RunwayAW20

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YOUR ESSENTIAL GUIDE TO THE NEW SEASON

UNWAY

AUTUMN

WINTER

CREATIVEHEADMAG.COM

2020




CONTENTS

AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

06

TOP FIVE MOMENTS

The finest selection from the A/W20 runways

14

THE TRENDS

What clients will be demanding this season

22

HOW HAIR HAPPENS

Take a closer look at five key hair stories from Fashion Week

34

RE:CREATE

Satisfy your fashion cravings with a deep dive on the hair backstage

38

I PUT A SPELL ON YOU

Chinese couture label Mithridate makes its London debut at the V&A

42

IN COLLABORATION WITH

How the hair leads pair up with designers at On|Off to make magic happen

44

CENTRAL SAINT MARTINS

We explore how the iconic fashion college celebrates and innovates in 2020

48

A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS

The University of Westminster’s Andrew Groves on menswear and the future of fashion

Cover image: Erdem, courtesy of L’Oréal Professionnel

04 AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

RUNWAY


EDITOR’S LETTER

EDITOR’S LETTER

Welcome dear Runway readers!

2020 may have been officially filed under the most challenging year in recent

times but it all started out so well, thanks to some hair magic at the A/W20 shows.

Looking to the future was a common theme for the hairstylists and designers alike,

from the futuristic silver bobs at Erdem and Star Wars-inspired ’dos at Angus

Tsui (from page 34) to the Central Saint Martins MA show, which showcased

the bright young stars of tomorrow (see Top Five Moments from page 6).

And if that wasn’t enough to whet your appetites, we also have a feature on

the amazing Mithridate show at the V&A over on page 38, before we take a

look at how designers at On|Off collaborate with the L’Oréal Professionnel hair

leads on page 42 – a must-read for budding session stylists. Then there’s an

interview with University of Westminster’s Andrew Groves (page 48) and, on

the subject of young brilliance, this year L’Oréal Professionnel celebrates its

20th anniversary of working with Central Saint Martins (see page 44), where

the iconic school was also figuring out how to turn around the graduating class

of its BA Fashion course during lockdown.

Global pandemics aside, A/W20 is still set to be an inspirational one for

hair with looks we’re sure will weather any storm (quite literally judging by the

‘windswept’ textures on display in Trends, from page 14).

This year may have been an unprecedented one but it’s also forced us all to

think a little more laterally and be a bit more inventive when it comes to

showcasing our craft. I for one can’t wait to see what you all do next!

Cassie Steer

Runway guest editor

Beauty editor

Editor in chief: Amanda Nottage Art: Graeme White Chief sub editor: Adam Wood

Contributors: Kelsey Dring, Deborah Murtha, Anna Samson Publisher: Catherine Handcock

RUNWAY ALFOL LTD, PO BOX 289, HEXHAM, NE46 9HJ

01434 610 416 enquiries@alfol.co.uk

Runway is published twice a year by Alfol Ltd. CreativeHEAD is a registered trademark. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without prior permission of the publisher. All information correct at the time of going to press

RUNWAY

AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

05


TOP FIVE

MOMENTS

IN HAIR &

FASHION

The part where we get to big up our favourite quintet…

06 AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

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GILTY PLEASURES

ERDEM

‘ROLL OUT THE BACOFOIL and crank up the

fabulosity factor to gas mark 10’ was the

(probable) call to arms at the National Portrait

Gallery, where floors were slicked in silver to

transform them into a resplendent runway.

The occasion? Why, Erdem’s A/W20 show of

course, where the designer had sought inspiration

from his favourite venue’s upcoming retrospective

of Cecil Beaton’s ‘Bright Young Things’ portraits.

As scandalous as they were glamorous, this motley

crew of boho aristos and smart-set socialites were

the glitterati of the roaring 1920s, and the designer

took a deep dive into their gilded universe by way

of Beaton’s theatrical silver foil backdrops. Even

the sprinkling of seven silver bob haircuts among

the modern-day finger waves were gutsy rather

than bonkers, which Anthony Turner for L’Oréal

Professionnel attributed to the high-shine finish

keeping things from going too “costume drama”.

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AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

07


BRIGHT YOUNG

THINGS

CENTRAL SAINT MARTINS MA

CECIL BEATON’S in-crowd had nothing on this

multifarious and multi-talented bunch. The

Central Saint Martins MA show saw the atrium of

the college transformed into an immersive space

complete with projections and soundscapes, and

the ensuing 100 looks from 21 students was an

assault on the senses – in the best possible way.

From cyber knitwear to classic workwear and

everything in-between, the succession of styles was

at times trippy and thrilling, while the hair, led by

Richard Phillipart of The Boutique Atelier, was as

idiosyncratic as the garbs (often an amped up

version of the model’s natural texture). One of the

winners of L’Oréal Professionnel’s coveted Creative

Award was Sarah McCormack, who summarised

her collection (think feral fairies and worldly wood

nymphs) as “joyriding on a wave of pleasurable

transgression”. It’s a sentiment that couldn’t be

more appropriate for the annus horribilis of 2020.

08 AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

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CULTURE VULTURE

MITHRIDATE

WITH OUR RECENT enforced hiatus on cultural

excursions, Mithridate’s homage to one of our

most treasured institutions is like a retrospective

balm. Named after a semi-mythical remedy to cure

all poisons and ward off potential threats of plague

(note to selves: start stockpiling now), Mithridate

founder and chief designer, Demon Zhang, paid

tribute to the V&A. “The prints are all inspired by

the V&A’s marble architectural surfaces and

medieval murals and artefacts,” she divulged.

Though there was nothing fusty about her timeless

garbs in rich, autumnal hues of russet, wine,

chestnut and fawn. The show saw models swathed

in ruched retro-esque leather dresses, cashmere

rollnecks and kimono-like coats. For the hair, Jack

Merrick-Thirlway at Neville Hair & Beauty for

L’Oréal Professionnel kept things classically chic

with a slick, low side-parted ponytail finished off

with a section wrapped around the base.

RUNWAY

AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

09


CHILD’S PLAY

MOLLY GODDARD

SOMETIMES YOU SEE a snapshot of someone as

a kid and it all falls into place. In this instance the

kid was designer Molly Goddard, and the photo

was one of her with her father published in

Japanese magazine Fruits in 1992, which she sent

out as a press release. Seeing Goddard as a toddler,

complete with red woolly jumper and trousers

with a teeny grey ruffled skirt over the top, was an

enlightening insight into the irreverent styling that

has become her trademark. The resulting collection

was a lesson in self-expression, with mismatched

silhouettes and textural and tonal clashes. And for

the first time ever she introduced a menswear

faction with a decidedly nerdy ’90s bias. Over on

hair, Luke Hersheson for L’Oréal Professionnel

echoed the ’90s sensibilities with his ‘Kirsten

Owen meets Kate Moss’ texture. “We’re using

a hint of oil, to give hair that grungy feel,”

he explained.

10 AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

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BUILT TO LAST

REJINA PYO

Images courtesy of L’Oréal Professionnel

A DANK RAILWAY arch with a crude concrete

floor and questionable drips from the ceiling is

not, on first reflection, the most fitting of venues

for an unforgiving fash pack. But Rejina Pyo is

no ordinary designer. Her ‘found’ space reflects

the environmental awareness that saw her eschew

the allure of a physical invitation for an email

and which keeps her committed to sustainable

production. Pyo’s inspiration for the collection

itself was photographer Harry Gruyaert’s ’80s

photographs of LA and Las Vegas and the

post-minimalist work of sculptor Eva Hesse.

Pyo plundered a muted palette of khaki, rust,

terracotta and retro brown, and the result was

anything but mundane. So what about the hair?

It was equally unpretentious with a ‘just got out

of the bath’ texture that Shiori Takahashi for

L’Oréal Professionnel described as “carefree but

expensive-looking”.

