10 minutes or so of riding, then it

is just hooligan mode all the way.

The tank is very big and you tuck

your legs into it and the seat feels

like a bucket seat that holds you

firmly in place slightly hindering

your movements across the bike

while hanging in corners, but also

quickly adapted to. Riding back

from ‘The Cradle’ was a bit more

suburban and urban so not too

much opportunity to really put the

1000XR through it’s paces, but it

is a bike you could easily live with

on your daily commute through

traffic with its higher seating

position to give a clear view over

the top of the traffic, narrow

enough to squeeze through some

of the smaller gaps and more

power than you will ever need to

shoot out ahead of traffic.

As with the 900XR, just a lot

bigger, the 1000XR does lend itself

to those long distance wanderings

to far off places in exotic locations

for a riding holiday. All the bikes do

come with a range of accessories,

including luggage to turn it into

a proper tourer that can be

chucked around the mountain

pass roads at speed at speed.

And it goes without saying that

every conceivable bit of BMW

is either built into the S1000XR

or can be added on as a plug-in

from their options list.

These are three fantastic

bikes. No question. What BMW

has achieved with that 900

parallel twin engine is quite simply

amazing. The bikes are so nimble

and fun to ride every day.

The S1000 XR would be one of

our very top choices for touring

this beautiful country. Ridiculously

fast, ultra modern and exiting to

ride. But also oh so comfortable...

My advice is this check out www.

bmw-motorrad.co.za to find your

closest stockist and get down to

you local dealer, spend a day in

the saddle of each of these bikes

and change your perception of

adventure riding, ignore the ‘peer

pressure’ sitting around the braai

fire or leaning against the pub and

buy the bike that fits you.

76 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020


BOOK REVIEW: BY DONOVAN FOURIE

THE WISDOM

OF THE ROAD

GODS BY BORIS

MIHAILOVIC

Lockdown is a period of selfreflection,

self-improvement,

self-actualisation and running

away from self out of sheer

boredom. Donovan Fourie has

metaphorically left his bachelor,

Lego-filled world for some blissful

moments reading the new book

by famous Australian motorcycle

author Boris Mihailovic, and finds

that it annoys him.

I hate it when people are better than me

at stuff. More infuriatingly, the list of stuff

people do better than me is long: an MX rider

scrubbing a triple jump that I rolled over in

white-knuckled terror. A chisel-jawed jock

achieving lap times around Red Star I can’t

match. Someone who can solve complex

mathematical equations that I gaze upon

with gormless stupefaction. Anyone who

can tighten a bolt without their motorcycle

catching fire. Four-year-olds who can

catch a ball without knocking themselves

unconscious. The list goes on.

Generally, I’m rubbish at nearly

everything. The only island of grace in

my vast sea of ineptitude is my

ability to write; generally, people

reading my stories have some

vague idea of what I am going on

about, and I dare say that people

even find some of it enjoyable.

With this flimsy twig holding

my entire ego aloft, I then read

the words of Boris Mihailovic

and my grievances at somebody

being better than me reach

incandescent levels.

Boris is an Australian biker, and

when we say biker, we are not

talking about a Sons of Anarchy

patch and a three-year-old bike

with 2000km on the clock. He

was the president of an outlaw

club in the 80s, the sort that

had their photos up on police

station walls, and lived their

lives around motorcycles

accompanied by a fog of

booze, drugs, women and

brawling.

In his next life, he switched

from police chases to

journalism – as an article

writer, an editor and later

a book author. He has his

own website at www.

bikeme.tv and has written for

publications in Australia and

throughout.

Non-Australian readers

might be more familiar with

his satirical work at the Dear

George page on Facebook,

and more recently his Dear

MotoGP page.

Reading his road tests,

reports, anecdotes and satire

fuels enragements within

my soul that I did not know

existed. Beneath the bouts of

outward laughter at his written

wit, the inward me is sobbing

at the anguish of knowing that

my writing will never be that

good. Especially when we write

similar stories and I peruse his

writing with my own cussing

voice-over often questioning the

reasons I didn’t write it like that.

Previously, he has published

two books – the hilariouslynamed

My Mother Warned Me

About Blokes Like Me and At

the Altar of the Road Gods. Each

is a series of anecdotes about

Boris and friends’ mad-capped

adventures of biking, booze,

drugs, women, police and the

life of an outlaw biker. Featuring

prominently are the stories from

the “Green Pirate House”, a rundown

dwelling in Sydney that he

and his friends chose based more

on its spacious garage rather

than whether the windows had

glass in them or not.

