24 Seven August 2020

cyacyl

24 Seven is a monthly, free magazine for personal growth, professional development, and self-empowerment. The approach is holistic, incorporating mind, body, soul, and spirit. As philosopher Francis Bacon said, “Knowledge is power.” Use this information to live your best life now.




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EDITOR IN CHIEF

Joan Herrmann

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Lindsay Pearson

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Matt Herrmann

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

Chris Giordano

Andrea Valentie

Oliver Pane

CONTRIBUTORS

Lorie Gardner, RN, NBC-HWC

Sean Grover, LCSW

Gayle Gruenberg, CPO-CD, CVO

Rick Hanson, PhD

Joan Herrmann

Mark Hyman, MD

Linda Mitchell, CPC


FROM THE EDITOR

Courage involves facing our fears, but

it is also about resilience, grit, and having

a built-in BS detector and knowing when

and how to use it.

I recently had a conversation with Evy

Poumpouras, author of the book Becoming

Bulletproof: Protect Yourself, Read People,

Influence Situations, and Live Fearlessly,

in which we discussed how we can

heighten our natural instincts to move

from fear to fearlessness.

Evy was raised in a low-income

neighborhood where struggle and crime

was the way of life. She believes that two

things come from that type of upbringing:

either a person becomes more afraid, or

that person rebels against fear. She chose

the latter.

According to Evy, research shows that

kids who grow up in inner cities, in rougher

environments, tend to be more resilient

later in life than those who grow up in a

more protective environment. Reflecting

on her life, she agrees.

“When you grow up in a difficult

environment you’re used to dealing with

problems and adversity and so from a

young age, you begin to problem solve,

you begin to start figuring out how to

solve an issue or problem,” said Evy. “But

when you’re too cocooned, when you’re

not dealing with a lot of obstacles, when

you’re growing up and extremely shielded,

it does you a disservice because later in

life when things do happen - you don’t get

that job, you get fired, you break up in a

relationship, you’re not getting the things

you thought you should get - you struggle.

Evy shared with me lessons and

insights that she learned from protecting

presidents and working in the most elite

security force in the world.

Evy is a former secret service special

agent who is the recipient of the United

States Secret Service Medal of Valor Award

for her heroism on 9/11. She has been

part of the protective details for former

presidents Obama, both Bushes, Clinton,

and Ford, and is the costar of Bravo’s Spy

Games.

Listen to my conversation with Evy:

https://spoti.fi/38RrMry

— Joan Herrmann


EVY POUMPOURAS

ISSUE NO.118


INSIDE THIS

ISSUE

MEET THE MOST POWERFUL RELAXATION

MINERAL AVAILABLE

BYMARK HYMAN, MD

PAGE 12

EMPTY THE CUP

BY RICK HANSON, PHD

PAGE 18

STAYING SAFE ONLINE

BY JOAN HERRMANN

PAGE 22

ON THIS MONTH’S

COVER

EVY POUMPOURAS SHARES LESSONS AND INSIGHTS

LEARNED FROM PROTECTING PRESIDENTS AND

WORKING IN THE MOST ELITE SECURITY FORCE

IN THE WORLD. SHE IS A FORMER SECRET SERVICE

SPECIAL AGENT WHO IS THE RECIPIENT OF THE

UNITED STATES SECRET SERVICE MEDAL OF VALOR

AWARD FOR HER HEROISM ON 9/11. EVY HAS BEEN

PART OF THE PROTECTIVE DETAILS FOR FORMER

PRESIDENTS OBAMA, BOTH BUSHES, CLINTON,

AND FORD. SHE IS THE COSTAR OF BRAVO’S SPY

GAMES AND AUTHOR OF THE BOOK, BECOMING

BULLETPROOF: PROTECT YOURSELF, READ PEOPLE,

INFLUENCE SITUATIONS, AND LIVE FEARLESSLY.