RUNWAY

AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

11


THAT WAS THE

SEASON…

From face masks to fabulous FROWs, it was a funny old Fashion Week but one we’re more than happy to relive…

VIVE LA REVOLUTION

FORGET WEARING your heart on your sleeve; it’s all about

wearing your manifesto on your boiler suit. Following in the

hallowed footsteps of fashion rebels like Dame Vivienne

Westwood and Katherine Hamnett, On|Off kicked off A/W20

with white overalls emblazoned with ‘All Power to the

Imagination’. Borrowing from the slogans of Parisian avant-garde

revolutionaries during the uprisings of 1968, it’s a rally cry to get

behind self-expression and to champion individuality.

Bora Aksu

#AWKS

BRIEFCASES at the ready,

it’s time to get studious

about style. No longer

content with being the

hapless sidekick, nerds are

now fashion protagonists in

their own right. Yes, you

heard it here first; geek is

officially chic. From

thick-rimmed Where’s

Wally? glasses to retro

suiting in all manner of

condiment colours (mustard

and BBQ sauce were

favourites), it’s all about

embracing some terribly

British eccentricity.

TOGA

NEW HORIZONS

ROMANCE WAS being played out somewhere between the

lashline and browbone, as sunset eyes heralded a new dawn

in beauty. These multi-tonal wonders ranged from pretty

ombre washes of pink, orange and gold at Bora Aksu, to more

intense daubs at Charlotte Knowles, while the fluoro hues at

Central Saint Martins MA show were more like a holiday

postcard on acid.

Charlotte Knowles

Central Saint Martins MA

12 AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

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THAT WAS THE SEASON

SPACE INVADERS

Molly Goddard

Mithridate

FROM HIGHBROW to low-key, godly to gritty, this

season’s venues didn’t disappoint in the intrigue stakes

and often it’s the only means of gaining access to

buildings that are otherwise off-limits to the public. Our

first ‘though the keyhole’ moment started at the BFC

Showspace for On|Off; a Brutalist building on the Strand.

Then it was on to Molly Goddard, who chose the lecture

hall and library of Central Hall Westminster as a stately

show setting, while Mithridate opted for the grandeur of

the Medieval and Renaissance galleries at the V&A.

GLAD HANDING

FASHIONISTAS aren’t exactly known for their warm

welcomes but University of Westminster graduate Brandon

Choi took it to the next level. Inspired by the beauty of raw,

unfinished works-in-progress, his calico creations were

elegantly poetic, but it was the plaster of Paris moulds cradled

by some of the models that got our thumbs up as they added an

extra layer of eccentricity. Also rather handy for avoiding

germ-ridden touchpoints we think.

QUILTY FEELINGS

MAKE EVERY day a duvet day in the form of some

fashion comfort food. From quilted jackets to padded

puffas, insulated outerwear is the trend that we’re totally

down with. House of Sheldon Hall’s gargantuan gold

creation at On|Off was pure fashion fantasy. Or, if a tad

more skin on show is more your cup of tea, opt for

Central Saint Martins’ cut-away alien-esque puffas.

House of Sheldon Hall at On|Off

Mithridate

SPOT ON

FORGET SMOKY eyes

and red lips, A/W20 is

all about specks appeal.

Bringing a 3D aspect to

making up faces,

make-up artist Lan

Nguyen-Grealis went

for black and red ‘alien

beauty’ dots in different

configurations at Yan

Dengyu while at

Mithridate, Jorge

Balzaretti used

teeny-tiny pearls to

accessorise the models’

faces. Our verdict?

Make-up on point.

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AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

13


THE

TRENDS

Unexpected accessories and clandestine accents make

for a suspenseful season of creative potential

GLOW-UP

ONCE UPON A TIME, ordinary hair was transformed into

something exceptional. No, not the stuff of hair fairy tales,

we’re talking about the accessories trend that saw pedestrian

plaits transmuted into bewitching braids while everyday objects

metamorphosed into enchanting accoutrements. At House of

Sheldon for On|Off, extreme plait/pony hybrids were

accessorised with a chin chain sewn into the crown for added

authenticity, while at 404 Studio for On|Off covetable charms

were woven into the hippie braids at intervals. Everywhere you

looked, it was all about giving hair a glow-up. But creating

impact doesn’t have to be ostentatious, and while the diamante

headbands at Erdem were fabulously flamboyant; the plain,

silver bobby pins that were used on some of the other models

were equally arresting when set against the dark finger waves.

Context, it seems, is everything, whether it’s pinning a plaited

weft across the back of the head as Daniel Galvin’s Frankie

Pullen did at the University of Westminster BA show or using

stationery to elevate a look to dazzling effect. Cue Mark Woolley

at Electric Hairdressing for L’Oréal Professionnel’s beautifully

eccentric ode to paperclips at D’IYANU at On|Off. Creating

individual looks, including a fringe made entirely from the office

supplies, the inspiration was the designer’s Nigerian roots and

cultural identity.

Erdem

D’IYANU at On|Off

Erdem

House of Sheldon Hall

at On|Off

GET THE LOOK

271 at On|Off

University of Westminster

THE SHOW: D’IYANU at On|Off

HAIR: Mark Woolley at Electric

Hairdressing for L’Oréal Professionnel

THE LOOK: Eclectic colour and strong

visual impact to celebrate the collection

HOW: Individual looks were created

dependent on each model, with bands

and paperclips woven into hair to

complement the colourful prints. Prep

hair with L’Oréal Professionnel

TECNI.ART Fix Max gel and, on

longer hair for shine opt for L’Oréal

Professionnel Mythic Oil. Tie coloured

elastics around lengths and dreads and

wind short hair into little bunches with

the bands. Pin paperclips at the parting.

14 AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

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TRENDS

House of Sheldon Hall at On|Off

PINT-SIZED PLAITS

SOMETIMES IT’S THE little things… Case in point, the small

but mighty plaits packing a big ol’ power punch on the runways.

These itty-bitty braids may be diminutive in stature, but what they

lack in size they certainly make up for in impact. At the University

of Westminster BA show, Frankie Pullen at Daniel Galvin for

L’Oréal Professionnel got to grips with her ‘renaissance waves’;

baroque ’n’ roll braids coiled around the head with extra

decorative plaited wefts added in to up the drama. Each take on

the trend began with a smooth blow-dry but for Tina Farey of

Rush Hair for L’Oréal Professionnel at 404 Studio at On|Off, the

base texture of her ‘modern hippie’ look was a touch more relaxed.

While curly hair was smoothed, straight hair was given a little

extra movement before delicate boho braids were added to the

front section of the head with a couple more peppered throughout.

Cristiano Basciu at Richard Ward Hair & Metrospa for L’Oréal

Professionnel went for quantity with a ‘student life’ quality over at

Hong Kong’s Blind by JW, while Neville Hair & Beauty’s Jack

Merrick-Thirlway for L’Oréal Professionnel rallied the troops at

House of Sheldon Hall at On|Off, with Royal Horse Guards

braids that commanded attention. Vertical braids close to the scalp

were plaited from the hairline to the crown where they were

gathered into a vertiginous ponytail and wrapped in black latex

to resemble the stately plumes of a cavalry helmet.

University of Westminster

House of Sheldon Hall

at On|Off

Blind by JW

GET THE LOOK

Blind by JW

House of Sheldon Hall

at On|Off

THE SHOW: Blind by JW

HAIR: Cristiano Basciu

at Richard Ward

Hair & Metrospa for

L’Oréal Professionnel

THE LOOK: Student life

HOW: Prep hair with L’Oréal

Professionnel TECNI.ART Pli

and blow-dry smooth, using

some TECNI.ART Liss Control

for an ultra-smooth finish.

Divide the hair into one-inch

sections and plait the lengths

in fine plaits. Finish with

TECNI.ART Ring Light

Shine Spray.

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AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

15


TRENDS

#IWOKEUPLIKETHIS

LIKE THE MUCH-MALIGNED hashtag, the reality of the

born-this-way barnets we all covet requires a little more effort

than might be implied. While the premise of the incidental ’dos

backstage was working with the models’ best hair, product was

still very much a feature; whether it was recreating Richard

Phillipart at The Boutique Atelier for L’Oréal Professionnel’s

undone, ‘slept in’ hair at the Central Saint Martins MA show or

the piecey, cool-girl texture over at Molly Goddard. For the latter,

the glint of grunge was encouraged with a touch of oil by Luke

Hersheson for L’Oréal Professionnel. Speaking of grunge,

‘Come As You Are’ must surely have been on the subliminal

soundtrack to shows such as TOGA where Shiori Takahashi for

L’Oréal Professionnel cited the muse as the models themselves.