The stories vary between

memories from starting his

biking life while in high school,

to moving through the world

of an outlaw biker and the jawdropping

tales that ensued, to

his later life as a motorcycle

journalist and the journeys that

inspired. Each story will resonate

78 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 79


with motorcyclists – nonmotorcyclists

not excluded –

either by way of a knowledgeable

nod or by wide mouthed

wonderment.

What will appeal to all readers

is how annoyingly well each story

is written and how sidesplittingly

funny they are.

Then we get to his third book

– The Wisdom of the Road Gods.

Here, Boris’s writing takes a

slightly different turn; it’s still

annoyingly well written, and

there are many moments of

spraying your coffee in hysterics.

These include an ill-fated hunting

trip where one member of the

group accidentally impales

himself with his own crossbow,

a sea cruise where the usual,

floral-shirted holiday makers had

to mix with outlaw biker Boris

and his behemoth Russian friend

who’s claim to fame is escaping

from a Red Army prison cell, and

two near-death experiences

involving hitting a kangaroo on a

Victory and crushing his hand in a

separate crash with the ensuing

hysterics of stubborn Boris in a

hospital.

While each story throughout

the book has its share of hilarity,

there are stories of a more

sobering nature, such as the

death of an old biking friend

and the touching tale of his last

months, the spreading of his

ashes by a naked lady from the

back of a motorcycle at midnight

and then there are the tales of

the Balkans, where Boris rides

through Europe, meets his

Serbian family and discovers

his roots, with the trials and

tribulations of his ancestry.

In particular, these stories take

a turn from the former hard-ass

biker themes and show a truly

soft side to even the hardest

of bikers. For someone like me,

wanting nothing more than

huge cackles and tomfoolery,

stories like these should be

dealbreakers. However, as they

unravelled, the pages kept

turning, time kept slowing, eyes

stayed fixed upon the words. The

narration unfolded

and dare I say a

chimp like me felt

moved.

Many of the

stories within the

covers of this book

may not be strictly

about motorcycling, but they

are told by a motorcyclist who

has seen more and done more

within the vast scope of the

two-wheeled world than nearly

anyone, and so they are laid out

with a perspective each of us can

warm to, each of us can uphold

and each of us can admire.

In South Africa, Wisdom of

the Road Gods is available

only through mail order from

Australia, and is a worthwhile

read for anyone still shackled by

lockdown or not. It is available

through their publishing website

https://www.shocknawe.com.

au for 39.99 Aus Dollars (roughly

R450) and 20 Aus Dollars for

shipping (roughly R230), but what

I would do is order his hard cover

third book from the Shock n Awe

site, and then go on Amazon and

download My Mother Warned Me

About Blokes Like Me and At the

Altar of the Road Gods for Kindle,

and by the time the physical book

arrives, you are all caught up on

all things Boris Mihailovic.

Trust me, it’s a damn sight

better written than this review.

Your copy awaits at

www.shocknawe.com.au/

80 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 81


The new Yamaha MT03 has arrived

in SA and although it’s a smaller

capacity motorcycle, it’s already

making big waves with its oh-sosweet

riding capabilities and styling.

Words: Rob Portman | Pics: Beam Productions

82 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 83


A proper looker that rides just as well as it looks

- that pretty much sums up this new beauty from

Yamaha. Powering the MT03 is the excitable 321cc

parallel twin cylinder, which makes the bike a real

joy to not only look at but ride as well. Combine that

lively motor with an even more lively chassis makes

the MT03 one very sporty and versatile character

out on the road.

The upright riding position and compact

dimensions make this naked lightweight an ideal

choice for new, returning and upgrading riders and

feels spot on out on the open road and even more

ideal for the daily, tight commute.

A big draw card to lightweight, sporty commuters

such as the new MT03 is value for money and

affordability going forward. This bike will hardly cost

you a cent once rolled out of the dealership - it’s

extremely light on fuel, maintenance is just about

nonexistent and if you were to have an oopsie there

is hardly anything to break on this very neat and

well-designed motorcycle.