LISTEN TO EVY ON CYACYL:

https://spoti.fi/38RrMry

HOW TO HEAL YOUR INNER SELF IN QUARANTINE

BY SEAN GROVER

PAGE 26

BE PROACTIVE AND BE READY FOR AN

EMERGENCY HOSPITALIZATION

BY LORIE GARDNER

PAGE 30

ORGANIZE FOR COLLEGE SUCCESS

BY GAYLE GRUENBERG

PAGE 34

PHOTOGRAPHY PROVIDED BY EVY POUMPOURAS

FINDING COMFORT IN UNCERTAIN TIMES

BY LINDA MITCHELL

PAGE 38

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ISSUE

NO.118

AUGUST

2020

MEET THE

M O S T

POWERFUL

RELAXATION

MINERAL

AVAILABLE

A deficiency in this critical nutrient makes you twice

as likely to die as other people, according to a study

published in The Journal of Intensive Care Medicine. It

also accounts for a long list of symptoms and diseases,

which are easily helped and often cured by adding this

nutrient. In fact, in my practice, this nutrient is one of my

secret weapons against illness. Yet up to half of Americans

are deficient in this nutrient and don’t know it.

Written by Mark Hyman, MD


I’m talking about magnesium.

It is an antidote to stress, the most powerful relaxation

mineral available, and it can help improve your sleep.

I find it very funny that more doctors aren’t clued in to

the benefits of magnesium, because we use it all the time

in conventional medicine. But we never stop to think about

why or how important it is to our general health or why it

helps our bodies function better.

I remember using magnesium when I worked in the

emergency room. It was a critical “medication” on the crash

cart. If someone was dying of a life-threatening arrhythmia

(or irregular heart beat), we used intravenous magnesium.

If someone was constipated or needed to prepare for

colonoscopy, we gave them milk of magnesia or a green

bottle of liquid magnesium citrate, which emptied their

bowels. If pregnant women came in with pre-term labor,

or high blood pressure of pregnancy (pre-eclampsia) or

seizures, we gave them continuous high doses of intravenous

magnesium.

But you don’t have to be in the hospital to benefit from

getting more magnesium. You can start taking regular

magnesium supplementation today and see results.

The Relaxation Mineral

Think of magnesium as the relaxation mineral. Anything

that is tight, irritable, crampy, and stiff — whether it is a

body part or an even a mood — is a sign of magnesium

deficiency.

This critical mineral is actually responsible for over 300

enzyme reactions and is found in all of your tissues — but

mainly in your bones, muscles, and brain. You must have it

for your cells to make energy, for many different chemical

pumps to work, to stabilize membranes, and to help muscles

relax.

When was the last time you had a good dose of seaweed,

nuts, greens, and beans? If you are like most Americans,

your nut consumption mostly comes from peanut butter.

That is why the list of conditions that are found related

to magnesium deficiency is so long. In fact, there are over

3,500 medical references on magnesium deficiency!

Even so, this mineral is mostly ignored because it is not

a drug, even though it is MORE powerful than drugs in

many cases. That’s why we use it in the hospital for lifethreatening

and emergency situations like seizures and

heart failure.

You might be magnesium deficient if you have any of the

following symptoms:

• Muscle cramps or twitches

• Insomnia

• Irritability

• Sensitivity to loud noises

• Anxiety

• Autism

• ADD

• Palpitations

• Angina

• Constipation

• Anal spasms

• Headaches

• Migraines

• Fibromyalgia

• Chronic fatigue

• Asthma

• Kidney stones

• Diabetes

• Obesity

• Osteoporosis

• High blood pressure

• PMS

• Menstrual cramps

• Irritable bladder

• Irritable bowel syndrome

• Reflux

• Trouble swallowing

Magnesium deficiency has even has been linked to

inflammation in the body and higher CRP levels.

In our society, magnesium deficiency is a huge problem.

By conservative standards of measurement (blood, or

serum, magnesium levels), 65 percent of people admitted

to the intensive care unit — and about 15 percent of the

general population — have magnesium deficiency.

But this seriously underestimates the problem, because a

serum magnesium level is the least sensitive way to detect

a drop in your total body magnesium level. So rates of

magnesium deficiency could be even higher!

The reason we are so deficient is simple: Many of us eat

a diet that contains practically no magnesium — a highlyprocessed,

refined diet that is based mostly on white flour,

meat, and dairy (all of which have no magnesium). When

was the last time you had a good dose of sea vegetables

(seaweed), nuts, greens, and beans? If you are like most

Americans, your nut consumption mostly comes from

peanut butter, and mostly in chocolate peanut butter cups.

Much of modern life conspires to help us lose what little

magnesium we do get in our diet. Magnesium levels are

decreased by excess alcohol, salt, coffee, phosphoric acid in

colas, profuse sweating, prolonged or intense stress, chronic

diarrhea, excessive menstruation, diuretics (water pills),

antibiotics and other drugs, and some intestinal parasites.