“It’s as if she’s just walked into the casting from waking up; fresh,

natural and completely unforced.” Similarly, at Yeung Ching at

On|Off, Luke Pluckrose at Saks referenced natural street looks,

working with the model’s own choppy cuts and colour, adding in

L’Oréal Professionnel’s TECNI.ART Beach Waves to enhance

texture, or straightening with Steampod 3.0 to emphasise more

graphic shapes. Meanwhile, at APUJAN, Taku Morimoto at

Daniel Galvin for L’Oréal Professionnel took the trend to the

next level with his ‘astro travel’ texture that had an undone,

windswept feel.

Central Saint Martins MA

TOGA

Molly Goddard

APUJAN

GET THE LOOK

Yeung Ching

Yeung Ching

THE SHOW: Molly Goddard

HAIR: Luke Hersheson for

L’Oréal Professionnel

THE LOOK: Piecey texture with a

hint of movement. It’s slightly

grungy and undone.

HOW: Spritz L’Oréal Professionnel

TECNI.ART Ring Light Shine

Spray onto dry hair. Run your

fingers through the hair to

distribute the product evenly so it

feels sheeny and separated. If hair is

curly, blow-dry it straighter first

and saturate it using TECNI.ART

Ring Light Shine Spray and

TECNI.ART Liss Control+ Serum.

16 AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

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TRENDS

Charlotte Knowles

DOUBLE TAKE

THERE’S NOTHING MORE satisfying than scoring a twofer

and, in the case of the dual-texture ’dos on display for A/W20

there may have been twice as much graft involved, but the result

was double the fun. While some take on the trend were more

overt, playing on hair that was at opposite ends of the texture

spectrum, others showed a more subtle shift in character. Take

the wet/dry contrasts at the University of Westminster BA show,

where Frankie Pullen of Daniel Galvin for L’Oréal Professionnel

sculpted wet-look Marcel waves in opposition to the more natural

texture of the ends, while at Rejina Pyo, the ‘just got out of the

bath’ look by Shiori Takahashi for L’Oréal Professionnel was only

a shade drier on the mid-lengths than it was at the crown.

Similarly, for ZAFUL at On|Off, Fowler35’s Darren Fowler for

L’Oréal Professionnel created big, fluffy, ’70s curls in stark

contrast to the smooth, shiny roots, while at Bora Aksu the

differentiation was made less distinct by Daniel Martin for

L’Oréal Professionnel. But it was the split personality of Shiori

Takahashi’s slicked-back hair at Charlotte Knowles that really

had us on the edge of our seats. The sleek look was broken up by

‘secret spikes’ that Takahashi explained hinted at the strength of

the model. Depending on the hair texture of each model, these

anarchistic accents either took the form of punky liberty spikes or

tough twists.

Bora Aksu

Charlotte Knowles

Charlotte Knowles

GET THE LOOK

ZAFUL at On|Off

University of Westminster

THE SHOW: Rejina Pyo

HAIR: Shiori Takahashi for

L’Oréal Professionnel

THE LOOK: Fresh and pushed back off

the face, more ‘damp’ than wet.

HOW: Section hair and spray L’Oréal

Professionnel TECNI.ART Pli on

hands and pull through the roots,

pulling hair back completely off the

face. Dry on a low heat with a diffuser

to set, then rub a small amount of

TECNI.ART Web Paste to create

hold and texture around the roots and

the front, as if it’s been pushed back

when wet. Mist the lengths and ends

lightly with water to finish.

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AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

17


BACK TO COOL

As summer fades away, cool things down with L’Oréal Professionnel’s

palette of tailor-made tones and finishes

18 AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

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ADVERTORIAL

1) Google trends FY2019. 2) Consumer Markets Insight Salon Tracker 2020 (conducted 26 March to 2 April 2020, 1,017 Women 16 to 75 years old). 3) Versus Majirel core range. 4) Instrumental wet sliding test.

EVERYONE LOVES A BIT OF SUN – even if we’ve had

to stay closer to home this year than usual. What we don’t

love is the effect it has on hair; unwanted warmth and

brassiness is a key concern for women after summer. 1

L’Oréal Professionnel’s broad palette of cool colours and

finishes means that you can easily reset or refresh tones

which have tipped too far into warmth. With a simple

diagnosis you can offer clients a bespoke finish which

leaves them feeling fabulous and more like themselves.

FEEL GOOD FACTOR

Almost one-third of women use hair colour to feel good

about themselves. 2 Banishing the brassiness can offer

women a huge boost of confidence. All you need is the

right colour product along with the professional technique

to customise the result for each client. From subtle colour

finishes to next-level natural, L’Oréal Professionnel has the

perfect palette.

A REFRESHING RESULT

Tone and refresh older colour work with DIA Light from

L’Oréal Professionnel. This gentle colour option gives intense

shine and 30 per cent more conditioned hair, 4 with a cool-gloss

tone to previous colour and balayage work. The fast development

time is ideal for topping up between permanent colour services

to keep clients looking cool. And with the new shades there’s a

finish for everyone.

ENHANCED NATURAL

Not everyone wants their colour to be eye-catching. Majirel Glow

from L’Oréal Professionnel offers translucent, delicate cool

finishes in 18 shades. Expect more reflect and less base colour for

a neutralised finish with a luminous shine.

A TRUE NEUTRAL

With nine shades to choose from, the Majirel Cool Inforced range

from L’Oréal Professionnel is boosted in cool reflects. 3 These

true-to-tone combination shades, particularly the .13 shades, are

perfect for clients who want a cool, natural beige blonde.

DIVE DEEPER

The Majirel Cool Cover line-up in 19 shades is perfect for a deep,

neutralised result. The cool coverage gives optimal neutralisation,

even on dark bases, with the highest concentration of extra cool

blue reflect to fight brassiness.

Take clients back to cool with L’Oréal Professionnel’s cool colour palette.

To find out more, visit lorealprofessionnel.co.uk or call 0800 030 4034.

@lorealprofessionnel #lorealprouk #backtocool

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AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

19


ADVERTORIAL

“Pro Longer is going to be

amazing for so many of my

clients! Thin, unhealthylooking

ends is one of the

biggest concerns for my guests

in the salon. Pro Longer

plumps and thickens ends to

look full as well as healthy”

ADAM REED, L’ORÉAL PROFESSIONNEL

UK EDITORIAL AMBASSADOR

A TOUCH OF

BRILLIANCE

Many clients are embracing longer locks for the first time, so keep them

coming back with the Microtrim service and Serie Expert Pro Longer

range from L’Oréal Professionnel

LONGER LOCKS ARE IN. Whether it’s

enjoying the extra length gained in lockdown,

embracing the ’70s summer style or looking at

the longer finishes sported by celebrities,

many clients might be tempted to keep their

hair that bit longer now that the tricky

growing out phase has passed. But long hair

with no style or shape is rarely flattering – and

this is where you can keep clients engaged and

returning to the salon.

How many clients beg you to “just take

off the ends?” Well, offering a Microtrim

service keeps the structure of the cut

without taking too much off the ends, a

quick and efficient pop-in service between

longer appointments.

As Microtrims are done on dry hair, you

can emphasise the speedy side of the service,

and pair it with an equally fast-acting

treatment: L’Oréal Professionnel Serie Expert

Pro Longer Ends Filler Concentrate. This

lightweight treatment works on thin ends, or

areas where help is most needed, in just 15

minutes. It works by penetrating the hair fibre

core to plump and thicken the hair from the

inside. Amino acids in the formula work to

strengthen the hair from the outside, leaving

hair looking and feeling thicker at the ends,

where it’s often most fine and weak.

Finish off that Microtrim service with a

take-home prescription from the Serie Expert

Pro Longer range to help clients keep that

length as healthy as possible. From shampoo

to styling, the line-up helps to reduce the

appearance of split ends and keeps hair strong

and looking plumper.