The safety factor is there with ABS and the multifunction

display with analogue tachometer shows

you all the info needed. LED lights help make you

visible out on the road, day or night, and I love the

Transformer like design Yamaha have pulled off.

Ride impressions

The MT-03’s two-cylinder isn’t exactly a necksnapper,

but nothing in this class really is. It provides

somewhere in the neighborhood of 41 horsepower

with a shockingly smooth delivery. The fueling

is excellent, with very linear response thanks to

a tried-and-true cable throttle, and the engine

doesn’t offer much in the way of vibration, even as

you near its nigh-on 12,000 rpm redline.

Torque is totally adequate and is delivered

smoothly and without big peaks. The way that

this engine offers its performance is exceptionally

friendly for beginners, yet it still offers enough thrills

to make an experienced rider grin.

The MT-03’s six-speed transmission is excellent

and extremely easy and satisfying to use. I never

had an issue finding neutral, either, something that

even much more expensive bikes have issues with.

The cable-actuated wet clutch is predictably light

and easy to modulate and shouldn’t give most

riders, even newbies, much trouble.

The suspension setup on the MT-03 is pretty

upscale for the class. The front gets 37-mm

inverted forks (most in the class

have right-side-up forks) though

these are a small step down from

those found on the more trackoriented

R3, which has similarly

upside-down units, albeit larger

ones. The rear monoshock isn’t

fancy, with preload adjustment

only. Still, it’s reasonably

competent, and because it’s

identical to the one found on

the R3, there’s no shortage of

aftermarket options to spruce it

up or replace it entirely.

The brakes on the MT-03 are

another high point. The single

front rotor is a 298-mm affair,

and while experienced riders

used to bigger bikes might scoff

at the slightly squishy lever and

gentle ramp-up in brake force,

the setup is perfect for someone

new to motorcycles. I’m outside

the intended size/weight range

for the MT-03, but I never found

myself running out of brake, even

in hard stops.

When it comes to electronics,

ABS is basically it, but that’s fine

at this power level and price point.

Adding an electronic throttle, ride

modes or traction control would

add significant cost to the bike,

and with only 41 horsepower, it’s

just not that big of a sacrifice.

From an ergonomic standpoint,

the MT-03 is a big win - a real

The MT03 is a very wellbalanced

machine for a

wide variety of riders to

enjoy out on the road.

It handles itself with

full confidence on the

long open stretches and

thrives in the everyday

urban hustle.

84 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020 85


An Adventure Type tyre that has evolved in

all aspects to offer outstanding straight-line

stability and performance in the wet, in addition

to satisfactory wear life

While preserving long tyre life, the ADVENTURE A41 achieves the conflicting

objectives of performance in the wet, stability in the dry and improved

handling. In particular, shorter braking distances on wet road surfaces and

enhanced cornering grip make for more confident riding even on rainy

days. This is a next-generation adventure tyre that allows riders to extract

even more enjoyment from the unique riding that only an adventure bike

can offer, whether it be long-distance touring, highway cruising or riding on

unpaved roads.

The OEM standard

tyre for the new BMW

R1250GS Adv - why?

Because it works!

Conquer the world, any way you like.

This performance is your new best friend.

Tread pattern and block shape for both front & rear have been reworked.

Carefully tuned performance and highly evolved durability let you to chase

down your own adventure. The AX41’s high performance enables powerful

off-road performance. More freedom, just the way you want it. A tyre on

which to discover the joy of conquering the unknown.

● For riders with adventure bikes who enjoy touring off-road.

● For riders who demand a high level of off-road performance and durability.

The lightweight,

compact, responsive

chassis works a real

treat in all areas and

will make even the

most nervous rider feel

like a MotoGP star in

the making.

confidence-builder, especially

with new riders. The bike’s 167kg

wet weight is also a plus for new

riders because it makes the bike

less daunting to move around at

low speeds and easier to pick up

when it inevitably gets dropped.

In terms of quality, the MT-03

rides like a much more expensive

motorcycle than it is. Nothing feels

cheap, everything seems wellscrewed-together

-- something

that we’d expect for a bike from

one of the big four Japanese

manufacturers.

The new MT03 is now available

in SA priced at a slightly face

smudging R94,950, but that’s just

another sign of the times here in

SA, with the rand plummeting by

the second it seems.