In fact, in one study in Kosovo, people under chronic war

stress lost large amounts of magnesium in their urine.

This is all further complicated by the fact that magnesium

is often poorly absorbed and easily lost from our bodies. To

properly absorb magnesium, we need a lot of it in our diet,

plus enough vitamin B6, vitamin D, and selenium to get the

job done.

A recent scientific review of magnesium concluded,

“It is highly regrettable that the deficiency of such an

inexpensive, low-toxicity nutrient results in diseases that

cause incalculable suffering and expense throughout the

world.” I couldn’t’ have said it better myself.

It is difficult to measure and hard to study, but magnesium

deficiency accounts for untold suffering — and is simple

to correct. So if you suffer from any of the symptoms I

mentioned or have any of the diseases I noted, don’t worry

— it is an easy fix. Here’s how.

• Stop draining your body of magnesium. Limit coffee,

colas, salt, sugar, and alcohol.

• Learn how to practice active relaxation.

• Check with your doctor if your medication is causing

magnesium loss (many high blood pressure drugs or

diuretics cause loss of magnesium).

• Eat foods high in magnesium. Include the following in

your diet as often as you can: Kelp, wheat bran, wheat germ,

almonds, cashews, buckwheat, brazil nuts, dulse, filberts,

millet, pecans, walnuts, rye, tofu, soy beans, brown rice,

figs, dates, collard greens, shrimp, avocado, parsley, beans,

barley, dandelion greens, and garlic

• Take magnesium supplements

• Take a hot bath with Epsom salts (magnesium sulfate).

This is a good way to absorb and get much needed

magnesium.

So if you’re coping with the symptoms here, relax.

Magnesium is truly a miracle mineral. It is essential for

lifelong vibrant health.

About The Author

MARK HYMAN, MD

Mark Hyman, MD, is a practicing family physician, a #1

New York Times bestselling author and an internationally

recognized leader, speaker, educator, and advocate in his

field. He is the director of the Cleveland Clinic Center for

Functional Medicine, chairman of the board of the Institute for

Functional Medicine, and the founder and medical director of

The UltraWellness Center.

To Learn More Visit:

www.DrHyman.com



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EMPTY

THE CUP

Written by Rick Hanson, PhD


O

Once upon a time, a scholar came to visit a saint. After the

scholar had been orating and propounding for a while, the saint

proposed some tea. She slowly filled the scholar’s cup: gradually

the tea rose to the very brim and began spilling over onto the

table, yet she kept pouring and pouring. The scholar burst out:

“Stop! You can’t add anything to something that’s already full!”

The saint set down the teapot and replied, “Exactly.”

Whether it’s the blankness of a canvas to an artist, the silence

between the notes in music, bare dirt for a new garden, the

not-knowing openness of a scientist exploring new hypotheses,

an unused shelf in a closet or cupboard, or some open time

in your schedule, you need space to act effectively, dance with

your partners, and have room around your emotional reactions.

Yet most of us, me included, tend to stuff as much as possible

into whatever room is available – room in closets, schedules,

budgets, relationships, and even the mind itself.

Personally, my own mind is often filled with themes of

work: details of tasks to do, problems to avert, opportunities to

capture keep swelling up again into awareness to capture my

attention. For a friend of mine, the wallpaper of her own mind,

as she puts it, is rumination about her health problems.

Remember the cup: its value is in the space, the emptiness,

it holds.

How?

Be more mindful of the element of space, openness, possibility,

reserve capacity, and emptiness in your life. This includes room

in a drawer, the volume of air in a kitchen, the vacuum in a

lightbulb, openmindedness in a friend, or minimal traffic on a

highway. Consciously appreciate the beneficial somethings that

are the gifts of various nothings.

What’s the “wallpaper” in your own mind – the everyday

preoccupations that fill it up like bermuda grass taking over

a yard? The usual suspects include recurring worries, issues

with work, resentments, and regrets. Try to be more mindful of

these, and disengage faster when they start taking over. Shift

your attention to something that’s positive and interesting,

and then try to invest yourself more in this topic.

Sometimes you’re just stuck with a big bucket of tasks yet to

do (I’ve been there . . . oops, I still am here!). But at least empty

the bucket faster than you fill it with new tasks.

Put some space between finishing one thing and starting

another. For example, after sending one email, take a breath

before replying to another one; when the dishes are done,

pause for a break; in a conversation, let the ending of one topic

reverberate for a moment before launching another one; take

real time for lunch.