You can fi nd a full tutorial on how to pull off the perfect Microtrim service on L’Oréal Professionnel’s Access education platform at

uk.lorealaccess.com. Discover how the Serie Expert Pro Longer range can restore clients’ lacklustre lengths at lorealprofessionnel.co.uk

or call 0800 030 4034 to stock it in your salon.

@lorealprofessionnel #lorealprouk #serieexpert #prolonger #keepitlonger

20 AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

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ADVERTORIAL

GO BIG

AT HOME

Achieve great volume from root to tip with the winning combination of Steampod 3.0 and

TECNI.ART from L’Oréal Professionnel

IT’S WHAT EVERY client desperately wants – to be able to

style salon-worthy looks at home. Boost their confidence and

self-esteem in one fell swoop by sending them home with the tools

to do exactly that.

Re-establishing your trust and expert opinion with your

clients – extending beyond their time in the salon – is the best way

to remind clients why they come to you in the first place. So share

the insider secrets you know deliver the goods. The TECNI.ART

range isn’t just a lifesaver for stylists; its iconic black and white

bottles and tubs have earned a spot on many a dressing table. Pair

this do-all product edit with the upgraded Steampod 3.0 for sleek,

healthy-looking hair in hardly any time at all.

TO SHAPE TO LIFT TO FIX

TECNI.ART

Pli

This spray does

it all. Add shape,

grip and hold

to any style, or

create volume at

the roots with

this prepping

multi-tasker.

TECNI.ART

Volume Lift

A pillowytextured

mousse

which is both

supple and

strong. Ideal for

creating volume

without weighing

ends down.

TECNI.ART

6-Fix

Don’t worry

about styles

dropping with

this super-strong

fixing spray, with

triple diffusion

for extreme hold

and quick drying.

TO SHINE

TECNI.ART

Ring Light

Shine on with

this ultra-fine

finishing spray.

A micro-dispersed

high-shine spray,

it gives hair

that final,

gleaming finish.

*Instrumental test versus regular straightener.

**Instrumental test versus regular straightener after 15 uses

Discover how at-home styling options from Steampod 3.0 and TECNI.ART from L’Oréal Professionnel can create lasting relationships

with your clients. Visit lorealprofessionnel.co.uk or call 0800 030 4034

@lorealprofessionnel #lorealprouk #steamforward

TO STYLE

Steampod 3.0

Lighter and thinner than previous versions

of the professional styler, Steampod 3.0 uses

steam technology to deliver two-times faster

and two-times smoother styling* than a regular

straightener, with 78 per cent less damage.**

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21


HOW HAIR HAPPENS

Head backstage with five of the most visionary stylists to see them create the looks that count for A/W20

THE SHOW – HOUSE OF SHELDON HALL AT ON|OFF

THE LEAD – JACK MERRICK-THIRLWAY AT NEVILLE

HAIR & BEAUTY FOR L’ORÉAL PROFESSIONNEL

Hair was divided into

sections vertically around

the head, and then plaited

upwards, close to the

scalp. Models were asked

to tip forward in their

seats, so gravity could help

keep the plaits in place

To create a strong

foundation for this

regal look, hair was

prepped with

TECNI.ART Pli

from L’Oréal

Professionnel and

blow-dried smooth

to reduce frizz

Towering ponytails were

created by scooping the

hair up to the crown

and securing tightly

with an elastic

22 AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

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HOW HAIR HAPPENS

The lengths of hair were

smoothed using Steampod

3.0 from L’Oréal

Professionnel, and wire and

tape were wrapped around

the base of the ponytail

The collection had a

Cool Britannia edge,

with models stomping

down the runway in

red, white and blue

Lips were bejewelled

with red glitter, with

sparking accents added

to the inside corners of

the eyes. Brows were

sketched in to be strong,

dark and straight

The Royal Horse

Guards served as the

inspiration behind this

look, and chin straps

were added to

exaggerate this vibe

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HOW HAIR HAPPENS

THE SHOW – ZAFUL AT ON|OFF

THE LEAD – DARREN FOWLER AT FOWLER35

FOR L’ORÉAL PROFESSIONNEL

To set the hair,

TECNI.ART

Constructor from

L’Oréal Professionnel

was sprayed over

and heat applied

with a Steampod 3.0

To begin, hair was

blow-dried straight

at the roots, with

very curly hair being

smoothed out by

Darren with

Steampod 3.0

from L’Oréal

Professionnel

One-inch sections were

created around the

head. The lengths were

then wrapped in a figure

of eight around the

prongs of large U pins

24 AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

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HOW HAIR HAPPENS

The pins were then

removed, and the

crinkled hair was

brushed out to

create extreme,

’70s-style body

Extra sparkle was added

with metallic accents

painted above the

eyelids. The rest of the

face was left soft, dewy

and natural

The result was an

explosion of volume

throughout the lengths,

and slick roots

defined by TECNI.ART

Liss Control

A menagerie of

high-shine fabrics

were employed for

a multi-textured

collection that was

equal parts modern

and classic

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25


HOW HAIR HAPPENS

THE SHOW – 404 STUDIO AT ON|OFF

THE LEAD – TINA FAREY AT RUSH HAIR

FOR L’ORÉAL PROFESSIONNEL

Sections were

then plaited

right down

the lengths

and tied

at the ends

Modern hippie hair

was the order of the

day, so hair was

blow-dried to keep

a natural wave and

a Steampod 3.0

from L’Oréal

Professionnel used

to iron out flyaways

One-inch sections

were created at the

front of the head by

Tina, and other pieces

of hair were clipped

out of the way

26 AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

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HOW HAIR HAPPENS

Looking at the

hair even closer,

tiny charms secured

by small metal

loops pierced some

of the plaits

Models wore party

dresses with cutouts

revealing peeps of skin,

perfectly complemented

by their free-spirited

hair and striking

make-up

Coloured bands and

glittery thread were

woven around the

braids to provide a

bohemian edge

Arching, cartoonish

eyebrows in unnatural

colours were the

focus of the make-up,

with a vinyl finish

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HOW HAIR HAPPENS

THE SHOW – YAN DENGYU AT ON|OFF

THE LEAD – JONNY ENGSTROM AT GUY KREMER

FOR L’ORÉAL PROFESSIONNEL

The sides were

brushed back with

TECNI.ART

Fix Design to

make them

super-sleek and

then pinned at the

back of the head

Hair was prepped

with TECNI.ART

Pli from L’Oréal

Professionnel, to

provide root lift

and a smooth

canvas to work on

The front section

of hair was

blow-dried back

off the face by

Jonny and

pulled back

28 AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

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HOW HAIR HAPPENS

The hair was

then smoothed

over to create

a strong, solid

silhouette with

a futuristic,

sleek feel

Models took to the

runway in ‘future

couture’, a dramatic

collection in a palette of

fiery reds and black.

Tulle ruffles collided

with silky capes and

hands sported

dark talons

The hair at the

top of the head was

backcombed gently

from the roots

to create volume

and height

As a finishing touch,

TECNI.ART Fix Max

was misted over the hair

to provide hold, and

small gems in red and

black were applied to

models’ faces

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HOW HAIR HAPPENS

THE SHOW – ERDEM

THE LEAD – ANTHONY TURNER

FOR L’ORÉAL PROFESSIONNEL

Using a tail comb,

a single finger

wave was shaped

into the front so

that it resembled

a brush stroke

Anthony wanted

a high-shine

wet-look featuring

modern-day finger

waves. “It’s a ‘20s

style with a futuristic

twist,” he said

Hair was combed in

a low side-parting

from left to right

and about half a

tube of L’Oréal

Professionnel

TECNI.ART Fix

Max was applied

30 AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

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HOW HAIR HAPPENS

The top of the head

was gently diffused

for about 15 to 20

minutes to ‘bake in’

the TECNI.ART

Fix Max gel and

set the style

A silver bobby pin was

added before the first

loop to secure the

finger wave. The vibe

was the 1920s world

of society photographer

Cecil Beaton

A strict, low pony

was secured at the

nape for those with

longer length before

heat was applied

with a dryer and a

precision nozzle for a

sleek finish. L’Oréal

Professionnel Mythic

Oil was smoothed on

the ends for shine

In addition, there were

seven silver cropped

bobs pre-styled with

S-shaped bends

celebrating the silver

tone of Beaton’s famous

photography. The

eyelids sported silver

foil, too

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31


AU REVOIR UNWANTED

BACK TO

COOL COLOUR TAILOR-MAD


RED, ORANGE AND YELLOW TONES

COOL

E TO YOUR HAIR STORY

The rights to use this visual are acquired from July 15 th , 2020 to January 15 th , 2022. Beyond that date the use of this visual shall be considered as a breach and you will have to pay any compensation that would be seek by the model or the photographer.