But after only a few hours on

the MT03 that big price is thrown

out of the mind and instead

replaced with just what a great

motorcycle it is to ride.

This bike from Linex Yamaha

Lifestyle Randburg - 011 251 4000

The Battlax Adventurecross Scrambler AX41S

is Bridgestone’s new concept. AX41S is making

attitude, fashion, design and performance

complementary.

AX41S adopts the latest technologies in terms of compounding, a directly

derivate from Bridgestone’s Sport-Touring category, to ensure the

necessary road performances. AX41S provides the perfect match for both

a custom build scrambler thanks to its design, and for the rider through its

performance.

86 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE AUGUST 2020

Available at dealers Nation-Wide


By Ollie Barstow (Visordown.com)

REMEMBER US?

7 WORLDSBK SPORTSBIKES

YOU MAY HAVE FORGOTTEN

ALL ABOUT

WorldSBK hasn’t

always just been

about your Kawasaki

ZX-10RRs and Ducati

Panigales... remember

when these machines

graced the grid?

While Kawasaki and more

recently Ducati have had their

own way on top of the podium,

it’s clear Yamaha was right up

there during the Phillip Island

opener, while BMW clearly has

potential and Honda will come

a long with its CBR1000RR-R

Fireblade soon enough.

However, while these are

well-established frontrunning

brands competing

at the highest-level, there

are a number of lesserknown

models – some more

successful than others – that

have tackled the Superbike

ranks over the years, some of

which may have slipped your

memory… so allow us to jog it

for you.

Petronas FP1

The Petronas FP1 was

originally conceived in the

early 2000s to compete in the

MotoGP World Championship

in a joint project between

Malaysian oil giants Petronas

and the Sauber Engineering

team it title sponsored in

Formula 1 at the time.

Instead, the model ended

up racing in the WorldSBK

Championship in collaboration

with racing legend Carl

Fogarty calling the shots, but

the project ran into several

problems. For one, the

899.5cc three-cylinder engine

developed by Suter found itself

100cc too short to compete

successfully against its larger

displacement rivals after

regulations were changed.

Despite this, the machine was

fairly-competitive - helped in

part by having the experienced

Troy Corser – and even notched

up a few podiums and pole

positions along the way.

However, a more pressing

issue was the homologation

standard that stipulated at

least 150 examples of the bike

had to be produced to be sold

commercially in order to qualify

as a production model.

Petronas complied by meeting

the quota with 75 remaining in

Malaysia and another 75 ending

up in the United Kingdom.

However, rather against the

spirit of the rules, few were ever

‘sold’ and even fewer ever ended

up on the road. The tale took on

a twist a few years ago when 60

brand-new models were found

in storage in Essex

Petronas ploughed on into 2005

despite regulation changes

making the FP1 woefully

uncompetitive and with no

chance of a successor ever

likely to appear, the team quietly

exited stage right.

Benelli Tornado Tre

While there are many who still

hold Benelli’s entry into the

sportsbike fray with the Tornado

Tre dear, it’s easier to forget the

triple-cylinder machine went

all the way to competing in

WorldSBK as a factory entry.

What’s unusual about the

Benelli Tornado Tre though is

that it actually went racing

before it entered production,

hitting the track in 2001 and the

road in 2002. The reason behind

this was a hope that it’d speed

up the development process


Bimota BB3

Arguably one of the stranger

episodes to unfold in recent years

was the brief return to WorldSBK

by – once again – Bimota.

A company which, like a lot of

the Italian motorcycle firms,

had been sent down the path

of destruction only to reemerge

with new investors and

promises of a return to the glory

days, Bimota’s latest owners

wanted to use WorldSBK to

publicise that everything was

just fine with the marque.

Except everything wasn’t ‘just

fine’ and it’s hard to believe

exactly how WorldSBK played

along for such a lengthy period

of time. In short, Bimota planned

to enter a pair of BMW-powered

BB3s in WorldSBK’s new (and

shortlived) EVO class for 2014,

but in order to do so it would

need to meet the homologation

demand of 1000 roadgoing

models.

As a company with traditionally

low production capabilities this

didn’t seem at all possible from

the outset but WorldSBK bended

the rules to allow the team to

compete in the meantime without

being allowed to register points.