Drop the stuff you can no longer afford to lug around. At sea

level, you can run with a brick in your backpack, but if you’re

hiking on a mountain, that brick’s got to go. Similarly, most of

us have some habits, indulgences, ideas, grudges, or fixations

that were kind of OK at one time but now – with changing

circumstances (such as juggling more balls, raising a family,

aging) – are wearing you down and really need to go. What’s

your own brick? What would you gain by emptying it out of

your own backpack?

Explore the practice not-adding as a form of subtracting,

emptying: not firing back with a tart rejoinder in a quarrel . . .

not presuming you know the right answer to something . . . not

taking on a new commitment . . . not plopping more stuff on

the counter . . . not piling on another self-criticism . . .

Enjoy emptiness in the forms that speak to you: perhaps the

quiet at night when everyone’s asleep but you, a blank page

in your journal, a friend’s receptive listening, an open counter

as you begin to cook (love this one myself), a hole in your

schedule, the space between thoughts as your mind calms and

becomes still, or a Saturday with no plans at all.

Or a cup waiting patiently for tea.

About The Author

RICK HANSON, PHD

Rick Hanson, PhD, is a psychologist, Senior Fellow of the Greater

Good Science Center at UYC Berkeley, and a New York Times bestselling

author. His books have been published in 29 languages and

include Neurodharma, Resilient, and Hardwiring Happiness.

To Learn More Visit:

www.RickHanson.net



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201-365-7946


August 2020 Issue

Staying Safe Online

Written by Joan Herrmann

E

Every day we are bombarded with

information about the coronavirus outbreak. Doctors

and other healthcare providers share tips to help us stay

healthy, and we are even taught the proper way to wash

our hands. While personal health and hygiene are of the

utmost importance, perhaps equally important is learning

how to maintain cyber health and hygiene during this

time.

Social distancing and stay at home directives have

confined people to their homes and we are using internet

and online services for social interaction, shopping,

paying bills, and completing work projects. And, while

we are blessed to have this technology, this lifeline comes

with heightened security risks. Unfortunately, threats

exist beyond the disease itself and criminals will use the

situation to take advantage of you! Here are a few ways to

help you stay safe online.

Watch out for scams. There are people who take

legitimate sites like the CDC or hospitals, and send out

official looking email messages about COVID-19. They

insert links in the message in an attempt to get you to

click for more information. They embed malware in the

links so that when you click, they can infect your computer

giving them access to login information, personal data, etc.

Do not open anything unless you visit the actual site, and

never click on a link or open an attachment, no matter how

legitimate it looks!

Think before you share. There is an abundance of

disinformation being disseminated in an attempt to

mislead you. Obtain your information from legitimate

sources only – actual news outlet sites, CDC, etc. Do not

trust third parties that you have never heard of before.

Always check the validity of information before sharing.

Practice good hygiene. In additional to washing

your hands after every physical contact, practice cyber

hygiene to keep your computer system and personal

information safe. Clean your computer of any viruses,

secure passwords, download patches and updates, and do

not download anything from unknown sources. Be extra

vigilant on verification.

Keep your personal information private. Being

confined to your home may create the need for connection,

which may cause you to lower your social media guard and

overshare. More time online may lead to riskier behavior.

Be careful not to provide more personal information

than normal and always monitor what appears in the

background of a photo or livestream. Be sure to maintain

proper privacy settings.

Be mindful of online contacts and connections.

Increased social media use can open the door for

communicating with strangers. Carefully vet a person

before accepting a connection request.

Avoid product scams. Searching the web can expose

you to scams. If you find a hard to acquire product on the

site of an unknown source, ask yourself why this site has

the product when other reputable sites do not. Follow the

rule of thumb: if it seems too good to be true, it is. Stick

with legitimate sites when ordering online.

Implementing safe online practices are important on any

“normal” day, but now when so many are vulnerable, it’s of

the utmost importance. As the old saying goes, “An ounce

of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”

About The Author

JOAN HERRMANN

Joan Herrmann is the creator of the Change Your Attitude…

Change Your life brand and host of the radio show and podcast,

Conversations with Joan. She is a motivational speaker and the

publisher of 24 Seven magazine.

To Learn More Visit:

www.JoanHerrmann.com



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WRITTEN BY SEAN GROVER

HOW TO HEAL YOUR

INNER SELF IN

QUARANTINE

Q

IN QUARANTINE, SOONER OR LATER, YOUR INNER WORLD

COMES KNOCKING, AND UNFORTUNATELY FOR MANY OF US,

IT WON’T BE A FRIENDLY VISIT.


M

Many of my patients have

experienced a resurgence of anxiety and depression since

the lockdown began. Critical inner voices muted for years

have returned with a vengeance. Those nasty, annoying

voices that are quick to promote our failings, criticize

our appearance, and poke holes in our confidence. Even

a simple glance in the mirror can trigger an avalanche of

disapproval.

Your inner critic’s goal? To turn you into a miserable,

complaining curmudgeon. Let’s examine why your inner

critic seems to thrive in quarantine.

Most of us didn’t choose to isolate. The pandemic did that

for us. Perhaps the most damaging aspect of the quarantine

is the lack of access to quality relationships that refresh

us. You can’t spend time with friends or family. If you’re

single, you can’t date. If you’re a student, you can’t see your

classmates. If you’re a sports fan, you can’t enjoy a game. If

you’re a grandparent, you can’t play with your grandkids.

And if you’re feeling lonely and just want a hug from a

friend, chances are you can’t have that either.

Unfortunately, the more you lose contact with the

activities and relationships that reinvigorate you, the more

despairing you feel. Is it any wonder that you’re feeling

beaten down?

When you’re in motion, moving from place to place,

your focus is outside of yourself. Frequently, you don’t have

time to spend with your thoughts and feelings; you’re just

too busy checking off your to-do list. But does a busy life

necessarily mean a happy one?

For many, the quarantine has forced us to slow down, hit

the pause button, and reflect on our choices. In this way,

quarantine naturally pushes us toward greater mindfulness.

Resilience comes from winning the battle with your

inner critic. It begins with quieting those negative voices

and making room for more positive ones. To do that, you’ll

need a strategy.

Start where you are. Rather than focusing on what you

can’t do, focus on what you can. Take up a new hobby,

challenge yourself to be more creative, tend to those tasks

that you’re avoiding. Stop worrying about things you can’t

control, and be proactive about what you can.

Foster gratitude. Gratitude is a force that can unleash

tremendous trapped energy. It can lighten your load and

refresh your outlook. Gratitude journals are an excellent

tool for inspiring more gratefulness in your life. If

journaling isn’t for you, try writing a letter to someone you

appreciate. Tell them how much they mean to you; not only

will you make your day, you’ll make theirs too.

Count your blessings. With so much bad news coming

at you, take time to recognize all the good things in your

life. Negativity is like gravity; it pushes you down. Counting

your blessings lifts you and reminds you that it’s still

possible to find simple ways to enjoy life.

Praise yourself. During stressful times, find a way to

praise yourself. Go ahead, admire, and celebrate yourself.

After all, you’re hanging in there; you’re still here, you’re

still striving. You’re like Rocky Balboa, still on your feet and

fighting.

Stop complaining. Complaining drains your energy,

dampens your spirits, and has a corrosive effect on your state

of mind. It also promotes helplessness and telegraphs your

victim status to the world. Breaking the complaining habit

won’t be easy; it will require a force of will to redirect those

impulses. But you’ll start to feel better once you muster the

courage to say, “The complaint department is closed!”

About The Author

SEAN GROVER, LCSW

Sean Grover, L.C.S.W., is a psychotherapist and the

author of When Kids Call the Shots: How to Seize Control from

Your Darling Bully and Enjoy Being a Parent Again.

To Learn More Visit:

www.SeanGrover.com


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Be Proactive

And Be

Ready For An

Emergency

Written by Lorie Gardner, RN, BSN, NBC-HWC

A

As we start to gain some

insights on the COVID-19 pandemic, it has become

clear that the need to be prepared for an emergency

hospitalization is very important.

Equally important, is to have a conversation with

your loved one, friend, or private patient advocate

who will be your main contact person during the

hospitalization. Think hard about who you want

that to be. It should be someone who is committed

to assisting you in understanding what is going on

in the hospital, is not afraid to ask the important

questions, and will challenge the situation and

completely understand what your wishes are.

Legal Matters

Being prepared legally is an important step. Liaise

with your attorney and have a Power of Attorney and


a Healthcare Proxy document

set up. This will protect you in

circumstances when you are

unable to make decisions for

yourself. Also, have an Advance

Health Care Directive compiled

so it is clear to your person who is

making decisions for you, when

you can’t, what your wishes are.

Be Prepared

It is wise to ensure which

hospitals in your area are in your

health insurance network ahead

of time. You can also check

the hospital(s) ratings. Some

hospitals are safer than others.

You can check the LeapFrog

Hospital Safety Grade website,

and if you are having surgery,

you can check your surgeon’s

ratings at Propublica’s Surgeon

Scorecard site.

Communication Plan

This pandemic has made very clear the need to have

a communication plan while in the hospital. You may

have many family members or friends that want to be

involved in your status and recovery. It is essential to

have one person who is dedicated to liaising with the

nursing staff, social workers, and medical team to stay

on top of the plan of care and test results.

It is wise to set up a patient portal for the hospital

so certain data can be monitored. This person needs

to introduce him/herself to the medical team as the

person to be directly involved in every detail of the

hospitalization. Ask each member of the medical

and hospital team for a business card/contact

information and the best times to get updates.

Monitoring Progress

Always be aware of what the daily treatment plan

is for the day. Frequently, the plan of care and/or

goals are written on a whiteboard in the patient’s

room. Understand what all of your medications are

indicated for and their possible side effects. If a new

medication is started while in the hospital, make

sure you know who prescribed it and why. Ask what

the potential benefits and side effects are.

If you have any imaging tests, ask the reason

for the test. Request the results as soon as they are

available and if the results require any additional

treatment. Understand the lab results they are

collecting and what they mean.

This may all be too much for you as the patient

From The Story

“This

pandemic has

made very

clear the need

to have a

communication

plan while in

the hospital.”

since you may want to concentrate on healing. Have

your loved one, friend, or private patient advocate

maintain a notebook and keep detailed notes on your

progress and actions taken while in the hospital.

Hospital Tool Kit

It can be helpful to have a bag containing

vital information should you have an emergent

hospitalization. This could include the following:

• Fact sheet – contains your name, address, phone

number, date of birth and any allergies

• Emergency contact person – name, phone

number, email and text information

• Medication list – list all the prescribed drugs, over

the counter drugs and supplements you take

• Medical conditions – list any chronic or acute

diseases

• Past surgeries and hospitalizations – a list of any

surgeries or hospitalizations you have had listed in

date order

• Insurance information – a copy of the front and

back of your insurance card

• HIPAA or Healthcare Proxy document

• Advance directive

• POLST or MOLST form, if available

• Power of Attorney

• Patient portal information

• Overnight bag with your cell phone and charger,

24 hours of medications, hearing aid, glasses,

notebook and pen, toiletries.

• Other – a note about anything special the hospital

staff or emergency responders should know about

you if you are not able to communicate yourself.

There were many people during this pandemic that

were admitted to the hospital in an emergency and

there was unavoidable stress due to no visitation for

family members. Being prepared with a plan, a contact

person, and the above information can increase the

ability to communicate and lessen the stress.

About The Author

LORIE GARDNER, RN, BSN, NBC-HWC

Lorie Gardner founded Healthlink Advocates,

Inc., to assist people with all aspects of their

healthcare. As private nurse patient advocates

and board certified health and wellness coaches,

they partner with clients seeking assistance

navigating the complex healthcare system

and those seeking self-directed, lasting health

improvements aligned with their values.

To Learn More Visit:

www.healthlinkadvocates.com


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August 2020 Issue

Organize for College Success

Written by Gayle M. Gruenberg, CPO-CD, CVO

A

Are you or do you

have a student starting college this fall?

Whether attending in person or online,

being organized can make a big difference

between a smooth transition and absolute

chaos.

Remember the old adage, “a place for

everything and everything in its place.”

Create zones (study zone, personal care

zone, quiet zone, food zone) and label

them (even if only in your mind). Equip

each zone with everything needed to do

the task performed there, like books and a

computer in the study zone.

For students on a campus, every item

has its assigned spot, like a specific hook

for a backpack, so it always gets hung up

when coming into the room and is right

there when the student is racing out

the door to class. A shower caddy keeps

personal care supplies corralled and easily

carried to the communal bathroom on

residence hall floor.

Have only the bare essentials. Dorm

rooms are small and bedrooms at home

may have to double as classrooms.

Being surrounded by too much can be

overwhelming and distracting, lead to

having nowhere to put anything, and

cause stress over having to keep track of

it all.

One essential if sharing space: have a

hamper or laundry bag in a convenient

place to avoid dirty clothes piling up

all over the floor. Do the laundry. Fold

and hang up clothes as soon as possible.

Keeping the floor clear (besides avoiding

trips and falls) can go a long way toward

roommate amity.

College is much less structured than

high school, and students suddenly

have freedom around their time. Use a

planner. It doesn’t matter if the planner

is paper or electronic. The one you use is

the right one for you. Record everything,

both small and large. Include test dates,

paper due dates, progress deadlines

(to stay on track, e.g. have an outline

for a paper due on 12/15 done by 11/1),

study sessions, activity meetings, sports

practices, and when to do laundry. Block

off prep time, the time it takes to do the

activity, and time for transitioning to

the next activity. My favorite suggestion:

color code as much as possible. Example:

use red for tests and paper due dates,

blue for social time, green for activities,

or whatever works for you.

One minute of planning saves 10

minutes of doing. Each night, prepare

everything you need for the next day in

your backpack or laid out on your desk.

Self-care is an important part of college

life, especially if living away from home.

A healthy body is essential for a healthy

mind. Strive for a balance of nutrition,

hydration, exercise, good sleep, fresh air,

social interaction, and “brain breaks” for

some down time and fun.

About The Author

GAYLE M. GRUENBERG

Gayle M. Gruenberg, CPO-CD, CVO, is the

chief executive organizer of Let’s Get Organized,

LLC, an organizer coach, and the creator

of the Make Space for Blessings system.

To Learn More Visit:

www.LGOrganized.com


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ISSUE

NO.118

CULMINATION

A U G

2020

FINDING

COMFORT IN

UNCERTAIN

TIMES

Written by Linda Mitchell, CPC


M

Most of us thrive when

feeling comfortable, in control with a plan we know we

can follow. We’re better at taking calculated risks when

things go as expected and life feels stable and predictable.

But what about when the opposite is true? How do we

stay grounded, steady and comfortable enough to keep

moving forward when our lives are turned upside down

and the unexpected becomes our new reality?

These steps prove helpful in times of uncertainty and

change:

Realize uncertainty is a normal part of life. We

face uncertainties each day - detours, setbacks, tough

decisions, to name a few. In small measure, it doesn’t feel

as uncomfortable or overwhelming. We don’t focus on or

embrace it, so when uncertainty becomes a major player,

it throws us for a loop. Uncertainty is challenging, but

with awareness and tenacity, the fear that accompanies

it can be conquered. It helps to remember how much

experience we’ve actually had.

Beat the brain’s bias. Our brains are wired to keep

us in the familiar and to avoid danger, risk, fear and

uncertainty. When we face trials, we’re inclined to focus

first on what can go wrong versus what can go right –

we’re just wired that way.

The control we do have is our power of choice; the

thoughts, feelings and beliefs residing in our subconscious

brains, are what truly control us. Because they’re based

in large part on the decisions we made long ago, we also

have the ability to make new decisions that serve us in

our current reality.

New circumstances call for new empowering beliefs. We

do this by examining old limiting beliefs that created our

knee-jerk reactions and discern if they’re in alignment

with the person we are today. If not, search for when and

where those beliefs were created (old programing) and

consciously choose new, more empowering decisions to

become your new truth.

Ease your grip on control. Needing control is a

natural response to anxiety. When we’re stressed or

fearful, we cling to anything that gives us the perception

of control. We may be just kidding ourselves, but the

illusion of control is powerful and provides solace

anyway. Easing the need for control opens us to new

possibilities and opportunities.

Accept present circumstances whether you like

them or not. Accepting what is allows us to release

the struggle and reduces the level of suffering we’ll

experience. Try acceptance without judging the situation

as good or bad – it just is. Look for one positive thing

daily, no matter how small. Gratitude is a powerful

means of creating more peace and calm even during

struggle.

Remember past success. You’ve been through

tough times before and you’ll manage again. Apply past

successes to the current reality. Draw on your strengths

to create new solutions and pathways.

Lean on loved ones. Lean on strong relationships

in weak moments. Friends, professionals and loved ones

nurture us and remind us we don’t have to go it alone.

Practice self-compassion and expect better days ahead.

About The Author

LINDA MITCHELL

Linda Mitchell is a board certified executive and personal

coach, speaker and reinvention expert. She empowers

people who feel stuck, overwhelmed or ready for change

to release struggle and evolve to their highest potential as

they transition to their next meaningful role with ease, joy,

confidence and purpose.

To Learn More Visit:

www.LivingInspiredCoaching.com




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