RE:CREATE

Shining a spotlight on hair that deserves to take centre stage

TOGA

TEAM PLAYER

A/W20 WELCOMED Shiori Takahashi to the L’Oréal

Professionnel fold where she led three shows. The Japaneseborn

hair whizz has always had a fascination for subcultures,

something that stood her in good stead at Charlotte Knowles,

where subversive spikes had a distinctly punky edge. Having

being part of the teams of Eugene Souleiman, Duffy and Tina

Outen, it’s no surprise she has perfected the effortlessly sexy

looks seen at TOGA and Rejina Pyo where the emphasis was

on individuality. A star in the making…

Frankie Pullen (left) at University

of Westminster

WHO RUNS THE WORLD?

Shiori Takashi at Rejina Pyo

SPOILER ALERT: the answer is

Frankie Pullen. This super-stylist

not only proved that she is the

mother of reinvention by creating

not one but THREE different looks

at the University of Westminster BA

show, but her incredible work ethic

meant she was doing shows just

two weeks back from maternity

leave. Perhaps it’s her day job at

Daniel Galvin that prepped her to

create Marcel waves, Hellenic plaits

and twisted ponies under pressure,

but one thing is sure: she’s on fire!

34 AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

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RE:CREATE

ROLL WITH IT

CRISTIANO BASCIU of Richard Ward Hair & Metrospa for

L’Oréal Professionnel was clearly on a roll at Hong Kong’s

Bettie show, where his androgynous quiffs were reminiscent of

rebellious Teddy boys. Combining a vintage roll with a low

ponytail, the look was teamed with graphic eyeliner and a bold

red lip in a nod to classic femininity with a modern twist.

I’M WITH THE BAND

THERE’S SOMETHING about a headband that instantly

elevates a look; they just seem to ooze a certain well-bred vibe.

Whether they’re erring on the side of lady of the manor aristo,

Italian nobility or even a bit ’80s Sloane Ranger, they help you to

look like you’ve made an effort – even when you haven’t. At Bora

Aksu, Daniel Martin for L’Oréal Professionnel added a single

hairband into the mix which instantly gave his ethereal,

pre-Raphaelite waves a touch of refined formality.

Central Saint Martins MA

WELL GEL

PREVIOUSLY SYNONYMOUS with dodgy ’80s dos, gel proved just

what an amazing all-rounder it can be backstage. It was slicked,

combed, twisted and painted onto hair giving form to finger waves and

structure to spikes, while imparting some mega-watt shine. Get the

TECNI.ART Fix Max ready, then set…

Erdem

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FULL STEAM AHEAD

THERE WERE SOME steamy scenes backstage and it was

all down to the work of one mane libertine. Say hello to the

L’Oréal Professionnel Steampod 3.0 – the next generation

steam styler that got everyone hot under the collar, including

Darren Fowler and Daniel Martin. Harnessing the power of

steam for smooth, long-lasting shine, the upgraded iron now

boasts a 360-degree swivel cord as well as a more streamlined

design. Cue heart eyes.

ZAFUL at On|Off

RIDE THE WAVES

THE ’20S WERE clearly having a moment this season (the 1920s

that is; 2020 should just be relegated to Room 101). At the

University of Westminster BA show, this was translated as

high-shine Marcel waves that were contrasted with dry-textured

lengths. Daniel Galvin’s Frankie Pullen for L’Oréal Professional

etched a strong centre-parting to add a contemporary nuance.

FELINE FINE

STRONGHOLD

FOR HAIRSPRAY with a little more clout, L’Oréal

Professionnel’s TECNI.ART 6-Fix was the can for the job,

judging by the number of stylists spritzing backstage. Made up of

just six ingredients for a purer formula, it’s the ideal fashion show

heavyweight as its lack of fragrance means that the ultra-fine

mist is more backstage (and salon) friendly.

Central Saint Martins MA

WHO CAN resist the raw, animal magnetism of leopard print?

Channelling some big cat energy, Daniel Fiorio for L’Oréal

Professionnel set to work creating individual looks for the

models at ARNIERI at the Celebration of Canada Design

showcase, the most intricate being the leopard print manes.

Pre-coloured wefts were applied to the hair before the lengths

were smoothed with Steampod 3.0 to enhance the pattern.

36 AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

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RE:CREATE

Central Saint Martins MA

APUJAN

HOW LOW CAN YOU GO

Central Saint Martins MA

ALL RISE FOR STYLES that have sunk to new levels. At the

Central Saint Martins MA show, the low-slung ponytails and

buns had a slept in (before going for a skydive and sleeping in

them again) feel thanks to The Boutique Atelier’s Richard

Phillipart. At APUJAN, Taku Morimoto at Daniel Galvin for

L’Oréal Professionnel took windswept to the next level and his

‘undone astro travel’ ponies were so low that the hairbands

almost grazed the ends of the hair.

SILVER LININGS

Images courtesy of L’Oréal Professionnel

MAY THE FORCE BE WITH YOU

IN A BACKSTAGE far, far away (well, Somerset House) hair

Jedi Luke (Pluckrose of Saks) set to work transforming models’

hair into otherworldly creations. The inspiration behind these

extraterrestrial looks at Angus Tsui? Star Wars movie The

Force Awakens and robots, and the result was simply masterful.

Prepping the hair with L’Oréal Professionnel’s TECNI.ART

Pli, he blow-dried it straight before applying Fix Max gel to the

front section, which was shaped into angular protrusions,

while the remaining hair was brushed back into a low cyborg

chignon and pinned into place. Light sabre optional.

THE MOST exquisite catwalk

creations often require a little

creative thinking. Case in point –

how to turn seven bobs into hair

that resembles a precious metal? The

answer, according to Anthony

Turner for L’Oréal Professionnel at

Erdem, was some industrial chrome

spray paint. After a LOT of trial and

error, Turner’s solution meant that

the pre-prepped wigs (complete with

S-shape bend) could be fitted to the

models on the day. Sterling work.

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38 AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

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I PUT A SPELL

ON YOU

The London debut of Chinese couture label Mithridate was a mesmerising spectacle that graced the incredible

location of the Victoria & Albert Museum’s Medieval and Renaissance galleries.

Runway takes a peek at the magic at work behind the scenes…

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EVERY ONCE IN A WHILE, a fashion

show comes along that is truly special, and

the London debut of Mithridate was just

that. The Chinese couture label arrived in

the UK in a blaze of artistic glory, and the

location was none other than the iconic

V&A Museum in Kensington.

Mithridate’s founder, Demon Zhang,

honed her talent for design at Central

Saint Martins before returning to China

to launch her label. However, the

inspiration of the British capital was never

far away. “As a city that combines the

modern and the ancient, London never

fails to inspire me,” she wrote in the show

notes. The collection melded couture high

glamour with Chinese craftsmanship and

even featured beads shaped like raindrops,

in a nod to typical London weather.

The show was the perfect reflection of

the Mithridate brand, a sublime

experience tied together by exquisite

detail, lighting and artworks. Models

weaved among sculptures, scored by

classical music, while guests sipped

champagne just inches from the models.

“We wanted to recreate a scene of

visitors hanging out in the gallery space –

being inspired and discovering the beauty

of all the artworks,” explains Zhang.

“The show was focused around the

appreciation of art as part of the brand

DNA and to celebrate this we delivered

immersive performance. It was a

choreographed story with all the models

mimicking groups of friends gathering,

talking about art and coming together in a

creative, inspiring environment.”