As it happens, the bikes –

campaigned by Ayrton Badovini

and Christian Iddon and prepared

by former Suzuki WorldSBK

champions Alstare – were

competitive and picked several

de facto EVO class wins and even

a few overall top ten finishes

between them.

However, not

only were

Bimota nowhere near that 1000

bike total, they weren’t even

close to the much-reduced 125

bike quota WorldSBK had later

proposed. In fact, only 30 Bimota

BB3s rolled off the production

line.

The team was thrown out of

WorldSBK by the mid-summer

break.

Unfortunately it was a fleeting

high for all with Bimota

struggling for finance before

the lifeline of a proposed

sponsorship deal with Levis fell

through (via an unscrupulous

businessman who quickly

stopped answering his calls) and

the team folded having started

just ten races.

and test some of its more

unusual features, such as the

under-seat radiators.

As it happens, the bike – in the

hands of experienced Australian

Peter Goddard – was modestly

competitive, it’s 2001 midseason

arrival yielding a handful

of points that could have been

greater had the series not

enjoyed such huge grid numbers

at that time.

A fuller season followed in 2002

– despite missing some of the

opening rounds – and Goddard

became a fairly regular pointsscorer

with the bike proving

more reliable on track that it

arguably was off it.

However, despite that solid

platform, Benelli didn’t invest in

the WorldSBK project any further

even if the Tornado stayed on

sale until 2010.

Bimota SB8R

While the Yamaha-powered

Bimota YB4 was one of the

founding ‘fathers’ of the inaugural

WorldSBK Championship in 1988,

it’s easy to forget that the Italian

marque not only returned to the

series in 2000 but even went on

to win again.

Using the Suzuki-engined SB8R,

Bimota rocked up to the start of

the season with minimal testing

but did have the wildest of

wildcards in its armoury through

rider Anthony Gobert. The

Australian’s off-track exploits

may go on to overshadow what

he could achieve on-track, but

there was no denying his fierce

talent when the stars all aligned.

And that’s exactly what

happened during round two at

Phillip Island when he swept

to an astonishing win on home

turf in treacherous conditions.


Erik Buell Racing 1190RX

For a championship that has

occasionally struggled to muster

up too much manufacturer

interest over the years, the 2014

WorldSBK season proved to be a

zenith in terms of entries with a

record number of nine different

manufacturers signing up.

Together with the incoming

MV Agusta and Bimota above,

WorldSBK got a surprise new

all-American addition in Erik

Buell Racing. Similar in mentality

to Bimota – albeit with the actual

means to produce motorcycles

– EBR brought its new 1190RX

to play using finance from new

Indian owners Hero Corp.

However, EBR somewhat

ambitiously attempted to

keep the effort as American as

possible at its hindrance with

Geoff May and Aaron Yates

simply not competitive enough

to trouble their more Europeanracing

experienced rivals.

The manufacturer did get some

points on the board with a

14th place finish on home soil

at Laguna Seca, though this

was actually achieved by Larry

Pegram on a wildcard privateer

EBR entry.

Even so, EBR stuck it out for

a second attempt in 2015 and

even signed the talented Niccolo

Canepa for a more competitive

tilt, but just a few rounds into

the season Hero Corp wanted

out and the money stream dried

up, forcing the team out after

four events.

MV Agusta F4 312 R

MV Agusta’s racing heritage

needs no introduction, though

this is more for its success on

the grand prix stage than it

is in production racing. It did

put some effort into a works

WorldSBK effort as recently as

2017, but its single-entry proved

modestly competitive (and

frightfully unreliable) at best.

Less well known is the previous

generation F4 (the 312 R) did in

fact complete a part-season

in WorldSBK back in 2007 with

Austrian racer Christian Zaiser.

Reliability wasn’t a strong suit

then either with Zaiser finishing

just four of the 14 races he

started before giving up.

Interestingly, the bike did go on

to feature in the Superstock 1000

ranks in 2009 piloted by one Alex

Lowes… but the team folded

before he could make use of any

of his young talent.

were swinging away from it.

The launch of the Ducati 1098

pushed the bar to 1200cc and

KTM found itself on the wrong

rail to homologate a model

that was useable on the road

but competitive on track. In the

end, the project was stillborn

and KTM focused on its future

MotoGP entry.

Even so, the RC8 did find some

success in the Superbike ranks,

proving competitive in the IDM

German Superbike series, while

it also started a few races in

the Superstock 1000 series in

what was supposed to act as

a precursor to stepping up to

WorldSBK.