The A/W20 collection is Mithridate’s

third, and with Zhang regularly drawing

inspiration from visiting the V&A while

studying in the city, the collection pays

homage to the art and architecture of the

iconic museum, featuring art-historical

reference reinterpreted as modern, wearable

designs. The prints are inspired by the

V&A’s marble surfaces and the medieval

murals and artefacts in the collection.

The label name itself derives from King

Mithridates VI of Pontus, who legend has

it created a potion, mithridate, that was an

antidote for poison. In a similar vein,

Mithridate wants to “provide a cure for

women who are continually exploring

their identity through clothing”.

Couture veteran Jack Merrick-Thirlway,

who works regularly on the Paris shows

with the Neville Hair & Beauty team, was

tasked with creating the hair for this

unique show for L’Oréal Professionnel.

“The show was like an exhibition, more

like Paris Couture Week rather than

London Fashion Week,” he says. “The

V&A gives you so much inspiration for

your work – the building and pieces of art

in it are incredible.”

However, despite his years of

experience, the day was a true test of his

hairdressing skills. “We were preparing

the models in a hotel opposite, as you

aren’t allowed to spray products in the

museum,” he explains. “We only had two

hours to prepare 25 models and, two

minutes in, the electricity blew because we

had too many hairdryers on. It got fixed,

but then the same thing happened again –

so an hour and a half into our prep, we

had no models ready and no electricity!”

Luckily, Jack and his team are ready

to step-up in a crisis. “We had to totally

change products and tactics, styling all

the models then taking them to the

museum and quickly running a L’Oréal

Professionnel Steampod 3.0 through their

40 AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

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MITHRIDATE

ponytails to finish the looks. You just can’t

panic, you have to crack on with it. That’s

what you prepare for – we know our

products and we put in so much hard work

behind the scenes in case things don’t go

smoothly. Anything could happen.”

The hero product that came to save the

hair was TECNI.ART Fix Design from

L’Oréal Professionnel. “It’s a very wet

hairspray with a lot of alcohol in it so it

dries itself – so you don’t need heat!”

explains Jack. “We used that all over the

top, and really soaked the hair down. We

also used a tiny bit of TECNI.ART Liss

Control on the lengths.”

He continues: “We still wanted to have

a little bit of movement, so there was the

dual texture between the head and the

ponytail. As simple as it looks, it’s actually

quite hard to make sure that every single

ponytail is at the right height on the head

and the parting is in the right place.”

With minutes to go, the team pulled it

off, and guests never knew that the

effortless looks had enjoyed their own

drama. The result was a smooth ponytail

that shone under the spotlights, perfect in

its simplicity, reflecting the beautiful

surroundings. “The hair was glossy,

simple but really well executed,” adds

Jack. “We wanted it to be so slick because

we knew the lights in the V&A were so

powerful that they would hit the top and it

would look even more shiny.”

It was a bold presentation, an event

that incorporated performance cleverly to

best depict the mythical otherworldliness

of the Mithridate collection. Proof positive

that London can deliver couture just as

well as its Parisian cousins.

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W H E N T W O

BECOME ONE

The On|Off show at London Fashion Week is a hotbed for fresh new design talent, who work with

L’Oréal Professionnel hairstylists to create a complete look. When creatives collaborate, great things happen…

ZAFUL AND

DARREN FOWLER

AT FOWLER35

HOUSE OF SHELDON HALL AND

JACK MERRICK-THIRLWAY

AT NEVILLE HAIR & BEAUTY

YAN DENGYU AND

JONNY ENGSTROM

AT GUY KREMER

ZAFUL AND Darren Fowler have

partnered on shows before and the teams’

work highlights the importance of

long-lasting relationships. “The creative

process was great – we have a synergy and

always connect well when building the

moodboards and the creation of models’

personas for the collection,” says Darren.

Renowned for creating characters for

editorial shoots and runways shows, Darren

is an expert on the importance of showing

and telling the story behind a collection.

“More designers are starting to appreciate

what designing the hair properly will do for

both the collection and the show,” he adds.

“Collaboration is paramount and

reputation is everything. The end result

being spot-on is key.”

JACK AND the Neville Hair & Beauty

team have a history of couture work where

they mastered the up-do – so they were a

great match for UK couture brand Sheldon

Hall. “The designers had a clear direction

of what they wanted from the show with a

strong eye for detail. It makes my job much

easier when everyone is on the same creative

path,” explains Jack. Though based in

different areas of England, Jack and Sheldon

Hall kept in touch regularly. “As it’s not

always possible to sit down with the

designers face-to-face and have a hair test,

trust is always a massive factor from both

sides,” he says. “We decided to make the

hair quite regal but with a modern twist.

We knew the accentuated high ponies

would work well with the patriotic dresses.”

A GREAT working relationship between

Yan Dengyu and Jonny Engstrom began at

On|Off S/S20 and has continued this season.

“Yan Dengyu is an amazing designer; he is

a very creative, forward-thinking and gentle

person. Before the show we discuss ideas

and it takes the stress out of hair trials,”

says Jonny. With a theme of ‘future couture’

for the hair, together they decided on a

slicked-back hair look with height at the

crown. “When you are a hairstylist working

on runway shows, you have to realise the

designer already has a concept, and you

have to build on that to make the complete

image,” he adds. “You have to listen and

have new ideas to deliver each time. The

hair is one main part of the collection and

it can make or break the show.”

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IN COLLABORATION WITH

ELSEWHERE

AT LFW

ERDEM AND

ANTHONY TURNER

Images courtesy of L’Oréal Professionnel

IYANU AND

MARK WOOLLEY

AT ELECTRIC HAIRDRESSING

AS AN expert in men’s hair, Mark’s

parntership with menswear designer

IYANU for On|Off made perfect sense.

He worked with the designer to create looks

that complemented her clear vision for the

show, which celebrated her Nigerian roots.

“It’s fantastic to work with a designer who

has great vision and understanding of hair,”

says Mark. Though busy schedules can

make it hard to meet in person, prior to the

show Mark and the designer had several

calls and Zoom meetings to discuss ideas

using visual prompts from the brief. “I

always find that building a partnership with

the designer is very important. It is vital to

discuss the desired outcome fully, and spend

time listening to the development of their

ideas,” he adds.

404 STUDIO

AND TINA FAREY

AT RUSH HAIR

TINA FAREY is no stranger to working

with emerging designers for the On|Off

shows. For A/W20, she worked with 404

Studio – a Spanish fashion brand with a

passion for reinventing tradition. Tina

credits much of the show’s success to their

meeting at the RUSH Hair Academy

beforehand. “It’s important to look at the

clothes and the brief so you can visualise the

story. It’s vital to make sure the designer is

happy with the hair,” she says. Inspired by

Jodorowsky’s The Holy Mountain, Tina

and the designer decided on a loose wave

and braids featuring charms and sections of

yarn. “Sometimes it’s about not just

focusing on the one look,” she adds. “You

may have to do more and really work

through options to achieve what you want.”

TOGETHER THEY are a

creative duo that has stood the

test of time. Maybe it’s because

Erdem and Anthony Turner are

both Scorpios, the session stylist

has wondered. “Erdem is a

perfectionist – he knows what

he wants. He likes my input

though and that’s where we

work really well together;

because I can tap into his ideas

really easily,” Anthony explains.

“I also really like it when he

plants something in my mind

– he’ll send me an image or a

quote by email and say: ‘Run

with it! This is what I’m

thinking – now you’ve got a few

weeks until the show to show

me what you’ve got!’”

For A/W20, the pair met at

Erdem’s studio two weeks

before the show to discuss ideas

and align their visions. “We sat

talking for hours. He’s like a

mad scientist,” Anthony smiles.

“In the collection there was a

lot of references from Cecil

Beaton’s photographs, which is

where the idea came from for

the silver hair,” he adds. “From

season to season, I never know

what he’s going to concoct, or

what he’s seen somewhere or

which historical person he’ll

reference next. He’s brilliant.”