KTM RC8 R

OK, we’re cheating a little bit by

including this here because as

you knowledgeable people will

of course recognise, the KTM RC8

never started a WorldSBK race.

However, it’s worth pointing out

that the Austrian firm had full

intentions to take its quirkilystyled

but well-received 1195cc

sportsbike to the premier

superbike series but ultimately

found itself in the wrong place at

the wrong time.

Indeed, the long gestation period

for getting the RC8 from concept

to reality – first shown in 2005

and hitting the streets in 2010 –

meant that by the time KTM could

turn attentions to developing a

race-version of it, the regulations


BUYER’S GUIDE

SELLING

YOUR BIKE?

FIRE IT UP IS THE MOST TRUSTED PURCHASER IN SA!

WE PAY INSTANTLY, WE COLLECT, WE COME TO YOU!

www.fireitup.co.za

MODEL PRICE MODEL PRICE MODEL

PRICE

MODEL PRICE MODEL

PRICE MODEL

PRICE

RSV4 RR 1000 R325,000 Monster 797

R138,300

RSV4 RR 1100 Factory R479,311 Monster 821

R173,100

Tuono V4 1100

Tuono V4 1100 Factory

RSV4 1100 FACTORY

G 310 R

G 310 GS

C 400 X Scooter

C 400 GT Scooter

F 750 GS

F 850 GS

F 850 GS Adventure

R 1250 GS

R 1250 GS Adventure

R 1250 R

R 1250 RS

R 1250 RT

R NineT Pure

R NineT

R NineT Scrambler

R NineT Urban GS

R NineT Racer

K 1600 GT

K 1600 GTL

K 1600 B

S 1000 R

S 1000 RR Red

S 1000 RR M Sport

HP4 Race

APRILIA

DUCATI

BMW

R289,000 Monster 821 Stealth R184,700

R315,000 Monster 1200

R209,900

Monster 1200 S

R245,600

Monster 1200 R

Monster 1200 Black

R257,900

R248,600

Hypermotard 950

R194,100

Hypermotard 950 SP R230,900

Supersport

Supersport S

R192,200

R216,200

Multistrada 950

R207,900

R69,300 Multistrada 950 S

R253,200

R80,400 Multistrada 1260

R232,000

R125,000 Multistrada 1260 S R284,700

R136,000 Multistrada 1260 Enduro R283,400

R190,500 Multistrada Pikes Peak R345,300

R202,500 Multistrada Grand Tour R312,900

R223,300 Diavel 1260

R299,900

R269,300

R288,900

Diavel 1260 S

X Diavel

R335,900

R316,900

R212,000 X Diavel S

R363,900

R227,000 959 Panigale

R229,900

R252,400

R175,300

959 Panigale Corse

Panigale V2

R264,900

R255,900

R196,700 Panigale V4 base

R334,800

R204,000 Panigale V4 S

R399,900

R180,350 Panigale V4 Speciale R669,900

R180,200 Panigale V4 R (2019) R669,900

R288,700 Panigale V4 25° 916 R755,000

R311,900 Panigale Superleggera R1,690m

R348,100 1299 Panigale R FE R669,900

R213,600 Streetfighter V4

R292,900

R311,400 Streetfighter V4 S

R342,900

R352,400

R1,3m

STREETFIGHTER V4

Sixty 2 Scrambler

Icon Scrambler

R119,500

R144,900

Full Throttle Scrambler R172,900

Classic Scrambler

R164,900

Desert Sled Scrambler R187,900

Cafe Racer

R187,900

1100 Scrambler

R199,900

1100 Scrambler Special R216,900

1100 Scrambler Sport R230,900

HARLEY-DAVIDSON

Street 750

Street Rod

R109,000

R120,000

Iron 1200

R153,000

Superlow

R147,500

Iron 833

1200 Custom

R151,500

R163,900

Superlow 1200T

R169,000

FortyEight Special

R163,000

FortyEight

Roadster

R163,000

R171,500

StreetBob

R191,000

LowRider

R218,500

Deluxe

Sport Glide

R276,900

R234,500

Fat Bob

R229,500

Fat Bob 114

R263,000

Soft Tail Slim

R249,900

Fat Boy

R280,500

Fat Boy 114

R316,500

Brak Out 114

R316,000

Break Out

Heritage Classic 114

R281,000

R319,500

Heritage Classic

R286,900

Ultra Limited Low

R385,000

Road King

R323,500

Road King Classic

R281,000

Road King Classic

R323,500

Road King Special

R344,500

Street Glide

R354,000

Street Glide Special

Road Glide Special

Road Glide

Road Glide Ultra

Ultra Limited

CVO Street Glide

CVO Limited

Free Wheeler

TRI Glide Ultra

FXDR114

HONDA

ACE 125

Elite 125 Scooter

NC750X

NC750X DCT

Africa Twin 1100 Manual

Africa Twin 1100 DCT

Africa Twin 1100 AS Man

Africa Twin 1100 AS ES

XR190

XR150L

XR125L

CRF250L

CRF250 Rally

CBR 1000 RR 2019

CBR 1000 RR-R 2020

CBR 1000 RR-R SP 2020

GL1800 Goldwing M

GL 1800 Goldwinh DCT

HUSQVARNA

R371,000

R375,000

R355,000

R379,000

R385,000

R510,000

R544,000

R407,000

R514,000

R299,900

R24,300

R23,399

R114,480

R123,120

R210,000

R222,499

R236,000

R269,000

R49,620

R32,960

R30,000

R74,999

R85,000

R209,999

TBA

TBA

R367,000

R432,200

FS 450

R122,699

701 Enduro

R141,699

701 Supermotard

R141,699

Vitpilen 401

R89,699

Svartpilen 401

R89,699

Vitpilen 701

R129,699

Svartpilen 701

R149,699

FTR 1200

R209,900 125 DUKE

R58,999

FTR 1200 Race Replica R269,900 RC 125

R59,999

Scout Sixty

R169,900 390 DUKE

R76,999

Scout 1133 R199,900 RC 390

R74,999

Scout Bobber

Chief Dark Horse

Chief Classic

Chief Vintage

Springfield

Springfield Darkhorse

Chieftan Dark Horse

Chieftan

Roadmaster

Z300

Z400 ABS

Ninja 400 ABS

Z650

Z900 ABS

Z900 RS

Z900 Cafe Racer

Z1000R

Z1000SX

Ninja 650

Versys X300

Versys 650

Versys 1000

ZX10R WSB 2018

ZX10R WSB 2019

Z H2

H2 SX SE

ZZR1400 Ohlins

INDIAN

KTM

KAWASAKI

R199,900

R299,900

R419,900

R379,900

R389,900

R369,900

R399,900

R399,900

R449,900

R61,995

R79,995

R86,995

R110,995

R145,995

R175,995

R168,995

R179,995

R179,995

R122,995

R85,995

R115,995

R159,995

R229,995

R259,995

R329,888

R310,995

R249,995

Z H2 Hypernaked

390 Adventure

790 DUKE

790 Adventure

790 Adventure R

690 Enduro R

890 DUKE R

1090 Adventure R

1290 Super Adventure S

1290 Super Adventure R

1290 Super Duke R

1290 Super Duke GT

1290 SUPER DUKE R

Agility RS 125

Like 125l ABS

G-Dink 300l

Xciting 400l

AK550

KYMCO

MOTO GUZZI

R85,999

R155,999

R181,999

R194,999

R159,999

R189,999

R198,999

R234,999

R249,999

R265,999

R248,999

R19,950

R34,950

R54,950

R99,950

R154,950

V85 TT Evocative E5 R234,850

V85 TT Travel Pack R249,850

Audace Carbon E4 R430,895

MGX 21 Flying Fortress E4 R575,296

V7 III Carbon E4

R210,750

V7 III Racer ABS E4 R224,750

V7 III Stone S

R228,420

V7 III Milano E4

R220,460

All pricing correct as at time of publishing, but may vary due to exchange rates etc.

All pricing correct as at time of publishing, but may vary due to exchange rates etc.


FASTRACK

YOUR MOTORCYCLE

BUYING EXPERIENCE!