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43


Richard Phillipart

PASSION PROJECT

A dedication to excellence. A passion for creativity. A nurturing of minds. The partnership between

Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design and L’Oréal Professionnel has been an extraordinary

success, and the 20th anniversary show saw yet another incredible collaborative vision come to life

LIFE WAS VERY DIFFERENT back at the

turn of the century. Long before influencers,

leaks and fast drops, fashion shows were the

blueprint for what trends the world would

see in the following six months. Central

Saint Martins was – and remains to this day

– the school that produces some of the key

designers leading the fashion landscape.

This training ground for tomorrow’s

taste-makers was exactly the sort of

environment that L’Oréal Professionnel

wanted to collaborate with.

“Hairstyles and hair colour say as much

about you as the clothes you wear,” says

Monica Teodoro, general manager of

L’Oréal Professionnel UK and Ireland. “It is

not only tremendously exciting, but also

absolutely vital for L’Oréal Professionnel to

forge a relationship with one of the most

important fashion schools in the world.

This ongoing partnership merges the very

latest in fashion talent with the creativity of

young hairdressers – it’s a unique and

inspired collaboration.”

The likes of Christopher Kane, Mary

Katrantzou, Rejina Pyo, Molly Goddard,

Matty Bovan, Grace Wales-Bonner and

Richard Quinn – whose first solo show

was even witnessed by Her Majesty the

Queen – often continue this relationship

even after graduating.

It all starts at the Central Saint Martins

BA and MA showcases. With big buyers

and recruiters in the audience alongside

peers and family members, this is the first

test for future design stars – and having the

support of an experienced L’Oréal

Professionnel hair team behind the scenes is

indispensable when executing a bold vision.

“The flow of ideas and creative energy is

central to both industries,” insists Sarah

Gresty, director of BA Fashion at Central

Saint Martins, backstage with Fabio Pires,

director of MA Fashion.

44 AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

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CENTRAL SAINT MARTINS ANNIVERSARY SHOW

Sarah McCormack

Runway was invited to the front row of

the star-studded MA show, to witness the

emergence of fashion’s next big stars and to

celebrate this ground-breaking partnership

which extends beyond backstage.

Tying together 21 collections with

disparate aesthetics is no mean feat, but it

was beautifully pulled off by The Boutique

Atelier’s Richard Phillipart and the L’Oréal

Professionnel Portfolio Team. To further

complicate matters, 106 models also made it

one of the longest Central Saint Martins

shows to date. The over-arching theme was

one of texture, a nomadic desert-wanderer

which looked almost slept-in and mussed.

“The looks were all personalised for each

model – we had to really get in there with

our hands,” Richard told us backstage.

L’Oréal Professionnel TECNI.ART

Savage Panache was the key product for the

look, massaged into the hair to open the

roots out. A little TECNI.ART Super Dust

took the style further, helping to pull out

and emphasise flyaways to give a

dehydrated effect. Each look was tweaked

slightly to accommodate the styling or

headwear, and the team’s Herculean efforts

made for a striking, multi-sensory catwalk

show, which also featured projections

throughout. This support and collaboration

with Central Saint Martins doesn’t stop at

the runway either; L’Oréal Professionnel

created bursaries that are awarded to three

MA Fashion students each year to offer

financial support to complete their studies.

The L’Oréal Professionnel Young Talent and

Creative Awards, worth £5,000 with an

opportunity to showcase the winning

collections, are also presented at the BA

and MA graduate shows.

To add a little extra drama to

proceedings, there was an unexpected

tie-break for the winner of the L’Oréal

Professionnel Creative Award 2020.

Selected by Monica Teodoro and Andrew

Davis of The Face magazine, Leeann

Huang and Sarah McCormack were

revealed as the joint winners.

Leeann’s over-sized, bright hats

contrasted brilliantly with Richard’s dry

hair texture, while the styling fit perfectly

with Sarah’s ‘feral fairy’ creations. Both

designers looked to the future with

collections that combine re-used materials

with the high level of craftsmanship Central

Saint Martins graduates are known for.

Leeann said: “I’m really grateful there

were so many experts backstage to keep

things together and help produce such

wonderful looks. I never thought I would be

able to win an accolade like the L’Oréal

Professionnel Creative Award, and to do so

“This ongoing partnership merges the very

latest in fashion talent with the creativity

of young hairdressers – it’s a unique and

inspired collaboration”

MONICA TEODORO

Leeann Huang

with my family there was very gratifying.”

The question now, post-lockdown, is

how the world of fashion will evolve,

particularly when it comes to showing work

and large scale events. The Central Saint

Martins BA course might just give us a

glimpse into the future. Turn the page to

discover how…

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AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

45


Jisoo Jang

Rebekah Guo

A NEW FRONTIER

2020 is a year nobody will forget. This year’s BA Fashion graduates at Central Saint Martins

are set to go down in history – and for all the right reasons

THE MARRIAGE OF FASHION and

technology has long been an unpredictable

love affair, with the likes of Hussein

Chalayan and Alexander McQueen having

presented futuristic fashion and electronics

on the catwalk even before the turn of the

century. As we journey through a new

decade, the fashion industry is turning to

technology more than ever before to stay

relevant and able to continue operating. The

effects of a global pandemic continue,

meaning a growing need to adapt in a new

digital landscape.

It was on 18 March, when Glastonbury

Festival was officially cancelled, that Sarah

Gresty, BA Fashion course director at

Central Saint Martins, realised that the 109

graduating students would face a year like

no other – with their final months as

students spent in family homes across the

world. “When lockdown happened, we

knew we wouldn’t be able to host a physical

fashion show, so we quickly had to adjust

what we were doing,” recalls Sarah. “We

felt it was important to celebrate students’

creativity despite the huge challenges of the

crisis, so decided on making a film and

creating a digital showcase of their work.”

With minimal access to materials and

equipment, and without hair and make-up

teams on hand, the students were “pushed

creatively in completely different ways”,

explains Sarah. Ahead of the showcase, they

were asked to make two looks of their final

collection and produce an accompanying

film to illustrate their narrative. Each film

would then be used as a part of a digital

‘lockdown show’, streamed online across

YouTube and a new bafcsm.com platform.

Collaborating with industry partners,

such as L’Oréal Professionnel, was key to

Sarah’s vision for the new online platform.

For the collection films, students were

offered the opportunity to partner with the

brand’s network of creative young

hairstylists through a virtual collaboration.

“We are proud to continue to work with the

students, help to nurture them and see their

talent flourish. It is precisely this talent that

is shining even more brightly as we all

navigate these times together,” says Monica

Teodoro, general manager of L’Oréal

Professionnel UK and Ireland. In total,

17 of the students worked with hairdressers

virtually to discuss styling options for

each of the looks. “We really value our

relationship with L’Oréal Professionnel and

working with the hairstylists on the looks,

as well as discussing the physicality of what

is possible,” adds Sarah.

As well as building virtual connections,

the digital brainstorms between students

and stylists has paved the way for

blossoming friendships and future

collaborations, in what L’Oréal

Professionnel’s Catherine McMahon has

described as an “explosion of creativity”.

Since the film made its debut in June, it

has been viewed more than 21,000 times (in

comparison to the 1,200 guests who usually

attend the physical show) and has received

masses of support from industry figures

with a huge reaction from the media.

“Students at Central Saint Martins lead the

way in so many areas, and I think people

have been so interested to see what we

would do. We had our showcase a couple of

days after London Fashion Week Digital,

and I think what our students did in

comparison was really exciting,” says Sarah.

“During the period, the articles published

about our show were the most viewed

during the entire show season,” she adds.

As Central Saint Martins continues to

46 AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

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CENTRAL SAINT MARTINS BA SHOW

Alexandra Sipa

Louis Shengtao Chen

Sabah Iqbal

champion rising stars of the industry, it is

clear that this year’s graduates are perfectly

poised to reinvent the fashion show as a

digital-first event. The class of 2020 are

young trailblazers who understand how to

create work that is fun and engaging for a

digital platform. While there is still a desire

for physical interactions and the need for

togetherness, the pandemic has forced the

fashion industry to re-evaluate its practices

– with current approaches to sustainability,

seasonal fashion trends and Fashion Week

as we know it, all pulled apart.

“We didn’t plan this and had to react

day by day, but we achieved something that

was absolutely amazing. The students have

“It was important to celebrate students’

creativity despite the huge challenges

of the crisis”

SARAH GRESTY

Zoe Sujin Lee

Taya Louisa Badgley

created work that was really reactive and

current. They were already looking at issues

such as sustainability, the impact of social

media and race – isolation had just made the

results that much more significant and

exciting,” Sarah enthuses.

This could be the start of a movement

towards a new digital frontier for London

Fashion Week, but it’s also an opportunity

for the next generation of designers to make

sustainability a core value and change the

future of fashion. Despite the hurdles

they’ve had to overcome, the class of 2020 is

already making history and for all the right

reasons, Sarah believes: “This is such a

special year. It’s one that everyone will

remember forever.”

Johannes Warnke

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47


University of Westminster BA Fashion Design show

48 AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

RUNWAY


ANDREW GROVES

A MAN FOR

ALL SEASONS

Andrew Groves has taken University of Westminster students’ final show onto the Fashion Week schedule while

also championing the importance of menswear within the industry. Runway caught up with the course director for

BA Fashion Design during lockdown to talk about his career, his love of Mr Benn and the future of fashion

Runway: Do you remember the moment

you realised ‘It’s got to be fashion for me’?

Andrew Groves: No! I wonder when that

moment was? I think I was far more

interested in what other people were

wearing, what that meant, who looked cool

and who didn’t. Now I think about that, it

makes more sense that I went into designing

for others and then working with students

and their vision. I remember watching the

cartoon series Mr Benn and I loved the fact

that he had this amazing wardrobe with all

these different outfits that led to adventures

when he wore them. The idea that what you

wear can help you become something else,

I love that.

R: What did you learn from your time with

the Alexander McQueen label, where you

designed with Lee McQueen?

AG: You don’t really need anything in terms

of money or resources to make something

really powerful. On some days you had to

sew by hand because you had no money for

the electricity to run the sewing machines.

And I always think that lack of resources is

actually good because it forces you to think:

‘Well what can I do with the things I have?’.

That’s why everyone now, because of the

pandemic, is thinking about what they’re

able to do – it gets you thinking creatively.

R: What do you think the long-term effect

is going to be of the pandemic, both on

design and fashion students, and in terms of

the kind of trends we’re going to see?

AG: There’s a need for intimacy that

we’re missing; it’s an experiential thing

that we don’t necessarily get from

something digital. But then we’ve had

five or 10 years of people digitally creating

themselves on Instagram. There’s a lot

students can already do that can push

the boundaries.

Invisible Men exhibition

R: What it’s all going to look like – shows,

events, courses – in September?

AG: I’m thinking about it because we

moved our show from June to February

three years ago to be on the Fashion Week

schedule but of course now, what does it

actually mean now to have a runway show?

I think it’s going to be a hybrid of physical

and digital. And I don’t think it’s going to

be at one point in time [i.e. seasons]; it’s

going to be a number of points in time.

R: L’Oréal Professionnel works closely with

the students on their final show each year.

How integral is the hair to the overall look?

AG: It’s really important because students

are so busy on the production of the

garments they don’t step back and think

about the image. My favourite moment of

the whole year is when we do run-throughs

with individual students and they’re

suddenly confronted with the models in

their outfits with the hair and make-up. It

transforms the collection and I can see them

almost in tears. I love all those technical

things and the students learn lots from that

and the expertise that the people and stylists

from L’Oréal Professionnel bring. They’re a

passionate, professional team.

R: At Westminster you’ve helped create a

menswear archive – why did you feel that

was necessary, was there a particular gap?

AG: We’d always be saying to students: “Go

and look at that trench coat in Burberry, or

see what Commes des Garçons has done

with this coat in Dover Street Market, see

how it’s finished”. And of course they would

never go because they were too busy. I

thought it would be much easier if we had

some garments at the university to show

them. We’ve got just under 2,000 garments

now. It’s a lot of eBay discoveries and

donations as well, we’ve actually got quite a

few garments that belonged to hairdressers!

For example from Michael Rasser

of michaeljohn we’ve got a ’60s Tommy

Nutter suit. It comes back to that idea

that if you wear a certain outfit, you

become something.

R: You helped pull together an impressive

menswear exhibition, Invisible Men, last

year. Why did you feel it was important?

AG: The more I researched the archive, the

more I realised there had been nothing out

there. The famous McQueen exhibition, for

example, none of that was menswear, even

though he began working in Savile Row. We

wanted to show a much bigger picture of

menswear that took you from designer and

practical garments to uniforms, and show

they’re all connected.

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AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

49


A/W20 HAIR IS…

“IRREGULAR

LAYERED CUTS,

HEALTHY AND

SHINY BOHO HAIR

WITH A MODERN

BIBA WAVE, SEXY

UNDONE FRENCH

TWISTS AND

MESSY PONYTAILS

FOR THE EVENING,

UNDONE BUT

ORGANIC”

Cristiano Basciu,

Richard Ward

Hair & Metrospa

“A RETURN TO

CLASSICS WITH A

ZERO-WASTE

UNDERSTANDING.

STYLING IS MORE

MINDFUL,

POSSESSING

A PUNK ATTITUDE

OF BEING A

RESPONSIBLE

REBEL”

Daniel Martin,

session stylist

“CHARACTER-

DRIVEN.

IT’S ABOUT

INDIVIDUALITY

AND USING YOUR

HAIR AS AN

EXPRESSION OF

WHO YOU ARE, OR

WHO YOU

WANT TO BE”

Darren Fowler,

Fowler35 and

Fowler Hair

Academy

“STRUCTURED

COLLARBONE-

LENGTH CUTS

WITH NATURAL

WAVES AND

CHOPPY FRINGES

– THINK PATTI

SMITH AND NEW

YORK IN THE ’70S.

SLEEK, WET LOOK

LOW PONYTAILS

WITH LONG

PARTINGS, TOO”

Frankie Pullen,

Daniel Galvin

“ALL DOWN TO

THE CUT! IT

SHOULD FRAME

THE FACE

PERFECTLY, WITH A

COLOUR THAT

COMPLEMENTS

THE SKIN TONE.

NO MORE THAN

TWO SHADES

EITHER SIDE OF A

NATURAL BASE”

Jack Merrick-

Thirlway, Neville

Hair & Beauty

A summary of the season, in the words of the professionals

A/W20 HAIR IS…

“ABOUT MORE

RADICAL

CHANGES. CLIENTS

WILL ASK FOR

MORE FRINGES,

SHORTER HAIR BUT

STILL WITH A SOFT

ROMANTIC WAVE

OR TEXTURE”

Jonny Engstrom,

Guy Kremer

“HEADING IN TWO

DIRECTIONS.

SUPER-GLAM,

EXPENSIVE, OTT

LOOKS THAT MAKE

UP FOR THE

NIGHTS OUT THAT

HAVE BEEN LOST,

OR MORE

LOCKDOWN-STYLE

TOPKNOTS WITH

ROOTS IF WE FACE

A SECOND WAVE”

Luke Pluckrose,

Saks

“A NOD TO THE

‘70S, WITH A

MODERN TWIST.

THE SHAG CUT OF

SOFT LAYERS,

LONG FRINGE AND

LOTS OF BODY,

WHILE A DEEP

SIDE-PARTING

WILL GIVE SIMPLE

STYLES A CLASSIC,

POLISHED FINISH”

Mark Woolley,

Electric

Hairdressing

“WATER-LIKE

MOVEMENT,

STRUCTURED,

WITH NATURAL

FLOW. COLLISIONS

OF TEXTURE

BETWEEN THE

SMOOTH AND THE

ASYMMETRIC”

Takuya Morimoto,

Daniel Galvin

“ABOUT FLAT,

MINIMAL STYLING.

SLICKED-DOWN

MIDDLE

PARTINGS WITH A

GRUNGY SHINE,

AND PONYTAILS

FLATTENED WITH

EITHER SIDE

PARTINGS OR

BRUSHED BACK

WITH A DIY

FINISH”

Tina Farey,

RUSH Hair

50 AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

RUNWAY



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