MODEL PRICE MODEL PRICE MODEL

PRICE

Dragster Pirelli LE

Dragster 800RR

Dragster 800 RC Limited

Super Veloce 800RR

Brutale 1000RR 208HP

RUSH 1000RR 212hp

MV AGUSTA

Turismo Veloce 800 160HP

R329,900

R299,900

R359,900

R379,900

R479,900

R549,900

R299,900

GTS 300l EV

Max Sym 600l ABS

Crox 125

Fiddle ll 150

Jet14 200

Orbit ii 125

Symphony 150

X-Pro 125

R63,995

R98,995

R17,995

R17,495

R23,995

R14,995

R19,995

R18,995

FJR1300

XMax 300 Scooter

YZF R3

YZF R6

YZF R1 2020

YZF R1M 2020

Niken 3-wheeler

NIKEN 3-WHEELER

R229,950

R89,950

R78,950

R209,950

R319,950

R399,950

R275,000

SUZUKI

TRIUMPH

UR110

R19,100

Street Triple RS

R170,000

UB125

R21,300

Speed Triple RS

R219,000

GSX150

R31,250

Street Twin

R144,000

GSX150F

R33,850

Bonneville T100

R145,000

GIXXER 250SF

R49,900

Bonneville T120

R169,000

DL650XA

R131,500

Bonneville Bobber

R169,000

DL1050XA

R221,950

Bonneville Bobber Black

R184,000

SV650A

GSXR750

GSXR1000 A

GSXS1000 R A

GSXS1000 A

GSXS1000 ZA

Katana

VZR1800

VZR1800BZL9

R101,900

R161,950

R237,500

R273,900

R163,500

R175,500

R188,900

R199,900

R204,900

Bonneville Speed Master

Street Scrambler

Thruxton 1200 R

Tiger 800 XCX

Tiger 800 XCA

Tiger 1200 XCX

Tiger 1200 XCA

Tiger 900

Tiger 900 Rally Pro

Rocket R

R179,000

R169,000

R192,000

R186,000

R205,000

R226,000

R260,000

R192,000

R215,000

R299,000

ZT250 R

ZT310R

ZT310X

ZT310T

ZONTES

R44,900

R63,900

R68,900

R74,900

DEALERS CONTACTS WHO

ADVERTISE WITH US

GIXXER SF 250

XS125 K Delivery

NH125

XS200 Blaze

XS200 Trail Blaze

Citycom 300l

SYM

R16,495

R25,995

R18,495

R19,995

R54,995

Rocket GT

XTZ125

YBR125G

TW200

XT250

XT1200Z

XT1200ZE

MT07 ABS

MT09 ABS

MT07 Tracer

MT09 Tracer

MT09 Tracer GT

YAMAHA

R315,000

R35,950

R28,950

R59,950

R69,950

R194,950

R228,950

R124,950

R152,950

R144,950

R159,950

R189,950

Aprilia SA (IMI) Tel: 010 443 4596

BMW West Rand Tel: 011 761 3500

SMG Motorrad Umhlanga Tel: 031 502 9800

SMG Motorrad Noth Coast Tel: 035 426 0020

Daly Motorrad Klerksdorp Tel: 018 011 1888

Ducati SA Tel: 012 765 0600

Honda East Tel: 011 826 4444

Holeshot Husqvarna Tel: 011 823 5830

Indian Motorcycles SA Tel: 010 020 6195

TRD Kawasaki Tel: 011 051 9104

Fire it Up Kawasaki Tel: 011 467 0737

RAD KTM Tel: 011 234 5007

TRAX KTM Tel: 012 111 0190

KTM Centurion Tel: 012 643 1110

Moto Guzzi SA (IMI) Tel: 010 443 4596

Fire it Up MV Agusta Tel: 011 467 0737

KCR Suzuki Tel: 011 975 5545

SYM TRD Motorcycles Tel: 011 051 9104

Zontes SA Tel: 012 565 6730

All pricing correct as at time of publishing, but may vary due to exchange rates etc.


ROAD

TRACK

DIRT

GET A GRIP ON 2020!

///RACE

///TRACK

KR451

D213 PRO

///TRACK

///ROAD

GPR 300

ROADSMART 3 ROADSPORT 2

Q3+ Q4

S594/A

///OFFROAD

///TRAIL

AT81 & AT81EX

MX33 MX53 EN91 TRAILMAX MISSION

50/50

DUNLOPTYRESSA

Get a Grip on 2020! Email Nicole Swanepoel at

nicole.swanepoel@srigroup.co.za or contact our call centre on 011 418 3088.

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines