U n iversity cafe - 11th European Conference on Psychological ...

ecpa11.lu.lv

U n iversity cafe - 11th European Conference on Psychological ...

ong>11thong> EUROPEAN CONFERENCE

ON PSYCHOLOGICAL

ASSESSMENT

Riga, Latvia

31 August – 3 September, 2011

Book of

PROGRAMME – ABSTRACTS


Book of Programme – Abstracts of the ong>11thong> EUROPEAN CONFERENCE

ON PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT

2011

ISBN 978-9984-45-387-3

© Unong>iversityong> of Latvia


CONTENTS

Prologue 4

Organizing Committee 5

Scientific Committees 5

Keynote speakers 6

Invited symposium 6

General information 7

Program overview 9

Floorplan 10

Overview activities 13

Overview presidential address /

Keynote addresses

Overview symposium and paper sessions 17

Overview poster sessions 35

Abstracts 45

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

14

Keynote addresses 47

Symposium abstracts 50

Oral presentation abstracts (A to Z) 86

Poster presentation abstracts (A to Z) 131

Index 179

3


4

Dear colleagues,

PROLOGUE

On behalf of the Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Department of Psychology, we welcome you to

the ong>11thong> ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment. We are very honoured

to host this conference of the ong>Europeanong> Association of Psychological Assessment, in

cooperation with the Union of Latvian Psychologists and the Latvian Professional

Psychologists’ Association.

We are very pleased that this conference will include presentations by scholars and

students from four continents and 33 countries. Historically the former Hanseatic

league city of Riga has been a multicultural centre as a geographical crossroads

between eastern and western influences. Therefore, it seems quite appropriate that at

this conference there will be quite an emphasis on psychological assessment challenges

from a cross-cultural perspective, looking at both emic and etic solutions to problems

of assessment within and across cultures.

It is very fortunate for us to have the ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment

being held in Riga at this precise moment in time. Although during the first half of

the 20th century some initial psychological research was being carried out in Latvia,

during the Soviet period teaching and research in psychology was greatly restricted,

and only in 1989 was the first psychologist training program initiated, at the Unong>iversityong>

of Latvia. During the past seven years the psychology researchers of Latvia have been

particularly active in regard to test adaptation and standardization as well as with the

development of original assessment instruments.

The ong>11thong> ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment scientific program includes

a very wide spectrum of presentations from the various branches of psychology –

organizational psychology, clinical psychology, educational psychology, cognitive

psyhology, personality psychology, positive psychology and others. The scientific

program also provides an opportunity to hear the latest on technological advances in

psychological assessment as well as to consider specific problems within the assessment

process. Very interesting will also be some direct challenges to underlying principles

of contemporary psychological assessment., which will thereby provide opportunity for

lively discussion and debate.

Malgozata Rascevska Sandra Sebre

ECPA Co-President ECPA Co-President

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


ORGANIZING COMMITTEE

Malgozata Rascevska (Co-president)

Sandra Sebre (Co-president)

Inese Muzikante (Secretary)

Anda Upmane (Secretary)

Anika Miltuze (Treasurer)

Anda Gaitniece-Putane

Inguna Griskevica

Baiba Martinsone

Evija Strika

Inga Skreitule-Pikše

Viesturs Renge (Chair)

Ivars Austers

Ieva Bite

Girts Dimdins

Arija Karpova

Aleksandrs Kolesovs

Solveiga Miezite

Edite Ozola

LOCAL SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE

INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE

Itziar Alonso-Arbiol, Unong>iversityong> of the Basque Country (Spain)

Valentin Bucik, Unong>iversityong> of Ljubljana (Slovenia)

Laurence Claes, Catholic Unong>iversityong> Leuven (Belgium)

Anastasia Efklides, Aristotle Unong>iversityong> of Thessaloniki (Greece)

Johnny Fontaine, Ghent Unong>iversityong> (Belgium)

Janos Nagy, Lorand Eotvos Unong>iversityong> (Hungary)

Nuria de la Osa, Autonomous Unong>iversityong> of Barcelona (Spain)

Willibald Ruch, Unong>iversityong> of Zurich (Switzerland)

Karl Schweizer, Goethe Unong>iversityong> Frankfurt (Germany)

Fons van de Vijver, Tilburg Unong>iversityong> (the Netherlands)

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

5


6

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

David Bartram, SHL group, United Kingdom

Klaus Boehnke, Jacobs Unong>iversityong>, Germany

Antonio Godoy, Unong>iversityong> of Malaga, Spain

Thomas Oakland, Unong>iversityong> of Florida, USA

Jaan Valsiner, Clark Unong>iversityong>, USA

INVITED SYMPOSIA

Itziar Alonso-Arbiol, Unong>iversityong> of Basque Country, Spain

Anastasia Efklides, Aristotle Unong>iversityong> of Thessaloniki, Greece

Johnny Fontaine, Ghent Unong>iversityong>, Belgium

Grazina Gintiliene, Vilnius Unong>iversityong>, Lithuania

Nuria de la Osa, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Spain

Willibald Ruch, Unong>iversityong> of Zurich, Switzerland

Karl Schweizer, Goethe Unong>iversityong>, Frankfurt, Germany

Siegbert Reiss, Goethe Unong>iversityong>, Frankfurt, Germany

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


ong>Conferenceong> venue

GENERAL INFORMATION

The venue of the ong>11thong> ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment will be the

Unong>iversityong> of Latvia main administrative building.

Address: Raina blvd. 19, Riga, LV-1586.

Language

The official language of the conference is English.

Information

For information about the conference please contact:

Anda Upmane,

Secretary of ong>11thong> ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment,

anda.upmane@lu.lv

or

Inese Muzikante,

Secretary of ong>11thong> ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment,

inese.muzikante@lu.lv, phone: 00371 29299670.

ong>Conferenceong> website: http://www.ecpa11.lu.lv

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

7


8

Internet and print/copy facilities

Inside Unong>iversityong> (only internet):

2nd floor, Law and Theology Faculty Library.

Opening hours:

from 31 August – 2 September 10:00 – 18:00,

3 September 10:00-14:00.

Outside Unong>iversityong>:

It is possible to use copy/print and internet services near to the main building of the

Unong>iversityong> of Latvia at

CopyPro – Raiņa bulv. 17, Riga, LV-1050

Social Events

Welcome Party, on Wednesday, August 31, at 19:00

takes place at the main building of the Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Unong>iversityong> Cafe

Gala Dinner, on Friday, September 2, at 19:00

takes place at the House of Blackheads, Rātslaukums 7.

Importany note: During the conference, including the social events, all participants

should have their badges on !

Entrance to The Welcome Party and Gala dinner with badge and

INVITATION CARD.

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological

Assessment:

PROGRAM OVERVIEW

Summer School - Tuulia M. Ortner and Friederike Dislich, Freie Universitat

Berlin, Germany: Beyond Self-Report Objective, Indirect, and

Other Assessment Approaches and Their Fields of Applications.

29–30 August

Workshop - Thomas Oakland, Unong>iversityong> of Florida, USA: Test Development

and Adaptation, 30 August

Wednesday

31 August 2011

10:00–16:30

Registration

17:00

Opening

Ceremony

19:00

Welcome Party

20:30

EAPA Executive

Committee meeting

Thursday

1 September 2011

9:00-10:00

Presidential address

Karl Schweizer, EAPA

President address

10:15-11:45

4 sessions

11:45-12:15

COFFEE

12:15-13:15

Keynote Speaker

Dave Bartram, SHL

Group

13:15-14:15

BREAK

14:15-15:45

4 sessions

15:45-16:45

COFFEE + Posters I

16:45-18:15

3 sessions

18:30

EAPA members meeting

(second call)

Friday

2 September 2011

8:45-10:15

4 sessions

10:15-10:45

COFFEE

10:45-12:15

4 sessions

12:30-13:30

BREAK

13:30-14:30

Keynote Speaker

Thomas Oakland,

Unong>iversityong> of Florida

14:45-15:45

Keynote Speaker

Jaan Valsiner,

Clark Unong>iversityong>

15:45-16:30

COFFEE + Posters II

16:30-18:00

4 sessions

19:00

Gala Dinner

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

Saturday

3 September 2011

9:00-10:00

Keynote Speaker

Klaus Boehnke,

Jacobs Unong>iversityong>

10:15-11:45

3 sessions

11:45-12:15

COFFEE

12:15-13:15

Keynote Speaker

Antonio Godoy,

Unong>iversityong> of Malaga

13:15-14:15

BREAK

14:15-15:45

4 sessions

15:45

Closing Ceremony

16:15

EAPA Executive

Committee meeting

9


10

Unong>iversityong>

ong>cafeong>

FLOORPLAN (Raiņa blvd. 19)

UNIVERSITY

CAFE

Basement

UNIVERSITY

CAFE

ACADEMIC

CLUB

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


REGISTRATION

DESK

Ground floor

POSTER

SESSIONS

(COATCHECK

HALL)

WC

M

WC

F

Entrance

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

101 –

Auditorija 1

104 –

Auditorija 6

To Great

Hall

11


12

WC

M

1st floor

GREAT

HALL

SMALL

HALL

WC

F

264 –

Auditorija 9

INTERNET

FACILITIES

10 00 –18 00

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


Wednesday, 31 August 2001

OVERVIEW ACTIVITIES

17:00-18:30 Opening Ceremony The Great Hall

19:00 Welcome Party Unong>iversityong> Cafe

20:30 EAPA Executive Committee meeting Academic Club

Thursday, 1 September 2011

Tour starting times: RIGA OLD TOWN –

18:30 and 21:00 guided walking tour

(registratiom on 31 August,

at registration desk)

18:30 EAPA members meeting

(second call)

Friday, 2 September 2011

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

Meeting at the

registration desk

The Great Hall

19:00 Gala Dinner House of Blackheads,

Old Town,

Rātslaukums 7

Saturday, 3 September 2011

15:45 Closing Ceremony The Great Hall

19:00 RIGA OLD TOWN –

guided walking tour

Academic Club

Sunday, 4 September 2011

9:00 RUNDĀLE CASTLE, BAUSKA departure from LU

BREWERY

main building

9:00 SIGULDA, CESIS departure from LU

main building

13


14

OVERVIEW PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS /

KEYNOTE ADDRESSES

Great Hall

Thursday, 1 September 9:00–10:00

Presidential Address

On the homogeneity crisis in the construction of psychological measures

Karl Schweizer, EAPA President, Goethe Unong>iversityong>, Germany

Thursday, 1 September 12:15–13:15

Keynote Address

The impact of personality on the competitiveness and

economic performance of nations

Dave Bartram, SHL Group, United Kingdom

Friday, 2 September 13:30–14:30

Keynote Address

The status of test development and use internationally

Thomas Oakland, Unong>iversityong> of Florida, USA

Friday, 2 September 14:45–15:45

Keynote Address

Assessment and its discontents: A view from cultural psychology

Jaan Valsiner, Clark Unong>iversityong>, USA

Saturday, 3 September 9:00–10:00

Keynote Address

On comparing apples and oranges:

Towards a quantitative emic cross-cultural psychology

Klaus Boehnke, Jacobs Unong>iversityong>, Germany

Saturday, 3 September 12:15–13:15

Keynote Address

Clinical decision making: Past, present, and future

Antonio Godoy, Unong>iversityong> of Malaga, Spain

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


Thursday,1 September 2011

Great Hall 264 –

101 –

104 – Coatcheck

Auditorija 9 Auditorija 1 Auditorija 6 Hall

9:00 – 10:00 Presidential address

Karl Schweizer,

EAPA President

10:15 – 11:45 InvSymp

Specific Personality I Educational

Cross-Cultural Assessment

Psychology I

Assessment I Issues I

12:15 – 13:15 Keynote Speaker

Dave Bartram, SHL

Group

14:15 – 15:45 InvSymp

InvSymp Personality II Organizational

Online Assessment I Construct

Representation

Psychology I

15:45 – 16:45 Poster

Session I

16:45 – 18:15 Specific Clinical InvSymp

Assessment Psychology I Advances and

Issues II

Challenges in

Test Adaptation

18:30 EAPA members

meeting (2nd call)

Friday, 2 September 2011

Small Hall /

264 –

101 – 104 – Coatcheck

Great Hall Auditorija 9 Auditorija 1 Auditorija 6 Hall

8:45 – 10:15 InvSymp

Symp

Clinical Organizational

Online Assessment II Response Styles Psychology II Psychology II

(Small Hall) in Rating Scales

10:45 – 12:15 InvSymp

Specific Personality III Cognitive

Cross-Cultural Assessment

Abilities I

Assessment II

(Small Hall)

Issues III

13:30 – 14:30 Keynote Speaker

Thomas Oakland,

Unong>iversityong> of Florida

(Great Hall)

14:45 – 15:45 Keynote Speaker

Jaan Valsiner, Clark

Unong>iversityong>

(Great Hall)

15:45 – 16:30 Poster

Session I

16:30 – 18:00 InvSymp

Symp

New Causal Organizational

Positive Psychology New

Assessment Psychology III

Traits I (Great Hall) Instruments

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

15


16

Saturday, 3 September 2011

Great Hall 264 –

Auditorija 9

9:00 – 10:00 Keynote Speaker

Klaus Boehnke,

Jacobs Unong>iversityong>

10:15 – 11:45 InvSymp

Facets of

Metacognition

12:15 – 13:15 Keynote Speaker

Antonio Godoy,

Unong>iversityong> of

Malaga

14:15 – 15:45 InvSymp

Aggression

and Conduct

Problems in

Childhood

InvSymp

Positive

Psychology

Traits II

101 –

Auditorija 1

Clinical

Psychology IIII

Educational

Psychology II

104 –

Auditorija 6

Cognitive

Abilities II

Interpersonal

Relations

Academic

Club

15:45 Closing

Ceremony

16:15 EAPA

Executive

Committee

meeting

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


OVERVIEW SYMPOSIUM AND

PAPER SESSIONS


Thursday 10:15-11:45

INVITED SYMPOSIUM

The Great Hall

Cross - Cultural Assessment I

OVERVIEW SYMPOSIUM AND

PAPER SESSIONS*

THURSDAY, 1 SEPTEMBER

Symposium Chair: Itziar Alonso-Arbiol, Unong>iversityong> of the Basque Country, Spain

Symposium Discussant: Fons J. R. van de Vijver, Tilburg Unong>iversityong>, Netherlands

Australian and finnish students’ free responses while engaging in collaborative

problem solving assessment tasks

Esther Care, Unong>iversityong> of Melbourne, Australia

Militant extremist mindset and the assessment of radicalization in general population

Lazar Stankov, National Institute of Education, Singapore

Cross-cultural assessment of time perspective: Equivalence and bias study

Anna Sircova, Umea Unong>iversityong>, Sweden.

Exploring the general patterning of acquiescence and extremity response styles from a

cross-cultural perspective

Jamis He, Tilburg Unong>iversityong>, Netherlands

Cross-cultural assessment procedures of components of prototypical anger

ItziarAlonso-Arbiol, Unong>iversityong> of Basque Country, Spain

PAPER SESSION

104 – Auditorija 6

Educational Psychology I

Chair: Anita Pipere, Institute of Sustainable Education, Faculty of Education and

Management, Daugavpils Unong>iversityong>, Latvia

* Note: Listed is the author who will be presenting.

Co – autors are listed in the Abstract section.

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

19


20

OVERVIEW SYMPOSIUM AND PAPER SESSIONS

Academic motivation in Latvian context: Probing the potential of concurrent mixed

methods design

Anita Pipere, Institute of Sustainable Education, Faculty of Education and

Management, Daugavpils Unong>iversityong>, Latvia

The affective factors that impact the Turkish students’ scientific literacy as per the

PISA 2006 results

Gonca Usta, Cumhuriyet Universitesi, Ankara Üniversitesi , Turkey

The prediction of the Turkish students’ reading literacy for PISA 2003-2006-2009

results by home possessions

R.Nükhet Demirtaşlı, Ankara Universitesi, Turkey

Pre-school teachers’ readiness for the early identification of preschool children at risk

of learning disabilities: The development of a research instrument

Anastasia Psalti, Alexander Technological Educational Institute of Thessaloniki, Greece

Maria Eleni Kouimtzi, Alexander Technological Educational Institute of Thessaloniki,

Greece

The effect of topic knowledge, comprehension monitoring and motivation on reading

comprehension

Panayiota Metallidou, School of Psychology, Aristotle Unong>iversityong> of Thessaloniki, Greece

PAPER SESSION

101 – Auditorija 1

Personality I

Chair: János Nagy, Faculty of Pedagogy and Psychology, Loránd Eotvos Unong>iversityong>,

Budapest, Hungary

Measurement invariance of a new Big Five Inventory across five countries

Markus Sommer, Unong>iversityong> of Graz, Austria

Response scale use in the NEO-PI-R – Can the middle category be ignored?

Eunike Wetzel, Otto-Friedrich-Unong>iversityong> Bamberg, Germany

Big Five personality profiles of vocational orientations

Liisa Raudsepp, Assessment Centre Tripod, Unong>iversityong> of Tartu, Estonia

Temperament and the basic dimensions of personality

János Nagy, Department of Personality and Health Psychology, Faculty of Pedagogy and

Psychology, Eotvos Lorand Unong>iversityong>, Budapest, Hungary

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

OVERVIEW SYMPOSIUM AND PAPER SESSIONS

PAPER SESSION

264 – Auditorija 9

Specific Assessment Issues I

Chair: Tuulia M. Ortner, Free Unong>iversityong> of Berlin, Germany

Test takers’ experiences during adaptive versus fixed item testing

Tuulia M. Ortner, Free Unong>iversityong> of Berlin, Germany

Consequences of test anxiety on adaptive versus fixed item testing

Juliane Caspers, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany

Too good to be true: Effects of attractive test examiners on performance of men and

women

Isabella Vormittag, Free Unong>iversityong> Berlin, Germany

Test-taking motivation in computerized adaptive testing and fixed item testing

Regine Asseburg, Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education (IPN),

Germany

She’s an examiner – but a woman! Test takers’ stereotypic view of examiners

Isabella Vormittag, Free Unong>iversityong> Berlin, Germany

Thursday 14:15-15:45

INVITED SYMPOSIUM

The Great Hall

Online Assessment I

Symposium Chair: Siegbert Reiss, Goethe Unong>iversityong> Frankfurt, Germany

Symposium Discussant: Karl Schweizer, Goethe Unong>iversityong> Frankfurt, Germany

Lessons we’ve learned: Tips and techniques for online data collection

Tom Buchanan, Unong>iversityong> of Westminster, UK

Internet-based assessment: Challenges and solutions.

Ulf-Dietrich Reips, Universidad de Deusto, Spain

Web-based assessment of working memory capacity: the Exchange Test goes online.

Michael Schreiner, Goethe Unong>iversityong> of Frankfurt, Germany

New constructs for next generation online assessment

Patrick C.Kyllonen, Educational Testing Service, USA

21


22

OVERVIEW SYMPOSIUM AND PAPER SESSIONS

INVITED SYMPOSIUM

264 – Auditorija 9

Construct Representation and Construct Underrepresentation in the Assessment

of the Affective Domain

Symposium Chair: Johnny Fontaine, Ghent Unong>iversityong>, Belgium

Quality of Life ratings result from a subjective evaluation and integration of

satisfaction in life domains

Peter Theuns, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium

Assessing experiences of self-conscious emotions

Mia Silfver-Kuhalampi, Unong>iversityong> of Helsinki, Finland

The world of emotions is not two-dimensional: Confirmation with perceived

similarities and emotional experiences during daily emotional episodes

Johnny Fontaine, Ghent Unong>iversityong>, Belgium

The role of unidentified multidimensionality in the assessment of emotional

intelligence

Johnny Fontaine, Ghent Unong>iversityong>, Belgium

PAPER SESSION

104 – Auditorija 6

Organizational Psychology I

Chair: Norbert Tanzer, Unong>iversityong> of Graz, Austria

Proactive personality, networking, and job performance

Norbert Tanzer, Unong>iversityong> of Graz, Austria

Differential Item Functioning in the AIST-R

Eunike Wetzel, Otto-Friedrich-Unong>iversityong> Bamberg, Germany

Team leader performance measurement and effectiveness potential

Rainer Kurz, Kingston Unong>iversityong>, UK

Ambulatory fatigue assessment: Speech, video, and biosignal based approaches for

measuring need for recovery and burnout risk

Jarek Krajewski, Unong>iversityong> Wuppertal, Experimental Industrial Psychology, Germany

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

OVERVIEW SYMPOSIUM AND PAPER SESSIONS

PAPER SESSION

101 – Auditorija 1

Personality II

Chair: Friederike Dislich, Technische Universität München, Germany

An Item Response theory analysis of self-report measures of motives

Friederike Dislich, Technische Universität München, Germany

Trait interactions as criteria for the validation of trait measures: The case of the

implicit and explicit intelligence self-concept

Manfred Schmitt, Unong>iversityong> of Koblenz-Landau, Germany

Validity of the Korean short version of Barratt Impulsiveness Scale

Unkyung No, Korea Unong>iversityong>, Korea

Song Jung, Korea Unong>iversityong>, Korea

Development of a questionnaire for assessing conscientiousness using conditional

reasoning items

Laurentiu P. Maricutoiu, West Unong>iversityong> of Timisoara, Romania

Thursday 16:45-18:15

INVITED SYMPOSIUM

104 – Auditorija 6

Advances and Challenges in Test Adaptation Research

Symposium Chair: Grazina Gintiliene, Vilnius Unong>iversityong>, Lithuania

Symposium Discussant: Thomas Oakland, Unong>iversityong> of Florida, USA

Reliability and validity of Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children–Fourth Edition

(WISC-IV) in Latvia

Malgozata Rascevska, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

Intelligence test adaptation from the researchers’ perspectives: The Lithuanian

experience

Sigita Girdzijauskiene, Vilnius Unong>iversityong>, Lithuania

Translation or reconstruction – This is the question

Urszula Brzezinska, Psychological Test Laboratory of Polish Psychology, Poland

23


24

OVERVIEW SYMPOSIUM AND PAPER SESSIONS

PAPER SESSION

263 – Auditorija 9

Specific Assessment Issues II

Chair: Gershons Breslavs, Baltic Psychology and Management Unong>iversityong> College, Latvia

Construction and psychometric properties of a computer memory battery using

classical test theory and item response theory

Aristides Ferreira, ISCTE - Lisbon Unong>iversityong> Institute, Portugal

How to create knowledge space? Different methods for constructing surmise relation

in the context of knowledge space theory

Denisa Denglerova, Department of Social Pedagogy, Masaryk Unong>iversityong>, Czech Republic

Development of a group-level conflict resolution strategy scale

Vineta Laizane, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Department of Psychology, Latvia

Insufficiency of theoretical models in the field of intergroup relations: Towards the

ethnic tolerance scale elaboration

Gershons Breslavs, Baltic Psychology and Management Unong>iversityong> College, Latvia

PAPER SESSION

101 – Auditorija 1

Clinical Psychology I

Chair: Sebastian Schnieder, Unong>iversityong> Wuppertal, Experimental Industrial Psychology,

Germany

“You sound so sad” – Detecting depression from voice characteristics

Sebastian Schnieder, Unong>iversityong> Wuppertal, Experimental Industrial Psychology, Germany

What are the factors related to depressive symptoms among patients suffering diabetes

mellitus?

Emre Senol Durak, Abant Izzet Baysal Unong>iversityong>, Turkey

Psychometric properties of Beliefs About Psychological Services Scale [BAPS] in Latvia

Aleksandra Andrejeva, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

Psychological assessment in clinical settings in Lithuania: Post soviet heritage and

future perspectives

Grigutyte Neringa, Vilnius Unong>iversityong>, Lithuania

The contribution of the greek model of supervision in psychological assessment

Mastrandrea Christina, Open Psychotherapy Centre, Athens, Greece

Panagiota Theodorou, Open Psychotherapy Centre, Greece

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


Friday 8:45-10.15

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

OVERVIEW SYMPOSIUM AND PAPER SESSIONS

FRIDAY, 2 SEPTEMBER

INVITED SYMPOSIUM

The Great Hall

Online Assessment II

Symposium Chair: Karl Schweizer, Goethe Unong>iversityong> Frankfurt, Germany

Symposium Discussant: Lutz F. Hornke, RWTH Aachen Unong>iversityong>, Germany

What should I study (was-studiere-ich.de)?

Katja Paessler, Universität Konstanz, Germany

New validation approaches in the viennese self-assessment for psychology

Martina Frebort, Unong>iversityong> of Vienna, Austria

Processing characteristics and reasonableness regarding self-assessments

Lisbeth Weitensfelder, Unong>iversityong> of Vienna, Austria

SYMPOSIUM

264 – Auditorija 9

Response Styles in Rating Scales: Potential Causes, Correlates, and Detrimental

Effects on Measurement

Symposium Chair: Christoph J.Kemper GESIS - Leibniz Institute for the Social

Sciences, Germany

Symposium Discussant: Mathias Ziegler , Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Germany

The use of response sets: Who prefers extremes and who likes the middle?

Erik Danay, Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Germany

Extreme Response Style among immigrants and natives in Germany

Birgit Becker, GESIS - Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences, Germany

Analysis of Extreme Response Style in vocational interests

Jörg-Henrik Heine, Universität der Bundeswehr, Germany.

The Big Five, acquiescence, and education: A cross-cultural replication of the

educational bias in responses to Big Five measures

Beatrice Rammstedt, GESIS - Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences, Germany

25


26

OVERVIEW SYMPOSIUM AND PAPER SESSIONS

PAPER SESSION

104 – Auditorija 6

Organizational Psychology II

Chair: Rainer Kurz, Kingston Unong>iversityong>, UK

What people do when they are not working at work? Construction and development

of a new scale for organizational assessment

Aristides Ferreira, ISCTE - Lisbon Unong>iversityong> Institute, Portugal

Validating a situational based Emotional Intelligence test in an organizational context

Norbert K. Tanzer, Unong>iversityong> of Graz, Austria

Measuring perceived leadership characteristics by phonetic analysis

Jarek Krajewski, Unong>iversityong> Wuppertal, Experimental Industrial Psychology, Germany

Measuring and predicting the three effectiveness factors: Contextual, leadership and

task performance

Rainer Kurz, Kingston Unong>iversityong>, UK

PAPER SESSION

101 – Auditorija 1

Clinical Psychology II

Chair: Sandra Sebre, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

Assessing emotional and behavioural problems with the Child Behavior Checklist:

Exploring the relevance of adjusting the norms for the Flemish community

Mark Schittekatte, Ghent Unong>iversityong>, Belgium

Aggressiveness, parental practices and attachment

Miriam Gallarin, Unong>iversityong> of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Spain

Itziar Alonso-Arbiol, Unong>iversityong> of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Spain

Assessment of social skills and problem behaviors: A Cross-cultural study with

preschool children

Sofia Major, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Unong>iversityong> of Coimbra,

Portugal

Differences in association of psychological control and child behavior problems in

Latvia and Lithuania

Sandra Sebre, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


Friday 10:45–12:15

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

OVERVIEW SYMPOSIUM AND PAPER SESSIONS

INVITED SYMPOSIUM

The Great Hall

Cross - Cultural Assessment II

Symposium Chair: Itziar Alonso-Arbiol, Unong>iversityong> of the Basque Country, Spain

Symposium Discussant: Fons J. R. van de Vijver, Tilburg Unong>iversityong>, Netherlands

Language-related biases in nonverbal intelligence tests

Norbert K. Tanzer, Unong>iversityong> of Graz, Austria

How many Samples do we really need?

Klaus Boehnke, Jacobs Unong>iversityong> Bremen, Germany

Incorporating emics within etic parameters: Conceptual and methodological tools for

cross-cultural assessment

Peter Weinreich, Unong>iversityong> of Ulster, UK

The combination of emic and etic methods in personality assessment

Fons J. R. van de Vijver, Tilburg Unong>iversityong>, Netherlands

PAPER SESSION

104 – Auditorija 6

Cognitive Abilities I

Chair: Michael Berg, Institute of test development and -application I.T.E.A., USA

The role of psychlogical test systems for the diagnostics of cognitive functions

Michael Berg, Institute of test development and -application I.T.E.A., USA

Can different measures of intelligence can be used interchangeably? A comparison of

the Wechsler and Stanford-Binet scales

Gilmore Linda, Queensland Unong>iversityong> of Technology, Australia,

How smart do you think you are? A meta-analysis on the validity of self-estimated

intelligence scores

Philipp Alexander Freund, Leuphana Universität Lüneburg, Germany

Wise students’ characteristics evaluated by themselves and peers

Liena Graudiņa, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

Development and validation of the Syllable-Word Working Memory Test

Tatjana Turilova-Miščenko, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

27


28

OVERVIEW SYMPOSIUM AND PAPER SESSIONS

PAPER SESSION

264 – Auditorija 9

Specific Assessment Issues III

Chair: Klaus Kubinger, Division of Psychological Assessment and Applied

Psychometrics, Unong>iversityong> of Vienna, Austria

A new approach of testing the Rasch model

Klaus Kubinger, Division of Psychological Assessment and Applied Psychometrics,

Unong>iversityong> of Vienna, Austria

Assessing handedness: An Even-handed assessment

Maryanne Martin, Unong>iversityong> of Oxford, UK

Speech emotion recognition – a framework for measuring for emotional states from

voice characteristics

Jarek Krajewski, Unong>iversityong> Wuppertal, Experimental Industrial Psychology, Germany

Validity of a measure of implicit disgust sensitivity

Axel Zinkernagel, Unong>iversityong> of Koblenz-Landau, Germany

PAPER SESSION

101 – Auditorija 1

Personality III

Chair: Martin Bäckström, Lund Unong>iversityong>, Sweden

Evaluative content in personality items: Symptoms, diagnosis and c

Martin Bäckström, Lund Unong>iversityong>, Sweden

Individual differences in emotion recognition and face cognition

Wilhelm Oliver, Unong>iversityong> Ulm, Germany

Children’s quality of life

Shulamith Kreitler, Tel Aviv Unong>iversityong>, Israel

Creation of Major Well-Being Dimension questionnaire

Maris Majors, Riga Teacher Training and Education Management Academy, Latvia

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


Friday 16:30–18:00

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

OVERVIEW SYMPOSIUM AND PAPER SESSIONS

INVITED SYMPOSIUM

Tha Great Hall

Instruments for the Assessment of Positive Psychology Traits I

Symposium Chair: Willibald Ruch, Unong>iversityong> of Zurich, Switzerland

Positive psychological assessment: Self-efficacy, emotional intelligence, learned

optimism and well-being in South Africa

Sebastiaan Rothmann, NWU, Vanderbijlpark, South Africa

The measurement of personal optimism by bipolar items for avoiding inhomogeneity

resulting from different item-wordings

Karl Schweizer, Goethe Unong>iversityong> Frankfurt, Germany

International Well-being Index: Austria, Switzerland and Germany

Stefan Höfer, Innsbruck Medical Unong>iversityong>, Austria

Assessment of positive perception: A three dimensional model and a scale

Tamar Icekson, Ben-Gurion Unong>iversityong> of the Negev, Israel

SYMPOSIUM

264 – Auditorija 9

A Cross Section of New Instruments in Psychological Assessment

Symposium Chair: Nicole Hirschmann, Unong>iversityong> of Vienna, Austria

Symposium Discussant: Tuulia Ortner, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany

Conception of a facet-oriented spatial ability test (TARV – Test of Applied Relations

and Visuo-spatial abilities)

Lisbeth Weitensfelder, Centre of Testing and Consulting, Division of Psychology, Austria

The Genetics Lab – A new computer-based problem solving scenario to assess

intelligence

Philipp Sonnleitner, Unong>iversityong> of Luxembourg, Luxemburg

INTAKT: A new instrument for assessing the quality of mother-child interactions

Nicole Hirschmann, Unong>iversityong> of Vienna, Austria

29


30

OVERVIEW SYMPOSIUM AND PAPER SESSIONS

PAPER SESSION

101 – Auditorija 1

New Causal Assessment

Chair: Stella Tamburello, Università Europea di Roma - Istituto Skinner di Roma, Italy

The role of the Order Matrix in the assessment process

Paolo Scapellato, Università Europea di Roma - Istituto Skinner di Roma, Italy

7 column functional analysis and causal cognitive assessment

Stella Tamburello, Università Europea di Roma - Istituto Skinner di Roma, Italy

New procedures and instruments of assessment of motivation, cognitive and affective

processes

Anna Contardi, Università Europea di Roma - Istituto Skinner di Roma, Italy

The logical and ontological impact of the new “Cognitive-Causal” assessment

Ettore De Monte, Università Europea di Roma - Istituto Skinner Roma, Italy

Paolo Scapellato, Università Europea di Roma - Istituto Skinner di Roma, Italy

PAPER SESSION

104 – Auditorija 6

Organizational Psychology III

Chair: Victor J. Rubio, Unong>iversityong> Autonoma of Madrid, Spain

Checkpoint 360 competency survey

Undīne Bušmeistere, SIA “Eiropersonāls”, Latvia

Measuring teamwork abilities implicitly through projective responses to computer

graphics

Shinkichi Sugimori, Tokyo Gakugei Unong>iversityong> / CRET: Center for Research on

Educational Testing, Japan

Reliability and validity of the short version of Success and Failure Explanatory Style

Questionnaire

Evgeny Osin, Higher School of Economics, Russia

Using Partially Structured Attitude Measures for assessing attitudes towards risk as an

estimation of risk propensity

Victor J. Rubio, Unong>iversityong> Autonoma of Madrid, Spain

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


Saturday 10:15–11.45

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

OVERVIEW SYMPOSIUM AND PAPER SESSIONS

SATURTDAY, 3 SEPTEMBER

INVITED SYMPOSIUM

The Great Hall

Issues in the Measurement of Facets of Metacognition

Symposium chair: Anastasia Efklides, Aristotle Unong>iversityong> of Thessaloniki, Greece

Two determinants of conclusions about the realism in confidence judgments of

memory reports: Measurements and repetition

Carl Martin Allwood, Unong>iversityong> of Gothenburg, Sweden

Investigation of the accessibility model of the feeling of knowing in episodic memory

with the use of TOTimals

Elisabeth Bacon, Hôpitaux Universitaires, Strasbourg, France

How to assess processing fluency

Rolf Reber, Unong>iversityong> of Bergen, Norway

Relation between self-assessment and performance measures of metacognition in

reading during adolescence

Svjetlana Kolic-Vehovec, Unong>iversityong> of Rijeka, Croatia

Unong>iversityong> students’ metacognitive knowledge about their efficacy in everyday

attention tasks and the frequency of attention lapses: Validity and reliability issues

Panayiota Metallidou, Aristotle Unong>iversityong> of Thessaloniki, Greece

PAPER SESSION

101 – Auditorija 1

Clinical Psychology III

Chair: Ieva Bite, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

Two rule-based models of differential diagnosis using the MMPI test: Rule decision

trees and approximate rules

Krzysztof Pancerz, Institute of Biomedical Informatics, Unong>iversityong> of Information

Technology and Management, Poland

Measuring interplay of trait self-control and situational demands in binge-drinking

Eva-Maria Kangro, Tallinn Unong>iversityong>, Institute of Psychology, Estonia

31


32

OVERVIEW SYMPOSIUM AND PAPER SESSIONS

The factors associated with stress-related growth in a sample of patients suffering

diabetes mellitus

Emre Senol Durak, Abant Izzet Baysal Unong>iversityong>, Turkey

Resilience, bereavement reactions and attachment style for adults after loss of parent

Liga Sovere, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

PAPER SESSION

104 – Auditorija 6

Cognitive Abilities II

Chair: Georgia Papantoniou, Unong>iversityong> of Ioannina, Greece

Using the VESPARCH verbal reasoning test to identify and categorise

underachievement in primary and secondary school students

Sarah McElwee, Unong>iversityong> of Oxford, UK

Bases of emotional intelligence: Emotional Stroop Effect

Tatiana Sysoeva, Russian State Unong>iversityong> for the Humanities, Russia

Aspects of emotional intelligence: Accuracy vs. sensitivity

Dmitry Lyusin, Russian State Unong>iversityong> for the Humanities, Institute of Psychology of

the Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia

An exploration of measurement bias due to worry and emotionality components of

test anxiety on cognitive ability tests

Georgia Papantoniou, Unong>iversityong> of Ioannina, Greece

Saturday 14:15–15:45

INVITED SYMPOSIUM

The Great Hall

Aggressive and Conduct Problems in Childhood

Symposium Chair: Nuria de la Osa, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Spain

Aggressive behaviour and psychopathology in preschool children from the general

Spanish population

Lourdes Ezpeleta, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Spain

The assessment of psychopathic traits in the community and in offender samples

using the APSD and the PCL:YV

Rafael Torrubia, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

OVERVIEW SYMPOSIUM AND PAPER SESSIONS

Assessing aggression in Spanish children: Psychometric properties of Childrens’

Proactive and Reactive Aggression Scale

Miguel Angel Carrasco, National Unong>iversityong> of Distance Education, Spain

INVITED SYMPOSIUM

264 – Auditorija 9

Instruments for the Assessment of Positive Psychology Traits II

Symposium Chair: Willibald Ruch, Unong>iversityong> of Zurich, Switzerland

Character strengths in children and adolescents: Reliability and validity of the

German Values in Action Inventory of Strengths for Youth (German VIA-Youth)

Willibald Ruch, Unong>iversityong> of Zurich, Switzerland

Character strengths in Israel: Hebrew adaptation of the VIA Inventory of Strengths

Shiri Lavy, Ariel Unong>iversityong> Center of Samaria, Israel

Adult playfulness and positive psychology: Measurement issues, correlates, and future

perspectives

René Proyer, Unong>iversityong> of Zurich, Switzerland

Assessment of children’s sense of humour: A survey of humour instruments

Sarah Auerbach, Unong>iversityong> of Zurich, Switzerland

Assessing individual differences in mood regulation competencies indirectly

Claudia Crayen, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany

PAPER SESSION

101 – Auditorija 1

Educational Psychology II

Chair: Anastasia Efklides, Aristotle Unong>iversityong> of Thessaloniki, Greece

Adaptation study of the epistemological beliefs inventory for Turkish undergraduates

Ezel Tavşancıl, Ankara Unong>iversityong>, Turkey

Measuring metacognitive knowledge of self, task, and strategies in mathematics

Anastasia Efklides, Aristotle Unong>iversityong> of Thessaloniki, Greece

Development of higher school pedagogues’ professional self-consciousness

Svitlana Paschenko, Kyiv National Unong>iversityong> named after Taras Shevchenko, Ukraine

33


34

OVERVIEW SYMPOSIUM AND PAPER SESSIONS

Cognitive development and tonal systems of Greek language: A comparative

longitudinal field study

Thalis N. Papadakis, Open Psychotherapy Centre, Athens, Greece

Evdokia Lagakou , Open Psychotherapy Centre, Greece

PAPER SESSION

104 – Auditorija 6

Interpersonal Relations

Chair: Despina Moraitou, Aristotle Unong>iversityong> of Thessaloniki, Greece

Causal attributions towards infidelity: Development of the questionnaire

Iveta Ruža, Daugavpils Unong>iversityong>, Latvia

Measurement invariance assessment within and between interpersonal relationships:

The issue of non-independence

Semira Tagliabue, Università Cattolica S. Cuore Brescia, Italy

Relationship of forgiveness, subjective well-being and perceived relationship quality

components

Ilze Plauča, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, The Faculty of Education, Psychology and Art, Latvia

Mindfulness and action control in young, middle-aged, and old adults: An

examination of their relationship to attentional bias towards emotional information

Despina Moraitou, Aristotle Unong>iversityong> of Thessaloniki, Greece

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


OVERVIEW POSTER SESSIONS


15:45–16:45

OVERVIEW POSTER SESSIONS

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1

1. Hierarchical structure of academic mastery orientation

Kati Aus, Tallinn Unong>iversityong>, Estonia

Co – author : Kätlin Peets

2. Children at risk – the efficiency of a training program

Luliana Birle Delia, Unong>iversityong> of Oradea, Romania

Co – authors : Monica Liana Secui, Rosana Stan

3. The effectiveness of a rational emotive and behavioral education program for

adolescents in the situation of incomplete parenting

Elena Bonchis, Unong>iversityong> of Oradea, Romania,

Co – authors : Daniela Roman, Camelia Dindelega

4. Relations between perfectionism, self-efficacy and subjective well-being

Renāte Buliņa, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

5. Classification procedures and cut score definition in psychological testing:

A review

Paola Bully, Unong>iversityong> of the Basque Country, Spain

Co – author : Paula Elosua

6. Differential conditions of quality of life in the elderly: Gender differences

Paola Bully, Unong>iversityong> of the Basque Country, Spain

Co – authors : Paula Elosua, Josu Mujika

7. Raven’s Coloured Progressive Matrices among children aged 4–5 years in

Lithuania

Dovilė Butkienė, Vilnius Unong>iversityong> Department of General Psychology, Lithuania,

Co – author : Gražina Gintilienė

8. Proactive and reactive aggression during childhood: Gender differences,

intercorrelations, and relations to internalizing and externalizing behavioral

problems

Miguel A. Carrasco, Unong>iversityong> of National Education of Distance (UNED), Spain,

Co – authors : Paloma Gonzalez, Victoria Del Barrio

9. Polish version of the IPIP scales for measuring Abridged Big Five

Dimensional Circumplex (AB5C)

Jan Cieciuch, Unong>iversityong> of Finance and Management in Warsaw, Poland

Co – authors : Tomasz Rowiński, Włodzimierz Strus

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

37


38

OVERVIEW POSTER SESSIONS

10. Assessment of dissociative symptoms and schizotypal personality features in

relation to schizophrenia and childhood abuse

Ilze Damberga, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

11. Association of parenting practices with Oppositional Defiant Disorder

and Conduct Disorder in Spanish preschoolers of a general population:

The role of sex

Nuria de la Osa, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Spain

Co – authors : Jenniffer Miranda, Lourdes Ezpeleta, Roser Granero, Josep Maria

Domenech

12. Associations of psychophysiological characteristics of speech emotional

prosody perception with EI measures in listeners of different ages

Elena Dmitrieva, Institute of Evolutionary Physiology and Biochemistry, Russ.

Ac.Sci., Russia

Co – authors : Victor Gelman, Kira Zaitseva, Aleksandr Orlov

13. Clinical validation of the Estonian version of the CERAD test battery

Margus Ennok, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Unong>iversityong> of Tartu,

Estonia

Co – authors : Kai Rohulaid, Liina Vahter, Katrin Gross-Paju

14. Preliminary Estonian normative data for the Stroop Test

Margus Ennok, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Unong>iversityong> of Tartu,

Estonia

15. Adaptation of Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire

Anda Gaitniece-Putāne, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

16. Comparison of Woodcock- Johnson International Edition Tests of Cognitive

Abilities data from year 2000–2004 and year 2005–2009

Inguna Griskevica, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

17. A study of the independence and resilience in unong>iversityong> students of Japan

Taiko Hashimoto, Institute of Japan Education and Clinical Psychology, Japan

Co – author : Misako Araki

18. Emotion regulation and dissociation in women with eating disorders

Ginta Jansone, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

Co – author : Ieva Bite

19. Adaptation of Creative Functioning Test in Latvia

Emils Kalis, Daugavpils Unong>iversityong>, Latvia

Co – author : Liga Roke

20. Investigations of teachers understanding about specific reading disabilities in

pedagogical practice

Anda Kaulina, Riga Teacher Training and Education Management Academy,

Latvia

Co – authors : Daina Voita, Toms Voits

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

OVERVIEW POSTER SESSIONS

21. Assessment of traumatic stress: Ambulatory assessment approach

Evaldas Kazlauskas, Vilnius Unong>iversityong>, Lithuania

Co – author : Skina Gausaite

22. Indicators for the ex post detection of faking in survey data constructed from

responses to the Big Five Inventory-10 (BFI-10)

Christoph. J. Kemper, GESIS - Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences, Germany

Co – authors : V. Trofimow, B. Rammstedt, N. Menold

23. Validity of a Single-Item Scale for Life Satisfaction

Mira Céline Klein, Gesis - Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences, Germany

Co – authors : Anastassiya Kovaleva, Constanze Beierlein, Christoph Kemper,

Beatrice Rammstedt

24. Psychometric properties of the Social Problem Solving Abilities Inventory in

Russian Language

Jelena Kolesnikova, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

25. Development of a new time perspective inventory in the Latvian and Russian

languages

Aleksandrs Kolesovs, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

26. Social responsibility in cross-cultural perspective: Assessment of future

Ukrainian and Lithuanian Engineers

Olena Kovalchuk, National Technical Unong>iversityong> of Ukraine \”KPI\”, Ukraine

Co – author : Aldona Augustiniene

27. Pilot study of different factors related to dental anxiety in 4–12 years old

children in Latvia

Liga Kronina, Riga Stradins Unong>iversityong>, Latvia

Co – authors : Malgozata Rascevska, Ruta Care

28. Relationship between adolescent attachment, codependency, and behavior

problems

Ilona Laizane, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

Co – author : Sandra Sebre

29. Assessing adult attachment orientations among Arabs in Israel

Shiri Lavy, Ariel Unong>iversityong> Center, Israel

Co – authors : Faisal Azaiza, Mario Mikulincer

30. A new scale for assessing the amount of flow in professional activity

Dmitry Leontiev, Lomonossov Moscow State Unong>iversityong>, Russia

31. The reliability and factorial validity of the Russian version of the Self-

Description Questionnaire-II (SDQ-II)

Elena Levina, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

Co – author : Natalija Ivanova

39


40

OVERVIEW POSTER SESSIONS

32. Adaptation of Coping Self-Efficacy Scale in Latvia

Maruta Ludāne, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

33. Picture Based Personality Survey for Children – new instrument for

measuring Big Five in childhood

Marta Maćkiewicz, Unong>iversityong> of Cardinal Stefan Wyszyński in Warsaw, Poland

Co – author : Jan Cieciuch

34. Using Rasch analysis to refine the VESPARCH verbal reasoning test for

children aged 10–13 years

Sarah McElwee, Unong>iversityong> of Oxford, UK

Co – author : Jane Mellanby

35. Impact of fear on self-control

Ina Melny, Technische Universität München, Germany

Co – author : Hugo Kehr

36. Assessment of study-related interests relevant for the transition to unong>iversityong>

Lilith Michaelis, Goethe Unong>iversityong> Frankfurt, Germany

Co – authors : Sonja Rohrmann, Helfried Moosbrugger, Siegbert Reiß

37. To develop a measurement for the dietary education of parents in homes

with infants

Araki Misako, J.F. Oberlin Unong>iversityong>, Japan

Co – author : Hajime Yamaguchi

38. The relationship between the dietary education in the home and drawing

of a supper

Araki Misako, J.F. Oberlin Unong>iversityong>, Japan

Co – author : Hashimoto Taiko

39. The construct validity of the SVR-20 in Lithuanian sex offenders sample

Marijus Mitrauskas, Mykolas Romeris unong>iversityong>, Lithuania

Co – author : Ilona Čėsnienė

40. Latvian adaptation of the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire

Marija Morozova Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Department of Psychology, Latvia

Co – authors : Ginta Jansone, Malgozata Rascevska

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


15:45–16:45

FRIDAY, 2 SEPTEMBER

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

OVERVIEW POSTER SESSIONS

41. Is gender related to attention-deficit?

Josu Mujika, Unong>iversityong> of the Basque Country, Spain

Co – authors : Paula Elosua, Paola Bully

42. Psychometric Properties of Latvian version of Driver Behaviour Questionnaire

Inese Muzikante, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

43. The basic dimensions of personality: Comparing rating and questionnaire

data

János Nagy, Department of Personality and Health Psychology, Faculty of

Pedagogy and Psychology, Eotvos Lorand Unong>iversityong>, Budapest, Hungary

Co – author : Zsofia Szirmák

44. Gender differences in the innovative activity of students

Donka Nikova - Tsioutsiou, UNWE, Bulgaria

45. Gender and age differences in “food selection criteria”

Masami Okano, Bunkyo Unong>iversityong>, Japan

Co – author : Masao Okano

46. Usage of vignettes for operationalization and measurement of emotional

intelligence

Ekaterina Orel, National research unong>iversityong> – Higher school of economics, Russia

Co – author : Tatiana Khavenson

47. Questionnaire of Acceptability of Anger Expression Types: Development and

psychometric properties

Madara Orlovska, Department of psychology, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

Co – authors : Marija Morozova, Lasma Katsena, Kristine Poca,

Malgozata Rascevska

48. What the progressive matrices actually measure?

Anna Páchová, Charles Unong>iversityong> in Prague, Pedagogical faculty, department of

psychology, Czech Republic

Co – author : Miroslav Rendl

49. Psychometric properties of the Greek version of the Test Anxiety Inventory

Georgia Papantoniou, Unong>iversityong> of Ioannina, Greece

Co – authors : Despina Moraitou, Dimitra Filippidou

50. Victimization and internalizing and externalizing psychopathology in

adolescents

Clàudia Paretilla Guardi, Unong>iversityong> of Barcelona, Spain

Co – authors : Laia Soler Corbella, Maria Forns i Santacana, Teresa Kirchner

Nebot, Noemí Pereda Beltran

41


42

OVERVIEW POSTER SESSIONS

51. Psychometric properties of a public domain Latvian measure of the

personality five-factor model

Viktorija Perepjolkina, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

Co – authors : Līva Van Skotere, Viesturs Reņģe

52. Psychometric properties of R. Plutchik`s Life Style Index (LSI) for Latvian

Alla Plaude, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

Co – author: Malgožata Raščevska, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

53. Episodic and semantic aspects of ethnic attitudes assessment, the application

of procedure of unconscious affective priming

Irina Plotka, Daugavpils Unong>iversityong>, Baltic Psychology and Management Unong>iversityong>

College, Latvia, Latvia

Co – authors : Dmitry Igonin, Nina Blumenau, Marija Bambulyaka, Elena Ozola,

Laura Šimane

54. Premorbid personality and cognitive functioning level in patients with

beginning Alzheimer disease

Cornelia Pocnet, Institute of Psychology, Unong>iversityong> of Lausanne, Switzerland,

Switzerland

Co – authors : Jérôme Rossier, Jean-Philippe Antonietti, Armin von Gunten

55. Zuckerman’s revised Alternative Five-Factor Model: Validation of the

Zuckerman-Kuhlman-Aluja Personality Questionnaire in four French

speaking countries

Cornelia Pocnet, Institute of Psychology, Unong>iversityong> of Lausanne, Switzerland,

Switzerland

Co – authors : Michel Hansenne, Nicolas Baudin, Julien Morizot, Jérôme Rossier

56. Assessing teachers’ personality in 6 seconds: What leads to high consensus?

Johanna Pretsch, Unong>iversityong> of Koblenz-Landau, Germany

Co – author : Manfred Schmitt

57. Is there a universal trajectory of self-esteem across the life span?

Helle Pullmann, Department of Psychology, Unong>iversityong> of Tartu, Estonia

Co – authors : Jüri Allik, Anu Realo

58. Ethnic identity research in multicultural society

Vitaly Raschevsky, Daugavpils Unong>iversityong>, Latvia

Co – author : Aleksejs Vorobjovs

59. Testing personality traits and vocational orientations in career counselling

Liisa Raudsepp, Assessment Centre Tripod, Unong>iversityong> of Tartu, Estonia

Co – authors : Maria Veltmann, Helle Pullmann

60. Polish validation of the Student Styles Questionnaire

Tomasz Rowinski, Cardinal Stefan Wyszyński Unong>iversityong> in Warsaw, Poland

Co – author : Jan Cieciuch

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

OVERVIEW POSTER SESSIONS

61. The humorous temperament of children and youth: Development of an age

based version of the State-Trait-Cheerfulness-Inventory (STCI)

Willibald Ruch, Unong>iversityong> of Zurich, Switzerland

Co – authors : Auerbach Sarah, Karin Sommer, Karin Hösli

62. Measuring job search intentions and behaviour

Sanita Saitere, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

63. Specific objectivity of depression: Rasch analysis of the Simplified Beck

Depression Inventory

Sebastian Sauer, Generation Research Program, Ludwig-Maximilians-Unong>iversityong>

Munich, Germany

Co – authors : Matthias Ziegler, Manfred Schmitt,

64. Assessment of social skills and problem behaviors: A validity study of the

PKBS-2

Maria João Seabra-Santos, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences –

Unong>iversityong> of Coimbra, Portugal

Co – authors : Andreia Azevedo, Maria Filomena Gaspar, Sofia Major,

TatianaHomem, Sara Leitão

65. Spiritual well-being and suicidal ideation in patients with major depressive

disorder and paranoid schizophrenia

Elina Selevica, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

Co – authors : Evija Strika, Elmars Terauds

66. The great power of Item Response Theory: Using IRT to compare ability levels

Anders Sjöberg, Assessio International, Sweden

67. The heritability of traits predicting job performance: A twin study

Anders Sjöberg, Assessio International, Sweden,

68. Observational and self-report assessment in evaluation of parent training

program: Impact of doing homework

Inga Skreitule-Pikše, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

69. Psychometric properties of the Latvian Version of the Mathematics Anxiety

Rating Scale

Daina Skuskovnika, School of Business Administration Turiba, Latvia

Co – authors : Inta Tiltina-Kapele, Inese Ābele

70. The three diagnostic strategies – which is the best?

Anna Słysz, Adam Mickiewicz Unong>iversityong> of Poznań, Poland

71. Relationship between victimization and psycopathology: Mediator role of

self-esteem

Laia Soler Corbella, Unong>iversityong> of Barcelona, Spain

Co – authors : Clàudia Paretilla Guardi, Maria Forns i Santacana, Teresa

Kirchner Nebot, Judit Abad Gil

43


44

OVERVIEW POSTER SESSIONS

72. Development of a Latvian Social Conservatism Scale

Ingrida Trups-Kalne, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

Co – author : Girts Dimdins

73. Life satisfaction judgments in Latvia: Quantitative and qualitative approach

Anda Upmane, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

Co – author : Sandra Sebre

74. Prognostic validity of the Offender Assessment System (OASys) in Lithuanian

offender sample

Laura Ustinaviciute, Mykolo romerio universitetas, Lithuania

Co – authors : Alfredas Laurinavicius, Rita Zukauskiene

75. A new assessment tool of spatial abilities for Information Technology

professionals

Aare Värk, Assessment Centre Tripod, Estonia, Unong>iversityong> of Tartu, Estonia

Co – authors : Maria Veltmann, Helle Pullmann

76. Spatial abilities vary across job complexity: A case of Ericsson Supply Site

Tallinn

Aare Värk, Assessment Centre Tripod, Unong>iversityong> of Tartu, Estonia

Co – author : Maria Veltmann

77. General mental ability predicting achievement in mathematics

Maria Veltmann, Assessment Centre Tripod, Estonia

Co – authors : Liisa Raudsepp, Helle Pullmann

78. Personality traits and mental abilities of Estonian leaders

Maria Veltmann, Assessment Centre Tripod, Estonia

Co – author : Helle Pullmann

79. A pilot study: Level of nonverbal attunement between mother and children

with secure and insecure attachment style

Kristīne Vende, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

Co-author: Ervins Cukurs

80. Specifics of psychosocial well-being Model of unong>iversityong> students in Latvia

Santa Vorone, Daugavpils Unong>iversityong>, Latvia

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


ABSTRACTS


Thursday 12:15–13:15

ABSTRACTS

KEYNOTE ADDRESSES

The impact of personality on the competitiveness and economic

performance of nations

Dave Bartram, SHL Group, United Kingdom

Big Five scale scores for over one million people are reviewed in terms of differences

between 31 countries involving over 20 different languages. Strong relationships are

found between country average scale scores and country SDs on the one hand and two

of Hofstede’s dimensions on the other. Country level performance indicators were also

examined (the World Economic Forum Global Competitiveness Index and UN Human

Development indices). Strong correlations were found between these indicators and

both country level mean personality scores and SDs of personality scores. While

Hofstede’s dimensions also predict variation in global competitiveness (R=0.66),

adding personality data significantly increases the level of prediction to R=0.88.

The implications of the results for establishing scalar equivalence across countries is

discussed.

Friday 13:30–14:30

The status of test development and use internationally

Thomas Oakland, Unong>iversityong> of Florida, USA

The development and use of tests may constitute psychology’s most important technical

contribution to the behavioral sciences. The level of test development and use differs

considerably internationally. The current status of test development and use will be

reviewed. Then the following four questions will be discussed: How did we reach an

advanced level of development in some countries and not others? What qualities are

needed to attain this development in other countries? What changes are occurring

to which tests need to respond? Thus, what changes in test development and use are

needed to be on the cutting edge of our profession?

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

47


48

ABSTRACTS : KEYNOTE ADDRESSES

Friday 14:45:15:45

Assessment and its discontents: A view from cultural psychology

Jaan Valsiner, Clark Unong>iversityong>, USA

The Assessment Act – a cultural-historical activity that involves projection of qualities

into the Assessed by the Assessor – is a communicative process of general kind. As

such it fits Karl Bühler’s Organon Model of communication– with the specific addition

of unidirectional attribution of the constructed meaning („the assessment outcome”)

into the object of assessment. Cultural psychology – in its focus on culture within

persons–provides a foundation for a generative look at the Assessment Act. The object

of assessment is a meaning-constructing system (a person, social group, community,

etc.) that operates at multiple organizational levels simultaneously and is involved in

self-regulation. From this angle, the focus of assessment becomes the study of potential

sign construction that regulates conduct through simultaneous processes of meaning

making and meaning inhibition. Methods of assessment of such semiotic potentials

entail qualitative investigation of the process of meaning making within the system of

emerging hierarchical semiotic regulation system.

Saturday 9:00–10:00

On comparing apples and oranges: Towards a quantitative emic

cross-cultural psychology

Klaus Boehnke, Jacobs Unong>iversityong>, Germany

The reigning credo of cross-cultural psychological assessment is that of perfect

equivalence in measurement across cultures being an irrevocable requirement for valid

comparisons. ‘Perfect’ in this context is a colloquialism for the demand that there should

be equivalence in the structure (number and relational pattern of factors), the relative

weight of items (loading pattern), and the size and relationship pattern of measurement

error. Such an approach commonly rules out that a construct can be measured by

different items in different cultures. This, however, need not be so. Suggesting that such

a kind of equivalence can only be achieved by using identical items in all cultures under

scrutiny, ignores Lord and Novick’s (1953) motto that the “numbers don’t know where

they come from.” It is certainly possible to show perfect equivalence of the sketched

type, when items between cultures differ. Psychological substance is not inherent in

the numbers. Testing equivalence is a—highly useful—number juggling endeavor;

it cannot substitute agreement on functional equivalence, as laid out by John Berry

as early as 1969. The keynote will take these thoughts as a point of departure and will

attempt to develop initial thoughts on how to engage in an emic quantitative crosscultural

assessment.

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


Saturday 12:15–13:15

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

A ABSTRACTS : KEYNOTE ADDRESSES BSTRACTS

Clinical decision making: Pass, present, and future

Antonio Godoy, Unong>iversityong> of Malaga, Spain

The study of clinical decision making has been an old research topic in Psychology from

the seminal and challenging little book published by Paul Meehl in 1954, Clinical versus

statistical prediction. In the present lecture, I will try to present what we have learned

from this research summing up its results around three topics: (a) How clinical decisionmaking

works in Psychology. In this part, I will discuss the research on the quality of

clinical judgments in using personality traits, in deciding whether a behaviour must

be conceived as a clinical symptom, in making clinical case formulation, in predicting

relevant clinical behaviour, and in deciding whether apply a psychological treatment,

and if so, what must be the focus of treatment, and what the type or components of the

treatment to be applied. (b) The second part of the lecture will try to sum up the results

of research aimed to understand why clinical decision-making does not reach the

expected level of quality. I will summarize, then, the research on clinicians’ problems

when collecting and processing information from a clinical case. (c) In the third part,

I will depict several proposals (especially, the role of clinical training) made on how to

improve clinical decision making, as well as the results obtained when these proposals

have been applied. Finally, I will describe two theoretical models useful for the study

and improvement of clinical decision making.

49


50

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

Thursday 10:15–11:45

SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

INVITED SYMPOSIUM

Cross - Cultural Assessment I

Symposium Chair: Itziar Alonso-Arbiol, Unong>iversityong> of the Basque Country, Spain

Synopsis of the Symposium

This symposium gathers papers that address both methodological and substantive issues

on cross-cultural assessment. In a double session, an up-to-date wide range of current

topics and methods being studied and employed in cross-cultural assessment will be

presented. The first two papers deal with cross-country comparisons of psychological

constructs studied in different fields, students’ responses to sets of two assessment

tasks and elements of militant extremist mindset. The next five presentations deal

with specific methodological aspects that may have an impact in any cross-cultural

examination. Specifically, equivalence and bias issues are addressed in various papers

at construct and item levels, as well as the implication of some data analytic strategies

used for sampling procedures in cross-cultural assessment. The last two papers are

illustrative elements of how the combination of Emic and Etic methods can be used in

the assessment of personality and other psychological phenomena. The implications of

the methods used for the interpretation of cross-cultural data will be discussed.

Paper 1

Australian and Finnish students’ free responses while engaging in

collaborative problem solving assessment tasks

Esther Care, Unong>iversityong> of Melbourne, Australia

Co – authors : Patrick Griffin, MarjaKankaanranta, ArtoAhonen

Several countries have been participating in the Assessment and Teaching of 21st

Century Skills (ATC21S) project from 2009. The focus in this paper is on the degree

to which students across two of these countries respond similarly to sets of assessment

tasks. The project has been responsible for the development of electronic tasks which

indicate competence in two skills areas. These areas are ICT literacy and collaborative

problem solving. The latter area is of interest in the field of both educational and

psychological assessment, and within the latter relevant to both cognitive and social

psychology. The construct of collaborative problem solving may be seen as multi-

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

dimensional, including both problem solving and collaborative components. Whether

these two dimensions in combination act differently from their parallels when engaged

in isolation is not yet clear. In order to refine the assessment tasks, students in both

countries participated in “cognitive laboratory” activities, in which they worked through

the tasks while providing a simultaneous monologue about their actions, perspectives,

and responses. A comparison of the text from these monologues is provided through

a qualitative analysis, which is linked to the selection responses of the students to the

tasks. This process provided the basis upon which the automated scoring of the tasks

is being developed. Of particular interest is the rationale for choices provided by the

students, and the degree to which these vary systematically across the Finnish and

Australian students. Differences and similarities are interpreted and discussed in the

context of the two nations’ pedagogical approaches to problem solving.

Paper 2

Militant extremist mindset and the assessment of radicalization in

general population

Lazar Stankov, National Institute of Education, Singapore

Co – authors : Goran Knezevic, Gerard Saucier

In this paper we review the evidence pointing to the existence of three main ingredients

of militant extremist mindset (MEM). Two surveys based on multinational samples

(Serbia, Australia, and USA) and three different ways of item development have

identified factors that can be labeled: Nastiness, Grudge and Excuse. In other words,

there are in our midst nasty people who are more prepared than others to accept, approve

or even advocate the use of violence. When such people feel a grudge in that they see

somebody as threatening to themselves (or to members of the group they belong to)

or think that the world is not a hospitable place to live in, they may resort to violence.

This violence tends to be accompanied with an excuse or justification by reference to a

higher authority or a “noble” principle. Although all three ingredients may be open to

intervention, Grudge appears to be the most amenable. We shall describe procedures

employed in the development of scales that measure ingredients of MEM.

51


52

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

Paper 3

Cross-cultural assessment of time perspective: Equivalence and bias

study

Anna Sircova, Umea Unong>iversityong>

Co – authors : Fons van de Vijver, Evgeny Osin, Taciano Milfont, Nicolas Fieulaine,

Altinay Kislali-Erginbilgic, Philip Zimbardo

We present a study assessing equivalence and bias of time perspective across 23

countries, with an overall sample of 11,867 participants. Time perspective refers to

individuals’ conceptions of past, present and future time, and was measure in this

study by the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI, Zimbardo & Boyd, 1999).

The ZTPI assesses five time frames: Past-Negative, Past-Positive, Present-Hedonistic,

Present-Fatalistic, and Future. Exploratory factor analyses with subsequent Procrustes

rotation were used to assess the factorial equivalence of the five-factor model across the

different language adaptations and cultural milieus. Results from Procrustes rotation

indicated that the original five-factor structure of the ZTPI was supported. Differential

item functioning analysis was also conducted. The number of biased items was rather

small and not due to systematic cross-cultural differences. These results support the

cross-cultural validity of the ZTPI and suggest that the five time frames are the main

time perspective dimensions. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings will

be discussed, and future studies using this cross-cultural data will also be outlined.

Paper 4

Exploring the general patterning of acquiescence and extremity

response styles from a cross-cultural perspective

Jamis He, Tilburg Unong>iversityong>, Netherlands

Co – authors : Fons van de Vijver

The present paper reports a cross-cultural study of response styles, using secondary data

of acquiescence and extremity. Acquiescence and extremity indexes are extracted from

various large-scale surveys, such as Schwartz Value Survey and the International Social

Survey Program. Acquiescence indexes from different studies show relatively high

convergence, thus the trait-like character of acquiescence is confirmed. In addition, we

computed correlations between the indexes and various country-level variables such

as norms, values, social indicators and economic figures. The results indicate that the

best predictors of both response styles were the clustered set of economic variables

and related psychological constructs such as well-being. Based on these findings

multilevel analyses were conducted with these country level variables at the highest

level, background characteristics as predictors at individual level and response styles as

dependent variables. Results will be presented.

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

Paper 5

Cross-cultural assessment procedures of components of

prototypical anger

ItziarAlonso-Arbiol, Univeristy of Basque Country, Spain

Co – author : Fons van de Vijver

We present the cross-cultural assessment procedures used for the examination of eight

components of prototypical anger (antecedents, body sensations, cognitive reactions,

verbal expressions, nonverbal expressions, interpersonal responses, and primary

and secondary self-control). Self-report scales of each of these components were

administered to 5,006 college students in 25 countries. First, we tested the cross-cultural

equivalence of the scales by examining congruence coefficients. Second, a multigroup

confirmatory factor model was tested where three latent variables (internal processes,

behavioral outcomes, and self-control mechanisms) account for the interrelations of

the eight observed variables. A third step included the examination of hypotheses of

isomorphism of both dimensions and their interrelations at individual and country level,

looking at both structural equivalence and concurrent validity. Finally, the individual-

and country-level predictors of self-reported prototypes of anger components were

examined with a multilevel analysis.

Thursday 14:15–15:45

INVITED SYMPOSIUM

Online Assessment I

Symposium Chair: Siegbert Reiss, Goethe Unong>iversityong> Frankfurt, Germany

Symposium Discussant: Karl Schweizer, Goethe Unong>iversityong> Frankfurt, Germany

Synopsis of the Symposium

Since many tests and inventories can easily be administered via internet, the internet

becomes more and more import for psychological assessment. Not surprisingly, there

is a fast growing field of online assessment tools that are applied for a great variety of

purposes. However, many of these tools are not the result of a scientific construction

process but are based on vague assumptions. Therefore, it is the aim of this symposium to

contribute to the improvement of the scientific basis of online assessment by providing

a stage for the presentation and discussion of research work originating from the field

of online assessment. The research work scheduled for the symposium incudes basic

concepts and online assessment techniques, studies exploring the conditions of online

assessment and evaluation studies by means of internet-based assessment. The first two

53


54

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

talks by Buchanan and Reips concentrate on basic concepts and techniques, illustrate

points with pertinent research findings, and present suggestions for good practice in

Internet-based assessment. Furthermore empirical results from investigations into the

validity of this type of assessment will be discussed. The third talk by Schreiner presents

a study, which focuses on the comparability of the results achieved by a cognitive task

tapping working memory that was administered via internet and in a lab environment.

The presentation by Kyllonen reviews the measurement of two new constructs in online

assessment – idea production and collaborative problem solving. Furthermore, the use

of these constructs for large-scale assessment is considered. (Is continued in part II)

Paper 1

Lessons we’ve learned: Tips and techniques for online data collection

Tom Buchanan, Unong>iversityong> of Westminster, UK

Online psychological testing was once the domain of specialists, awkward to do and

regarded with suspicion by many. Now, it is widely recognised as a useful technique

in research and applied practice. Easily accessible software tools make it simple

to administer many psychological measures online, and the validity of Internetmediated

data is more widely accepted. However, there are lessons learned from the

‘early days’ and from more recent research that need to be kept in mind. These relate

to validity, techniques available, ethical concerns, sampling, and potential difficulties

that may arise. This session will comprise a primer for those relatively new to online

psychological measurement, and an aide-memoire for those with more experience. It

will cover basic concepts and techniques, illustrating points with pertinent research

findings, and presenting suggestions for good practice in future work.

Paper 2

Internet-based assessment: Challenges and solutions

Ulf-Dietrich Reips, Universidad de Deusto, Spain

An up-to-date overview of techniques, methods, tricks, and tools for Internetbased

assessment. The talk summarizes challenges and solutions in design, security,

recruitment, sampling, self-selection, multiple submissions, reactance-free question

design, response time measurement, dropout, error estimation, data handling, and data

quality. Among other methods that have been developed in Web survey methodology

and Internet science, the presenter will explain the OIOS design, the seriousness check,

sub-sampling procedures, multiple site entry, and the high hurdle technique. Free Web

services are introduced, like a self-scoring Big Five personality test ready for use by

simply linking it to another online study (in English, German, and Spanish, http://

webscience.deusto.es/cgi-bin/big5/wwwffi1a.pl), VAS Generator (http://vasgenerator.

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

net) for creating visual analogue scales, the web experiment list at http://wexlist.net

and Amazon\’s Mechanical Turk for the recruitment of participants. Empirical results

from investigations into the validity of several of the techniques for Internet-based

assessment will be discussed. I report on a series of studies concerning measurement

scales, context effects, visual design issues, non-response, and online scale development

using items from the International Personality Item Pool at http://ipip.ori.org/. Some

issues will be discussed with the examples of the development of GPCP: A German

version of the scale for online privacy concern and protection for use on the Internet

and with the development of a narcissism scale for use on the Internet. Finally, some

recommendations are developed for authors, reviewers and editors of articles reporting

results from Internet-based assessment.

Paper 3

Web-based assessment of working memory capacity: The Exchange

Test goes online

Michael Schreiner, Goethe Unong>iversityong> of Frankfurt, Germany

Co – authors : Karl Schweizer, Siegbert Reiss

The assessment of cognitive abilities is an important ingredient in the prediction of

success in higher education although reasoning scales are considered as the the main

predictors of academic outcome. Working memory capacity has also shown a strong

relationship to fluid intelligence and more specifically to reasoning and may therefore

be used alternatively in the prediction of academic achievement as well. Since there is

hardly any research on the assessment of working memory capacity via internet we are

faced with the question whether administrating a test on working memory capacity

via web leads to results comparable to the results based on validated laboratory data.

To address this question, a web-version of the ‘Exchange Test’ was programmed. This

version was completed by freshmen of psychology in a cross-over design via internet

and in laboratory as well. The talk will be about the results regarding the usability of the

‘Exchange Test’ as a web-based application and about it’s contribution to the prediction

of academic success by means of working memory capacity.

Paper 4

New constructs for next generation online assessment

Patrick C.Kyllonen, Educational Testing Service, USA

Current online assessment has focused on new methods-computer adaptive testing,

automatic item generation, and automatic scoring-technologies that are mature or

developing rapidly. Next generation online assessment promises the measurement of

55


56

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

new constructs, ones that cannot be easily measured with paper-and-pencil tests. In

this talk I review the case for two new constructs – idea production and collaborative

problem solving – that have been cited as important 21st century skills. I will discuss

the evidence for their importance, how they can be assessed online, how they could be

implemented in large-scale assessments such as OECD\’s Programme for International

Student Assessment (PISA), and what the implications might be.

INVITED SYMPOSIUM

Construct Representation and Construct

Underrepresentation in the Assessment of the Affective

Domain

Symposium Chair: Johnny Fontaine, Ghent Unong>iversityong>, Belgium

Synopsis of the Symposium

The present symposium focuses on construct representation and construct

underrepresentation in four intensely studied affective sub-domains. The first study

reports on experimental research on how subjective well-being integrates information

from diverse life domain and offers supportive evidence for the validity of subjective

well-being measures. The second study focuses on the assessment of self-conscious

emotions using a multilevel approach. An additional shame/embarrassment factor is

identified over and above the existing three factors of negative self-esteem, guilt, and

externalization. The third contribution demonstrates that power and unpredictability

structure emotional experiences and their similarities over and above the commonly

used two-dimensional valance-arousal models. In the final study, it is demonstrated

that identifying improbable relationships and identifying probable relationships

form overlooked sources of variation in the assessment of emotional intelligence.

In each contribution it will be discussed how construct representation or construct

underrepresentation can guide or respectively misguide both theoretical and applied

emotion research.

Paper 1

Experimental studies on the contribution of life domains to global

assessments of Subjective Well-Being

Peter Theuns, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium

Quality of Life ratings result from a subjective evaluation and integration of satisfaction

in life domains. The current paper reports on a series of experiments that investigate

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

how information on life domains is integrated into a global rating of well-being. The

results indicate that when people judge one’s well-being, simple heuristics can explain

how bits of information on life domains are combined into an overall self-assessment.

Moreover it seems that (say positive) information about the one domain can compensate

for (say negative) information about some other domain. It appears that averaging

models can mostly explain the obtained ratings of subjective wellbeing. An important

consequence of our findings is that the rating scales used in our assessments can safely

be considered linear measures. Our results indicate that Functional Measurement is a

valuable approach to assess the quality and the level of measurement obtained from

rating scales for subjective concepts.

Paper 2

Assessing experiences of self-conscious emotions

Mia Silfver-Kuhalampi, Unong>iversityong> of Helsinki, Finland

We studied experiences of self-conscious emotions with a questionnaire that combines

free descriptions of real-life experiences and structured questions concerning those

experiences. The respondents were Finnish unong>iversityong> students (N=149), who each

provided descriptions of three situations. The questions included the emotion

components defined by Mesquita and Frijda (1992): appraisals, physical reactions,

gestures, subjective experiences and action tendencies. The items were factor analysed

using situation descriptions as observations, and a four-factor solution appeared to best

describe the data. The factors were labelled as negative self-evaluation, externalization,

guilt and shame/embarrassment. Interestingly, the aspects that have been defined as

components of shame in the literature (global negative self-evaluations, feeling of being

negatively evaluated by others, desire to withdraw, shame gestures) were clearly split

into two factors, as global negative self-evaluations were separate from the other shame

features. Situational features were differentially related to these factors, suggesting that

differentiating between them may be important.

Paper 3

The world of emotions is not two-dimensional: Confirmation with

perceived similarities and emotional experiences during daily

emotional episodes

Johnny Fontaine, Ghent Unong>iversityong>, Belgium

Co – author : Elke Veirman

In a psycholinguistic study on the meaning of emotion terms by means of 144 emotion

features that where theoretically derived from the componential emotion approach

57


58

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

Fontaine et al. (2007) found that four dimensions spanned the emotion domain in

three West-ong>Europeanong> languages (English, French, and Dutch), namely pleasantness,

power, activation, and unpredictability. In the present study it is investigated whether

these four dimensions also structure the perceived similarities between emotion terms

and the experience of daily emotional episodes. In total 770 adult participants rated

the similarity between 85 daily used emotion terms and reported their emotions

in a recent emotional episode on the same terms. Multidimensional scaling of the

perceived similarities as well as of the emotional experiences revealed the expected

four-dimensional structure. The present results call to go beyond the currently popular

two-dimensional models that distinguish valence and arousal (or a rotation thereof)

for the assessment of affect and emotions.

Paper 4

The role of unidentified multidimensionality in the assessment of

emotional intelligence

Elke Veirman, Ghent Unong>iversityong>, Belgium

Co – authors : Nele Libbrecht, Johnny Fontaine

Research on the assessment of emotional intelligence from an ability perspective is

confronted with the problems of unstable nomological networks across studies, difficult

to validate internal structures, and high residual item variances. The current study

investigated to which extent this can be attributed to unidentified multidimensionality.

EI was investigated in a heterogeneous child and adolescent sample (635 respondents

from 10 till 17 years) in terms of sex, socio-economical status, and educational level using

the Mayor-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Scale (Youth version). In a random

split half of the sample exploratory factor analysis revealed two higher-order factors,

namely correctly Identifying Improbable Relationships (IIR) and correctly Identifying

Probable Relationships (IPR) in the emotion domain. This structure was confirmed

in the second split half. Moreover, both factors were characterized by a differentiated

nomological network with for instance the IIR factor positively correlating with selfesteem

and the IPR negatively correlating with depression and anxiety scales.

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


Friday 8:45–10:15

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

INVITED SYMPOSIUM

Online Assessment II

Symposium Chair: Karl Schweizer, Goethe Unong>iversityong> Frankfurt, Germany

Symposium Discussant: Lutz F. Hornke, RWTH Aachen Unong>iversityong>, Germany

Synopsis of the Symposium

(This text continues the abstracts of Online Assessment I) The following three

presentations provide research results concerning online self-assessments in the course

of unong>iversityong> admission. Päßler presents results regarding construct validity, predictive

validity, and usability of an interest inventory and three ability tests als elements of

online self-assessment for German universities. Frebort outlines an alternative for

conventional methods of investigating criterion validity: the analysis of test profiles of

exceptional students. And last but not least Weitensfelder examines test characteristics

of responders and non-responders in online self-assessments to provide information

about test abortion.

Paper 1

What should I study (was-studiere-ich.de)?

Katja Paessler, Universität Konstanz, Germany

Co – authors : Benedikt Hell, Heinz Schuler

Use and validity of an online self-assessment for German Universities. College success

is based upon two criteria: academic retention (persistence vs. dropout) and academic

performance (grade point average). Determinants of those criteria have been widely

studied over the past decades. Among others, prominent reasons for college dropout

are a perceived mismatch between a person’s interests and abilities and the requirements

of a major and connected with it misinformation about the contents of a certain field

of study and job prospects. In order to enable students to get feedback regarding their

interests and abilities, to get to know the requirement of certain college majors and

occupations, and get acquainted with the dong>iversityong> of fields of study we developed

an online self-assessments for German universities. Based on a Holland type interest

inventory and three ability tests students receive lists of recommendations. Results

regarding construct validity, predictive validity, and usability are presented.

59


60

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

Paper 2

New validation approaches in the viennese self-assessment for

psychology

Martina Frebort, Unong>iversityong> of Vienna, Austria

Co – authors : Julia Grass, Klaus D.Kubinger

Approaches to measuring prognostic validity within the framework of the psychometric

procedures used in self-assessments are sometimes unsuccessful because of the fact

that there is hardly any data regarding suitable criteria for success in tertiary education

(Kubinger, Moosbrugger, Frebort, Jonkisz, & Reiß, 2007). An alternative for the

measurement of criterion validity will be outlined. Students who were classified by

lecturers as exceptional, had the opportunity to work on the Viennese self-assessment

for psychology. The calculation of the variation coefficients showed that the group of

exceptional students were especially homogenous with regard to their knowledge in the

field of psychology as well as certain personality aspects which were measured using

questionnaires on motivation and organizational ability. Furthermore, an attempt

was made to represent the entire group in the form of a prototypical test profile,

using the process of variance reduction. It was shown that exceptional psychology

students possess a high ability to reason and think analytically as well as a high level

of prior knowledge within the field of psychology. Moreover, they show a high interest

in psychology (the most interest lies in the area of clinical psychology, followed by

methodology and psychometrics) as well as high motivation and a high organizational

ability. These results will be discussed.

Paper 3

Processing characteristics and reasonableness regarding

self-assessments

Lisbeth Weitensfelder, Unong>iversityong> of Vienna, Austria

Co – authors : Martina Frebort, Christine E.Mueller, Barbara Mitschek

It is often brought up for discussion that voluntary participants in a study differ from

the population in question, with regard to fundamental criteria (e.g. cf. results from

Rosenthal & Rosnow, 1975). However, non-responder analyses (e.g. cf. Tiapel, in prep.,

Unterhofer, 2009, Leitner, 2008) show that this is not necessarily the case, even in the

Viennese Self-assessment for Architecture, there are no differences between responders

and non-responders. The view on test characteristics seems to be more promising with

regard to reasonableness: when are self-assessments most likely to be aborted? Which

procedures are most likely to be aborted? Are strenuous procedures perceived as less

reasonable? A comparison of two Viennese self-assessments which are structured

differently (architecture and psychology), shows that the test abortion rates are similar,

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

suggesting that there are general test characteristics for longer test batteries, which are

independent of content. In this presentation, a design will be introduced, showing how

test characteristics can be examined in the future for possible valuable information.

First results will also be presented.

SYMPOSIUM

Response Styles in Rating Scales: Potential Causes,

Correlates, and Detrimental Effects on Measurement

Symposium Chair: Christoph J.Kemper, GESIS - Leibniz Institute for the Social

Sciences, Germany

Symposium Discussant: Mathias Ziegler, Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Germany

Synopsis of the Symposium

Questionnaires using rating scales are a widely used measurement tool for the description

and prediction of human behavior in various areas of psychology, especially personality

psychology and assessment, and in other social sciences as well. However, these rating

scales do not exclusively capture variance associated with the construct to be measured

but also capture systematic variance irrelevant to the target construct. Thus, mean and

covariance structures may be biased threatening the internal and external validity of

conclusions drawn from research data. The systematic but irrelevant variance may be

due to the way rating scales are used by study participants, i.e., due to response styles.

Different response styles have been identified in prior research, e.g. the tendency to

prefer middle or extreme categories of ratings scales (midpoint responding, MRS,

extreme response style, ERS) or the tendency for acquiescent responding (ARS). This

symposium is dedicated to contribute to research on response styles that are frequently

observed in self-report measurements by addressing potential causes or correlates and

detrimental effects on measurement and data quality. The first two papers focus on

the description of persons preferring either middle or extreme response categories

by reporting predictors of interindividual differences in MRS and ERS. Danay does

so from a personality perspective whereas Becker and Kemper chose a cross-cultural

approach. The detrimental effects of response styles on measurement and data quality

will be demonstrated by Heine, Tarnai, and Hartmann in the case of MRS and ERS, and

by Rammstedt, Kemper, and Borg in the case of ARS.

61


62

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

Paper 1

The use of response sets: Who prefers extremes and who likes the

middle?

Author: Erik Danay, Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Germany

There is a lot of empirical evidence documenting the existence of specific response

sets. Especially preferences when using rating scales have been reported. One such

response set is the preference for either middle categories (middle crosser) or extreme

categories (extreme crosser). Little is known, however, with regard to characteristics

of middle and extreme crossers. The current study aimed at elucidating individual

differences between middle and extreme crossers. To this end, an online study with

N = 1524 participants was conducted. The test battery consisted of the NEO-FFI with

a 5-point-Likert scale used to identify middle and extreme crossers by applying item

response theory methods (mixed Rasch model). Moreover, the same questionnaire was

administered with a dichotomous response format as well. These scores were used as

predictors in a linear regression with type of response set as dependent variable. Results

demonstrated an independent contribution of all Big 5 domains as well as gender.

Theoretical and practical implications will be discussed.

Paper 2

Extreme response style among immigrants and natives in Germany

Author: Birgit Becker, GESIS - Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences, Germany

Co – author : KemperC.J.

Extreme response style (ERS) threatens the validity of results from empirical studies.

This potential bias has especially attracted attention in cross-cultural research

because the tendency for ERS not only depends on individual socio-demographic

characteristics of respondents but also differs between cultures. Thus, observed crosscultural

differences in responses to survey questions may be due to mere measurement

artefacts. Although this problem is well recognized in international cross-cultural

studies, migration studies usually take little notice of it. However, observed differences

between immigrants and natives in a country may as well be affected by differences in

the propensity to use ERS. Differences between immigrants and natives with regard

to ERS can be expected because these groups usually differ in their distribution of

socio-demographic characteristics (e.g., educational level) as well as with regard to

attitudes and values (e.g., traditionalism) that are associated with ERS. This paper

analyses differences in ERS between immigrants and natives in Germany using item

response theory (mixed Rasch model). In addition, also differences between several

migrant groups from different countries of origin are examined. Preliminary results

show that, on average, the propensity to use ERS is different for immigrants and natives

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

in Germany. However, there is also a remarkable variability in ERS between different

immigrant groups. Although some individual socio-demographic characteristics are

associated with ERS, attitudes and values seem to play a more important role. These

attitudes typically vary between different migrant groups leading to different response

behaviour. Implications of the results for migration and cross-cultural studies will be

discussed.

Paper 3

Analysis of extreme response style in vocational interests

Author: Jörg-Henrik Heine, Universität der Bundeswehr, Germany

Co – authors : Tarnai C., Hartmann F.

Individual response styles in polytomous response scales are a frequently observed

phenomenon. One type of response style is a distortion in terms of a tendency towards

middle (MRS) or extreme (ERS) response categories. There is evidence from research

that this distortion is independent of the content of the measured construct and the

offered items. In the present study, the six scales of the General Interest Structure Test

(AIST-R, Bergmann & Eder, 2005), which is based on the hexagonal model (RIASEC)

of Holland (1997), are tested for their scalability using Rasch and mixed-Rasch models.

It is examined, whether for the six sub-scales different, content-independent response

sets could be found (ERS vs. MRS). The calculations were performed with the R-package

mixRasch using jML estimation and the windows program WINMIRA 2001 using cML

estimation. Data basis for this study is a sample of Unong>iversityong> students (N = 734). The

findings of this study suggest that three of the six scales are Rasch-scalable, in terms of

item and person homogeneity. A two-class solution has proven best for the other three

sub-scales. In each of the two classes different item category difficulties are observed,

which can be considered as an indication of different response styles, in terms of a

tendency to medium (MRS) or extreme (ERS) response categories. Both methods for

model estimation (jML vs. cML) returned similar results. The findings are discussed in

the context of the hexagonal model of interests (Holland, 1997).

Paper 4

The Big Five, acquiescence, and education: A cross-cultural replication

of the educational bias in responses to Big Five measures

Author: Beatrice Rammstedt, GESIS - Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences, Germany

Co – authors : Kemper C.J., Borg I.

Previous research findings suggest that the Big Five factor structure may not be

measurement equivalent at all educational levels. Recent studies (Rammstedt, Goldberg,

63


64

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

& Borg, 2010, Rammstedt & Kemper, 2011) indicated that these educational differences

in the Big Five Factor structure are caused by differences in the tendency for acquiescent

responding: Lower educated respondents showed a significantly higher tendency

for acquiescence than higher educated respondents. Controlling for acquiescence

diminished the initially found differences and the Big Five turned out in textbook-like

clarity. Unfortunately both previous studies were based on German data. This raises

the question whether the effect is also replicable in other, Western and non-Western

countries. Thus the present study draws on representative data from different countries

around the world. Results are in good agreement with those found for Germany in the

previous studies. Conclusions will be drawn with regard to the generalizability of the

educational bias in acquiescence and its effect on the Big Five.

Friday 10:45–12:15

INVITED SYMPOSIUM

Cross - Cultural Assessment II

Symposium Chair: Itziar Alonso-Arbiol, Unong>iversityong> of the Basque Country, Spain

Symposium Discussant: Fons J. R. van de Vijver, Tilburg Unong>iversityong>, Netherlands

Synopsis of the Symposium

This symposium gathers papers that address both methodological and substantive issues

on cross-cultural assessment. In a double session, an up-to-date wide range of current

topics and methods being studied and employed in cross-cultural assessment will be

presented. The first two papers deal with cross-country comparisons of psychological

constructs studied in different fields, students’ responses to sets of two assessment

tasks and elements of militant extremist mindset. The next five presentations deal

with specific methodological aspects that may have an impact in any cross-cultural

examination. Specifically, equivalence and bias issues are addressed in various papers

at construct and item levels, as well as the implication of some data analytic strategies

used for sampling procedures in cross-cultural assessment. The last two papers are

illustrative elements of how the combination of Emic and Etic methods can be used in

the assessment of personality and other psychological phenomena. The implications of

the methods used for the interpretation of cross-cultural data will be discussed

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

Paper 1

Language-related biases in nonverbal intelligence tests

Norbert K. Tanzer, Unong>iversityong> of Graz, Austria

Co – author : Jeremy Hof

It is widely accepted that developing multicultural/multilingual tests involves more

than a mere translation, that is, the rewriting of a test from one language into another.

However, it is still a widespread opinion that these cultural biases are mainly caused

by extensive use of verbal material. Consequently, employing \”nonverbal\” tests such

as Raven´s Standard Progressive Matrices Test (SPM) would substantially reduce the

problem. However, an early cross-cultural study by Piswanger (1975) found solving

items that required identifying and applying rules from left-to-right to be more

difficult for Arabic students than for Austrian students. (Note the traditional format in

matrices items with the missing element at the bottom right corner). Our own study

aimed to provide experimental evidence for this “cultural congruence” hypothesis. Our

sample consisted of 292 undergraduate and graduate students from four universities

in the United States, who had never been exposed to a language other than English

(i.e., reading from left to right and top to bottom). To create culturally incongruent

items, we mirrored the items horizontally and/or vertically which were then randomly

assigned to the participants. As expected, we found significant medium-sized effects

(Cohen’s d =.37 and .33 respectively) indicating that solving culturally congruent items

is much easier than solving their mirrored (i.e., culturally incongruent) counterparts.

We therefore suggest the use of culturally de-centered tests (e.g., by a mix of original

and \”mirrored\” item) for assessments in a multicultural/multilingual context.

Paper 2

How many samples do we really need?

Klaus Boehnke, Jacobs Unong>iversityong> Bremen, Germany

Co – author : David Schiefer

Examining Multi-level Data Sets with only a Limited Number of Group-level Units

Using Analysis of Variance with Polynomial Contrasts Multi-level data sets provide

variables which describe individuals (e.g. personality traits, education level, subjective

well-being) but also variables that characterize the social environment the surveyed

individuals live in, such as organizations, schools or countries. Such nested data

structures enable the researcher to examine the interaction of the two or even more

levels (e.g. whether the relationship between individual self-esteem and school success

is different depending on the type of school a student goes to as well as the characteristics

of the country these schools are located in). A number of statistical programs are

available to conduct such multi-level analyses. However, in order to receive statistically

65


66

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

reliable results a minimum number of group-level units are required. Simulation studies

have demonstrated that a number of 30 or more group-level units are recommendable,

which is often cost-intensive. The presentation points to a well-matured alternative

which allows analysing certain types of group-level effects using only a limited number

of group-level units: Analyses of Variance with polynomial contrast coefficients.

The procedure of the analyses will be demonstrated using the example of six ethnic

minority group samples from a recently conducted survey project as well as 20 country

samples of the ong>Europeanong> Social Survey. It will be demonstrated how ANOVAs and

contrast estimates were utilized to test how individual’s group-related attitudes vary as

a function of the cultural value climate the individuals lives in.

Paper 3

Incorporating emics within etic parameters: Conceptual and

methodological tools for cross-cultural assessment

Peter Weinreich, Unong>iversityong> of Ulster, UK

The starting point of the paper is the familiar etic/emic dilemma concerning the

assessment of psychological dimensions postulated as being cross-cultural universals –

etics – given that culturally specific interpretations characterise the indigenous psycho

logies of local cultures – emics. Although having recognisable features across

cultures, different conceptions of psychological issues – anorexia nervosa, gender and

professional identity, primordial sentiments about ethnicity and nationality – will be

expressed in alternative discourses peculiar to the respective indigenous psychologies

and may not have immediately translatable equivalents across cultures. The conceptual

and methodological tools of the Identity Structure Analysis (ISA) conceptual

framework (Weinreich & Saunderson, 2003) are outlined. ISA provides for a natural

and practical integration of the emic with the etic (etics incorporating emics), and for

which ethnographic input about indigenous psychologies is fundamental (Weinreich,

2009). When assessing psychological concepts ISA uses the person’s own discourses

in the vernacular – as expressed and interpreted by oneself – in accordance with the

emic requirement. Achievement of the etic status of cross-cultural, as well as person-toperson,

comparability follows by using standardisation procedures that are internal to

each person and predicated on one’s own usage of discourses. Internal standardisation

establishes scalar limits to identity parameters. These limits to a parameter – none

to maximum – have equivalent analytical meanings for each person while the emic

characterisation of the parameter differs from person to person. The algorithms for

standardisation enable empirical assessment of etic parameters that incorporate emic

qualities by way of the dedicated ‘ipseus’ computer software (Weinreich & Ewart,

2007).

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

Paper 4

The combination of emic and etic methods in personality assessment

Fons J. R. van de Vijver

Co – author : Alewyn Nel, Velichko Valchev

The presentation describes methodological issues in the development of a personality

assessment inventory for you use among 11 language groups in South Africa. In the

first stage speakers of each of these languages described themselves and persons they

knew well. This psycholexical study yielded a set of about 55,000 responses, which after

a long process of discussion and consultation with cultural and language experts were

reduced to 31 subclusters and 9 clusters. Items were then generated on the basis of this

classification. Pilot instruments were administered to various groups. The presentation

will focus on the methodological issues of this mix-methods study, such as the validity

in the process of condensing responses in the qualitative stage, the balance between

culture-specific and universal models of personality, and requirements for formulating

items that can be translated in multiple languages.

Friday 16:30–18:00

INVITED SYMPOSIUM

Instruments for the Assessment of Positive Psychology

Traits (part 1 of 2)

Symposium Chair: Willibald Ruch, Unong>iversityong> of Zurich, Switzerland

Synopsis of the Symposium

Psychology has long focused on pathology and the development of treatments for various

disorders. In contrast, the main focus of positive psychology is on emotions, traits, and

institutions that make our lives most worth living (Seligman & Csikszentmihalyi, 2000).

It pursues research on conditions and processes that enable human flourishing and

optimal functioning. Three topics are at the centre of positive psychology: (a) positive

subjective experiences (e.g., happiness or pleasure), (b) positive individual traits (e.g.,

character strengths or talents), and (c) positive institutions (e.g., families or schools)

(Peterson, 2006). One of the first achievements of positive psychology is the rediscovery

of the “good character” and the development of a classification of strength and virtues.

However, also existing concepts, such as optimism, humour or playfulness experience

a renaissance in this movement. One remaining challenge is the development of

67


68

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

psychometric instruments that measure positive psychology traits in a reliable and valid

way that can be used in research. The present symposium brings together experts from

different areas of positive psychology as well as different geographic regions of Europe

and Africa. Approaches to the assessment of concepts, such as character strengths, selfefficacy,

optimism, humour/playfulness, positive perception, and well-being will be

presented and results refer to both adults and children/adolescents. Attention will be

given to the special challenges of the assessment of these concepts.

Paper 1

Positive psychological assessment: Self-efficacy, emotional intelligence,

learned optimism and well-being in South Africa

Sebastiaan Rothmann, NWU, Vanderbijlpark, South Africa

Co – authors : Shelley-Ann Williams, Marié Wissing, Michael Temane

Theorising in cognitive psychology indicates that the way in which an individual

appraises a situation may be more important to psychological outcomes than the actual

presence of a stressor. Recently, personal resources have been hypothesised to influence

these individual differences. Few if any studies have explored such personal resources

as moderators in the relationship between work context and psychological outcomes,

especially in the South African public service context. Thus, the general aim of this

study was to determine whether personal resources (emotional intelligence, self-efficacy

and explanatory styles) are moderators in the relationship between work context (job

demands and job resources) and psychological outcomes (psychological well-being

and work engagement) in a sample of government employees. A questionnaire-based

cross-sectional survey research design was implemented. Data were collected from 459

participants (males = 151, females = 273, age ranging between 25 and 55) with the

following measuring instruments, the Job-Demands Resources Scale, the Satisfaction

with Life Scale, the Affectomemter-2 Short-form, the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale,

the General Self-efficacy scale, and the Explanatory Style Questionnaire. The results of

the study showed significant main effects for work context and the personal resources

as predictors of psychological outcomes. The results also showed that the personal

resources (emotional intelligence, self-efficacy and explanatory style) moderate the

relationship between work context and psychological outcomes (life satisfaction,

positive and negative affect and work engagement). Work contexts characterised

by the preponderance of job resources appear to facilitate both life satisfaction and

dedication.

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

Paper 2

The measurement of personal optimism by bipolar items for avoiding

inhomogeneity resulting from different item-wordings

Karl Schweizer, Goethe Unong>iversityong> Frankfurt, Germany

Measures of optimism are usually composed of equal numbers of positively and

negatively worded items. An unfavorable characteristic of such measures is that

they usually show an insufficient degree of homogeneity because of the mixture of

positively and negatively worded items. As a consequence, some researchers suggested

an alternative view: the separation of optimism and pessimism. One way of avoiding

inhomogeneity is replacing the unipolar positively and negatively worded items by

bipolar items. This possibility is explored in a study that concentrated on an already

existing measure of personal optimism. In the first step pairs of unipolar items were

identified. In the second step the pairs were merged to give bipolar items. Each one of

these items included six response options. In a sample of 308 unong>iversityong> students the

psychometric quality of the two scales was investigated. In order to be sure that the two

scales measured exactly the same trait, trait-specific equivalence of the original and the

new scales was demonstrated, i. e. it was shown that the items of both measures load on

the same latent variable. Furthermore, both scales displayed a high degree of internal

consistency, and the part-whole correlations of all the items were of an agreeable size. So

it could be concluded that bipolar items are a useful tool for avoiding inhomogeneity.

Paper 3

International Well-being Index: Austria, Switzerland and Germany

Stefan Höfer, Innsbruck Medical Unong>iversityong>, Austria

Co – authors : Claudia Harzer, Daniela Renn, Marco Weber, Willibald Ruch

The International Well-being Index (IWI) is intended as a measure to allow crosscultural

comparisons in regards of perceived well-being of a nation. It measures both

personal and national well-being by two scales: the Personal Well-being Index (PWI)

and the National Well-being Index (NWI) comprising of 8 and 6 items. The present

analysis focuses on the validity, reliability of the instrument across three nations.

Participants from Austria (N=487, 37.8±13 years, 70% female), Switzerland (N=1232,

41.2±14 years, 62% female) and Germany (N=3759, 36.7±12 years, 67% female)

took part in an online survey (www.charakterstaerken.org). The original two factor

structure was confirmed in each country, explaining 55.7%–56.3% of the total variance,

Cronbach’s alpha ranging between 0.85–0.86 (PWI) and 0.88–0.89 (NWI) in each

country. Item 8 (“satisfaction with spirituality or religion”) showed in each country the

lowest factor loadings and did not add to the internal consistency. Further, the Mokken

Scaling Procedure was applied to the scales. Overall the two scales have an h-value of

69


70

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

0.43 (PWI, 0.38–0.47) and 0.58 (NWI, 0.51–0.58), forming a moderate (PWI) to very

strong (NWI) hierarchical cumulative scale.

Paper 4

Assessment of positive perception: A three dimensional model and a

scale

Tamar Icekson, Ben-Gurion Unong>iversityong> of the Negev, Israel

Co – author : Ayala Malach Pines

The paper offers a three-dimensional model of positive perception, which represents a

general tendency to evaluate positively one’s abilities, the past and human nature. The

need to develop a comprehensive model of positive perception and with it a reliable

and valid tool, resulted from the insufficiency of existing conceptual formulations and

assessment instruments. The model adds to earlier research by integrating dimensions

of positive perception that were previously viewed as separate. It is suggested that

positive perception is a dispositional tendency (a trait) that can be influenced by a

temporary situation (a state). The construction of an 8-item self-report measure of

positive perception, the Positive Perception Scale (PPS), is detailed. Three samples

of unong>iversityong> students and a national sample of working couples (altogether 796

participants) participated in a series of studies that examined various psychometric

aspects of the PPS. The studies confirmed the three dimensional model of positive

perception, demonstrated it as both a trait and a state. Practical implications point to the

importance of developing intervention programs as well as organizational conditions,

which enhance individuals’ positive view of themselves and of their surroundings.

Finally, high validity and reliability, as well as ease of use, make the new scale attractive

for researchers and practitioners interested in psychological strengths.

SYMPOSIUM

A Cross Section of New Instruments in Psychological

Assessment

Symposium Chair: Nicole Hirschmann, Unong>iversityong> of Vienna, Austria

Symposium Discussant: Tuulia Ortner, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany

Synopsis of the Symposium

Ranging from the measurement of different facets of a well known construct, the optimal

usage of latest information technology to the psychometrically sound assessment

of complex social interactions, Psychological Assessment of the 21st century has to

deal with several challenges. To master these, new developments in the field draw

heavily on new insights of cognitive psychology, information technology and social

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

and developmental psychology. Our symposium will focus on three new instruments

which cover a broad range of constructs and are based on contemporary psychometric

standards, theoretical advancements and utilize newest technology: The Test of Applied

Relations and Visuo-spatial abilities (TARV) is a new test for assessing different facets of

spatial skills to meet the often complex requirements on spatial abilities. The Genetics

Lab, a computer-based problem solving scenario, allows the assessment of intelligence

in the educational context and demonstrates the benefits of process measures which

are directly based on behavioral data. Finally, INTAKT will be introduced, a new

instrument for rating the quality of maternal behavior during mother-child interactions.

For all instruments, we will report on theoretical background and the construction of

the instrument. Furthermore, we will present data on the objectivity, reliability, and

validity of the new instruments. Possible fields of application of the instruments will

be discussed.

Paper 1

Conception of a facet-oriented spatial ability test (TARV – Test of

Applied Relations and Visuo-spatial abilities)

Lisbeth Weitensfelder, Centre of Testing and Consulting, Division of Psycology, Austria

Many spatial ability tests base on single facets of spatial skills, e.g. on mental rotation.

However it has been shown that spatial ability is not a homogenous concept but consisting

of several components (e.g. Linn & Petersen, 1985, Voyer, Voyer & Bryden, 1995). Also

some job requirements may figure on several facets of spatial ability (e.g. Gruber, 2008,

for pilots and air controllers). Based on those considerations a new test was developed,

which consists of two parts (concluding from 2D to 3D and concluding from 3D to

2D) and focuses on three aspects of spatial ability: orientation, mental rotation and the

ability to identify size and distance relations. Test takers have to identify “errors” when

comparing two- and three-dimensional illustrations, whereat for each item one spatial

facet is particularly important. The presentation will focus on the conception of the test

and introduce some results of students from technical fields.

Paper 2

The Genetics Lab – A new computer-based problem solving scenario to

assess intelligence

Philipp Sonnleitner, Unong>iversityong> of Luxembourg

Co – authors : Martin Brunner, Ulrich Keller, Romain Martin, Thibaud Latour

Assessments of intelligence by means of paper-pencil tests faced several critiques

that point to their lack of face validity, insufficient coverage of the definition of

71


72

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

intelligence, their sensitivity to the emotional state of the test taker, and the danger

of getting outdated. The present paper discusses to what extent these limitations can

be overcome by computer-based problem solving scenarios-so-called microworlds.

Generally speaking, microworlds are supposed to be highly accepted by test takers, to

provide process measures by directly tracing problem solving behavior, and to realize

game-like characteristics that may increase test motivation and reduce test anxiety. To

capitalize on these potential advantages, we developed the microworld Genetics Lab

that was completed by a large, heterogeneous sample of more than 600 Luxembourgish

students. Performance scores were derived for students’ problem solving strategies as

well as their mental problem representations–important cognitive data which are not

accessible with typical paper-pencil tests. Analyses of the psychometric characteristics

of the Genetics Lab empirically underscored the construct validity for the derived

performance scores. For example, process oriented measures of strategy use were

found to possess discriminant validity with respect to grades. Further, acceptance

and induced test anxiety of the Genetics lab was explored relative to a paper-pencil

measure of intelligence. Our results show that the Genetics Lab is a reliable and valid

assessment instrument and emphasize the benefits of using microworlds for assessing

intelligence.

Paper 3

INTAKT: A new instrument for assessing the quality of mother-child

interactions

Nicole Hirschmann, Unong>iversityong> of Vienna, Austria

Co – authors : Pia Deimann, Ursula Kastner-Koller, Nadine Aigner, Tanja Svecz

The influence of primary caregiver’s interaction with young children on their further

development has been proven in many contexts. Nonetheless, there is a lack of

standardized and published inventories for assessing the quality of such interactions.

Our newly developed instrument, INTAKT, is designed to close this gap. It helps to

rate maternal sensitivity, maternal feedback, and maternal interaction in joint attention

episodes by providing well defined categories with precise behavioral descriptions.

In two studies we examined the psychometric properties of INTAKT, applying it to

different kinds of mother-child dyads. Inter-rater reliabilities as well as validation data

using internal and external criteria showed that the INTAKT scales allowed for an

objective, reliable, and valid assessment of interaction quality between mothers and their

children. Thus, as soon as norm-tables can be provided, the inventory will be suitable as

a diagnostic instrument for assessing the quality of mother-child interactions.

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


Saturday 10:15–11.45

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

INVITED SYMPOSIUM

Issues in the Measurement of Facets of Metacognition

Symposium chair: Anastasia Efklides, Aristotle Unong>iversityong> of Thessaloniki, Greece

Synopsis of the Symposium

Although research on metacognition has a history of more than 40 years, there are

still open issues in its measurement, mainly because metacognition is not a single,

well-defined phenomenon. Metacognition has various facets, such as metacognitive

experiences or metacognitive knowledge, each of which requires different assessment

or measurement instruments. The present symposium aims to (a) bring to the fore

problems that have been identified in the past and solutions that have been recently

proposed; (b) aspects of metacognitive monitoring that do not have yet been assessed

satisfactorily; and (c) new instruments for the measurement of people’s awareness

of their cognitive characteristics. Specifically, Allwood in his presentation discusses

research evidence that pinpoints the shortcomings of measures of metacognitive

ability (in the sense of metacognitive realism) and possible means that can remedy the

problems. Bacon, Augier, and Izaute focus on the measurement of feeling of knowing

and present recent attempts to use new instruments such as TOTimals. Reber, in his

presentation, discusses the difficulty to properly measure processing fluency and its

metacognitive counterpart, namely judgment of ease of processing. Kolic-Vehovec

focuses on the validity of instruments measuring students’ awareness of their reading

comprehension. Finally, Malegiannaki and Metallidou present a new questionnaire

for the assessment of people’s awareness of their attention efficacy. Overall the five

presentations make evident the multiplicity of the metacognitive phenomena and the

need for a variety of measures depending on the facet of metacognition addressed and

the factors that impact the people’s awareness of their cognitive processes.

Paper 1

Two determinants of conclusions about the realism in confidence

judgments of memory reports: Measurements and repetition

Carl Martin Allwood, Unong>iversityong> of Gothenburg, Sweden

Metacognition is not a single phenomenon and does not appear to draw on a specific

single ability. For example, different kinds of metacognitive measures often do not

correlate very highly. In this presentation these issues are discussed in the context of the

realism of confidence judgments of the correctness of one’s memory reports. Two aspects

that contribute to the realism of confidence judgments are domain knowledge and

73


74

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

individual confidence stability. However, this presentation will specifically focus on two

further aspects, the first of which is the effect of how metacognitive ability is measured.

Here I will discuss some differences between various measures of metacognitive realism

whose popularity differ between metacognitive research domains. More specifically, I

will compare and discuss properties of the measures calibration, over-/underconfidence,

slope, resolution, the confidence-accuracy correlation and the gamma measure. The

second aspect that affects metacognitive ability to be discussed in the presentation is

the effect where a person’s confidence in the correctness of an assertion increases with

repetition of the assertion although the correctness of the assertion remains stable. This

effect is called the Reiteration effect (Hertwig, Gigerenzer, & Hoffrage, 1997), or the

Truth effect (Dechene, Stahl, Hansen & Wänke, 2010). Dechene et al. present results

that show that this effect depends on how it is measured. Here new research will be

presented that in addition shows that the effect depends on how well the knowledge

tested is integrated and on what population is tested (adults or children).

Paper 2

Investigation of the accessibility model of the feeling of knowing in

episodic memory with the use of TOTimals

Elisabeth Bacon, Hôpitaux Universitaires, Strasbourg, France

Co – authors : Luc Augier, Marie Izaute

When people fail to retrieve a memory target, they can most of the time accurately

predict whether they know or not the currently missing answer. The metamemory

judgment of Feeling Of Knowing (FOK) is a prediction about he likelihood of future

recognition of a currently unrecalled item. According to the accessibility model

developed by Koriat, the computation of FOK in healthy people does not rely on

the target answer itself. Koriat demonstrated in tasks assessing short-term memory

(1993) or semantic memory (1995), that the FOK relies on the retrieval of partial and/

or contextual information related to the target. FOK ratings depend on information

accessibility, i.e., the mere quantity of information accessible. The aim of this study was

to assess the validity of the accessibility model for long-term episodic memory in an

ecological task. Participants had to learn the names of imaginary animals, TOTimals

(Smith, 1994). Their use allowed manipulation of acquisition, as the nature and number

of contextual information (size, weight, food, etc.) of each animal may be controlled by

the experimenter. During the learning session, the presentation of the TOTimals was

accompanied by different levels of richness of contextual information. The accessibility

to partial or contextual information, as well as the relationships between the context

retrieval and FOK ratings, and the predictive accuracy of FOK were investigated.

Preliminary results show a good concordance between the retrieval of cues and the

FOK ratings, confirming the validity of the accessibility model of feesdeling of knowing

for long-term episodic memory.

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

Paper 3

How to assess processing fluency

Rolf Reber, Unong>iversityong> of Bergen, Norway

Processing fluency is the ease with which a cognitive process can be executed and

serves as a metacognitive feeling. It has been shown that fluency influences a variety

of judgments and influences processing styles. Recent research relevant to education

yielded some surprising findings. For example, decreasing the readability of materials

induced analytical processing and thus increased learning outcomes, and the same

statements were more likely to be judged as being true when their processing was

easy rather than difficult. After having introduced the concept of processing fluency

and some examples of relevant research, I provide an overview of methods to assess

both perceptual fluency (the ease to perceive input) and retrieval fluency (the ease of

recalling instances from memory). It follows a discussion of examples where the wrong

method to assess fluency has been applied. The final section examines the advantages

and disadvantages of assessing objective measures of processing speed versus subjective

measures of ease of processing. Specifically, our research on assessing perceptual

fluency has shown that objective measures of speed at different stages of the perceptual

process are independent of each other, but jointly contribute to the global feeling of

ease of processing.

Paper 4

Relation between self-assessment and performance measures of

metacognition in reading during adolescence

Svjetlana Kolic-Vehovec, Unong>iversityong> of Rijeka, Croatia

Relation between self-assessment and performance measures of metacognition

in reading was explored in several studies. The participants were students from

11- to 17-years old. The focus was placed on adolescence as a crucial period for the

development of metacognition in the domain of reading comprehension. Different

performance measures were used to assess comprehension monitoring during

reading: detection of semantic and syntactic inconsistencies in sentence and text, as

well as close-task. A Strategic Reading questionnaire (Kolic-Vehovec & Bajsanski,

2001b) was applied as a self-assessment measure of students’ awareness of cognitive

and metacognitive reading strategy use. Students’ reading comprehension was also

assessed. The most performance measures of comprehension monitoring did not

significantly correlate with the measure of students’ awareness of reading strategy use

until 14 years when all measures of comprehension monitoring moderately correlated

with the measure of students’ awareness of reading strategy use. Performance measures

of metacognition in reading were moderately correlated with text comprehension in

75


76

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

all students, while self-assessment measure was not significantly correlated with text

comprehension until 14 years. The results indicated that self-assessment measures of

metacognition in reading become valid and consistent in middle adolescence, while

performance measures proved to be good indicators of comprehension monitoring

from the beginning of adolescence.

Paper 5

Unong>iversityong> students’ metacognitive knowledge about their efficacy in

everyday attention tasks and the frequency of attention lapses: Validity

and reliability issues

Amaryllis Malegiannaki, Aristotle Unong>iversityong> of Thessaloniki, Greece

Co – author and presenting author : Panayiota Metallidou, Aristotle Unong>iversityong> of

Thessaloniki, Greece

The aim of the present study was to examine the validity and reliability of two attentionrelated

scales on a Greek sample of unong>iversityong> students. One hundred and sixty seven

first year unong>iversityong> students of both genders (females n = 138 and males n = 29)

participated in the study. Participants were asked to assess their efficacy in everyday

activities that require attention as well as the frequency of making attention errors.

Specifically, they were asked to complete the Metacognitive Knowledge for Attention

Questionnaire (MKAQ), which was constructed for the purposes of the present study,

and the Attention Related Cognitive Errors Scale (ARCES; Cheyne, Carriere, & Smilek,

2006). Furthermore, 72 of the participants were examined with a battery of attention

tasks, tapping selective attention, sustained attention, distributed attention and switch

of attention tasks. The results of the analyses, although preliminary, provide evidence

for reliability as well as factorial and convergent validity of MKAQ and ARCES as

measurements of perceived efficacy in everyday attention-related activities and lapses

of attention, respectively. The theoretical implications of the results are discussed.

INVITED SYMPOSIUM

Advances and Challenges in Test Adaptation Research

Symposium Chair: Grazina Gintiliene, Vilnius Unong>iversityong>

Symposium Discussant: Thomas Oakland, Unong>iversityong> of Florida

Symposuim abstract

The symposium focuses on test adaptation issues from the researchers and test

publisher’s perspectives. The papers display some intelligence test development and

adaptation research in Latvia and Lithuania and also consider challenges researchers

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

encounter when addressing the question whether adapted intelligence tests objectively

and validly measure intelligence in their countries. The paper from Psychological Test

Laboratory (Poland)presents some dilemmas the publisher faces in adapting foreign

tests and questionnaires.

Paper 1

Reliability and validity of Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children–

Fourth Edition (WISC-IV) in Latvia

Malgozata Rascevska, Latvian Unong>iversityong>, Latvia

Co – author : Sandra Sebre

The aim of this study is to establish norms and determine reliability and validity of

WISC-IV in a representative standardization sample in Latvia among children age

6–16. The sample consists of 660 children (50% boys) from all geographic regions

and 88 schools who were divided into 11 age groups, each consisting of 20 children.

The evidence of internal consistency reliability for the normative sample was obtained

using the Spearman- Brown split-half method for all subtests except the subtests of

Processing Speed. The reliability coefficients range from .81 to .93 for the subtests

and from .84 to .96. for the composite scales. Exploratory and confirmatory factor

analyses identified a four factor structure (same as with the original WISC-IV): Verbal

Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning, Working memory and Processing Speed. These

factors explained 60% of the total variance. Further evidence of validity was examined

by looking at the relationship between WISC-IV and academic achievement tests of

Latvian language and math, Adaptive Behavior Assessment System – Second Edition

(ABAS-II) and differences between mean scores of the standardization sample and

some clinical groups: children with mental retardation or with learning disabilities.

Age norms for each subsample also will be reported.

Paper 2

Intelligence test adaptation from the researchers’ perspectives: The

Lithuanian experience

Sigita Girdzijauskiene, Vilnius Unong>iversityong>, Lithuania

Co – author : Gražina Gintiliene

Cross-cultural aspects of psychological tests are important when tests are adapted

for use in new cultures or used in multicultural settings. This presentation considers

several advantages of Lithuanian studies of intelligence test adaptation during the last

decade following the adaptation of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children–III.

The adaptation of the Intelligence– Structure–Test 2000R, the Wilde Intelligence Test,

77


78

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale–III, and the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of

Intelligence revealed the importance of the item analysis when adapting them for new

populations. The number of non-discriminating items was greater in the verbal scales

than in the performance scales in all Lithuanian standardization studies. However

some linguistic and cultural differences affected results of the subtests that seemed

to be cultural free. One of the most important challenges the researches met during

test adaptation process was to determine whether the adapted test and the original

test measure the same construct. Test adaptation can be complicated and always a

time consuming process. Those engaged in test adaptation should strongly consider

linguistic, cultural and socioeconomic differences among the population. The different

experience of subjects may be important not only when the national norms are

interpreted but also when ethnic minority groups within the country are investigated..

This presentation offers some proposals for the test authors, publishers, and the test

users from the small country perspective.

Paper 3

Translation or reconstruction – This is the question

Urszula Brzezinska, Psychological Test Laboratory of Polish Psychology, Poland

The Publishers\’ struggles to make the psychological tool diagnostic for the new

population and / or let the tool keep their original identity Adaptation of psychological

tools has become somewhat universal and widely accepted. Issues typically consider

bilingual studies, back translation, or need to conduct pilot studies. This is less

scholarship on what to do when the original publisher insists there is no need to

change anything in the tool construction and that the preservation of its original

identity is important. However, the publisher is likely to know the creation of valid

tools with good prognostic parameters may need to differ somewhat from the original

scale. The mission of Psychological Test Laboratory (PPL) of the Polish Psychological

Association, Poland\’s biggest national publisher, is to bring to the market products

that meet the highest ethical and methodological standards. Its team of researchers is

responsible for creating, adapting, and publishing new tools. For 25 years PPL has had

numerous experiences in these efforts, especially in adapting tests and questionnaires.

The experiences of the PPL staff will be discussed in light of its work with the newest

adaptation: EPQ-R, ACL, and Words and Numbers Test. The following issues will be

discussed: Is the adaptation of a psychological test in ways that maintain its identity

and make it prognostic for the new population possible? What form of adaptation is the

most effective and why. To what extent can the requirements of the licensor and needs

of psychologists-practitioners be attained?

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


Saturday 14:15–15:45

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

INVITED SYMPOSIUM

Aggression and Conduct Problems in Childhood

Symposium Chair: Nuria de la Osa, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Spain

Synopsis of the Symposium

Conduct problems (CP) in early childhood and adolescence are a matter of worry in

western societies. CP is one of the most common reasons that children and adolescents

are referred to mental health clinics. There is evidence that aggression is an important

dimension of CP. Research has consistently shown that aggressive behavior in children

and adolescents is often quite stable after the preschool years. It is critical then, that

better assessment methods are developed that allow early identification. Heterogeneity

in types, severity and course is another characteristic of CP. In order to improve in

the development of causal models research on the different pathways to CP is needed.

That means studies on the characteristics of children and also of aggression to identify

specific patterns for specific problems. The studies presented in this symposium are

about these important subjects in the research of CP in childhood and adolescents. This

research has many important implications for the design of specific interventions to

prevent or treat these problems and for improving the assessment methods with useful

instruments for clinicians and researchers.

Paper 1

Aggressive behaviour and psychopathology in preschool children from

the general Spanish population

Lourdes Ezpeleta, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Spain

Co – authors : Juan Vera, Roser Granero, Josep Maria Domenech

Objective: Aggressive behavior is a normal and frequent behavior during preschool

years. The goal is to study if aggressive behavior is a correlate of psychopathology

in boys and girls of the general population as early as at age 3. Method: A sample of

1341 3 year-old Spanish school children were randomly selected and screened for

a double phase design. A total of 622 families were assessed with a semi-structured

diagnostic interview and questionnaires of psychopathology and daily functioning,

teachers answered measures of aggressive behavior. Data were analyzed with linear

and logistic regressions. Results: Boys showed higher levels of aggressive behavior and

of callous-unemotional traits. There were no sex differences on relational aggression.

Aggressive behavior and callous-unemotional traits were significantly correlated.

Callous-unemotional traits were associated with disruptive behavior disorders. Specific

79


80

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

aggressive behaviors were correlated with different DSM-IV disorders: high aggressive

behavior total scores with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and conduct disorder,

low physical aggression with anxiety, high relational aggression with ODD, depression

and generalized anxiety disorders, low initiated physical aggression with generalized

anxiety, major depression and high initiated physical aggression with conduct disorder.

Conclusions: early in life it is possible to identify specific aggressive behaviors that are

correlated with specific mental disorders, which might be the target for selective and

indicated preventive programs.

Paper 2

The assessment of psychopathic traits in the community and in

offender samples using the APSD and the PCL:SV

Rafael Torrubia, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain

Co – authors : B. Molinuevo, O. Anton, L. Gonzalez, Y. Pardo

Forth, Hart and Hare (1990), using an adapted version of the Psychopathy Checklist-

Revised (PCL-R, Hare, 1991), showed that it is possible to assess psychopathic traits

in youth offenders. Since this seminal research, a growing interest in the study of

precursors in children and adolescents of adult psychopathy has been detected. One

of the most interesting challenges in this field has been the development of specific

psychopathy indices in order to provide the researchers with the necessary framework

for measuring the concept. The aim of this paper was to examine the reliability and

validity of the Spanish and Catalan language versions of the Antisocial Process Screening

Device (APSD, Frick, and Hare, 2001) in community samples (aged 6 to 22 years) and

in delinquent samples (aged 14 to 22 years), and also the psychometric properties

of the Spanish version of the Psychopathy Checklist: Youth Version (PCL:YV, Forth,

Kosson and Hare, 2003) in offender youth aged 14 to 22 years. The results showed that

the APSD, in spite of the fact that it has several limitations related to the stability of

its factorial structure and convergent validity with the PCL:YV, is a useful and easilyadministered

measure for the screening of psychopathic traits in the community and

in offender populations. As regards to the PCL:YV, it is concluded that in spite of some

difficulties when not collateral information is available or when this is limited, it is a

useful scale for the clinical assessment of psychopathy in young offenders,

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

Paper 3

Assessing aggression in Spanish children: Psychometric properties of

Childrens’ Proactive and Reactive Aggression Scale

Miguel Angel Carrasco, National Unong>iversityong> of Distance Education, Spain

Co – authors : Paloma Gonzalez, Victoria del Barrio

The present study examines the psychometric properties of the Proactive and Reactive

Aggression Scale (PRAS). A sample of 424 children (42.42 % boys , 57.58 %girls),

age from 3 to 6 years (M = 51.32 months, SD = 11.29) were evaluated by teachers

and parents. In order to obtain evidence of construct validity parents completed

the Childhood Behavior Questionnaire (CBQ) and the Child Behavior Check List

(CBCL). Cross informant associations, internal consistency and test-retest reliability

are provided. Results indicated that the PRAS demonstrated internal consistency, test–

retest associations, and concurrent validity cross informants. Moreover, reliability and

validity were highly similar across child sex. Aggression showed significant relations

with different temperamental dimensions as well as childrens’ behaviour problems.

Results are discussed in terms of the utility of a parent/teacher report measure of reactive

and proactive aggression and, implications of informant agreement and prevention the

aggression problems.

INVITED SYMPOSIUM

Instruments for the Assessment of Positive Psychology

Traits (part 2)

Symposium Chair: Willibald Ruch, Unong>iversityong> of Zurich, Switzerland

Synopsis of the Symposium

Psychology has long focused on pathology and the development of treatments for various

disorders. In contrast, the main focus of positive psychology is on emotions, traits, and

institutions that make our lives most worth living (Seligman & Csikszentmihalyi, 2000).

It pursues research on conditions and processes that enable human flourishing and

optimal functioning. Three topics are at the centre of positive psychology: (a) positive

subjective experiences (e.g., happiness or pleasure), (b) positive individual traits (e.g.,

character strengths or talents), and (c) positive institutions (e.g., families or schools)

(Peterson, 2006). One of the first achievements of positive psychology is the rediscovery

of the “good character” and the development of a classification of strength and virtues.

However, also existing concepts, such as optimism, humour or playfulness experience

a renaissance in this movement. One remaining challenge is the development of

psychometric instruments that measure positive psychology traits in a reliable and valid

81


82

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

way that can be used in research. The present symposium brings together experts from

different areas of positive psychology as well as different geographic regions of Europe

and Africa. Approaches to the assessment of concepts, such as character strengths, selfefficacy,

optimism, humour/playfulness, positive perception, and well-being will be

presented and results refer to both adults and children/adolescents. Attention will be

given to the special challenges of the assessment of these concepts.

Paper 1

Character strengths in children and adolescents: Reliability and

validity of the German Values in Action Inventory of Strengths for

Youth (German VIA-Youth)

Willibald Ruch, Unong>iversityong> of Zurich, Switzerland

Co – authors : Marco Weber, Nansook Park, Christopher Peterson

The Values in Action Inventory of Strengths for Youth (VIA-Youth, Park & Peterson,

2006) is a self-report inventory assessing 24 character strengths among people between

10 and 17 years of age. The present paper describes the adaptation and initial validation

of the German VIA-Youth. Several samples (in total N = 5494) were used involving

participants from Austria, Germany and Switzerland. Furthermore, about one third

of them each filled in a paper-pencil version, and about two third an online version

(www.charakterstaerken.org). Overall, the German VIA-Youth demonstrated good

psychometric properties and promising evidence for validity. The 24 subscales yielded

high reliability (median alpha = .80, median corrected item-total correlations = .51)

and exhibited stability across four months (median test-retest correlation = .72).

Self-reports and parent- or acquaintance-ratings of strengths converged (averaged

correlation = .41 for parents and .37 for acquaintances). There were small age effects,

and small to medium gender effects of the VIA-Youth subscales (i.e., girls scored higher

on beauty and kindness). Character strengths correlated with personality dimensions in

a plausible manner, and also correlations with measures of life satisfaction and domain

specific satisfaction were found replicating and extending findings from earlier studies

of the English VIA-Youth and supporting the validity of the German VIA-Youth.

Furthermore, most of the strengths were strong predictors of self-efficacy and some

of the strengths showed assortative mating. Strengths of transcendence declined with

age. An oblique five-factor solution was found to represent the data well. These scales

can be recommended for the assessment of character strengths in German-speaking

children and adolescents.

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

Paper 2

Character strengths in Israel: Hebrew adaptation of the VIA Inventory

of Strengths

Hadassah Littman-Ovadia, Ariel Unong>iversityong> Center of Samaria, Israel

Co-author and presenting author: Shiri Lavy

The Values in Action Inventory of Strengths (VIA-IS) has been extensively used to assess

character strengths. We adapted a Hebrew translation and analyzed its psychometric

properties and associations with life satisfaction, personality traits and positive and

negative affect, and examined its factorial structure in 635 Israeli adults. Results

indicated that: (a) All 24 sub-scales had satisfactory reliabilities (αs > .72) (b) Hope,

gratitude, vitality, curiosity and love had the highest associations with life satisfaction,

modesty, appreciation of beauty, fairness, humour and honesty, had the lowest, (c)

Women scored higher than men on love, appreciation of beauty and gratitude, men

scored higher on creativity. (d) A five-dimensional model best represented the factorial

structure. Most findings replicated previous findings in other countries, supporting the

use of the Hebrew version.

Paper 3

Adult playfulness and positive psychology: Measurement issues,

correlates, and future perspectives

René Proyer, Unong>iversityong> of Zurich, Switzerland

Adult playfulness is (most certainly compared to playfulness in children) a neglected

field in psychology. Neither is there a widely accepted theory of adult playfulness nor

an agreement on how it should be measured. The presentation will provide an overview

on self-report instruments and critically comments (from a theoretical but also

empirical perspective) on properties of representative inventories. Given the potential

of adult playfulness (e.g., in terms of enabling flow-experiences, or its contribution to

divergent thinking and academic success) there is a need for more fundamental but

also applied research in this area. The conceptualization of playfulness as character

strength (synonymous with “humour”, cf. Peterson & Seligman, 2004) will also be

addressed. In an ongoing study, two measures of playfulness were related to the Valuesin-Action

Inventory of strengths (VIA-IS). The available data at the moment indicate

a robust relation between humour (in the VIA-classification) and playfulness that is

far from indicating redundancy (r = .43, p < .01, N = 151, correlations at item-level

ranged between -.15, n.s., and .43, p < .01). Findings of this study will be embedded

in a broader discussion of playfulness as strength of character. Recent developments

(outline of a current research program) and studies will be presented in an overview.

83


84

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

Paper 4

Assessment of children’s sense of humour: A survey of humour

instruments

Sarah Auerbach, Unong>iversityong> of Zurich, Switzerland

Co – author : Willibald Ruch

Over the last 30 years, psychologists have rediscovered the sense of humour as research

topic. In positive psychology, humour is one of the 24 character strengths that contribute

to the good life. While many instruments exist for measuring the sense of humour as

well as different aspects of humorous behaviour in adulthood, only few instruments

have been constructed to assess humour in children and adolescents. This contribution

presents the status quo of existing children’s humour instruments, i.e., a collection

of available instruments to assess different aspects of humorous behaviour at young

age. A search in the databases PsycInfo and Psyndex using relevant keywords (e.g.

humour, development, assessment) led to more than 50 studies. The instruments were

classified by (a) content (i.e. appreciation, comprehension, production, coping humour,

humour as character strength, and the sense of humour), (b) assessment approach (i.e.

questionnaire, peer rating, behavioural observation, interview, performance test),

and (c) test construction principles (e.g., theoretical basis of the trait construct to

be measured, construction process, psychometric properties). Inspection shows that

most instruments measure appreciation and comprehension of cartoons and jokes

at different developmental stages, but very few measure individual differences in the

sense of humour. Many instruments lack a theoretical basis, and often instruments did

not undergo a clear test construction. Occasionally, also information on reliability and

validity were not provided. So far, no comprehensive instrument for the assessment of

a multidimensional approach to humour is available.

Paper 5

Assessing individual differences in mood regulation competencies

indirectly

Claudia Crayen, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany

Co – authors : Tanja Lischetzke, Michael Eid

Individual differences in mood regulation competencies (MRC) can have important

consequences for subjective well-being and psychological health. MRC refer to the

ability to modify or actively maintain mood states in a functional way. As part of

emotional intelligence, MRC have been related to well-being and social functioning.

Existing self-report measures ask participants to directly report on their MRC. One

limitation of this retrospective and global approach concerns memory mechanisms

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : SYMPOSIUM ABSTRACTS

that distort self-report judgements. This is one reason why the convergence of selfreport

measures with actual behaviour may be low. To scrutinize this relationship

and record momentary reports of mood experiences, we conducted an ambulatory

assessment study with 165 participants in which self-reported momentary mood was

measured 8 times per day for 7 days by a short version of the Multidimensional Mood

Questionnaire implemented in handheld computers. These repeated measurements of

momentary mood allow us to infer the MRC from characteristic series of mood states.

Subgroups of individuals who differ in their mood course over time were identified

via the application of mixture latent Markov models. These models describe typical

mood courses by means of transition probabilities that are allowed to differ between

subgroups (latent classes). Results show that the majority of healthy participants belong

to a group that displays high stability in a moderately positive mood state, and a second

subgroup with pronounced MRC that has a higher mean mood level and shows a

pattern of regulation towards an elevated mood state.

85


86

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

Psychometric properties of Beliefs About Psychological Services

[BAPS] scale in Latvia

Aleksandra Andrejeva, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia,

Co – authors : Marija Morozova, Madara Orlovska, Lāsma Katšena, Kristīne Poča,

Malgožata Raščevska

Individuals’ attitudes toward seeking psychological services have been widely studied

in past decades as a predictor of psychological help seeking behavior. Ægisdóttir &

Gerstein (2009) developed the Beliefs About Psychological Services [BAPS] scale, which

includes items generated by the target group (e.g., students). The BAPS scale consists

of 18 items grouped in three subscales: Intent, Stigma Tolerance, and Expertness.

Objective: The present study was conducted to examine the psychometric properties

(reliability, factor structure) of the BAPS scale for a sample of Latvian undergraduate

students. Method: The total sample consisted of 312 students from Unong>iversityong> of Latvia

(aged from 18 to 44 years, M = 22.26, SD = 3.32, 47 male and 265 female) matched

to the original sample by age, gender, study years in unong>iversityong> and psychological

counseling experience. The forward and backward translation technique was used to

develop Latvian version of BAPS. Participants from a pilot and main study completed

a demographic questionnaire and Latvian version of BAPS with some additional items.

Results: Confirmatory factor analysis revealed a three-dimensional solution similar to

that found in the original English version. Based on the results of a pilot study, wording

of several items was corrected to be better suited for people of Latvian culture, two

original items were removed due to low factor loading, and substitution items were

introduced in order to strengthen the structure of the scale. Reliability coefficients for

the BAPS subscales ranged from .67 to .86 (Cronbach alpha).

Test-taking motivation in computerized adaptive testing and fixed

item testing

Regine Asseburg, Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education (IPN),

Germany,

Co – author : Andreas Frey

Computerized adaptive testing (CAT) is a promising test algorithm to be implemented

in large-scale assessments. The reason is that CAT allows for much higher measurement

efficiency than the conventionally used fixed item testing (FIT). However, the effects of

CAT on test-taking motivation are not yet thoroughly understood. Since test-taking

motivation is positively correlated with performance in low-stakes test situations,

sufficiently high motivation is required for a valid test score interpretation as maximum

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

performance. Based on expectancy-value theory of motivation, this 2x2 experiment

investigates the effects of test algorithm (CAT/FIT) and test instruction (no explanation

of test algorithm/explanation of test algorithm) on test-taking motivation, accounting

for test-takers’ domain-specific self-concept and dispositional achievement motivation

(N = 703 ninth graders in Germany). Results and implications for the application of

CAT in educational measurement are discussed.

Evaluative content in personality items: Symptoms, diagnosis and c

Martin Bäckström, Lund Unong>iversityong>, Sweden,

Co – author : Fredrik Björklund

More than 50 years ago Peabody showed that personality items tend to regard both

personality content proper (a social person is extraverted) and evaluation (it is good to

be social in modern Western societies). When item ratings include both evaluation and

content the scales that they correspond to tend to capture both personality content (e.g.

Extraversion) and evaluation. The evaluative factor may include personality content

too, i.e. be related to stable behaviour, but appears to be on a different level as compared

to other personality factors (e.g. the Big Five). When item ratings include both

evaluation and content the scales that they belong to tend to capture both personality

content such as Extroversion (stemming from ratings of the occurrence of behavior)

and evaluation (stemming from the desirability of the behavior). It has been suggested

that the evaluative content can be captured by methods such as having subjects rate

the items’ social desirability, or by calculating the item’s popularity in self-ratings

(the number of subjects endorsing it, or the mean rating level of an item on a graded

scale). Our method “evaluative neutralization” concerns rephrasing of items in a way

that makes their mean ratings closer to the midpoint of the scale. Results supporting

the technique and a preliminary inventory (with maintained structural and criterion

validity) are presented.

The role of psychlogical test systems for the diagnostics of cognitive

functions

Michael Berg, Institute of test development and -application I.T.E.A., Germany

Test systems admit a sophisticated form of theory guided validation. This is achieved

by verifying hypothesizes concerning the effects of task generating variables on the

course of task difficulty. For this purpose the subtests assessing different cognitive

functions are constructed by purposeful variation of task generating variables. In this

case, the test material can be the same for all subtests, including the device for the input

of responses. The test system Corporal is generated from only two test figures. Both

figures have exactly the same perceptual complexity (structural information load).

From simple multiple choice tasks to very difficult inference tasks subtests assessing

87


88

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

different cognitive functions are derived from one another. By test systems, an observed

performance can be referred to a cause in the form of an underlying performance. Thus,

the diagnostic statement can be more specific than achievable by traditional tests. For

example, a poor performance in a memory test must not assign a memory deficit: It can

be caused by a lack of attention. A respective study shows that a decreasing memory

performance in older persons are rather caused by a poor retrieval performance

than by decreasing attention. For various diagnostic issues, the following cognitive

functions can be assessed and compared by Corporal: diffuse, spatial focused, selective

and divided attention, vigilance, working memory (free recall), spatial aptitude (metal

rotation) and spatial ability (inference by serial learning).

Insufficiency of theoretical models in the field of intergroup relations:

Towards the Ethnic Tolerance Scale elaboration

Gershons Breslavs, Baltic Psychology and Management Unong>iversityong> College, Latvia

The field of intergroup relations is replete with theoretical models, but the concept of

social tolerance is still very ambiguous despite huge progress in social psychology and

related fields in the recent 50 years. It is viewed as too complicated and researchers prefer

to analyze tolerance components: stereotypes, prejudice, and social discrimination

which seem to be more one-dimensional and available for study. At the same time,

the amount of intergroup conflicts including collective violence has not decreased in

the 21st century, and psychologists need more holistic measures to assess attitudes

to out-groups that could predict individual predisposition to involvement in such

violence. Integrated Threat theory was selected as appropriate for the understanding

of the concept of tolerance (Stephan & Stephan, 1996). The five-stage process of ethnic

tolerance scale elaboration comprises: a) phenomenological data collection through

structural interviews and main topics description, b) formulation of the set of statements

from this data collection according to the Threat theory and pilot study, c) preparation

of the first 89-item inventory, d) data collection with the 89-item inventory and factor

analysis of the data resulting in the reduction of statements to 50 with three subscales,

e) two-stage data collection with the 50-item inventory and 18-item’ antipathy scale

with contrast samples, and quantitative analysis (including factor, variance and

correlational analysis) of the data. The data has shown good internal consistency and

moderate construct validity of the 50-item scale that could be reduced to the 38-item

scale with two subscales.

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


Checkpoint 360 Competency Survey

Undīne Bušmeistere, SIA “Eiropersonāls”, Latvia

Co – author : Inna Ferdmane

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

The study was concluded by SIA “Eiropersonals” in cooperation with “Profiles

International” during the winter of 2010. The aim of the present research was to determine

the profile of the most successful Latvian managers, describing their competences. The

second aim of the research was to investigate the criteria as to how the companies

determine their best managers. Participants of this study were 100 Latvian middle

and higher level managers of both sexes (47 women and 53 men) aged from 25 to 40.

Checkpoint 360 Competency Survey was used to determine managers’ competencies

in eight skill clusters and 18 universal skills. This method was used as a multi-rater

feedback with an opportunity to receive an evaluation from different people – selfevaluation,

evaluation from their manager, peers and subordinates. Highly evaluated

competencies are task management and production, but low evaluated competencies

are development of other and relationships. The social consequences of the findings can

help managers to compare the opinions of others with their own perceptions, positively

identify their strengths and improve the other areas.

Consequences of test anxiety on adaptive versus fixed item testing

Juliane Caspers, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany,

Co – author : Tuulia Ortner

In the present study, we investigated the effects of test anxiety on test performance

using computerized adaptive testing (CAT) versus conventional fixed item testing

(FIT). We hypothesized that tests containing mainly items with medium probabilities

of being solved would have negative effects on test performance for test takers high in

test anxiety. A total of 110 students (aged 16 to 20) from a German secondary modern

school filled out a short form of the Test Anxiety Inventory (TAI-G, Wacker, Jaunzeme,

& Jaksztat, 2008) and then were presented with items from the Adaptive Matrices

Test (AMT, Hornke, Rettig, & Etzel, 1999) on the computer, either in CAT form or in

a fixed item test form with a selection of items arranged in order of increasing item

difficulty. Additionally, half of the students were given a short summary of information

about the mode of item selection in adaptive testing before working on the CAT. In a

moderated regression approach, a significant interaction of test anxiety and test mode

was revealed. The effect of test mode on the AMT score was stronger for students with

higher scores on test anxiety than for students with lower test anxiety. Furthermore,

getting information about CAT led to significantly better results than receiving standard

test instructions. Results are discussed with reference to test fairness.

89


90

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

New procedures and instruments of assessment of motivation,

cognitive and affective processes

Anna Contardi, Università Europea di Roma - Istituto Skinner di Roma, Italy,

Co – authors : Ettore De Monte, Massimo Continisio, Paolo Scapellato,

Stella Tamburello, AntoninoTamburello

In the last years, the interest in clinical psychology in the scientific research about

mind has shifted from a focus on mental contents centrality to cognitive process

analysis. At present, interests, motivations and aims represent the fulcrum of the

mental working models, based on the analysis of feed-forward psychological processes.

The assessment aim is to specify the different levels of the Multilevel Motivational

Structure (MMS) proposed by Tamburello (2008) in relation to an individual goal

hierarchy. The MMS’s motivational levels are connected to several aspects, in which

the individual fulfils himself: – oneself dimension: first realization level. – relational

dimension: second realization level. – self-efficacy dimension/area: third realization

level. – area of the psychophysiological well-being and of the tendency to preserve an

optimum level of: fourth realization level. – area of vital wish the world has particular

characteristics, considered absolutely necessary (reality must be like one’s wish): fifth

realization level. The assessment based on the identification of MMS allows to increase

the information about the explanation of specific behaviors as regards the profile of

Motivation, Cognitive and Affective Processes. Moreover, a semi-structured interview

is presented, based on causal analysis methods and procedures, with specific reference

to motivational meanings, on which this cognitive working model is based.

The prediction of turkish students’ reading literacy

for PISA 2003–2006–2009 results by home possessions

R.Nükhet Demirtaşlı, Ankara Universitesi, Turkey,

Co – authors : H. Deniz Gülleroglu, Safiye Bilican

The PISA study purportedly assessed how much 15 year-old students can use what

they learn at school in their daily lives. The PISA assessment studies involve skills of

reading comprehension, mathematical literacy, scientific literacy since 2000. In these

assessments, links are established between learning outputs and the characteristics of

the students and the factors which determine their learning outcomes both in and out

of school. Turkey has been involved in the PISA assessment applications in 2003, 2006

and 2009 as a member of OECD countries. The purpose of this study is to determine

the best predictors (home possessions) of reading literacy for PISA 2003, 2006, 2009.

For this purpose, Turkey’s data (2003,2006,2009) on Reading Literacy were retrieved

from OECD’s official website. In these data, the predictive variables considered are

possession of literature, computer, text books, calculator, poetry, dictionary, internet,

study place, sofware, own room and the number of books at home. A stepwise

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

procedure of multiple regression analysis was carried out on the data. According to

results of the analyses, the best predictors were the same for each term. These predictors

are, respectively, possession of literature, computer and textbooks. The findings are

discussed in relation to extant literature.

How to create knowledge space? Different methods for constructing

surmise relation in the context of knowledge space theory

Denisa Denglerova, Department of Social Pedagogy, Masaryk Unong>iversityong>, Czech

Republic

This paper deals with Knowledge Space Theory (KST) formulated by Doignon and

Falmagne in 1985. KST is very effective process to assess, diagnose or test (not only)

knowledge. In this paper I show different ways how to create KST or more precisely

surmise relations between items. In the empirical part I used KST as an alternative

approach to constructing and interpreting psychological tests. I have analyzed data

from personality inventory NEO FFI based on the theoretical principles of the Big

Five in context of KST. The paper shows the KST’s contribution of information to

the psychometrics and stresses the results of the tests which are not easily detectable

with classical testing theory. The way the knowledge space was created is important in

KST theory. In this work I compare the results of two approaches: knowledge spaces

generated from the data of the respondents and the knowledge spaces based on expert’s

judgement. It becomes clear that it is possible to use the expert knowledge spaces even

in personality testing but there is a risk of bi-directional prerequisite relations. Further

there is discussed the impact of bi-directionality to the tests’ reliability.

An Item Response Theory analysis of self-report measures of motives

Friederike Dislich, Technische Universität München, Germany

Co – author : Felix Schoenbrodt

Several different self-report measures of motivation exist. Although frequently used,

only few studies ever tried to compare these different measures with regard to their

psychometric properties (e.g., Engeser & Langes, 2010). This lack calls for a systematic

analysis of these inventories based on a modern statistical approach. Thus, an item

response theory analysis of the central motives (achievement, affiliation/intimacy,

and power) was carried out. Therefore, 21 different scales for these motives have

been administered to 942 participants, containing the three subscales Achievement,

Dominance (Power), and Affiliation of the Personality Research Form (PRF, Jackson,

1984), the Personality Values Questionnaire (PVQ, McClelland, 1991), the Achievement

Motive Scale (Lang & Fries, 2006), the Mehrabian Affiliation Tendency Questionnaire

(MAFF, Mehrabian, 1970), the Mehrabian Sensitivity to Rejection Questionnaire (MSR,

Mehrabian, 1994), the Goals Questionnaire (Poehlmann & Brunstein, 1997), and

91


92

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

additional self-constructed items (Schönbrodt & Dislich, 2010). The Samejima (1969)

graded response model was used to analyze the test whether the existing self-report

measures of motivation suffer from scaling problems and to construct new optimized

scales based on the complete item pool. Results show that commonly used motivation

scales can be improved in a number of important ways, thus, new unifying motive

scales are presented that map on the underlying theoretical dimensions, are unbiased in

respect to gender, and are able to provide a higher precision with fewer items.

Measuring metacognitive knowledge of self, task, and strategies in

mathematics

Anastasia Efklides, Aristotle Unong>iversityong> of Thessaloniki, Greece

Co – author : Symeon P. Vlachopoulos

Feeling of difficulty (FOD) is a common and powerful metacognitive experience (ME)

that denotes lack of processing fluency. However, it is often confused with perception of

task difficulty, which involves metacognitive knowledge (MK) of tasks. The present study

investigated the extent to which MK of mathematical tasks difficulty (easy / low demands

vs. difficult / high demands tasks) is distinct from MK of the self regarding one’s fluency

in processing mathematical tasks (easiness / fluency vs. difficulty / lack of fluency)

and MK of strategies used in mathematical tasks processing (cognitive/metacognitive

strategies, strategies that can improve fluency and enhance one’s competence, and

strategies that can help cope with lack of fluency when processing mathematical tasks

such as avoidance strategies). Furthermore, the study aimed to investigate whether MK

of tasks amd MK of the self predict the self-reported FOD on three mathematical tasks.

The Metacognitive Knowledge in Mathematics Questionnaire (MKMQ) addressing the

above three types of MK was firstly administered to 311 junior high school students

(Grades 7 to 9) and then to 210 unong>iversityong> students for cross-validation. Confirmatory

factor analyses confirmed the presence of seven first-order interrelated factors. In

both samples convergent validity was tested via correlations of the seven factors with

measures of self-concept in mathematics and mathematical ability. Regression analyses

showed that self-concept and to a lesser extent mathematical ability, but not MK of

tasks or MK of the self, predicted the self-reported FOD in the three mathematical

problems. The findings suggest that FOD is triggered by different processes and not by

the person’s perception of task difficulty or MK of the self as processor of mathematical

tasks.

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

The logical and ontological impact of the new “Cognitive-Causal”

assessment

Ettore De Monte, Università Europea di Roma - Istituto Skinner Roma, Italy

Co – authors : Giuliana Mossolani, Anna Contardi, Paolo Scapellato,

Stella Tamburello, AntoninoTamburello

The cognitive-causal assessment model exalts the contribution of Logic and Ontology.

It pursues the validity of the conclusions and the profoundness of thought. The

Logic concurs to plan and uphold the inductive modalities of clinical investigation

(classifications, generalizations, investigation of the causes) and permits a comprehensive

and integrated assessment. For example, a useful tool for the arrangement of clinical

data is the 7 column Functional Analysis that places itself as an integration and

expansion of the classic ABC model, since it associates volitional and cognitive

parameters to environmental antecedents and the intended aims to the consequences

of a behavior. Such a tool discloses the first ontological theme: the person takes on a role

of complementary priority in regards to the environment. On the other hand, a useful

tool of clinical investigation is the Causal Analysis, consisting in the investigation of the

pathogenic causes. Utilizing methods of formulation and validation of the hypotheses,

it pursues an elastic and open logic, which is the legacy of the traditions of Bacon,

Mills and Gödel. Such a tool discloses a second ontological theme: it is correct to speak

about a psychic causality, and therefore investigate it, assuming its essential features are

clarified. In conclusion, a useful tool for the elaboration of the clinical goals is the Order

Matrix, intended as a perspective and ideal picture of the most suitable and expected

outcome of the therapeutic course. In conclusion, a third ontological theme comes full

circle: a human being is always perfectible.

Construction and psychometric properties of a computer memory

battery using classical test theory and item response theory

Aristides Ferreira, ISCTE - Lisbon Unong>iversityong> Institute, Portugal

In accordance with the classical psychometric theory and the item response theory

(IRT), the authors constructed a computer memory battery with six tests, which was

prepared to be used with the adult population. These tests intend to measure working

memory and short-term memory constructs with verbal and non-verbal contents.

A factor analysis has been conducted to assess the internal structure of the tests in

accordance with the results of 547 undergraduate students. According to the literature,

several confirmatory factorial analysis models were conducted. Our results show better

fit measures (CFI=.984, TLI=.969, RMSEA=.060) in a model with two independent

latent variables of verbal and non-verbal factors. This structure reproduces the initial

battery organization. The Cronbach α coefficients showed acceptable to high internal

item consistency levels for the six tests (α ranging from .72 to .89). IRT analyses (Rasch

93


94

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

and Partial Credit models) revealed good Infit and Outfit measures and high level of

precision for parameter estimation. Also, the DIF analysis for gender only reveals one

item biased in two of the six tests analyzed. Gender and type of course interaction

effects for the tests were analyzed with Rasch measures. Only gender differences for

two working memory tests were found. The potential utility of these memory tasks for

psychological research and practice will be discussed.

What people do when they are not working at work? Construction and

development of a new scale for organizational assessment

Aristides Ferreira, ISCTE - Lisbon Unong>iversityong> Institute, Portugal

Employees often make personal phone calls, surf on the Internet, send e-mails to friends,

do office betting pools, shop for travel bargains, and chat with other colleagues while

at work. The present study examines the development and factorial structure (for the

Portuguese adult population) of a 12 items scale designed to evaluate the dimensions

mentioned above. Specifically, it assesses the types of leisure- and home-oriented

activities that people engage in at work and examines why such personal activities

are performed during the workday. We are currently collecting data (more than 300

subjects) and intend to show the scale\’s psychometric properties according to the

Item Response Theory and Classical Tests Theory. We also intend to present important

measure correlations (concurrent validity) with organizational dimensions of leadership

control, work stress, presenteeism and job roles. We will discuss implications for future

research according to the results and intend to give an important contribution for these

aspects of employee\’s behavior that are relevant in terms of organizational productivity,

but are often ignored.

How smart do you think you are? A meta-analysis on the validity of

self-estimated intelligence scores

Philipp Alexander Freund, Leuphana Universität Lüneburg, Germany

Co – author : Nadine Kasten

Self-estimates of intelligence are routinely used in career counseling decisions. Using

self-estimates as valid substitutes of standardized test scores requires a significant

relationship between the two. We examine the validity of self-estimates of intelligence

by conducting a random effects, multilevel meta-analysis including a total of 149 effect

sizes reported in 40 published studies. Moderator variables are specified both at the

level of the effect size and at the level of the study. The overall effect is estimated at

r = .32. Assuming a standard deviation of 15 IQ points, this validity coefficient leads

to a standard error of estimation of 14.21 IQ points. There is significant heterogeneity

among effect sizes, and our moderator analysis shows that the validity of self-estimates

is greatly enhanced when relative scales with clearly specified comparison groups are

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

used, and when numerical abilities are assessed rather than general intelligence. Under

optimal conditions, empirical Bayes estimates for the effect size went up to as high as

r = .67, leading to a standard error of estimation of 11.14 IQ points. The assessment of

less well-known facets of intelligence and the use of student populations significantly

decreases validity. The results suggest that self-estimates of intelligence can be used

as valid proxies of standardized intelligence test scores. Furthermore, substituting test

scores with self-estimates is appealing because self-estimates can be obtained very

economically, doing without cost- and time-intensive administrations of standardized

tests.

Aggressiveness, parental practices and attachment

Miriam Gallarin, Unong>iversityong> of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Spain

Co – author : Itziar Alonso-Arbiol

The aim of the present study was twofold: a) to test the mediation role of attachment

between parenting practices and aggressiveness, and b) to clarify the differential role

of mothers and fathers in aggressiveness. A total of 554 adolescents (330 girls and 224

boys), ages ranging between 16 and 19, completed measures of attachment to mother

and to father, mother’s and father’s parenting practices, and aggressiveness. Acceptance/

implication of each parent highly positively predicted adolescent’s attachment to that

parent, and coercion/imposition negatively predicted attachment to a lower extent. Using

structural equation modeling, a full mediation model was confirmed. With attachment

in the model, the paths between the two parenting practices and aggressiveness were

small and statistically non-significant. Only attachment to father, but not attachment to

mother, was predictive of adolescents’ aggressiveness. Results are discussed in light of

the importance of the father-son/daughter relationship in the adolescence.

Can different measures of intelligence can be used interchangeably? A

comparison of the Wechsler and Stanford-Binet scales

Linda Gilmore, Queensland Unong>iversityong> of Technology, Australia

Co – author (s): Melinda Garred, Kimberley Wilson

The Wechsler and Stanford Binet scales are among the most commonly used tests

of intelligence. In clinical practice, they often seem to be used interchangeably. This

paper reports the results of two studies that compared the most recent editions of two

Wechsler scales (WPPSI-III and WISC-IV) with the Stanford-Binet Fifth Edition (SB5).

The participants in the first study were 36 typically developing 4-year-old children who

completed the WPPSI-III and SB5 in counter-balanced order. Although correlations

of composite scores ranged from r = .59 to r = .82 and were similar to those reported

for earlier versions of the two instruments, more than half the sample had a score

discrepancy greater than 10 points across the two instruments. In the second study,

95


96

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

the WISC-IV and SB5 were administered to 30 children aged 12–14 years. There was

a significant difference between Full Scale IQs on the two measures, with scores being

higher on the WISC-IV. Differences between the two verbal scales were also significant

and favoured the WISC-IV. There were moderate correlations of Full Scale IQs (r = .58)

and Nonverbal IQs (r = .54) but the relationship between the two Verbal scales was not

significant. For some children, notable score differences led to different categorisations

of their level of intellectual ability The findings suggest that the Wechsler and Stanford

Binet scales cannot be presumed to be interchangeable. The discussion focuses on how

psychologists might reconcile large differences in test scores and the need for caution

when interpreting and comparing test results.

„Wise” students’ characteristics evaluated by themselves and peers

Liena Graudiņa, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

Co – author : Malgožata Raščevska

This study aims to compare peer-evaluations and self-evaluations of characteristics of

students who are nominated as wise, and to compare self-evaluations of characteristics

of wise students and the other students. The study consisted of three stages. First, 226

students(203 female and 23 male) completed „Personal Characteristics Checklist (PCC),

constructed originally for this study. Thereby self-evaluations were collected. Second,

students were asked to nominate „wise course-mates”, altogether 151 nominations were

gathered. Third, randomly selected participants were asked to evaluate characteristics

of a particular student from the “wise” group (n=32), but they were not told that the

student has been rated as “wise”. A mean result of three peer-evaluations was used for

further analysis for each „wise” student. Results indicate that peer-evaluations of wise

students are significantly higher than self-evaluations for most of the characteristics in

PCC. There are no statistical differences between the majority of PCC characteristics’

self-evaluations of „wise” students and the other students, meaning that „wise” students

have not evaluated themselves higher.

Psychological assessment in clinical settings in Lithuania: Post soviet

heritage and future perspectives

Neringa Grigutyte, Vilnius unong>iversityong>, Lithuania

Co – author : Vaida Kalpokienė

The origin of psychological assessment in clinical settings derives from the psychiatric

system of Soviet Union and has not changed much since the declaration of independence

of Lithuania in 1990. Different attempts were made to raise essential questions on

psychological assessment and to find possible solutions to the existing issues. The current

situation on clinical assessment in Lithuania needs to be reconsidered. The Lithuanian

Psychological Association has prompted several successive actions this year: the inquiry

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

of professional psychologist on problems and possible solutions in psychodiagnostics

as well as national conference on psychological assessment in clinical settings were

held. Even though the lack of valid and proper methods of assessment is generally

considered as the main issue in psychological assessment there are much deeper

aspects of this problem. Amongst these are the mindset of the professionals, the lack

of general centre of coordination and/or qualification, the psychologists being directly

subordinate to the requirements of institution they work in. Possible approaches and

perspectives for future directions of progress on psychological assessment in clinical

settings are discussed in the presentation.

Measuring interplay of trait self-control and situational demands in

binge-drinking

Eva-Maria Kangro, Tallinn Unong>iversityong>, Institute of Psychology, Estonia

Co – author : Martin Hagger

This study presented aimed to examine the role of trait self-control and contextual

demands in binge-drinking behavior. Two hypotheses were set up: (1) People are more

likely to binge-drink when they are sharing the situation with other binge-drinkers,

and (2) High trait self-control is related to lower sensitivity to situational characteristics

in binge-drinking. Participants (n = 572, females n = 342, M age = 28.05) completed selfreport

measures of trait self-control, alcohol behavior, and contextual characteristics of

a situation described. First, 96% of drinkers described the binge drinking situation as

a social event. However, those assessing the situation as socially supportive for binge

drinking, showed lower levels of self-control (M = 69.91, SD = 12.76) than others

(M = 76.81, SD = 16.76, p < 0.01). Second, those having lower self-control (β = -0.15)

and higher sensitivity to situational incentives (β = 0.14) were likely to binge drink more

[F(5, 232) = 10,081, p < 0.001]. Those results provide some evidence to the interactive

patterns of self-control and situational demands. Based on prior research (e.g., Gross

& John, 2004, Fujita & Han, 2009), enhancement of self-regulatory skills by develping

reflective strategies might help to overcome provocative environmental signals when

drinking.

Speech emotion recognition – a framework for measuring for

emotional states from voice characteristics

Jarek Krajewski, Univ. Wuppertal, Experimental Industrial Psychology, Germany

This paper describes a measurement approach for detecting emotional states based

on speech characteristics. The utilization of voice communication as an indicator for

emotional states could match the demands of in field studies, business, consulting,

therapy or, everyday life settings applying standard mobile phone equipment. Contact

free measurements as voice analysis are non-obtrusive (not interfering with the

97


98

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

primary task) and favorable for state detection, since an application of sensors would

cause annoyance, additional stress and often impairs working capabilities and mobility

demands. In addition, speech is easy to record even under extreme environmental

conditions (bright light, high humidity and temperature), requires merely cheap,

durable, and maintenance free sensors and most importantly, it utilizes already existing

communication system hardware (mobile phones). The acoustic speech emotion

recognition research is mainly based on phonetics, general signal processing and

computational intelligence research. How emotions are expressed in the voice can

be analyzed acoustically by measuring the characteristics of the speech wave form

radiating from nostrils and mouth. Accordingly, acoustic features can be divided

referring to auditive-perceptual concepts into prosody (pitch, intensity, rhythm,

pause pattern, and speech rate), articulation (slurred speech, reduction and elision

phenomena), and speech quality (timbre: breathy, whispery, tense, sharp, hoarse, or

modal voice). SER engines were able to detect emotional states in naturalistic settings

(speaker-independent, spontaneous speech) within a range of about 80–90% ‘classwise’

determined recognition rate (CL) for 2-class problems, which seems close to

the performance of a single human labeler. Due to large inter-individual differences

in speaker characteristics and the way speakers employ different acoustic features in

different ways, higher classification rates could be achieved by personalized, speakerdependent

classification

Ambulatory fatigue assessment: speech, video, and biosignal based

approaches for measuring need for recovery and burnout risk

Jarek Krajewski, Univ. Wuppertal, Experimental Industrial Psychology, Germany

Co – authors : Sebastian Schnieder, Martin Golz, Thomas Schnupp, Christian Heinze

Fatigue – and thus need for recovery and burnout risk-play an important role within

individual, organizational and economical contexts, especially when focusing on

safety, performance or quality of life. Precise measurement of fatigue in professional

and private life allows determining the individual’s need for action and serve as

integral parts of automated fatigue countermeasure devices. A short overview is given

on speech, video, and biosignal based measurement instruments of fatigue. Fatigue

incorporates physiological modifications within the central nervous system and the

autonomic nervous system (i.e. cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, respiratory, metabolic

or endocrinologic changes). Psychological consequences affect cognitive (i.e. perception,

central processing, psychomotor functions), emotional (irritability, dejection),

motivational (loss of motivation, decline of aspiration level, enhancement of strain)

and behavioral systems (tendency to fall asleep, posture balance, (facial) expression).

These changes can be captured within fit-for-duty tests or monitoring approaches.

The most frequently used experimental methods are the pupillographic sleepiness test

(PST), psychomotor vigilance task (PVT), power spectral analysis of EEG-activity,

multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) and Eye lid Movement (e.g. PERCLOS). Related to

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

organizational workstations, automatic measuring systems could include a fusion of

bio-, speech and video-signal-based components (i.e. analysis of mouse movements,

keyboard input, phonetic voice changes and video-based detection of eye, lid and head

movements).

Measuring perceived leadership characteristics by phonetic analysis

Jarek Krajewski, Univ. Wuppertal, Experimental Industrial Psychology, Germany

Co – authors : Sebastian Schnieder, Tom Laufenberg

Leadership can change followers’ attitudes, self-concepts, and motives and is thus

associated with satisfaction, commitment, organizational citizenship behavior, and

organizational performance. Measurement of leadership is mostly conducted by

observer reports. Observer reports obtained from trained experts are manpower, and

cost intensive. Building speech based systems which automatically determine leadership

skills could offer lots of advantages for field research and personnel selection purposes.

Subject, Procedure and Corpus Engineering. The Leadership corpus consists of 409

one-minute segments of 143 speeches (143 male executives within the age range about

20–75). The recordings took place in lecture-rooms under varying levels of noise and

reverberation. The corpus was annotated by 10 raters who had been formally trained

to apply a standardized set of judging criteria. Each rater assigned an integer value

from 1 to 5 to each of the following dimensions of the Culturally Endorsed Leadership

questionnaire: charismatic, visionary, inspiring, upright, teamintegrating, nonmalicious,

diplomatic, decisive, performing, selfconfident. Speech Feature Extraction. Different

types of phonetic features are commonly used within the field of speech emotion

recognition (SER) containing information about e.g. (a) speech rate, (b) pause length,

(c) articulatory precision, (d) tension, (e) breathiness, (f) nasality, (g) pitch contour,

(h) intensity contour, (i) vocal tract tension, (j) degree of jaw opening, (k) position

of tongue body, and (l) size of front cavity were computed. Results. Using all acoustic

features we achieved on the two-class detection problems (low vs. high leadership

states) an accurracy of up to 71.7 % on speaker-independent data, i.e. me correctly

sorted 72 from 100 one-minute speech segments into the right class (median splitted

low vs. high leadership dimension) without any baseline information of the speaker.

Children’s quality of life

Shulamith Kreitler, Tel Aviv Unong>iversityong>, Israel

Co – author : Michal M. Kreitler

The objective was to construct a questionnaire of the quality of life of children that

would adequately present the major relevant domains of quality of life of children with

different demographic characteristics. The constructed questionnaire has 55 items, each

with three response alternatives. It provides scores for 15 scales, such as positive feelings,

negative feelings, and basic needs, functioning at school or kindergarten, entertainment

99


100

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

and fun, health and cognitive functioning. The questionnaire was administered to 3400

children in the ages 5 to 18. The structure of the questionnaire, examined by structural

equation modeling, remained the same in children of the two genders, five different

age groups, Jewish and Arab, as well as those living in big cities, medium-sized towns,

and in villages or smaller communities. Versions of the questionnaire were developed

that adults can answer about the child or as if they were the child. The largest gaps

were found between the responses of children and the responses of parents as if they

were the child, especially in the scales referring to emotions. Conclusions refer to the

advantages and special applications of this questionnaire.

A new approach of testing the Rasch model

Klaus Kubinger, Division of Psychological Assessment and Applied Psychometrics,

Unong>iversityong> of Vienna, Austria

Co – authors : D Rasch, T. Yanagida.

In correspondence with pertinent statistical tests, it is of practical importance to

design data-sampling when the Rasch model is used for calibrating an achievement

test. That is, determining the sample size according to a given type-I- and type-IIrisk,

and according to a certain effect of model misfit which is of practical relevance

is of interest. However, pertinent Rasch model tests use chi-squared distributed teststatistics,

whose degrees of freedom do not depend on the sample size or the number

of testees, but only on the number of estimated parameters. We therefore suggest a new

approach using an /F/-distributed statistic as applied within analysis of variance, where

the sample size directly affects the degrees of freedom. The Rasch models quality of

specific objective measurement is in accordance with no interaction effect in a specific

analysis of variance design. The simulation study (100 ,000 runs for each of several

special cases) proved that the nominal type-I-risk holds as long as there is no significant

group effect. Analysing a certain DIF, this F-test has fair power, consistently higher than

Andersens test.

Team leader performance measurement and effectiveness potential

Rainer Kurz, Kingston Unong>iversityong>, UK

Introduction This study investigates relationships within a heterogeneous set of criterion

measures, and reports on the key predictors found. Design In a concurrent validation

study a total of 230 Team Leaders were invited to complete Swift Analysis Aptitude,

Wave Professional Styles and the Wave Performance 360 self-assessment. Each boss was

invited to rate the team leader’s performance on the same 39 dimensions. Appraisal data

for three consecutive years as well as sub-ordinate data on Gallup’s Q12 questionnaire

was also available. Results Performance appraisal summary values correlated fairly

highly with the Boss ratings on the Performance 360. All other criterion measures

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

were virtually uncorrelated illustrating that sub-ordinate, self and boss perspectives

on performance can differ widely. The Diagrammatic test showed the best validity

in the prediction of Boss Global Performance 360 (.20 uncorrected) and average

performance appraisal rating (.14). The best Professional Styles predictors related to

Conscientiousness and Intellect as would be expected from the research literature on

validity generalisation. In addition interpersonal themes were identified that were

associated with higher performance on Q12 areas. Discussion A Task Management

predictor composite based on 5 Dimensions correlated .23 (uncorrected) with Boss

Global Performance 360 ratings. A People Management composite based on 5 different

Dimensions correlated .23 with Boss Behaviour Total Performance 360 ratings. The

recommendation for Swift Analysis Aptitude is to triple weight Diagrammatic in an

Intellect composite. Combining these composites achieves a validity of .29 with Boss

Global performance rating and .19 with performance appraisal ratings averaged across

the three years, and .37 against the unit weight sum of these criteria.

Measuring and predicting the three effectiveness factors: contextual,

leadership and task performance

Rainer Kurz, Kingston Unong>iversityong>, UK

Introduction The Three Effectiveness Factor (3EF) model outlined by Kurz et al

(2009) differentiates Working Together (Contextual Performance), Promoting Change

(Leadership Performance) and Demonstrating Capability (Task Performance). This

study explores to what extent comparable components emerge from a, an independently

developed tool b, administered in a different language / culture (French) c, across Self,

Boss, Peer and Report rater groups. Design For a total sample of N=198 Self, Boss, 2

Peer and 3 Report rating sets on a management development 360 tool (MGM) were

available for analysis. In addition Wave Professional Styles data was gathered. Results

The first three PCA components accounted on average for 70% of the variance. All

rotated solutions closely resembled the three factors outlined in the 3EF model.

Factor analysis of averaged participant results yielded a three components accounting

for 46%, 12% and 11% of the variance with minor variations across rater groups.

Working Together had high loadings for Agreeableness and Emotional Stability related

themes including ‘soft’ leadership skills. Demonstrating Capability had high loadings

for Conscientiousness related scales and Analytical. Promoting Change covered the

remaining scales. Correlations between Professional Styles and averaged ratings rose

up to .45 (uncorrected). Discussion The results suggest that the Three Effectiveness

Factor (3EF) can account for the structural characteristics of an independently designed

management development tool. The prevalence of development-oriented leadership

behaviours pushed such themes towards the Working Together factor. High point-topoint

validities were found for the related criterion-predictor pairs.

101


102

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

Development of a group-level conflict resolution strategy scale

Vineta Laizane, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Department of Psychology, Latvia

Co – author : Ģirts Dimdiņš

The aim of this research was to construct a quantitative measure of group level conflict

resolution strategies, described in qualitative terms by Behfar et al. (2008), JAP. Two

preliminary studies (N = 58 and N = 122) were carried out in which the first version

of the scale was tested. The results were used to reconstruct the items of the scale. The

revised scale was tested in another study (N = 141) with a sample of employees and

managers. The sample was balanced in terms of participant gender, age, education,

company size, and industry sector. Factor analysis was used as one of the methods for

analyzing the collected data. Correlations and subscale reliability were also taken into

consideration.The final version of the scale had relatively high values of Cronbach’s

Alpha for both subscales measuring pluralistic and particularistic conflict resolution

strategies (α = .71 and α = .61 respectively, one should take into account that both

strategy measures include diverse sets of indicators, posing a challenge to achieve high

alphas). In line with theoretical predictions, the results of the study revealed statistically

significant correlation between the pluralistic conflict resolution strategy subscale and

satisfaction (rs = .29**, p


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

was given to 634 participants along with other psychological tests. The correlation

between accuracy and sensitivity was weak (-.138). Indices of accuracy and sensitivity

yielded different patterns of correlations with MSCEIT, a self-report measure of EI

(EmIn Questionnaire), IQ (Raven’s APM), and Big Five personality traits (NEO-FFI).

The results prove that accuracy and sensitivity indicate different aspects of emotion

recognition.

Assessment of social skills and problem behaviors: a cross-cultural

study with preschool children

Sofia de Oliveira Major, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Unong>iversityong> of

Coimbra – Portugal, Portugal

Co – authors : Maria João Seabra-Santos, Kenneth W. Merrell

Multicultural studies developed across the 21st century have emphasized the importance

of cultural dong>iversityong> on psychological and educational assessment. Furthermore, great

progress in the evaluation of young children’s social-emotional characteristics has

been made during the last ten years, with several newly developed questionnaires/

checklists focusing particularly on the assessment of social-emotional and behavioral

problems/competencies in preschoolers. The Preschool and Kindergarten Behavior

Scales – Second Edition (PKBS-2, Merrell, 2002), is a behavior rating scale developed

specifically to assess social skills and problem behaviors in children 3–6 years old,

recently adapted and validated to the Portuguese population. The aim of this study is to

compare characteristics of children from two Portuguese-speaking cultures: Portugal

and Angola. Preschool teachers from Angola (Lubango) were invited to rate social

skills and problem behaviors of 40 children using the Portuguese version of the PKBS-2

and these ratings were compared with equivalent ones made by teachers for a matched

sample of Portuguese preschoolers. Results indicate that, according to their preschool

teachers’ ratings, Angolan preschoolers show less social skills and higher levels of

problem behaviors than their Portuguese age mates. Results from Angolan children

are also compared taking the Portuguese and American normative data as reference.

Findings highlight the importance of cultural factors on the social-emotional assessment

of preschoolers. Results are discussed in the context of a multicultural approach (e.g.,

particular items may have differential relevance across cultures, children’s behavior

per se, and cultural informants’ expectations/tolerance), trying to achieve a better

understanding of the cultural factors underlying the observed differences.

103


104

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

Creation of Major Well-Being Dimension questionnaire

Maris Majors, Riga Teacher Training and Education Management Academy, Latvia

Co – authors : Laila Majore, Guna Svence

The aim of this presentation is to present the results of the first stage of a new

questionnaire in Latvia, the Major Well-Being Dimensions (MWBD). We used

both qualitative and quantitative methods. The qualitative analysis involved 288

incomplete sentences of respondents (age 12– 75 years) about well-being, amounting

to 878 content units. The quantitative analysis addressed frequencies of content codes

according to well being theory. Based on this analysis we created 230 statements for

piloting. The questionnaire was administered to 167 respondents, aged 21–61 years.

This led to a selection of a test version of the MWBD with 68 statements. We initially

found 5 scales (eudemonic, hedonic, cognitive, interpersonal, transcendental). Values

of Cronbach’s alpha of the 5 scales ranged from 0.72 to 0.89, with an overall alpha of

0.95. Significant correlations were found between the MWBD and instruments of wellbeing

from positive psychology classics (Ryff , Diener et al.). Ideas will be discussed

about theoretically based model variations of MWBD scales, especially cognitive,

interpersonal, transcendence and psychometric data with augmented samples.

Development of a questionnaire for assessing conscientiousness using

conditional reasoning items

Laurentiu P. Maricutoiu, West Unong>iversityong> of Timisoara, Romania

Co – authors : Irina Macsinga, Silvia Magurean, Alin Sava Florin, Delia Virga

Measurement of motivation using a conditional reasoning (CR) test was first

introduced in psychological assessment by James (1998). These types of tasks are

based on the assumption that people need to conclude that their own behavior is being

reasonable. In the development of our CR measure for conscientiousness, we start from

the assumption that highly conscientious persons will elaborate specific justifications

for engaging or disengaging a difficult task. Regarding the same difficult task, low

conscientious persons will also elaborate specific justifications for engaging or not

engaging it. Our CR measure for conscientiousness presents respondents with dillemas

and asks for the best solution for solving that dillema. The solutions we present for each

dillema are tailored to be favoured by high or low conscientious persons. Therefore,

our instrument does not assess conscientious behavior, but justifications specific to

high or low conscientious persons. In our presentation we will address the following

issues: development of CR dilemmas, internal consistency and validity results for the

CR measure of conscientiousness.

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

Assessing handedness: An even-handed assessment

Maryanne Martin, Unong>iversityong> of Oxford, UK

Co – authors : Marietta Papadatou-Pastou, Marcus R. Munafò

One of the most striking characteristics of humans is their population bias toward

right-handedness. Handedness itself is a marker for language lateralisation in the

brain. We have conducted an extensive meta-analysis which reveals that the incidence

of left-handedness is greater among the male than the female population. The overall

best estimate for the male to female ratio of left-handed to right-handed odds is 1.23.

Significant variation in the magnitude of the odds ratio over studies depends on (a) the

method of handedness assessment, (b) the time when the study was conducted, and (c)

the location of the study. In the case of assessment method, the odds ratio is smaller

for assessment in terms of writing hand or self-classification than it is for questionnaire

measures of hand preference. In the case of time, there has been a decline in the odds

ratio over the decades. In the case of location, the odds ratio is, for example, higher for

studies in North America than in Europe, with some evidence of it being particularly

low in Scandinavia. In terms of the cultural variables proposed by Hofstede, the odds

ratio increases with higher levels of cultural masculinity and with higher levels of

uncertainty avoidance, but decreases with higher levels of individualism. To investigate

the effect of assessment method on the handedness odds ratio in more detail, a study

has been carried out with 200 participants. This allows evaluation of, for example, the

proposal by Bryden of differential patterns of extreme responses between the genders.

The contribution of the Greek model of supervision in psychological

assessment

Christina Mastrandrea, Open Psychotherapy Centre, Athens, Greece

Co – authors : Hara Haritaki, Evdokia Lagakou, Panagiota Theodorou,

Ioannis K. Tsegos

The necessity of supervision both during training in Psychological Assessment and

professional practice has been widely acknowledged. Most supervision models in use

place emphasis on the correct coding, analysis and synthesis of the answers of the

examinee. Yet, the personality interaction between the examinee and the examiner is

also of special importance. One model that has been in application is the Greek Model

of Supervision (Tsegos, 1988, 1995, 2002, 2007), applied in the Training Institutes

(Psychological Assessment, Group Analysis, Sociotherapy-Psychodrama, Family

Therapy) of the Open Psychotherapy Centre. According to this model, the supervisory

group processes on a sentimental, imaginary and mental level the examinee responses

to tests. The resulting reactions, both dynamic and structural in nature, are used to aid

the psychologist to further understand the limitations interwoven in the diagnostic

procedure. The specific model plays an important part in the clarification of the

105


106

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

personality characteristics of the examinee and simultaneously offers the psychologists

the opportunity to further mature and develop both on a personal and professional

level. The supervision process of the specific model as well as its application in the

psychological assessment of adults (case study) is presented.

Using the VESPARCH verbal reasoning test to identify and categorise

underachievement in primary and secondary school students

Sarah McElwee, Unong>iversityong> of Oxford, UK

Co – author : Jane Mellanby

A student can be said to be underachieving at school if their academic potential

significantly exceeds their academic performance. Ability in the verbal domain is

generally more predictive of academic success than is non-verbal ability. Measuring

verbal academic potential independent of scholastic attainment is challenging, as

most group tests are confounded by reading skill, vocabulary, working memory and

attention. VESPARCH is a new online test of verbal reasoning comprising analogical

and categorical questions designed to measure potential in a culture-fair way,

independent of reading skill and vocabulary. Pupils wear headphones and hear the test

instructions and questions read aloud as they simultaneously appear on screen. Simple

vocabulary is used throughout and five initial practice questions with aural feedback

ensure that all pupils understand the test. The computerised presentation maintains

attention and supports working memory and the multiple-choice format reduces

anxiety. Two versions of the test, for children aged 7–8 years (n = 768), and 10–13

years (n = 1195) have been piloted. Test scores were compared to current National

Curriculum attainment (primary) or to scores on the verbal section of the Cognitive

Abilities Test (secondary). Approximately 15% of children across the ability range

showed a significant superiority on the VESPARCH test to measures of attainment

and so were identified as underachieving. These children were followed up, using brief

assessments of phonological decoding and the level of complex language acquisition.

Possible interventions to support underachieving students, and the overall advantages

of the VESPARCH as an assessment tool, will be discussed.

The effect of topic knowledge, comprehension monitoring and

motivation on reading comprehension

Panayiota Metallidou, School of Psychology, Aristotle Unong>iversityong> of Thessaloniki,

Greece

Co – authors : Vaitsa Giannouli, Mara Gioka, Anthi Borodimou, Maria Valougeorgi

The aim of the present study was to examine the predictive value of topic knowledge,

comprehension monitoring and reading motivation for primary school students’

performance in a reading comprehension task. Five hundred and fifty two fifth (n = 310)

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

and sixth (n = 242) graders of both genders (girls n = 297 and boys n = 255) participated

in the study. The participants were tested in groups in their school classes. Initially, a

7-item multiple choice test was used to measure their topic knowledge on environmental

problems. After that, a 569-word task on environmental problems followed by an 8-item

multiple choice test was used to measure their reading comprehension ability. Their

comprehension monitoring assessed through the detection of semantic inconsistencies

in three texts. As regards reading motivation, the participants were asked to complete a

questionnaire for their reading self-efficacy and reading task value. The results provide

evidence for the significant predictive value of topic knowledge and comprehension

monitoring for children’s achievement in the reading comprehension task. Reading

motivation had only a marginally significant effect via reading task value beliefs. The

educational implications of the results are discussed.

Mindfulness and action control in young, middle-aged, and old adults:

An examination of their relationship to attentional bias towards

emotional information

Despina Moraitou, Aristotle Unong>iversityong> of Thessaloniki, Greece

Co – author : Georgia Papantoniou

The study aimed at investigating the relationships of the self-regulatory dispositions of

mindfulness and action control with attentional bias towards emotional information

in young, middle-aged, and old adults. The participants (N = 185) were 69 young

(M = 24.7 years, SD = 5.0), 67 middle-aged (M = 47.3 years, SD = 7.6), and 49 old adults

(M = 73.4 years, SD = 5.6) of both genders. They were divided into three educational

levels (low, middle, high) according to the years of education. An emotional colorword

interference test (EC-WIT) was designed by the authors to investigate attentional

bias towards (a) positively toned and (b) negatively toned information, and it was used

along with self-report measures of mindfulness and action-state orientation. SEM

analyses were used to examine structural validity of the two self-report instruments as

well as their factor and indicator invariance across age. The application of path analysis

to the data of the total sample indicated that age was related to slower reaction times

(RTs) for the two conditions of the EC-WIT, while the higher the level of education the

faster the RTs. As regards each age-group separately, decision-related action orientation

was associated with a decreasing level of negativity bias in early attention orienting in

young adults. Mindfulness was associated with a decreasing level of attentional bias

towards emotional information, either positive or negative, in middle-aged adults. Old

adults were not found to reduce interference of the emotional information with the

cognitive task at hand via mindfulness and action control.

107


108

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

Temperament and the basic dimensions of personality

János Nagy, Department of Personality and Health Psychology, Faculty of Pedagogy and

Psychology, Eotvos Lorand Unong>iversityong>, Budapest, Hungary

This presentation discusses the empirical relationships between two overlapping

areas of individual differences: temperament and personality. Each of four traditional

temperament measures were administered together with each of three inventories

designed to assess individual differences on the basic dimensions of personality. Three

temperament instruments represent three different approaches to the temperament

proposed by the authors of the questionnaires: EASI-III (Buss & Plomin, 1975), I7

(Eysenck et al., 1985), and AIM (Affect Intensity Measure (Larsen, 1984). The fourth

instrument, the DOTS (Dimensions of Temperament Survey, Windle & Richard,

1985) was intended to measure temperament categories based on Thomas and Chess’

temperament theory. The following inventories measure the „basic dimensions” of

personality from three different viewpoints. The EPQ (Eysenck & Eysenck, 1976)

represents Eysenck’s Giant Three, the Goldberg list (Goldberg, 1992) represents the

lexical Big Five, and the ZKPQ (Zuckerman et al, 1993) represents Zuckerman’s

“alternative Big Five” model. For each of the four temperament tests we have data of

722–791 persons, for each of the three personality tests we have 941–1052 persons

collected by psychology students as part of their psychometric course. As the tests were

administered in pairs (one temperament plus one personality test in all combinations),

we have altogether 12 samples of the different test combinations (N=250–300). The

psychometric analyses of the tests reveal that the Hungarian adaptations of the above

mentioned tests cover fairly well the original scale and factor structure. The presentation

gives details of the overlapping factor structures of the temperament and the global trait

dimensions, and supports the difficulties in distinguishing these two conceptualizations

of individual differences.

Validity of the Korean short version of Barratt Impulsiveness Scale

Unkyung No, Korea Unong>iversityong>, Korea

Co – authors : Song Jung, Sehee Hong

Objective and Method: The purpose of this study is to determine the validity of Korean

short version of Barrett Impulsiveness Scale-11(K-BIS-11) in adolescent subjects. Chung

and Lee(1997) translated original version of BIS-11 to Korean and they validate Korean

version of BIS-11 in unong>iversityong> students. In this study, we revised and tested K-BIS-11

in elementary students(N=306) and high school students(N=338). After exploratory

factor analysis was performed to determine K-BIS-11 factor structure and we made

short version and tested in high school students as other sample(N=324). Results: As a

result, factor structure of K-BIS-11 in elementary students was mixed. However, factor

structure of K-BIS-11 in high school students was three factors (non-planning, motor,

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

attention) presented by Chung and Lee(1997) but some items were low factor loading

or not belonging to any factor. For making short version of the K-BIS-11, the five items

with highest loading on the factor analysis for each sub-dimension were selected. After

testing Korean short version of Barrett Impulsiveness Scale-11(15 items) in other high

school student subjects, exploratory factor analysis confirmed a three factor structure

clearly. Conclusion: The short version of K-BIS-11 is a valid measure of impulsivity

in Korean high school students. But the translated items were difficult and long for

Korean elementary school students. Because K-BIS-11 is not acceptable to Korean

elementary students, further research is needed to develop the impulsivity scale for

elementary students.

Individual differences in emotion recognition and face cognition

Wilhelm Oliver, Unong>iversityong> Ulm, Germany

Co – authors : Andrea Hildebrandt, Werner Sommer

The structure of human cognitive abilities in the interpersonal and emotional domain

and their relation with established ability constructs is insufficiently substantiated.

The present study investigated the status of emotion recognition tasks with faces.

We developed operationally coherent tasks classes supposed to measure emotion

perception, memory for emotional expressions in the face, the speed of emotion

perception and the speed of recognizing emotional expressions from memory. We

administered these newly developed tasks to N=250 participants together with tasks

capturing face perception, identity recognition and the speed of face cognition using

faces with neutral expressions. We critically discuss scoring and measurement issues

of individual tasks and establish a measurement model for the three task classes. The

newly established emotional ability factors are related to face cognition factors and

general cognitive ability factors. Analyses provide insights into theoretically critical

relations concerning the distinction between perceptual and mnemonic abilities for

faces with emotional and neutral expressions. We derive recommendations for the

measurement of interpersonal and emotional abilities using face stimuli.

Test takers’ experiences during adaptive versus fixed item testing

Tuulia M. Ortner, Free Unong>iversityong> of Berlin, Germany

Co – author : Eva Weißkopf

We investigated the effects of computerized adaptive testing (CAT) versus computerized

fixed item testing (FIT) of reasoning ability on current motivation in terms of avoidance

tendencies (i.e., anxiety) and approach tendencies (i.e., subjective probability of

success), as well as flow. One hundred seventy-four students (aged 15 to 21) from two

German secondary schools were presented either a CAT or a FIT version of a matrices

test, motivational variables were assessed during a short break in testing. More anxiety

109


110

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

and less subjective probability of success were reported using CAT compared to FIT.

Self-reported flow did not differ between test mode conditions. When addressing the

hypothesis that adaptive testing is equally motivating for both high and low performers

(Betz & Weiss, 1976), test performance appeared to moderate the relationship of test

mode and subjective probability of success: Only during FIT was subjective probability

of success higher with worse test performance. Furthermore, we investigated students’

metacognitive experiences in terms of feeling of difficulty, feeling of satisfaction and

estimate of effort. A moderated regression approach revealed partially diametric results

within test modes with reference to metacognitive experiences: Students were more

satisfied with their performance the better they actually had performed in FIT, whereas

in CAT test takers were the more satisfied, the worse they actually had performed.

CAT appeared significantly more difficult, the better students performed and a positive

relationship between estimated effort and ability parameter were given in the CAT

condition only.

Reliability and validity of the short version of Success and Failure

Explanatory Style Questionnaire

Evgeny Osin, Higher School of Economics, Russia

Co – author : Tamara Gordeeva

The Success and Failure Explanatory Style Questionnaire (SFESQ, Gordeeva, Osin,

Shevyakhova, 2009) is a Russian-language measure of optimistic attributional style

developed on the basis of ASQ (Peterson et al., 1982) and its versions. A short version

of the SFESQ includes 5 success and 7 failure situations. The respondent is asked to

provide a cause for each situation and rate it on three parameters (stability, globality,

and controllability) using a 6-point scale. The resulting 36 items are grouped into

success and failure situation scales, as well as 3 parameter scales. The questionnaire

was validated in an undergraduate natural science student sample (N=166) revealing

adequate internal consistency (Cronbach’s α > .8 for optimism in success and failure

situations). The optimistic explanatory style scores showed weak to moderate significant

associations with measures of subjective well-being (satisfaction with life, vitality),

dispositional optimism, hardiness, intrinsic motivation, academic control, self-control,

and grit. Optimistic explanations of successful situations predicted subsequent academic

performance (the following year’s Grade Point Average), and moderated the association

between past and subsequent academic performance. An expert-rating procedure was

introduced to score the verbal cause formulations provided by the respondents for each

of the 12 SFESQ situations. The resulting personalization scores showed predictable

associations with the other study variables, suggesting validity of the procedure, at

least for research purposes. Internal attribution of successes moderated the association

between optimistic explanations of failure situations and academic performance,

providing evidence of complexity of the explanatory style phenomenon. Another study

to confirm these findings is underway.

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

Two rule-based models of differential diagnosis using the MMPI test:

Rule decision trees and approximate rules

Krzysztof Pancerz, Institute of Biomedical Informatics, Unong>iversityong> of Information

Technology and Management, Poland

Co – author : Jerzy Gomula

In our research we use an approach based on supervised inductive learning for cases

(profiles of women examined using the MMPI-WISKAD test) grouped into eight

classes: simulation, dissimulation, norm, neurosis, schizophrenia, organic, sociopathy,

dependences. Data were selected for analysis by clinicians using the competent

judge method. In the case of a rule decision tree model, a decision tree has been

generated using Quinlan’s C4.5 algorithm, and next a rule set has been obtained. The

decision tree has been pruned and decomposed and the obtained rule set has been

optimized. The rule decision tree creates a model of differential diagnosis intelligible

for diagnostician-clinician. In case of an approximate rule model, a rule set has

been generated using algorithms implemented in the RSES system (e.g., LEM2) on

the basis of cases classified beforehand. Next, this rule set has been optimized. The

cross-validation methods (CV-10 and CV-5) have been used for testing the obtained

rule sets. An average classification accuracy for each class was greater than 80%. A

tabular collation of rules (their conditions) created for each class constitute a tabular

model. Such a collation enables us to determine the so-called code types important

in the MMPI diagnosis. Conditions of rules may include scales constituting a profile,

indexes created on the basis of these scales as well as index systems (e.g., Goldberg’s,

Diamond’s, Leary’s, Toulbee-Sisson’s, Pancheri’s, Pluzek’s). The presented functionality

has been implemented in the Copernicus system. It is a tool created for computer-aided

diagnosis of mental disorders based on personality inventories.

Cognitive development and tonal systems of Greek language:

A comparative longitudinal field study.

Thalis N. Papadakis, Open Psychotherapy Centre, Athens, Greece

Co – authors : Evdokia Lagakou, Christina Terlidou, Dimitra Vekiari,

Ioannis K. Tsegos

A longitudinal field study investigating the effect of Greek written language’s tonal

systems (“polytonic” vs. “monotonic”) on the cognitive development is presented. The

comparison (linear mixed models) via WISC III and Athena test, of two different groups

of children, aged 6 to 12 years, showed that the group which learns the polytonic system,

as an extracurricular activity, increases in: (a) Verbal I.Q., (b) conceptualization, and

(c) visual-motor ability until the 9th year of age. The “monotonic” group increases in:

(a) visual acuity and (b) numerical reasoning, while it decreases in the three I.Q. scales

of WISC III (intra-group) and also it lacks in conceptualization (inter-group). The

111


112

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

implications of learning a more differenciated visual stimulus, associated with more

grammatical rules, as well as historical orthography and etymology (morphological and

semantic elements of written language) in cognitive realms (visual-motor-perceptive

and conceptual), are discussed.

An exploration of measurement bias due to worry and emotionality

components of test anxiety on cognitive ability tests

Georgia Papantoniou, Unong>iversityong> of Ioannina, Greece, Greece

Co – authors : Despina Moraitou, Dimitra Filippidou, Magda Dinou, Effie Katsadima

The purpose of the present study was to test for measurement bias, due to worry

and emotionality components of test anxiety, on cognitive ability tests, using a

structural equation modeling technique. The total sample consisted of 231 volunteer

undergraduate students. Cognitive abilities were measured with two tests from the

Kit of Factor-referenced tests (Ekstrom et al., 1976) addressed to Numerical Ability

and Space Visualization, and with a test addressed to Inductive Ability (Gustafsson et

al., 1981). The participants were also asked to respond to the Test Anxiety Inventory

(Spielberger, 1980) tapping trait test anxiety, worry and emotionality. In comparing two

nested models, one hypothesizing measurement bias due to worry and one not, results

show that the model indicating measurement bias gave a slightly better fit than the one

not: Δχ2 (Δdf = 1) = 4.28, p < .05. Actually, it was found that one of the five item parcels,

which were used as indicators for the Space Visualization, was not invariant for worry.

Similarly, in comparing two nested models, one hypothesizing measurement bias due

to emotionality and one not, results show that the model indicating measurement bias

gave a slightly better fit than the one not: Δχ2 (Δdf = 2) = 10.76, p < .01. Actually, it was

found that two item parcels (one of the five item parcels, which were used as indicators

for the Numerical Ability and one of the five item parcels, which were used as indicators

for the Inductive Ability) were not invariant for emotionality.

Development of higher school pedagogues’ professional

self-consciousness

Svitlana Paschenko, National Unong>iversityong> named after Taras Shevchenko, Ukraine

In building up the Ukrainian state system the establishment of an educational system

for a cultural and moral revival of Ukrainian people in line with requests by society is

important. Pedagogues have a leading role in solving this problem. Therefore, higher

school pedagogues have a major relevance in our time both in terms of their activities,

level of their professional mastership and professional self-consciousness (PSC). So the

target of our research is higher educational establishments’ pedagogues’ PSC as one

of the main conditions of their personal development and professional formation. The

problem of PSC has been worked out in the fields of general, educational, professional

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

and work psychology by Derkatch (2005), Zeyer (2008), Klymov (1984), Mytina (1989)

and others. PSC is directly connected with human self-recognition in professional

activity. The main structural components of higher school pedagogues’ PSC are the

professional setting of pedagogical activity, need of self-cognition and self-evaluation

of professionally significant skills, self-regulation in pedagogical tasks and appropriate

motives of professional self-completion. PSC is a dynamic creation which continually

develops and extends (Markova, 1996). The significant qualities in pedagogues’

PSC development are skills in critical, adequate self-evaluation, adequate level of

demands, development of empathy skills, communicative and social-psychological

settings, positive attitude toward others and self-attitude, adequate self-perceiving and

perceiving of others. The key part in the process of higher school pedagogues’ PSC

development belongs to the active methods of self-learning and self-development.

Among them are training of personal development and participation in the international

academic programs. They both are directed to professional reflection deepening better

understanding of one’s own personal qualities and suitability of a chosen profession.

Academic motivation in Latvian context: Probing the potential of

concurrent mixed methods design

Anita Pipere, Institute of Sustainable Education, Faculty of Education and

Management, Daugavpils Unong>iversityong>, Latvia

This presentation aims to display the possibilities of mixed methods research design for

studies in educational psychology. The convenience sample of 128 graduate students

(105 women and 23 men) from Daugavpils Unong>iversityong>, Latvia, was asked to complete

1) the College version of Academic Motivation Scale (AMS, Vallerand et al., 1992);

2) the modification of the Self Confrontation Method (SCM, Hermans, 1996) as to

reflect the important experiences of the student’s past, present and future in their life in

general and in graduate studies; and 3) Personal Positions Repertuare (PPR, Hermans,

2001) to analyse the meanings associated with different positions related to academic

life. In this study the assessment methods usually applied in a therapeutic setting were

adapted for use with this larger sample. Quantitative and qualitative measures were

applied simultaneously to describe the aspects of phenomena that cannot be quantified.

Triangulation in the context of concurrent mixed methods design permitted to create

a composite model of master students’ academic motivation, to provide a more

comprehensive account of the results, and to enhance the credibility of findings and

their utility for practitioners. The statistical analysis and thematic content analysis were

used for the corresponding data. Some preliminary findings will be exhibited during

the presentation. The study attests to the relevance of PPR and SCM as the instruments

descending from Dialogical Self Theory to empirical research with a larger sample.

Understanding the deeper relationships between academic motivation and personal

meanings may help to develop more effective teaching strategies and institutional

support of graduate students.

113


114

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

Relationship of forgiveness, subjective well-being and perceived

relationship quality components

Ilze Plauča, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

Co – author : Ieva Bite

Transgression situations in close relationships can lead to negative attitudes by one

or both partners toward each other. Forgiveness can change this attitude in a positive

way, but the question remains as to how partners assess their relationship and the

partners’ subjective well-being. The current investigation examines the relationship

of forgiveness, perceived relationship quality and subjective well-being between both

partners. In this research forgiveness were measured by changes in revenge motivation,

avoidance motivation and benevolence motivation (TRIM-18, McCullough, 1998).

The following perceived relationship quality components were measured: relationship

satisfaction, commitment, intimacy, trust, and passion (PRQC, Fletcher et al, 2000).

Subjective well-being measure consisted of satisfaction with life, positive affect

prevalence and avoidance from negative affects (SWL, Diener, 2002). These factors

were examined among both partners. The results of the research showed an association

between forgiveness and trust, intimacy and relationship satisfaction. Intimacy as one

of the relationship qualities was correlated with subjective well-being. The results also

showed correlation of five relationship quality evaluations: relationship satisfaction,

intimacy, passion, trust, and love. Association existed among two forgiveness constructs:

avoidance and revenge motivation. The results also indicated gender differences

in evaluation of life satisfaction, relationship satisfaction and positive affects. If one

partner forgives his partner’s offensive behavior after conflicts, they restore their trust

to each other, the relationship is more intimate and they are more satisfied with their

relationship. Partners feel more positive emotions and are more satisfied with life when

they feel intimacy in their relationship.

Pre-school teachers’ readiness for the early identification of preschool

children at risk of learning disabilities: The development of a research

instrument

Anastasia Psalti, Alexander Technological Educational Institute of Thessaloniki, Greece

Co – author : Eleni Maria Kouimtzi

Early identification of young children who demonstrate delays in development that

may place them at risk for later identification as having a learning disability is strongly

recommended. However, preschool teachers’ readiness to recognize early signs of

learning difficulties is still questioned. The aim of the present study is the development

of a novel pre-school teachers’ readiness research instrument. This instrument deals

with measuring domains such as basic knowledge of learning difficulties, perceptions

of competence, empowerment, and self-efficacy. The paper presents the pilot study in

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

which the questionnaire was administered in fifty pre-school in-service and pre-service

teachers. The validity and the reliability of the instrument are presented and the results

are discussed in terms of pre-school teachers’ education and training.

Big Five personality profiles of vocational orientations

Liisa Raudsepp, Assessment Centre Tripod, Unong>iversityong> of Tartu, Estonia

Co – author : Helle Pullmann

Personality traits and vocational interests are two major noncognitive individual

difference domains in the field of psychology. The current study demonstrates that

individuals with different vocational preferences have distinct mirror-image personality

profiles. A numerous sample of Estonian adolescents (n=831) and adults (n=1,562)

from 15 to 68 years of age (m=27, SD=11) completed two measures: the Tripod-IK

questionnaire to measure Big Five personality traits (Emotional Stability, Extraversion,

Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, Openness) and the Tripod-TASK inventory to

assess Holland\’s occupational orientations (Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social,

Enterprising, Conventional). The analyses revealed characteristically contrasting

personality profiles, expressed in significant mean level differences for individuals

who liked or disliked a particular vocational orientation. For instance, individuals who

expressed remarkable enterprising preferences, who remarkably preferred enterprising

activities, were more emotionally stable, extraverted and open to experience. Contrarily,

individuals reporting unwillingness to be involved in enterprising field had a tendency

to experience negative affects and psychological distress, they were more reserved and

displaying rather conservative attitudes. Distinctly, individuals with clear conventional

preferences were more introverted and less open to experience but very conscientious.

The results are illustrated by Big Five personality profiles of various professions (e.g.,

sales manager, accountant, writer, counsellor). The role of personality traits in the

development of vocational preferences will be discussed.

Using Partially Structured Attitude Measures for assessing attitudes

towards risk as an estimation of risk propensity

Victor J. Rubio, Unong>iversityong> Autonoma of Madrid, Spain

Co – authors : José Manuel Hernández, M. Oliva Márquez, Javier Horcajo,

Constanza Pujals

Individuals clearly differ in risk-taking behavior. Moreover, it is assumed human beings

demonstrate consistent risk-taking tendencies and that thought is used in different

contexts. For instance, many personnel recruitment processes have include the

assessment of applicants’ risk tendencies (investment advisers, air traffic controllers,

etc.) as a relevant variable to be taken into account. Traditionally, the way for assessing

risk propensity is based on explicit self-reports in which participants are asked about

115


116

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

how often they engaged in various risky behaviors or, alternatively, how would they

behave in different situations. However, all of them are subject to the involuntary biases

and intentional response distortion that can influence both reliability and validity and,

in the end the predictability of future behavior. As an alternative for overcome some

of the limitations mentioned, it is proposed a partially structure attitude towards risk

measure for assessing risk propensity. Instead of directly asking examinee to states his/

her reactions to the attitudinal object, partially structured measures assess attitudes

appraising a scene, a character or the behavior of a third person (Cook & Sellitz, 1964).

The current work presents a new instrument for assessing risk propensity based on

partially structured attitude measuring. Factorial structure as well as psychometric

information is provided, including internal consistency, test-retest reliability and

convergent validity with some other risk propensity measures.

Causal attributions towards infidelity: Development of the

questionnaire

Iveta Ruža, Daugavpils Unong>iversityong>, Latvia

Co – author : Aleksejs Ruža

In spite of people’s belief that relationship partners should be faithful to each other, the

extra-dyadic-involvement (EDI) quite often afflicts the romantic relationship. There

are many different reasons in any culture and differences for men and women as to

why romantic partners become unfaithful to each other. In fact, infidelity, as any other

psychological experience, may be attributed to another person, to chance, or to the self.

The causal attributions towards infidelity can substantially increase or reduce the effect

of traumatic emotions for a betrayed partner and the feelings of guilt of the betrayer

depending on the way in which partners explain the infidelity for themselves. In order

to expose the causal attributions towards infidelity, the instrument Causal Attributions

Towards Infidelity Questionnaire (CATIQ) was developed for this study. Based on

1366 Latvian residents’ verbal responses in regard to infidelity, the CATIQ includes

45 items representing possible infidelity causes for men and women divided into nine

components.

The role of the Order Matrix in the assessment process

Paolo Scapellato, Università Europea di Roma - Istituto Skinner di Roma, Italy,

Co – authors : Stella Tamburello, Anna Contardi, Ettore De Monte,

Antonino Tamburello

In diagnosis, the psychologist has great difficulty deriving from the non-objective

nature of his object of study: the human psyche. A doctor can know the cause of a

heart’s damage because he has reference parameters for its healthy functioning.

Instead, a psychologist has no “healthy functioning” model of the various psychic

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

faculties, and so he/she is obliged to point out the disease only in the case in which

the psychic manifestation significantly affects the subject’s social and work life. The

causal perspective of the cognitive-behaviorist approach presents a useful tool in

resolving, partially, this diagnostic issue. The Order Matrix is the set of the essential

characteristics of a given subject, and these produce the complete functioning and,

thus, the order. As there is an Order Matrix of a healthy heart, so one can have a set of

the essential characteristics of an action (an Order Matrix of action), which describes

its nature and its relative full functioning. The building of a Matrix is full of difficulties

and theoretical risks since it has to address various issues, among them, not the least, is

the question of relativity or the absoluteness of the truth. Following a structured path

of knowledge, the psychologist may obtain some Matrices containing a more orderly

vision of the object of study, if not the perfection of knowledge itself. This tool will be

very useful for accomplishing a therapeutic plan dedicated to the reduction of the gap

between the patient’s current state and his ideal psychic state.

Assessing emotional and behavioural problems with the Child

Behavior Checklist: Exploring the relevance of adjusting the norms for

the Flemish community.

Mark Schittekatte, Ghent Unong>iversityong>, Belgium,

Co – authors : Caroline Braet, Justine Callens, Veerle Soyez, Celina Druart,

Herbert Roeyers

The Child Behavior Checklist is one the most frequently used dimensional instruments

for screening behavioural and emotional problems in children. Reliability and

concurrent validity have not yet been tested for the most recent CBCL-2001 version in

a Flemish community sample. Furthermore, to-date there is no study demonstrating

the appropriateness of the CBCL- 2001 norm data for use within the Flemish

community. The aim of this study was twofold: (1) exploring the psychometric

properties of the CBCL 2001-version and (2) exploring the usefulness of existing

U.S. norms for both the CBCL broad-band scales and the different syndrome scales

within a Flemish community sample. Mothers of young children (N=170) and schoolaged

children/adolescents (N=718) completed the CBCL and the SDQ. Reliability of

both the CBCL/1½ -5 and CBCL/6-18 was found to be excellent. Also, substantial

correlations were shown between the SDQ and CBCL, indicating a good concurrent

validity. However, some interesting differences were found when comparing the mean

CBCL raw scores of the different subsamples (for different ages and gender groups)

with the U.S. norms. Generally spoken, clinical and borderline clinical cutpoints for

Flemish children appeared to be lower, specifically for the Total Problems score and

the Externalizing scales. In most cases these differences are supported by a significant

difference in mean score between the norm groups. In conclusion, further research is

indicated to disentangle whether using the current CBCL norms within the Flemish

117


118

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

clinical practice is justified, since some children may not be identified as ‘positive cases’

when applying the U.S. cutpoints.

Trait interactions as criteria for the validation of trait measures: The

case of the implicit and explicit intelligence self-concept

Manfred Schmitt, Unong>iversityong> of Koblenz-Landau, Germany

Co – author : Friederike Dislich

Despite its great success in personality and psychological assessment, the trait concept

has often been criticized for being overly simplistic. More specifically, it has been

argued that the classic additive trait model does not reflect the interactive nature of

personality processes appropriately. This critique has important implications for the

validation of trait measures. The incremental validity of a trait measure can no longer

be determined on the basis of the additive trait model. Rather, interactions between

traits speak to the validity of trait measures. We applied this rationale to the validation

of measures for the implicit intelligence self-concept (Implicit Association Test) and the

explicit intelligence self-concept (questionnaire). Based on self-consistency theory, we

predicted an interaction of the implicit self-concept with the explicit self-concept. This

prediction was confirmed in three studies using different intelligence tests as criteria.

Implications of our results are discussed.

“You sound so sad” – detecting depression from voice characteristics

Sebastian Schnieder, Univ. Wuppertal, Experimental Industrial Psychology, Germany,

Co – author : Jarek Krajewski

Experienced clinicians currently use psychological testing, clinical interviews, selfreports,

and reports by others to determine the state of depression. However, current

assessment techniques consume significant amounts of time and resources. Thus, the

non-obtrusive ambulatory assessment of depression in field studies, and therapy settings

could be very beneficial. Measuring depression from voice communication via standard

mobile phone equipment could match the demands of everyday life measurement

Depression related cognitive-physiological changes can influence indirectly voice

characteristics according to the following stages of speech production: (a) Cognitive

speech planning: reduced cognitive processing speed („central slowing hypothesis“);

impaired fine motor control and slowed articulator movement; slackened articulation

and slowed speech, (b) Respiration: decreased muscle tension; flat and slow respiration;

lower fundamental frequency, intensity, articulatory precision, and rate of articulation,

(c) Phonation: decreased muscle tension; increased vocal fold elasticity and decreased

vocal fold tension. Ten female patient and ten control subjects took part in this study.

The depression level was assessed by the Becks Depression Inventory (5 samples per

subject, total number of speech samples: 100 samples). Patients meeting the following

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

criteria were included in the current study: a Beck depression score greater than 20

and a dysthymic disorder, major depressive episode, or major depressive disorder

as defined by the DSM-IV criteria. Several acoustic features which cover possible

prosodic, speech quality and articulatory changes in depressed speech show significant

correlations to depression states (e.g. articulation rate = - .38*, pitch slope = -.39*, mean

intensity = -.34*). In order to determine the multivariate prediction accuracy a linear

regression model was applied and showed R-square = .63*).

Differences in association of psychological control and child behavior

problems in Latvia and Lithuania

Sandra Sebre, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia,

Co – authors : Roma Jusiene, Egle Staneviciute, Inga Skreitule-Pikše

Several recent studies have examined differences in the effects of psychologically

controlling parenting practices in vastly different cultures such as the United States

and China. The aim of the present study was to examine the associations between

psychologically controlling parenting practices and child behavior problems in Latvia

and Lithuania, countries which evidence more subtle differences in measures in

collectivism-individualism and extraversion-intraversion. Participating in the study

were 352 mothers and fathers of preschool children from Latvia, and 182 mothers

and fathers of preschool children from Lithuania. Parents completed an adaptation

of Block’s Child Rearing Practices Report (Aunola & Nurmi, 2004) and the Child

Behavior Checklist for preschool age children (Achenbach & Rescorla, 2000). Results

show that Lithuanian parents in general tend to be more expressive also in the selfreport

of parenting practices, reporting higher ratings of psychological control, direct

punishment as well as parental affection. In both countries parental affection is a negative

predictor of child behavior problems, and direct punishment is a positive predictor.

However, paternal psychological control is a positive predictor of child behavior

problems in Latvia and a negative predictor in Lithuania. Results are discussed in

regard to differences in attribution of meaning to psychologically controlling behaviors

in each country and implications for clinical practice.

What are the factors related to depressive symptoms among patients

suffering diabetes mellitus?

Emre Senol-Durak, Abant Izzet Baysal Unong>iversityong>, Turkey,

Co – authors : Mithat Durak, Ozlem Bozo-Irkin, Ozlem Elagoz Feride, Fatih Kiliçlı

Mhemet

Schaefer and Moos developed a model describing the relative contribution of

environmental resources, individual resources, event related factors, impact of event

and coping on significant life events. In the present study, the theoretical model was

119


120

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

modified to examine factors associated with depression in a sample of patients suffering

diabetes mellitus. Structural equation model revealed that both individual (self-esteem

and self-efficacy) and environmental resources (social support received from family,

friends and significant others) had indirect effects on depressive symptoms through

the effect of event-related factors (perceived prognosis and perceived threat), impact

of event (rumination, avoidance and hypervigilance) and coping (planful problem

focused, seeking social support, escape-avoidance, accepting responsibility, refuge in

fate and refuge in supernatural forces). Results are discussed in the frame of current

literature.

This research was supported by grant from The Scientific and Technological Research

Council of Turkey (TUBITAK-SOBAG-109K528)

The factors associated with stress-related growth in a sample of

patients suffering diabetes mellitus

Emre Senol Durak, Abant Izzet Baysal Unong>iversityong>, Turkey,

Co – authors : Mithat Durak, Ozlem Bozo-Irkin, Ozlem Elagoz Feride, Fatih Kiliçlı

Mhemet

Stress-related growth among patients suffering from chronic illnesses has been

examined in the literature. In their comprehensive model, Schaefer and Moos

mentioned the relative impact of personality, event related factors, cognitive processing

and coping on significant life events. In the present study, the theoretical model was

modified to test factors associated with stress related growth in a sample of patients

suffering from diabetes mellitus. Structural equation model revealed that personality

(self-efficacy and self-esteem) had indirect effects on stress-related growth through

the effect of event-related factors (perceived prognosis and perceived threat), cognitive

processing(rumination, avoidance and hyper vigilance) and coping (planful problem

focused, seeking social support, escape-avoidance, accepting responsibility, refuge in

fate and refuge in supernatural forces). Results were discussed in the frame of current

literature.

This research was supported by grant from The Scientific and Technological Research

Council of Turkey (TUBITAK-SOBAG-109K528)

Measurement invariance of a new Big Five Inventory across five

countries

Markus Sommer, Unong>iversityong> of Graz, Austria

Co – authors : Martin Arendasy, Elke Gruber, Fritz Mayr

The globalizations of the economy and employees’ increasing mobility have brought

new challenges to psychological assessment that exceed the scope of traditional

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

monolinguistic assessments. Research indicates that simply translating psychometric

tests from one language to another is not sufficient to enable a valid comparison of

respondents’ test scores across language versions. In order to circumvent different

sources of bias several judgmental designs have been used to maximize the psychological

and linguistic similarity of the adapted items. In this presentation we will discuss the

merits and limitations of top-down approaches to automatic item generation test

adaptation. This new approach to test adaptation will be illustrated using data from a

recently developed Big Five questionnaire. The questionnaire has been simultaneously

developed in German and English and was later on adapted into French, Turkish

and Serbia. We will illustrate merits, shortcomings and prerequisites of an automatic

item generation approach to test adaptation at different stages of the test construction

and adaptation process. The presentation will be rounded off with first results on the

measurement invariance of the different language version at the item and scale level.

Finally, based on the results of our study and current research in test adaptation and

automatic item generation we will provide suggestions on how classic judgmental

designs and an automatic item generation approach to test adaptation can be combined

to simultaneously enhance the quality of multi-lingual tests and reduce the cost and

resource requirements in test adaptation.

Resilience, bereavement reactions and attachment style for adults after

loss of a parent

Liga Sovere, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia,

Co – author : Ieva Bite

Objectives of this study were the following: (1) to explore how resilience is associated

with bereavement reactions and attachment styles for adults after the loss of parents;

and (2) to investigate whether attachment style and resilience can predict adults’

bereavement reactions after the loss of parents. Within the framework of the research

33 participants – adults aged from 25 to 50 who had lost a biological parent or a

foster parent (or both parents) within the past two years – completed the following

quesitonnaires: Resilience Scale of Adults /RSA/, (Hjemdal, et al., 2001, Friborg, et

al., 2003, Friborg, et al., 2005), adapted by Sovere (2010); Relationship Questionnaire

(Bartholomew & Horowitz, 1991), adapted by Bite (2002); Inventory of Traumatic

Grief /ITG/, (Prigerson & Jacobs, 2001), adapted by Maslovska et al., (2005). Results

indicate that resilience correlates significantly with the secure attachment style, several

factors of resilience correlate significantly with the secure, anxious–preoccupied and

fearful–avoidant attachment. There is a significant relation between resilience and

bereavement after loss of parents as well as between ambivalent attachment styles and

bereavement. Results reveal that total scores of RSA significantly predict bereavement

reaction after loss of parents. Most important predictors for bereavement are Social

resources, anxious–preoccupied attachment style and dimension Perception of Future.

Separation Distress was significantly predicted by ambivalent (preoccupied and fearful)

121


122

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

attachment styles together with the resilience dimensions: Self perception, Perception

of future and Social resources.

Measuring teamwork abilities implicitly through projective responses

to computer graphics

Shinkichi Sugimori, Tokyo Gakugei Unong>iversityong> / CRET: Center for Research on

Educational Testing, Japan,

Co – authors : Rie Tateishi, Atsushi Furuya, Ayaka Mori, Atsushi Aikawa

Teamwork ability has normally been measured by self/other rated questionnaires. Selfrated

questionnaires are fundamentally prone to biases such as social desirability. The

aim of this study was to build an assessment tool measuring individual\’s teamwork

abilities implicitly through projective responses to computer graphics (CG). For this

purpose, we prepared a CG software. This software present CG of a solo fish or person,

swimming or walking (a)alone, (b)alone outside of a group, or (c)within a group. To

reduce contamination of context information, the image of the fish and person was

relatively abstract, not using realistic figures. We have also developed and used self-rating

teamwork ability scale and also other rated teamwork ability in a company. The former,

self-rating scale of teamwork ability consisted from five factors: communication, team

orientation, back up, monitoring, and leadership. To measure the projective responses

of participants about the CGs, we asked a question “how do you think the solo fish/

person is feeling?” for each CG. Through statistical examinations, it was revealed that

many of the responses to CGs have reasonable and significant relation with the self/

other rated measures. It was suggested the development of CG testing of teamwork

abilities is both possible and promising.

Measurement invariance assessment within and between interpersonal

relationships: The issue of non-independence

Semira Tagliabue, Università Cattolica S. Cuore (Brescia), Italy,

Co – author : Margherita Lanz

Studies regarding interpersonal relationships often analyze differences between

different types of relationships, but rarely verify measurement invariance. Some papers

(see for instance Cook, 1993) compared measurement reliability and validity of the

same instrument used to assess different relationship types, although the significance

of the differences found was not tested. One of the possible reasons could be that

relational data are often characterized by non independence (Kenny, Kashy, & Cook,

2006), whereas the classical techniques used to verify measurement invariance ask

for the independence of observations. The aim of the present paper is to present two

different techniques to test measurement invariance using non-independent data. The

first technique aims to test the invariance at the item level: it is a modified version

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

of the analysis proposed by van de Vijer e Leung (1997). The second technique aims

to test the invariance of the overall structure of the scale: it is a modified version of

the classical confirmatory factor analysis. Participants were 235 young adults (34.8%

males) and their parents, sibling, friend and romantic partner. Data from standard

reciprocal design and non-standard non-reciprocal design have been analyzed (Kenny

et al, 2006). Examples using instruments measuring relational constructs are provided.

For instance, application of the techniques has been done, until now, on the relational

conflict subscale of NRI (Furman e Buhrmester, 1985). The two techniques presented

overcome some difficulties of the non-independent data analyses regarding the

measurement invariance assessment.

Column functional analysis and causal cognitive assessment

Stella Tamburello, Università Europea di Roma - Istituto Skinner di Roma, Italy,

Co – authors : Paolo Scapellato, Anna Contardi, Ettore De Monte, Loredana Rosiello

In the paradigm of cognitive-behaviorist psychotherapy, functional analysis represents

a fundamental tool for the planning of treatment. Behavioral ABC helps the therapist

in the realization of specific techniques based on conditionings, cognitive ABC is useful

in tracing the thoughts and beliefs to be restructured. The cognitive causal perspective

offers again a further version of functional analysis, increasing it from 3 to 7 columns,

dedicated to highlighting the motivational aspects of the observed behavior. This version

is used in the assessment phase as a necessary tool in understanding the deep levels of

the personality and the dynamics which produce the disease, together with another

tool called Causal Analysis. The idea is the overcoming of a simple description of the

behavioral sequence, by operating a system capable of identifying a given behavior’s

causes, which are animated by an individual’s dominant motivations (Priority Interests).

The basic hypothesis is that there is present in a person a motivational structure capable

of explaining the origin, the meaning and the role of a person’s each and every response.

Clinical diagnosis is enriched by a new investigative method which, overcoming the

nomothetic amd idiographic approaches, aids the therapist in tracing the patient’s

deep motivational levels. Besides the 7 column Functional Analysis, which is useful

in knowing a person’s Interests, one resorts to Causal Analysis, focusing on singling

out the stratifications of these Interests in the assessment phase. Knowledge of the

individual’s Motivational Structure will improve the diagnostic work and allow a more

incisive therapeutic plan.

123


124

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

Proactive personality, networking, and job performance

Norbert Tanzer, Unong>iversityong> of Graz, Austria

Co – author : Mary Gevorkian

This study investigated aimed to confirm that proactive personality is a separate

construct from the Five Factor Model (FFM) of personality, and to provide evidence that

proactive personality as a useful predictor of work-related outcomes such networking

and job (task vs. contextual) performance. The sample consisted of 427 employees who

held varying positions within their respective organizations in the United States. The

Five-Factor Model of Personality was measured using Saucier’s (1994) mini-markers,

proactive personality was measured using Bateman and Crant’s (1993) scale, networking

was measured using Wolff and Moser’s (2009) instrument, and job performance was

measured using Bott, Syvantek, Goodman and Bernal’s (2003) task performance and a

modified version of Motowidlo and Van Scotter’s (1994) contextual performance items.

The results indicated that proactive personality is a different personality construct than

the Five Factor Model (FFM) of personality. In addition the results demonstrated that

task performance and contextual performance are two distinct although correlated

aspects of job performance. The factor structure of networking instrument could also

be replicated in the United States. Furthermore, the findings also indicated that the

relationship between proactive personality and contextual performance (but not task

performance) was partly mediated by networking.

Validating a situational based emotional intelligence test in an

organizational context

Norbert Tanzer, Unong>iversityong> of Graz, Austria,

Co – authors : James A. Scrivani, Richard Roberts

Emotional intelligence (EI) has been a household word for over a decade. However,

due to differing models and measures, there is little consensus as to what EI is, and

what it can predict. To date, there is minimal research on the relationship between

EI, proactive personality, and network building in a workplace context. Further, the

majority of EI tests have been self-report measures, which can be affected by social

desirability or faking. Alternatives to existing self-report measures are situational

judgment tests (SJTs). This study investigates two newer situational based measures

of EI: the Situational Test of Emotion Management (STEM), and the Situational Test

of Emotional Understanding (STEU) (MacCann & Roberts, 2008). First, a qualitative

pilot study was conducted to localize the Australian tests on an American audience.

The quantitative main study tested the STEM and STEU and their relationships

with proactive personality and political skills. Data was collected from 299 working

professionals in the United States via electronic survey. Confirmatory factor analysis

was conducted on the STEM and STEU, confirming MacCann and Roberts (2008)

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

posited model. Relationships were then examined between the STEM, STEU, proactive

personality, and political skills. The results suggest an interesting relationship between

Strategic EI and apparent sincerity, a political skill, which is worth further investigation.

Implications and suggestions for future research are discussed.

Bases of emotional intelligence: Emotional Stroop Effect

Tatiana Sysoeva, Russian State Unong>iversityong> for the Humanities, Russia,

Co – author : Dmitry Lyusin

Understanding cognitive bases of emotional intelligence (EI) contributes to developing

more precise and sophisticated measurement tools for EI. Emotional Stroop effect (ESE)

is sometimes mentioned as a possible indicator of lower-order cognitive processes

underlying EI. The aim of the present study was testing a hypothesis about a relation

between EI and ESE. EI was measured by two methods developed specially for the

Russian population: EmIn Questionnaire and Videotest of EI (an objective measure

of emotion recognition accuracy). ESE was measured by a standard procedure with

16 threatening and 16 neutral words printed in 4 different colors. ESE was calculated

as a difference between RT for threatening and neutral stimuli. The general sample

consisted of 273 participants. Mean RT for threatening words was 15 ms longer than

mean RT for neutral words. We found low positive correlations (1) between ESE and

general scores of EmIn Questionnaire (r=0.16, p


126

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

of the inventory was made. This form of the inventory was administered to students

included in the study group. Using cross-validation method, an adaptation study was

conducted among 500 students randomly selected from the study group. The validity

of these measures was examined by testing the fit of the five-factor measurement model

specified for the orginal form of the inventory to related data using confirmatory factor

analyses (CFA). According to a series of the CFA’s results, the 25-item Turkish Form of

the inventory was formed. Fit indices calculated for the measures obtained this form

of the inventory (GFI= 0.90, AGFI= 0.88 and RMSEA= 0.052) indicated that the fivefactor

model fitted the data well. To get the reliability evidences for the meaures obtained

from the transleted form of the inventory, Mcdonald’s ω coefficients (varied between

ω=0.61 and ω=0.899 for subscales) were calculated. All of these results indicated that

the Turkish Form of the inventory could give reliable and valid measures to determine

Turkish undergraduates’ epistemological beliefs.

Development and validation of the Syllable-Word Working Memory

Test

Tatjana Turilova-Miščenko, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

Co – author : Malgožata Raščevska

The purpose of the study was to determine the psychometric properties of the newly

developed Syllable-Word Working Memory Test (SWWMT). This test was based on the

working memory model by Baddeley and Hitch (1974; Baddeley, 2000). The test contains

series of syllables and the task is to construct words from syllables. The Syllable-Word

Working Memory Test consists of 12 items. The sample included 130 participants, aged

from 14 to 16 years, was roughly gender balanced (49 percent female and 51 percent

male). All items of the SWWMT show good dificulty and discrimination indices. The

average item difficulty index is .52 and the average item discrimination index is .55.

Results show that Spearman-Brown split-half reliability is 0.77. The concurent and

convergent validity was established for SWWMT using WISC-III Digit span subtest.

The affective factors that impact the turkish students’ scientific literacy

as per the PISA 2006 results

Gonca Usta, Cumhuriyet Universitesi, Turkey

Co – author : R. Nükhet Demirtaşlı

PISA study aims to assess how much the 15 year-old students can use what they learn

at school in their real lives. PISA assessment studies are applied in skills of reading

comprehension, on mathematical literacy, scientific literacy since 2000. In these

assessments, links are established between the learning outputs and the characteristics

of the students and the factors which determine their learnings both at school and

out of school. Turkey has involved to the PISA assessment applications in 2003, 2006

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

and 2009 as a member of OECD country. In this study, the relationships between the

scientific literacy and the general value of science, personal value of science, self efficacy

in science, the support of scientific inquiry variables are tested. For this purpose,

PISA 2006 Turkey’s data is retrieved from OECD’s official website. In this data, the

variables are specified that respectively scientific literacy, the support for scientific

inquiry, general value of science, personal value of science, self efficacy in science from

affective factors which have effect on scientific literacy in PISA 2006. Then, a structural

equation model is constructed to describe the relationships between these variables.

This model is applied to Turkish sample data in terms of fitting model-data . After

that, the same model has been tested separately on girls and boys as well as public and

private school students. According to the findings of this research, the general value of

science does not have a direct effect on scientific literacy however, is seen that the more

interest of students in general value of science, the more importance given by them

to the scientific inquiry and thus this increases their competency in scientific literacy.

The students’ performance in scientific literacy increases as much as the they perceive

themselves as self-efficant in science. Besides, the more confident the students perceive

themselves in science, the more importance is given by them to scientific inquries and

accordingly their competency increases in scientific literacy. The structure shown by the

relationships between the variables does not changed between girls and boys student

groups and public and private school students groups. The findings are discussed with

the related literature.

Too good to be true: Effects of attractive test examiners on

performance of men and women

Isabella Vormittag, Free Unong>iversityong> Berlin, Germany

Co – author : Tuulia M. Ortner

In the past, research on experimenter effects has shown that person characteristics

of a test examiner like gender or ethnicity can influence the performance of test

takers in an assessment procedure. Still, conclusions are heterogeneous, partly due to

different underlying research designs and different tests used. We wanted to deepen

the understanding of uncontrolled experimenter effects and applied a standardized

face-to-face testing procedure: One hundred fourteen nonpsychology students were

individually tested by one of twenty-two test examiners. We used a lexical knowledge

task, where test takers first have to estimate their own performance and second solve

multiple-choice items on verbal knowledge. Results showed that perceived attractiveness

of the examiner led to more cautious self-estimations of knowledge. A moderated

regression analysis further revealed a significant three-way interaction of gender of test

taker and test examiner and examiner’s attractiveness on verbal knowledge: When test

takers were confronted with examiners perceived as less attractive, test takers showed

similar results with male or female examiners. When test takers were confronted with

test administrators perceived as highly attractive, they showed lower scores on verbal

127


128

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

knowledge in same-gender interaction than in interaction with an opposite-gender

attractive test administrator or in interaction with a nonattractive test administrator.

Potential theoretical explanations for these results are discussed.

She’s an examiner – but a woman! Test takers’ stereotypic view of

examiners

Isabella Vormittag, Free Unong>iversityong> Berlin, Germany

Co – author : Tuulia M. Ortner

In most assessment procedures some kind of examiner or test administrator is present,

mostly to give information, impede cheating, and guide the assessment. Despite the

enormous use of psychological assessment methods, especially tests, we hardly know

how test takers perceive and evaluate examiners within the testing procedure. Research

on impression formation and stereotypes has shown that first impressions rely heavily

on stereotypes and especially physical cues of age, gender, and ethnicity have a deep

impact. As testing includes social interaction, we expected a biased evaluation of test

examiners due to gender and age stereotypes. In an online survey, we employed short

video clips of psychologists giving the same standardized test instruction. In order to

investigate peoples’ evaluation of psychologists with reference to gender and age, we

included videos of different men and women as examiners representing two age groups.

Three hundred seventy five students rated one video of each representing four groups

group via online assessment. Results showed that female examiners were rated as

more socially competent, and middle-aged examiners – independent of gender – were

ascribed more task competence. Young male examiners received less favorable ratings.

Possible reasons for this differential judgments and implications are discussed.

Concentration in everyday life and in tests – measured online

Karl Westhoff, Department of Psychology, Dresden Unong>iversityong> of Technology, Germany,

Germany

Co – authors : C. Flehmig Hagen, Anja Scholz

Concentration in everyday life and in tests – measured online or sustained attention is

a personality trait that can be measured by questionnaires and tests. We have developed

online versions of the questionnaire of concentration in everyday life (CIEL), and the

Restle task as an online concentration test (OCT) (two versions: 5 and 20 minutes). The

CIEL measures lapses of concentration and flow reliably (rho = .89 and .81 respectively),

which correlate rho = .41. The OCT measures retest-reliably speed of concentrated

work (rho = .89) and percentage of concentration errors (rho = .60). There were no

significant correlations between subjective and objective measures of concentration.

These findings correspond to those found by paper-and-pencil or PC tests. From these

results we conclude that people do not work in everyday life with as much concentration

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

as in tests. If there are conditions which attenuate concentration and which people

cannot eliminate, like intensive pain, then there is a significant positive correlation of

pain intensity and percentage of concentration errors (Berg et al., 2010).

Differential item functioning in the AIST-R

Eunike Wetzel, Otto-Friedrich-Unong>iversityong> Bamberg, Germany

Co – author : Benedikt Hell

Large differences are consistently found in the vocational interests between men and

women (e.g. Su, Rounds, & Armstrong, 2009). Expressed in the framework of Holland’s

RIASEC model, men show stronger interests in the Realistic and Investigative domains,

while women express stronger interests in the Artistic, Social, and Conventional

domains. These differences may be attributable to real differences in the underlying

traits. However, they may also be due to a gender bias in interest measurement. The

goal of this project was to analyze a widely used German interest inventory (AIST-R,

Bergmann & Eder, 2005) regarding its measurement invariance for men and women.

To test the measurement invariance of the AIST-R regarding gender, differential item

functioning (DIF) analyses were conducted on a sample of 805 participants. Both a

non-parametric (ordinal Mantel-Haenzel in DIFAS) and a parametric (according to

item response theory in ConQuest) method were applied. Several items on the AIST-

R’s scales showed significant DIF across both methods. Thus, a gender bias exists on

the item level. On the Realistic and Investigative scale, DIF items favored men whereas

DIF items on the Artistic and Social scales favored women. By deleting items showing

strong DIF, gender differences could be reduced partly, though some gender differences

remained.

Response scale use in the NEO-PI-R – Can the middle category be

ignored?

Eunike Wetzel, Otto-Friedrich-Unong>iversityong> Bamberg, Germany

Co – authors : Jan R, Boehnke, Claus H. Carstensen, Fritz Ostendorf

Test users assume that all participants use the response scale in the same manner.

Research on the occurrence of response styles has shown that this often is not the

case. Studies that examine response styles usually collapse the middle category with

the next lower category to facilitate interpretation. However, this practice could distort

the analysis of response behavior since participants who chose different response

categories are treated as if they belonged into one group. In this study, we analyzed

the German NEO-PI-R (Ostendorf & Angleitner, 2004) with Mixed Rasch Models to

investigate whether merging two response categories is justified. Mixed Rasch Models

were computed on a sample of 5862 participants to identify latent classes of different

response styles. These latent classes were examined regarding their response behavior

129


130

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

and the intraindividual consistency with which participants used the same response

style over different personality traits. For most facets of the NEO-PI-R, 3 to 5 classes fit

the data best. The three most frequently occurring response styles can be interpreted

as 1) participants who avoid extreme responses, 2) participants who prefer extreme

responses, and 3) participants who use the response scale as intended. Analyses were

conducted once with the NEO-PI-R’s five response categories and once with the second

and third category merged. Results indicate that collapsing the middle category with a

neighboring category misrepresents the participants’ response behavior. This practice

of combining responses from participants who choose the second and third category is

shown to disregard the trait differences between these participants.

Validity of a measure of implicit disgust sensitivity

Axel Zinkernagel, Unong>iversityong> of Koblenz-Landau, Germany

Co – authors : Wilhelm Hofmann, Friederike Dislich, Manfred Schmitt

We propose a single block single target Implicit Association Test (SB-ST-IAT) for

measuring implicit disgust sensitivity. Based on dual process theories, we tested

the construct validity of this new measure using a sample of N = 75 participants.

Incremental validity of the newly developed SB-ST-IAT was demonstrated using a

disgust sensitivity questionnaire as a direct measure of disgust sensitivity as well as

two behavioral criteria. A controlled approach versus avoidance task with disgusting

stimuli (worms) was employed as a measure of controlled behavior. Facial disgust

expression and withdrawal of hands and upper body from the disgust stimuli were

used as indicators of automatic behavior. Implications of our research for the validation

of indirect measures are discussed. Findings of this Study have been validated in two

other Studies (N = 117, N = 130).

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATIONS ABSTRACTS

POSTER PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

Hierarchical structure of academic mastery orientation

Kati Aus, Tallinn Unong>iversityong>, Estonia

Co – author : Kätlin Peets

Academic achievement goals are defined by theorists as purposes for engaging in

competence-relevant settings. Of these achievement goals, mastery orientation has

been associated with positive outcomes and considered well worth promoting. With our

present study we are tackling the question of whether assessment of mastery-orientation

should rely mainly on subject-specific measurement or is general mastery-mindedness

an aspect to be reckoned with. 277 Estonian ninth grade pupils (155 girls and 122 boys

with a mean age of 15.3) were asked about their level of mastery orientation in four

school subjects. Higher-order bifactor models proved most illuminating in studying

the hierarchical structure of mastery orientation. Models with one or two general

factors and four subject-specific (Foreign Language, Estonian Language, Science and

Mathematics) factors either explaining variance over and above the general factors

or in some cases failing to do so, were specified. Measurement invariance between

boys and girls was assessed. Differences in the generalizability and subject-specificity

of the mastery construct emerged between genders. Mastery orientation for boys

was best explained by two higher-order factors of verbal and quantitative subject

domains, whereas for girls this distinction was not justified. Validity of the proposed

hierarchical structure of mastery orientation was assessed with the personality

trait of Conscientiousness. Conscientiousness, as hypothesized, was significantly

associated with general mastery orientation, while having no significant relations with

subject-specific factors. Differentiating between general and subject-specific mastery

orientation proved salient and assessment as well as intervention would benefit from

using such distinction.

Children at risk – the efficiency of a training program

Luliana Birle Delia, Unong>iversityong> of Oradea, Romania

Co – authors : Monica Liana Secui, Rosana Stan

The study aims to evaluate the efficiency of an intervention program having the

purpose to develop social skills and emotional competencies for the children at risk –

having one or both parents left to work abroad. The basis of this intervention consists

in the findings of a prior research that showed significant differences regarding social,

emotional and behavioural problems for the children in the situation of incomplete

parenting, when compared to children from complete families. The situation is due

131


132

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

to the last changes in Romania, after EU integration and after the liberalisation of the

labour market. The efficiency of the intervention was measured by comparing the

results with those found on a control group. Significant results were found, on different

dimensions. Implications of the study will be discussed. This study was realised with

the support of The National Council of the Scientific Research in Unong>iversityong> Education

through PN II Ideas 666/2009.

The effectiveness of a rational emotive and behavioral education

program for adolescents in the situation of incomplete parenting

Elena Bonchis, Unong>iversityong> of Oradea, Romania

Co – authors : Daniela Roman, Camelia Dindelegan

Under the circumstances of incomplete parenting, question marks are raised concerning

problems that may occur in adolescent’s social –affective development. In this program

we approached the issue of rational –emotive and behavioral education effectiveness as

intervention program in fighting emotional and behavioral stress among the adolescents

whose parents work abroad. The 10 proposed activities carried on for 3 months

included the following areas: self knowledge and personal development and emotional

development. The interest variables were social relationships, assertiveness, aggression,

behavioral problems and self-control problems, the teacher completed the scales in the

scales in the case of the last two variables (the class masters of the adolescents in the

research ). 60 adolescents were included in the study (30 experimental group, 30 control

group). The participants were tested in 3 stages: initial stage, post-testing and followup.

The significant obtained results sustain the increase of personal effectiveness in

the case of the teenagers included in the present program. The obtained results in this

sense will be presented. Possible implications are also taken into consideration. This

study was realised with the support of The National Council of the Scientific Research

in Unong>iversityong> Education through PN II Ideas 666/2009.

Relations between perfectionism, self-efficacy and

subjective well-being

Renāte Buliņa, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

The goal of this study was to clarify how perfectionism is linked to general self-efficacy

and subjective well-being. Two hypotheses were put forward: 1) adaptive perfectionism

is positively linked with self-efficacy and subjective well-being; and 2) maladaptive

perfectionism is negatively linked with self-efficacy and subjective well-being. The

study surveyed 254 adult respondents aged 18 years and above (average age M = 24.63,

SD = 5.30), 76.8% of the respondents were female and 23.2% were male. Participants

filled out a questionnaire which was located at a number of social sites and web pages.

Methods used in study included – General Self-Efficacy Scale (Jerusalem, & Schwarzer,

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATIONS ABSTRACTS

1995,) and Almost Perfect Scale – Revised Short Form (Slaney et al., 1997) which were

translated and adapted to Latvian language in this study; Latvian version of Positive

and Negative Affect Schedule (Upmane, 2009); and Latvian version of Satisfaction with

Life Scale (Maslovska, Voitkāne, Miezīte, & Raščevska, 2005). Study results showed that

adaptive perfectionism is linked with higher self-efficacy, higher positive emotions and

less negative emotions, in turn, maladaptive perfectionism is linked with lower selfefficacy,

lower positive emotions and higher negative emotions. In addition, level of

self-efficacy and positive and negative emotions for maladaptive perfectionists does not

differ from nonperfectionists indicators, complementing existing research that suggests

perfectionism has adaptive and maladaptive components. However, satisfaction with

life indicators show that there are no statistically significant differences between groups

of the adaptive perfectionism, maladaptive perfectionism and nonperfectionism.

Classification procedures and cut score definition in psychological

testing: A review

Paola Bully, Unong>iversityong> of the Basque Country, Spain

Co – author : Paula Elosua

When tests are used to make decisions, it is the test developers\’ responsibility to

ensure the instrument offers fair and valid measures. When cut scores are used as the

primary interpretation of the test they are key to establishing the test\’s validity. From

a theoretical point of view different procedures and methods can be used to classify

examinees and to establish cut point scores. But which are the most used procedures

in the applied psychology? In order to give an answer to this question, we reviewed

the manuals of the most used psychological tests in Europe. We want to know how the

applied psychologists utilize different procedures because this knowledge is the first

step in order to offer new alternatives. In this sense is being relevant the work coming

from the field of computer science or artificial intelligence.

Differential conditions of quality of life in the elderly: Gender

differences

Paola Bully, Unong>iversityong> of the Basque Country, Spain

Co – authors : Paula Elosua, Josu Mujika

Quality of life in elderly people has become an important multidimensional construct

which is studied from a variety of disciplines and which has significant effects on

designing social policies for well-being. Its relevance is scientifically and socially

accepted. Scientists assess it from a variety of disciplines (psychology, economics,

sociology, biology, or medicine) and policy makers try to define social policies in order

to improve the quality of life for the elderly. Quality of life is a dynamic construct which

varies among individuals and cultures and which has differential distinctiveness along

133


134

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

the vital cycle. The characteristics of each period are determined by demographic,

political, social or historical aspects, and with reference to elderly people there are

especially important dimensions related to health or social relationships. The aim of

this work is to incorporate the perspective of gender in the study of the quality of life.

We analyze economical factors, social factors, family factors and individual factors

related to gender, and describe the differences between males and females.

Raven’s Coloured Progressive Matrices among children

aged 4–5 years in Lithuania

Dovilė Butkienė, Vilnius Unong>iversityong> Department of General Psychology, Lithuania

Co – author : Gražina Gintilienė

The Raven’s Coloured Progressive Matrices (CPM) test is used world-wide to evaluate

the non-verbal reasoning ability of young children. In 2004, we conducted the

Lithuanian standardization of the CPM for children aged 6–11 years. However, the

CPM is widely used for evaluation of 5 years old children and increasingly used even

for children as young as 4 years (e.g. in the Netherlands, Spain, France). The objective

of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the CPM among 4–5 years

old children in Lithuania. The sample of 214 children attending and not attending

kindergartens was collected in a way to meet Lithuanian young children population

proportion according to gender and place of residence. Data analysis based on methods

of internal consistency, item analysis and comparison of data between different groups

of children showed adequate psychometric properties of the CPM for targeted age

groups. The gender differences in the CPM scores were minimal and not significant.

Analysis of types of erroneous responses made by children revealed that proportion

of different types of errors for 4 and 5 years old children are different. With this study

we demonstrate that the CPM appears to be a reliable and valid instrument for use in

screening Lithuanian children aged 4–5 years.

Proactive and reactive aggression during childhood: Gender

differences, intercorrelations, and relations to internalizing and

externalizing behavioral problems

Miguel A. Carrasco, Unong>iversityong> of National Education of Distance (UNED), Spain

Co – authors : Paloma Gonzalez, Victoria Del Barrio

The present study examines the relationships between aggression and behavioral

problems in children. Two forms of aggression were considered, proactive and reactive

aggression, in relation to externalizing and internalizing behavioral problems. The

sample was composed of 906 children (42.42 % boys) ranging in age from 2 to 6 years

old. Results confirmed prior findings of gender differences of aggression (favoring

boys), specially, in proactive aggression. Results indicated a substantial intercorrelation

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATIONS ABSTRACTS

between reactive and proactive aggression. Despite this high intercorrelation, the 2 forms

showed different associations with children’s maladjustment: proactive aggression is

more strongly related to externalized problems, and reactive aggression is related to

internalizing. Moderation effect of age and gender was found for these relationships:

boys and older children shown a stronger effect size of these relationships.

Polish version of the IPIP scales for measuring Abridged Big Five

Dimensional Circumplex (AB5C)

Jan Cieciuch, Unong>iversityong> of Finance and Management in Warsaw, Poland

Co – authors : Tomasz Rowiński, Włodzimierz Strus

The Five Factors Model of personality (Digman, 1990) is one of the most prominent

taxonomy of traits. Many of the empirical studies supporting the FFM lead McCrae

(2009) to the comparison of the FFM to the physics of personality. However, researchers

have faced some problems in FFM. Unsatisfied results of confirmatory factor

analysis are one of the most significant. Therefore, some researchers postulated two

higher-order factors (Digman, 1997, DeYoung, 2006) or even one General Factor of

Personality (Rushton, Bons, & Hur, 2008). Another approach to describe the structure

of personality was proposed by Hofstee, de Raad and Goldberg (1992). According

to them each trait is characterized by loadings on a subset of two of the five factors.

The Abridged Big Five Dimensional Circumplex (AB5C) model consists of the 10

two-dimensional circumplexes, which are formed by each pair of the five factors. In

metaphoric language Hofstee, de Raad and Goldberg (1992) claimed, that the 10 twodimensional

circumplexes could be treated as kind of “the periodic table” of traits. We

have prepared the Polish version of the 45 IPIP (International Personality Item Pool,

Goldberg, 2006) scales for measuring personality in AB5C model. The psychometric

properties of the scales, as well as the possibility of more refined description of the

personality structure, will be presented.

Assessment of dissociative symptoms and schizotypal personality

features in relation to schizophrenia and childhood abuse

Ilze Damberga, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

Co – author : Sandra Sebre

The broader aim of this study was to examine the associations between experience

of childhood abuse, dissociative symptoms and schizotypal personality features for

women with and without diagnosis of schizophrenia. The hypothesis was put forth that

dissociation serves as a mediator between experience of childhood abuse and schizotypal

personality features. In total, 105 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and 115 women

from a non- clinical sample completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ,

Bernstein, et al., 1994), Dissociative Experience Scale (DES, Bernstein & Putnam, 1986)

135


136

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

and the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire (SPQ, Raine, 1991). The DES and SPQ

were for the first time translated and adapted for use in Latvia. A mediator model was

used to examine if the degree of association between the ratings of experienced abuse

and schizotypal personality features reduces if the dissociation ratings are included in

the model. The results indicate that dissociative symptoms serve as a partial mediator

of the relation between experience of childhood abuse and schizotypal personality

features. Women with an experience of childhood abuse and dissociative symptoms

report greater degrees of schizotypal personality features. This partial mediator effect

was found both for women with the diagnosis of schizophrenia and the non-clinical

sample. The clinical implications of this study indicate the necessity to consider the

effects of childhood experience of abuse and dissociative symptoms in the treatment of

schizophrenia and schizotypal personality disorder.

Association of parenting practices with Oppositional Defiant Disorder

and Conduct Disorder in Spanish preschoolers of a general population:

The role of sex

Nuria de la Osa, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Spain

Co – authors : Jenniffer Miranda, Lourdes Ezpeleta, Roser Granero, Josep Maria

Domenech

There is evidence of the link between certain dimensions of parenting and child’s

disruptive behaviors. Still, data concerning to preschoolers and data isolating

Oppositional Defiant Disorder as defined in DSM-IV (ODD) from other types of

conduct disorders are scarce. Also the role of sex in parenting preschoolers with ODD

is a matter that needs more attention as ODD is quite prevalent at these ages. The aim of

this study is to explore the specific association between parenting practices and ODD,

Conduct Disorder (CD) and Disruptive Disorders (ODD-CD) and the possible role

of sex in the association in preschoolers. Methods Five hundred and ninety 3 year-old

children (294 girls and 296 boys) from a community sample participated in the study.

The assessment was carried out using a structured diagnostic interview (DICA-P)

and the Spanish version for preschoolers (UED, 2010) of the Alabama Parenting

Questionnaire (APQ, Frick, 1996). Parents complimented both measures. Statistical

analyses were carried out through linear and logistic regressions. Results Parental

involvement was negatively associated with ODD, and parental corporal punishment

showed a positive association with ODD and Disruptive Disorders but not with CD.

Conduct disorder (CD) was associated only with a low parental norms score. In

general, characteristics of parenting practices were similar for children of both sexes

for the ODD subsample, although parental poor monitoring was more frequent in boys

of the general population. Being a boy and the presence of a high degree of norms

decreases the possibility of presenting Disruptive Disorders (ODD-CD). Conclusions

Parenting practices considering specific types of disruptive disorders are important

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATIONS ABSTRACTS

targets of preventive and therapeutic intervention in preschool children with behavioral

problems. At this age no sex differences are observed as regard parenting practices

Associations of psychophysiological characteristics of speech

emotional prosody perception with EI measures in listeners

of different ages

Elena Dmitrieva, Institute of Evolutionary Physiology and Biochemistry, Russ. Ac.Sci.,

Russia

Co – authors : Victor Gelman, Kira Zaitseva, Alexandr Orlov

Human behavior to a certain extent depends on the ability to express and comprehend

speech emotional intonation. Although person-distinctive features of speech

emotional perception have received some consideration the literature is not consistent

in this regard. Ability to recognize emotional prosody in human speech is one of the

components (cognitive characteristics) of the Emotional Intelligence (EI). The aim of

the present research was to further examine the psychophysiological characteristics

of speech emotional prosody perception and their associations with the data on EI

assessment. The mechanisms underlying the perception of emotional intonations

of different valences (positive and negative) in speech were studied in the sample of

42 listeners of 20-79 years old. The comparison of emotional intonation recognition

was conducted at different linguistic levels (for semantically neutral utterances and

meaningless words). The questionnaire assessing “intrapersonal” and “interpersonal”

EI was completed by the listeners. The psychophysiological features of the emotional

prosody perception were assessed by comparing the accuracy of recognition (AR) and

time of reaction (RT). The ANOVA on accuracy of recognition and time of reaction

revealed “type of emotion”, “gender” and “age” to be significant (p


138

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

Alzheimer’s Disease (CERAD) has developed brief but sensitive test battery to detect

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) as early as possible. The aim of this study is to validate the

test battery for Estonian population and provide optimal cut-off scores. Participants

and methods: Sample included 70 healthy elderly controls (39 women, 31 men, age

M=71.6, SD=8.6, education M=12.8, SD= 3.4) and 34 persons with AD (23 women, 11

men, age M=74.6, SD=5.8, education M=11.8, SD=3.6). All subjects were tested with

the Estonian version of CERAD test battery. Healthy controls were also screened with

the Short-Orientation-Memory-Concentration Test. Demographic variables had only

minor effect on the test scores in healthy control group. Age had an effect on verbal

fluency and the Boston naming test. There were no significant effects of education and

gender on the test scores. Healthy controls performed significantly better in all CERAD

subtests except in constructional praxis. The sensitivity and specificity indices were

estimated to find optimal cut-off scores for subtests. We concluded that the CERAD test

battery is a sensitive tool for detecting early changes in testing subjects with cognitive

complaints suggestive of AD. The preliminary cut-off scores to differentiate healthy

controls from subjects with probable AD are provided.

Preliminary Estonian normative data for the Stroop Test

Margus Ennok, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Unong>iversityong> of Tartu,

Estonia

Objective: Adequate interpretation of cognitive test results depends on the locally

appropriate test norms. The aim of this study is to provide contemporary Estonian

norms for the Stroop test, also assessing the effects of demographic variables to test

scores. Participants and methods: Sample includes 169 healthy subjects (86 women,

83 men) aged from 19 to 83 years with mean education of 13.8 years. An Estonian

version of the Stroop Test was administred. The test includes 3 parts (100 items in

each arranged to 5 × 20 columns). All parts have the same basic colors (blue, yellow,

green, red) for reading or naming. In part A the subject is asked to read color names

out loud as quickly as possible. In part B the subject is asked to name the color of X-s

printed in different colors as quickly as possible. Part C is an interference condition

where the name of color and ink of print do not match. The subject is asked to name the

print color of the word. Results: Age effects were observed in all test conditions, with

younger subjects performing faster. Education effects were apparent on parts B and C,

subjects with higher education performed faster. The interference effect assessed from

expected performance by word reading and color naming was also influenced by age

and education. A sex effect was observed on part A. Conclusions: The interpretation of

Stroop Test results should take into account different demographic variables, especially

age of the subject. Preliminary norms for test scores are presented.

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATIONS ABSTRACTS

Adaptation of Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire

Anda Gaitniece-Putāne, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

The goal of the present study was to adapt the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire

(Buss & Perry, 1992) for use in Latvia on the basis of theoretical principles of classical

analysis of items and scales as well as general requirements for test adaptation

(American Educational Research Association, American Psychological Association

& National Council on Measurement in Education, 1999, Hambleton, Merenda &

Spielberger, 2001). The study included 576 respondents (302 females and 274 males)

from different socio – economical groups. In general the Latvian version of the

Aggression Questionnaire has good reliability ratings although the Latvian version has

lower Cronbach’s alphas than the original version. Only if certain items are excluded

from the Latvian language version is it possible to get the same factorial structure as

with the original version. An open issue is whether the scale of Verbal Aggression in the

cultural environment of Latvia really measures verbal aggression, because the results

indicate that the contents of these items can be interpreted as the ability to be open to

confrontation and to defend one’s personal opinion, rather than to perceive it as verbal

aggression in the same context as the author of this questionnaire has defined it.

Comparison of Woodcock- Johnson International Edition Tests of

Cognitive Abilities data from year 2000-2004 and year 2005-2009

Inguna Griskevica, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

The Woodcock- Johnson International Edition Tests of Cognitive Abilities (WJ-IE

COG) is the first assessment instrument of cognitive abilities in Latvian which has

been standardized, this took place in the year 2005. The study presents analyses of

comparison between WJ-IE COG standardization data gathered between year 2000-

2004 and later data gathered between year 2005-2009 to see if the mean values of the

WJ-IE COG have changed during the time period from year 2000 to 2009. The study

is based on the WJ-IE COG standardization sample and adjusted sample of 150 people.

The results indicate differences in cognitive abilities between sociodemographic groups

and demonstrate the stability of the WJ-IE COG measurement.

A study of the independence and resilience in unong>iversityong> students of

Japan

Taiko Hashimoto, Institute of Japan Education and Clinical Psychology, Japan

Co – author : Misako Araki

There is a Japanese culture of “AMAE” which is over protection so that young people

have only self-loving mind and are harmed those who stay at home then find value in

139


140

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

games or computers. This study was to examine the psychological traits of independence

in unong>iversityong> students.

The subjects were 219unong>iversityong> students in Tokyo. The methods were asked to fill

Resilience Scale Independence Dependence Kitora`s Scale SCT and Baum Test on

October 2009.The subjects were classified by ±1 SD 6.10, added to the average. Resilience

scores =33.1 into the higher group A, (N=30, men=21 female=9 mean of age=20.1years)

and the lower group B, (N=28, men=28, men=17, female=11 mean of age=19.9years).

Results: 1. Independence Dependence Kitora`s Scale, A strong difference (p


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATIONS ABSTRACTS

Adaptation of Creative Functioning Test in Latvia

Emils Kalis, Daugavpils Unong>iversityong>, Latvia

Co – author : Liga Roke

The present research addresses the adaptation of Creative Functioning Test (CFT)

(Smith, Carlsson, 2000) in Latvia. The CFT measures creativity as in the context of

process-oriented personality and perceptogenesis theory (Smith, 2007). It utilizes

a perceptgenetic (PG) technique and thus explores perceptual microprocesses to

understand creativity while most creativity tests aim to measure divergent thinking.

The PG technique provides a broader framework for understanding creativity since a

PG experiment may disclose relative richness or poverty of perceptual microprocesses.

The PG technique presents a picture of still life in black and white at a very short

exposure time which successively increases until the stimulus has been identified

correctly (straight series). The decreasing portion of the test or reversed series assume

gradually abbreviated exposure times and help to learn about an individual’s inclination

to be open for subjective interpretations. The first phase of adaptation included the

adjustment of technical hardware and software, followed by the second phase –

adjustment of procedures to ensure exposure times and testing conditions equivalent

to those indicated in the CFT Manual. Several problems had to be eliminated in these

phases. A sample of 30 students from different pedagogical branches participated in

the testing procedure using CFT. The results gained from this sample were evaluated

by two trained judges showing satisfactory interrater reability (.85-.93). The study gives

also some evidence about construct validity based on the correlation between straight

and reversed series (.58) and correlations with several self-reports. The authors of the

adaptation proposed and tested some alternative scoring procedures.

Investigations of teachers understanding about specific reading

disabilities in pedagogical practice

Anda Kaulina, Riga Teacher Training and Education Management Academy, Latvia

Co – authors : Daina Voita, Toms Voits

The study is devoted to investigation of teachers understanding about specific reading

disabilities in pedagogical practice. Reading disabilities can be present during one’s

entire life and have an impact on the quality of life. Symptoms of the specific reading

disabilities are primary and secondary. Primary symptoms are mostly evaluated /

observed in the reading process and they can be detected in two levels – level of words,

difficulties to decode words and phonological disorders, reading and comprehension

and level of sentences and text. Secondary symptoms are manifesting in psychological

problems – low motivation of learning, emotional and behavioural disorders. A

questionnaire for secondary school teachers with eight blocks of questions was

developed for this research to find out current teacher knowledge, understanding and

141


142

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

attitude towards reading disorders. A total of 532 teachers filled out the questionnaires.

Gender, age and work experience were taken in account when analysing the results.

Understanding of reading disorders were also researched in context of the classes

teachers are giving. Obtained results give a more profound understanding about the

problems of educational system in Latvia within the context of EU and underline the

need to develop a precise further education programme for teachers in Latvian schools

based on latest scientific studies and acquired data in this study. To be successful in

further life, a child with reading disabilities must be recognised early in life, the earlier

the better, therefore the knowledge of symptoms of specific reading disabilities is very

important for all specialists involved in the pedagogical process.

Assessment of traumatic stress: Ambulatory assessment approach

Evaldas Kazlauskas, Vilnius Unong>iversityong>, Lithuania

Co – author : Skina Gausaite

Traumatic stress reactions are dynamic emotional and physiological responses to

traumatic events. Reactions tend to change over time and single measure point using

standard interview or self-report measures procedures may not be able to capture

dynamical nature of stress reactions. Ambulatory assessment approach utilizing daily

measures using touch screen smartphones was developed by study authors. One week

daily measures enable to capture traumatic stress reaction changes and social contextual

factors contributing to fluctuations of reactions. Vilnius Unong>iversityong> Trauma research

group developed a Windows based IT solution using My Experience software platform

for traumatic stress assessment. Participants of study are prompted six times per day

to answer questions regarding PTSD symptoms, and social traumatic stress reactions

interactions. We conclude that this is a promising approach for assessment of traumatic

stress, and further possibilities of implementation of this method in clinical setting and

therapy effectiveness studies will be discussed.

Indicators for the ex post detection of faking in survey data

constructed from responses to the Big Five Inventory-10 (BFI-10)

Christoph. J. Kemper, GESIS - Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences, Germany

Co – authors : V. Trofimow, B. Rammstedt, N. Menold

Faking by interviewers poses a persistent challenge for survey research since it threatens

the quality of survey data and the validity of conclusions drawn from the data. Finding

indicators that are sensitive to faking is a necessary first step in the development of

statistical procedures for the identification of “at risk interviewers” in surveys. The BFI-

10 is an ultra short 10 item measure of the Big Five that may be used to construct

such indicators. In the present research, N =105 interviews were faked by providing

fakers with 11 sociodemographic characteristics, e.g. sex, age, education, religion etc.,

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATIONS ABSTRACTS

of N =105 real persons. Real persons were randomly drawn from a representative

random sample of participants in the International Social Survey Program (ISSP 2008).

Substantial differences between real and faked interviews were found suggesting that

indicators constructed from BFI-10 responses, e.g. “don’t know category” endorsement

or acquiescence, are sensitive to faking. Implications of the results for the identification

of fakers in surveys will be discussed.

Validity of a Single-Item Scale for life satisfaction

Mira Céline Klein, Gesis - Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences, Germany

Co – authors : Anastassiya Kovaleva, Constanze Beierlein, Christoph Kemper,

Beatrice Rammstedt

Overall life satisfaction (LS) is defined as the global judgment of one‘s life. Recent

research shows its strong coherence not only with psychological constructs such as

extraversion and neuroticism, memory for positive and negative events, depression etc.,

but also with socio-demographic and economic variables, e.g. age, income, repeated

marriage or divorce. Hence, surveys are highly interested to assess LS. Regarding the

strict time and money constraints the German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP), the

Swiss Household Panel (SHP), the Longitudinal Internet Studies for the Social sciences

(LISS) etc. regularly assess LS using single-item scales. However, the single-item

scale for LS used in German (e.g. GSOEP) has not been validated yet regarding to

a multi-item measure. The present study compares the psychometric qualities of the

single-item scale for LS taken from the GSOEP with the SWLS (Sat-isfaction with Life

Scale). Using the sample representative of the German population stratified according

to socio-demographic and educational background (N = 546), descriptive statistics,

reliability, convergent validity with the SWLS and discriminant validity with the Big

Five and locus of control were analyzed. Furthermore the invariance of CAPI and

self-completion assessment modes was investigated using the General Linear Model

analysis of variances (GLM) for the repeated measure design. The present results

show the good convergent validity of the single-item scale and the SWLS. Previously

reported findings regarding the LS could be to a large extent supported by the data of

the single-item scale.

Psychometric properties of the Social Problem Solving Abilities

Inventory in Russian language

Jelena Kolesnikova, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia,

The aim of the study was to determine the psychometric properties of the Social

Problem-Solving Abilities Inventory - Revised (SPSI-R, D’Zurilla, Nezu, & Maydeu-

Olivares, 2002) in Russian. The initial sample consisted of 42 participants, aged from

20 till 35 years (female 15 and male 27). The SPSI-R is a multidimensional instrument

143


144

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

with 52 items and five scales – Positive problem orientation, Rational problem solving,

Negative problem orientation, Avoidant style, Impulsivity/Carelessness style. Results of

the study indicated that the internal consistencies (Chronbach`s alphas) for the 5 scales

of SPSI-R respectively were of .75 to .91 and the test-retest reliability coefficient in the

range of .54 to .72. Results from a larger sample will be presented.

Development of a new time perspective inventory in the Latvian and

Russian languages

Aleksandrs Kolesovs, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia,

The aim of this study was to develop a new model of individual’s time perspective in

Latvian and Russian ethnolinguistic groups in Latvia. At the first step, 183 items were

formulated in the result of a theoretical analysis and focus group interviews concerned

individual views on the past, present, and future. All items were formulated in two

languages – Latvian and Russian. The second step focused on the exploration of a

factorial structure of the inventories. The Latvian sample consisted of 202 unong>iversityong>

students (158 female and 44 male, mean age = 21.32 years, SD = 4.15). The Russian

sample included 200 unong>iversityong> students (50 male and 150 female, mean age = 21.57

years, SD = 4.34). Exploratory factor analysis via the principal component method

with varimax rotation was performed separately for the Latvian and Russian samples.

The procedure of parallel analysis was applied to determine the number of factors

that should be retained. Eleven and thirteen factors were retained for the further

development of the Latvian and Russian forms of the inventory, respectively. In general,

these factors represent positive or negative view on the past, present, and future as also

individual’s dealing with deadlines. Comparisons of factors and confirmation of the

factorial structure are examined in the next step of the study.

Social responsibility in Cross-cultural perspective: Assessment of

future Ukrainian and Lithuanian engineers

Olena Kovalchuk, National Technical Unong>iversityong> of Ukraine \”KPI\”, Ukraine,

Co – author : Aldona Augustiniene

Background: The problem of social responsibility is currently considered in all spheres

of human life. One of the practical uses of social responsibility is as a diagnostic tool

for educational, business or scientific purposes. Objective: To define the level and the

type of social responsibility of future engineers. Methods: Open-ended questionnaire,

association method, Social Responsibility Scale (SRS) (Kovalchuk, Proskura 2010)

and interviews were used. Two groups of Ukrainian and Lithuanian students, ages

18 – 23, were interviewed using an open-ended questionnaire and the SRS test. The

participants were asked to explain how they understand such notions as responsibility,

social responsibility, and irresponsible attitude. The students were also asked to give

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATIONS ABSTRACTS

examples of engineers’ mistakes and their results. Results: For classification of collected

data, we considered social responsibility at three levels: society, organization and

personality. At the level of society the respondents connected social responsibility with

government care, life conditions and environment, at the level of organization they

linked it with work, relationships with other people, lifestyle, at the level of personality

they associated it with level of education, self-improvement, development, family.

Ukrainian and Lithuanian future engineers were compared by five components of

social responsibility: civil consciousness, law-abiding ability, reflection of the action

results, moral consciousness and altruism the scales of SRS-test. Conclusions: Our

results can be applied to design a student training programme that increases learners’

social responsibility, moral development, and awareness of ethical issues and to help

them deal with ethical dilemmas in their future professional activity.

Pilot study of different factors related to dental anxiety in 4-12 years

old children in Latvia

Liga Kronina, Riga Stradins Unong>iversityong>, Latvia,

Co – authors : Malgozata Rascevska, Ruta Care

Background: Fearful patients often attend dentists to alleviate their pain, but do not

proceed with routine treatment. Visits in paediatric dentistry are often postponed

due to inappropriate behaviour of children. Thus, fearful patients might have higher

DMFT(decayed/missed/filled teeth) index. Dental fear is often related to parental

dental anxiety and different psychosocial factors. The aim of this study was to evaluate

the association between children’s dental anxiety, dental caries, dental behaviour and

parental dental anxiety. Design: 38 children (mean age 8.55 years, SD=2.37) and their

parents took part in a pilot study. Parents evaluated their own dental anxiety (Modified

Dental Anxiety Scale), and their children’s anxiety (Children Fear Survey Schedule-

Dental Subscale). Other psychosocial factors were assessed by an originally created

questionnaire. Dental status was fixed and DMFT was calculated. Dental behaviour

was evaluated by a dentist (Frankl scale). Results: There was statistically significant

negative correlation between children’s dental anxiety and their appropriate behaviour

(r=-0.77, p0.05), but between children’s and their parents’ dental anxiety it was r=0.12,

(p>0.05). Conclusions: The negative correlation between children’s dental anxiety and

their appropriate behaviour during visit means that the higher their anxiety, the worse

is their behaviour. No statistically significant correlation was found between children’s

dental anxiety and DMFT or children’s and their parents’ dental anxiety in this stage

of the study. Correlation between childrens’ dental anxiety and other factors must be

examined.

145


146

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

Relationship between adolescent attachment, codependency, and

behavior problems

Ilona Laizane, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia,

Co – author : Sandra Sebre

The aim of this study was to examine the role of codependency in the relationship

between the adolescent’s attachment to parents, and adolescent problem behavior.

The study participants were 315 adolescents, 15 to18 years old, 190 female and 125

male from Latvia primary and secondary schools. The participants completed three

self-report questionnaires regarding attachment to parents (Inventory of Parent and

Peer Attachment – IPPA, Armsden & Greenberg, 1987), codependency level (Spann-

Fischer Codependency Scale, SFCDS, Fischer, Spann &Crawford, 1991), and problem

behavior (YSR 11/18 – Youth Self Report, Achenbach &.Rescorla, 2001). Multiple

regression analysis revealed that codependency mediates the relationship between

insecure attachment to parents and internalized behavior problems for female and male

adolescents. A similar effect was found in regard to externalized behavior problems for

female adolescents. The findings suggest the necessity for a differentiated approach for

treatment of female and male adolescent behavior problems, and the necessity of parent

management training programs taking in account the adolescents’ gender in order to

improve the communication and attachment quality of adolescents and their parents.

Assessing adult attachment orientations among Arabs in Israel

Shiri Lavy, Ariel Unong>iversityong> Center, Israel

Co – authors : Faisal Azaiza, Mario Mikulincer

Attachment orientations – anxiety and avoidance – reflect mental representations of

the self and others. Studies revealed meaningful cultural differences in adult attachment

orientations. However, only few of these studies included Arab samples, and they

typically used single-item scales to assess attachment orientations. In the current

study, we examined attachment orientation among Arabs in Israel using the 36-items

Experiences in Close Relationships scale (ECR, Brennan, Clark, & Shaver, 1998) and

comparing them with Israeli Jews\’ attachment orientations. Participants (292 Israeli

Arabs and 215 Israeli Jews) briefly described their attachment figures and completed

the ECR scale in their native language. The two ECR subscales (anxiety and avoidance)

showed satisfactory reliability in the Arab version and most of the items proved to be

relevant for Arabs in Israel, with a few exceptions related to cultural norms. Arabs

reported higher attachment anxiety than Jews, and within the Arab sample men reported

higher avoidant attachment than women. Jews\’ and Arabs\’ attachment figures were

similar in terms of gender and relationship type (usually romantic partner or same-sex

friend). Findings suggest that the ECR is a valid tool for examining adult attachment

orientations in Arab samples and that romantic partners are usually their main

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATIONS ABSTRACTS

attachment figure (as found in western samples). The few differences between Arabs

and Jews in attachment orientations fit previously observed Arabs-Jews differences in

relational norms.

A new scale for assessing the amount of flow in professional activity

Dmitry Leontiev, Lomonossov Moscow State Unong>iversityong>, Russia

Attempts to measure the variables related to flow (Csikszentmihalyi, 1990) have shown

a limited success, probably because of the complicated nature of the construct. Flow is a

self-induced state with considerable individual differences in the capacity of producing

and experiencing it. Multiple studies reveal that though the state itself is described in

terms independent of culture, education and profession, the flow-producing activities

may largely vary. So the tendencies to experience flow in definite activities may serve as

important quasi-dispositional variables. We have elaborated an unidimensional scale

of Flow in Professional Activity (FPA) in Russian. There is also an English version with

very few data on it. The items refer to the self-report of frequency of experiencing the

elementary states and sensations that are the characteristic indices of the flow state.

The first version (FPA-1) was rather satisfactory, and after minor improvements a

final version of 14 items, the FPA-2, was produced. The scale has very good alpha and

contains one major factor accounting for 30% of the total variance. In a number of

validation studies FPA revealed high correlations with Satisfaction With Life Scale

(Diener at al.), General Happiness Scale (Lyubomirsky & Lepper), Noetic orientations

Test (Leontiev), Hardiness Survey (Maddi); we also found a very high scores on the

sample of final participants of the academic contest in chemistry for schoolchildren

from 13 countries.

The reliability and factorial validity of the Russian version of the Self-

Description Questionnaire-II (SDQ-II)

Elena Levina, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

Co – author : Natalija Ivanova

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and factorial validity of the

Russian version of The Self-Description Questionnaire-II (SDQ-II). The SDQ-II is an

Australian self-concept instrument with 102 items. It was designed by Herbert Marsh

(1988). It is based on the Shavelson, Hubner, and Stanton (1976) hierarchical and

multidimensional model and measures 11 different dimensions of self-concept. The

sample consisted of 297 participants from Latvian schools aged from 14 to 17 years

(boys – 49.5%, girls – 50.5%). All the SDQ-II scales had high internal consistency

and test-retest reliability. The factorial structure of the Russian version revealed ten

factors instead of eleven of the original instrument. Factor analytic results revealed the

presence of the global self-concept dimension in several factors.

147


148

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

Adaptation of Coping Self-Efficacy Scale in Latvia

Maruta Ludāne, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

This study presents adaptation results regarding coping self-efficacy obtained with the

Latvian version of Coping Self-Efficacy Scale (CSES; Chesney,Neilands, Chambers,

Taylor & Folkman, 2006) in a sample consisting of 178 unemployed individuals, 58%

female and 42% male, aged 18 to 59, who have been unemployed from several weeks to

84 months. The aim of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the

CSES Latvian version and to detect if CSES is an appropriate measure for predicting

potential distress for unemployed. The total scale of the CSES showed very good

reliability. Reliability of subscales of problem focused and emotion focused coping

self-efficacy demonstrated good reliability, but reliability for social support self-efficacy

subscale was not completely satisfactory and some items require revision. There were

no gender differences neither in the full scale nor subscales. Coping Self-efficacy was

inversely related to anxiety (measured with State Trait Anxiety Inventory – STAI) and

depression (measured with Beck Depression Inventory – BDI II) for unemployed, thus

confirming that CSES is an appropriate measure for explaining of individual differences

of distress in unemployed.

Picture Based Personality Survey for Children – new instrument for

measuring Big Five in childhood

Marta Maćkiewicz, Unong>iversityong> of Cardinal Stefan Wyszyński in Warsaw, Poland

Co – author : Jan Cieciuch

The Five-Factor Personality Model is a commonly known and recognized model of

describing personality which is defined as a set of traits (Digman, 1990, McCrae, Costa,

2005). In the recent years many researchers in the field of the developmental psychology

have begun to study the Big Five in a developmental approach. To date the personality

of children was examined by means of questionnaires which are constructed for adult

participants, by analyzing the data collected from teachers, parents and peers, and by

self-report questionnaires. Searching for the personality structure in self-descriptive

data obtained by children is a particularly intriguing challenge. The most problematic is

to develop a method which considers forming reading skills, attention and other aspects

of cognitive development. In order to meet these requirements we have constructed the

Picture Based Personality Survey for Children – a method for measuring the children

personality in FFM approach. Each scale consists of five items. Every item comprises

two pictures presenting one situation but the main character behaves differently

in each picture. The first behaviour indicates a factor of high intensity whereas the

second behaviour indicates the same factor of low intensity. Children have to choose

the picture which demonstrates their behaviour the most. The psychometric qualities

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATIONS ABSTRACTS

of the PBPS-C have shown that it can be a reliable and valid instrument for measuring

the Big Five in the late childhood.

Using Rasch analysis to refine the VESPARCH verbal reasoning test for

children aged 10-13 years

Sarah McElwee, Unong>iversityong> of Oxford, UK

Co – author : Jane Mellanby

VESPARCH is a computerised test of verbal reasoning for children that is designed

to measure academic potential independent of learned vocabulary, reading skill and

social knowledge. Children wear headphones, and hear all of the instructions and

questions read aloud as they simultaneously appear on screen. The computerised

presentation maintains attention and supports working memory, and the untimed

multiple-choice format reduces anxiety. By comparing VESPARCH scores with current

school attainment scores it is possible to identify children who are underachieving

given their potential and to implement interventions to support them. An early version

of VESPARCH was used for 10 years with schools in Oxfordshire, UK. Recently, the test

was revised in order to refine the test questions and to ensure that the level of difficulty

was appropriate for the age-group of test-takers. Statistical analysis using Rasch

modelling was used to guide and inform this process. The Rasch model assumes that

the probability of a given respondent answering an item correctly is a logistic function

of the difference between the person’s ability, and the difficulty of the item. Using the

RUMM2020 software package, data from the original VESPARCH test was examined to

look at overall test functioning, and item-level functioning. Fit statistics were examined

to explore items that under-discriminated or over-discriminated between participants

and items were tested for evidence of differential item functioning, indicating potential

sex differences in responding. New questions were trialled and the test was refined in a

series of iterative steps, using data from Rasch models at each stage.

Impact of fear on self-control

Ina Melny, Technische Universität München, Germany

Co – author : Hugo Kehr

According to the strength model, regulation of emotions and behavior require selfcontrol

(Baumeister, 1998). Self-control is conceptualized as a limited resource. This

means that after exercising self-control recently, its capacity is likely to be depleted

and self-regulation failure would result. As conceptualized by the compensatory

model of work motivation and volition (Kehr, 2004), self-control is needed a) to

compensate insufficient motivation or b) to suppress inappropriate intrinsically

motivated behavioral tendencies aroused by implicit motives. The primary objective of

this research was to examine the depletion of self-control caused by fear. Aroused fear

149


150

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

motives lead to intrusive thoughts and behavioral impulses. To suppress these negative

effects, a resource of self-control is needed. We expected greater self-control depletion

in participants high in fear motives than in those low in fear motives, as we assumed

a high implicit fear motive to be aroused more easily in a fear-related situation than a

low implicit fear motive. Moreover, we hypothesized that self-control strength can repel

fear-related intrusive thoughts and minimize depletion of the self-control resource. Selfcontrol

strength as an amount of self-control resource can differ between individuals.

To be more precise, we assume that people high in self-control strength compensate

for depletion better than those with lower self-control strength. We measured implicit

motives with the Multi-Motive-Grid (Sokolowski, Schmalt, Langens, & Puca, 2000) and

self-control depletion with the dual-task paradigm (Baumeister, Bratslavsky, Muraven,

& Tice, 1998). First results, limitations, and implications for future research will be

discussed.

Assessment of study-related interests relevant for the transition to

unong>iversityong>

Lilith Michaelis, Goethe Unong>iversityong> Frankfurt, Germany

Co – authors : Sonja Rohrmann, Helfried Moosbrugger, Siegbert Reiß

Lacking information about the different fields of study at the unong>iversityong> as well as a

lack of insight in personal interests were identified amongst others as main reasons

of indecisiveness during the selection process of a specific major. Consequently there

are reasons leading to an inaccurate image and wrong expectations of the eventually

chosen major. In case that the expectations concerning the subject matter, study

conditions and requirements, as well as the personal suitability regarding a specific

major can’t be met, an impairment of the motivation to study is rather likely. Drop out

or a change of discipline(s) may be the result. Furthermore, former studies suggest that

the drop-out rate or a change of discipline, respectively, is lower amongst the individuals

showing strong intrinsic study related interests than others. Based on these findings,

the present study examines the structures of specific study-related interests among

high school students (N=150). Items that measure the affective valence of study-related

interests were used in an online-assessment. By comparing the study-related interest

patterns of high school students with the interest patterns of unong>iversityong> students of the

corresponding majors, the validity of the test as a tool for guiding the selection process

of prospective students is investigated.

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATIONS ABSTRACTS

To develop a measurement for the dietary education of parents in

homes with infants

Araki Misako, J.F. Oberlin Unong>iversityong>, Japan

Co – author : Hajime Yamaguchi

In 2005, “The Fundamental Acts of Dietary Education” was enacted by Japanese

government. Since then, a lot of Japanese have focused on the Dietary Education

through the media, and it has been emphasized that a necessity to reexamined about

our dietary habits. We are especially emphasizing the importance of the dietary

educations in childhood, which create foundations and maintain dietary habits in a

lifetime. Therefore, we developed a measurement for the dietary education of parents

in homes with infants. In the preliminary investigation, we interviewed 6 people,

nurse and parents, in order to understand the actual situation at home with regard to

the children’s dietary education and behavior and to create a list itemizing different

categories of measurement. These categories were itemized 52 categories and divided

into 3 main areas and 8 sub-items. In the principal investigation, we gathered data from

319 pairs of parents and children. Using factor analysis, we found 3 main factors: “Ideal

Awareness of Dietary Education”, “Implementation of Dietary Education”, and “Proper

Eating Habits Training for the Children”(α=.75~.85). Future of this measurement, it

will use to compare with a development of children between a high and a low level of

the dietary education in home.

The relationship between the dietary education in the home and

drawing of a supper

Araki Misako, J.F. Oberlin Unong>iversityong>, Japan

Co – author : Hashimoto Taiko

Introduction: In recent years, the dietary education has concerned in Japan, because

for “The Fundamental Acts of Dietary Education” was enacted by Japanese government

in 2005. We are especially emphasizing the importance of the dietary educations in

childhood, which create foundations and maintain dietary habits in a lifetime. Therefore,

we developed a measurement for the dietary education of parents in homes with infants

(Araki&Yamaguchi, 2010).In this study, we compared effects of the dietary education

to children’s drawings of a supper. Method: We investigated into 117 volunteers who are

a pair of parents and infant, and. 38 subjects responded to our questionnaire (32.5%).

Parents replied to questionnaires: Dietary Education in the Home (DEH), and children

drew a daily supper. Result and Dissection: We compared with children’s pictures

between the high score group of DEH and the low score group of DEH by using

square test. The features of drawings of the high score group seem having stability,

communicating with a family, and enjoying a supper. On the other hand, the features of

other group’s pictures seem romping children, feeling solitary family, and not observing

151


152

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

kitchen and living-room. Although there were significantly developmental effects on

the dietary education, this investigation had subjects are slanted for the distinction of

sex. This research hereafter needs to increase the number of subjects.

The Construct Validity of the SVR-20 in Lithuanian sex offenders

sample

Marijus Mitrauskas, Mykolas Romeris unong>iversityong>, Lithuania

Co – author : Ilona Čėsnienė

Sexual offender violence risk assessment has made important advances during the past

decade. However, in spite of many research studies about the reliability and validity

of risk assessment tools, there are still inconsistent research results (Rettenberger et

al., 2010). The Sexual Violence Risk – 20 (SVR – 20, Boer, et al., 1997) is structured

professional judgment tool designed to use as clinical checklist and help professionals

to assess risk of sexual violence. The main purpose of the current study was to evaluate

the construct validity of the SVR-20 (Boer et al., 1997) in a sample of incarcerated

Lithuanian sexual offenders. The study sample was drawn from 5 randomly selected

correctional institutions and consisted of 119 male inmates. The mean age of

participants was 32.7 years (SD = 9,82, range = 20 – 68). Results of the present study

showed interface between SVR-20 total scores and number of sex offenders victims,

as well as age at first encounter with the law enforcement institutions (r = -0.263,

p < 0.05). The SVR-20 total scores also correlated with age at first conviction (r = -0.286,

p < 0.05), and the age at first conviction for sexual crime (r = -0.285, p < 0.05). The

results of the present study showed interface between SVR-20 total scores and number

of official marriages (r = -0.259, p < 0.05), as well as number of long term employments

(r = -0.279, p < 0.05). Results are discussed in terms of their implications for further

research and practice.

Latvian adaptation of the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire

Marija Morozova, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

Co – authors : Ginta Jansone, Malgozata Rascevska

The aim of this study was to develop and validate a Latvian version of the Emotion

Regulation Questionnaire (ERQ, Gross & John, 2003), to estimate its psychometric

properties in the cultural environment of Latvia. The sample consists of 100 participants

(40 men and 60 women, mean age – 20 years). Respondents were selected in proportion

to the original sample, except for division into ethnicity. The two-scale ERQ structure

(Reappraisal and Suppression) was confirmed by confirmatory factor analysis, each of

the two scales showed good internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha coefficients for the

Reappraisal scale is .76, for the Suppression scale - .69). Convergent validity is confirmed

using the following tools: The Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS, Watson,

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATIONS ABSTRACTS

Clark, & Tellegen, 1988, Latvian adaptation – Mizane & Bite, 2006) and The Big Five

Inventory (BFI, Benet-Martinez & John, 1998, Latvian adaptation – Austers, 2004). The

Latvian version of ERQ can be used in further studies in the cultural environment of

Latvia since it demonstrates good reliability and the factorial validity corresponding to

the original ERQ version.

Is gender related to attention-deficit?

Josu Mujika, Unong>iversityong> of the Basque Country, Spain

Co – authors : Paula Elosua, Paola Bully

Researchers and health institutions tell us about the importance of conducting studies

which take the difference between sexes into account. However, there are still many

studies that do not consider gender. This leads to problems in identifying special needs

and the appropriateness of interventions. An example of this situation is the problem

associated with lack of attention and impulsivity. Because of the support that has been

given to the study of Executive functions and Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

(AD/HD) by the areas of society, psychology and education, attention and impulsivity

have become two of the main concerns of the educational system. The most widely

used tests for evaluation of these aspects are the Continuous Performance Task (CPT).

The CPT presents a series of stimuli where the evaluated person should discriminate

between a particular stimulus or set of stimuli (target) and other (non-target) stimuli

and respond to them as quickly as possible. This study aims to analyze how different

a computerized CPT adopts the perspective of sex differences in their respective

manuals.

Psychometric properties of Latvian version of Driver Behaviour

Questionnaire

Inese Muzikante, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

Many previous studies show that the Driver Behaviour Questionnaire is an appropriate

tool for investigating driving violations. Due to the high accident rate and mortality

on Latvian roads research in traffic psychology in Latvia has increased. The aim of

the present study was to investigate the factorial structure of the Driver Behaviour

Questionnaire in Latvia. In the study participated 500 drivers and they completed either

a paper–and-pen questionnaire or questionnaire via internet (web-based survey). The

questionnaire consisted of 29 items which were taken from British Driver Behaviour

Questionnaire and Swedish DBQ version. In order to have the questionnaire easy for

participants to fill out a shorter version was created. An analysis of data based on the

original DBQ confirmed a three-factor structure. Two items did not load higher than

.300 for any factor. As with the original version each type of behaviour was found to

have different demographic correlates.

153


154

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

The basic dimensions of personality: Comparing rating and

questionnaire data

János Nagy, Department of Personality and Health Psychology, Faculty of Pedagogy and

Psychology, Eotvos Lorand Unong>iversityong>, Budapest, Hungary

Co – author : Zsofia Szirmák

The aim of this project is to combine the two taxonomic research tradition of

personality description. On the one hand, the Hungarian lexical tradition, connected

to the name of Zs. Szirmak, has some international reputatioin as it was one of the

first research conducted on non-indoeuropean grounds (Szirmák, De Raad, 1994a, b;

Szirmák, 1994; De Raad, Perugini, Szirmák, 1997). On the other hand, several ‘fivefactor’

questionnaires were adapted and analysed in Hungarian since the middle of

the 1990s. In both traditions, the revealed factor structures were mostly in accordance

with the favourite model of the time, the Big Five or Five Factor Model. However, some

atypical results were also found, as in many different cultures, especially in the case of

the fifth factor. In the Hungarian lexical study the fifth factor seemed to be weak, and

was interpreted as Integrity (Szirmák & De Raad, 1994). The following instruments

are to be involved in separate and joint analyses: 561 items Hungarian Taxonomy List

(561 items; Szirmák & De Raad, 1994); HEXACO-H (Lee, Ashton, & Szirmák, 2008);

Big Five Inventory (BFI-H; John and Szirmák, 2007) Five-Factor Personality Inventory

(FFPI-H, Szirmák & Nagy, 1996; Hendricks et al., 2003); ZKPQ-H (Zuckerman et al.,

1993; Nagy, 1994); EPQ-H (S. B. G. Eysenck and Matolcsi, 1984). Exploratory and

confirmatory analyses are to be done on an ever growing data base representative for

the Hungarian population. The preliminary results (Szirmak et al, 2010), based on a

mixed sample of 637 (185 males, 448 females) subjects using but some of these tests,

suggest four to six factor solutions depending on the applied instruments. Based on

those analyses a six factor solution seems promising to be established as a common

reference for the majority of the personality measures.

Gender differences in the innovative activity of students

Donka Nikova - Tsioutsiou, UNWE, Bulgaria

The research is based on a theoretical and empirical exploration of innovation,

innovative activity and gender differences in the innovative activity of students. The

main purpose of the research is to clarify the essence of the innovative activity of

students and to clarify the differences in the innovative activity between female and

male students with a main goal: to enhance the innovation and its scientific and

practical-applied explicitness. The test SDOM - 26 for testing the innovative activity

is used in the research. The statistical treatment is done by Descriptive statistics,

Factor and T-test analyses. The extract includes 1507 bachelor students, 627 male and

880 female, from a main economic unong>iversityong> in Bulgaria. The students’ innovative

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATIONS ABSTRACTS

activity is at a satisfactory level of development – as the part of students at a middle

level of innovative activity prevails. The middle level of innovative activity of male

students prevails, followed by a high level of innovative activity. The middle level of

innovative activity of female students prevails, followed by a low level of innovative

activity. There is a statistical significant difference between female and male students

in the innovative activity. In order to meet the students’ needs for their future

professional and social innovative realization, the ascertained deficit and differences in

development of their innovative activity, must be considered and accepted a tendency

and a base for orientation /reference point/ for future researches and should lead to

some changes in the unong>iversityong> education of the future highly qualified and competent

staff.

Gender and age differences in “food selection criteria”

Masami Okano, Bunkyo Unong>iversityong>, Japan

Co – author : Masao Okano

Purpose: In this report the food selection criteria of Japanese consumers have been

extracted using the measures of Steptoe, Pollard, and Wardle (1995) which reliability

had been confirmed at first. Next the reliability of the five dimensions of “food

selection criteria” is confirmed. In addition the difference of evaluation of the five

dimensions across three age groups and gender is examined. Method: 720 participants

evaluated 36 items related to their food selection criteria on 4-point scales. A factor

analysis was carried out. Multiple Group Analysis was carried out to compare the

estimations of the five dimensions across three age groups and gender. Results.The

following five factors were extracted: (1) mood, (2) safety, health, and nutrition, (3)

convenience, (4) weight control, and (5) price. Through Multiple Group Analysis,

the differences in estimation of the five dimensions between groups were confirmed.

For example, the female subjects in their twenties considered the “weight control”

and “safety” dimensions more important than did males. The female subjects in their

thirties considered the “weight control”,” convenience “and “safety” dimensions more

important than did male.

Usage of vignettes for operationalization and measurement of

emotional intelligence

Ekaterina Orel, National research unong>iversityong> – Higher school of economics, Russia

Co – author : Tatiana Khavenson

Aim: operationalization of emotional intelligence concept through the study of

representations of “emotionally smart” behavior. Problem: there is no consensual

representation about the concept of emotional intelligence in modern psychology. Some

authors represent EI as an ability, the others – as a personality trait. The data, gathered

155


156

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

in different models are not related with each other. Moreover, the authors have different

views on the content of EI concept, so all the EI questionaires have different factor

structure. But we failed to find a research about the representations of “emotionally

smart” behavior. We assume that this kind of research can help to operationalize

the EI concept clearer. Method: to operationalize the EI concept we used vignettes.

Vignettes is a method of collecting information by presenting hypothetical situations

and asking the research participants a set of question to reveal their perceptions and

values. The use of vignettes helps researcher to control the amount of information

available to participants. By varying the set of vignettes presented to participants,

it is possible to see how different variables affect decisions, perceptions and values.

Results: we developed the set of vignettes concerning people’s interaction, dealing with

emotions and understanding of the emotion gave it to the participants (psychology and

sociology students). As a result we have a set of representations about the “emotionally

smart” behavior. At the first stage we mark some basic components of EI from different

concepts, than put them into vignettes and get the degree of importance of these

components in human perception.

Questionnaire of Acceptability of Anger Expression Types:

Development and psychometric properties

Madara Orlovska, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

Co – authors : Marija Morozova, Lasma Katsena, Kristine Poca, Malgozata Rascevska

The aim of this study was to construct and clarify psychometric properties of the

Questionnaire of Acceptability of Anger Expression Types (QAAET). The items of

QAAET represent possible types of anger expression – aggressive and non-aggressive

types. The first version of the questionnaire consisted of 88 items which was were

evaluate by a youth sample (N=204; mean age=22.60; SD=1.90; 61% women, 39%

men). After exploratory factor analysis the number of items was reduced to 37 ,

yielding five factors: Physical aggression against agent of anger (Ph), Constructive

anger management (C), Verbal aggression against agent of anger (V), Explosion of

anger against objects (O), Dissemblance of anger (D). Reliability for the total scale

was α=.94 and for the five scales, respectively: Ph α=.94; C α=.90; V α=.91; O α=.77;

D α=.75. The most acceptable type of anger expression was found to be Constructive

anger management, followed by Dissemblance of anger, Verbal aggression against

agent of anger, Explosion of anger against objects and the most unacceptable type of

anger expression was Physical aggression against agent of anger. Significant gender

differences were found on scales Physical aggression against agent of anger (U=3710.50;

p


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATIONS ABSTRACTS

What the progressive matrices actually measure?

Anna Páchová, Charles Unong>iversityong> in Prague, Pedagogical faculty, department of

psychology, Czech Republic

Co – author : Miroslav Rendl

The aim of this paper was to consider the progressive matrices as tools for measurement

of intelligence. We wanted to verify the potentiality of the test to measure native culture

independent cognitive ability. To evaluate native cognitive ability we decided to find

whether the principles of the matrices were learnable. We used the pretest and retest

sets of matrices chosen from the Raven\’s Standard Progressive Matrices and Raven\’s

Advanced Progressive Matrices. We also designed three separate sets of matrices that

were used for explanation of matrix task principles. We confirmed the learnability of

these principles, i.e. the matrix task results are influenced not only by the biological

factors. To examine whether the results of the test are independent on the socio-cultural

background we compared Czech and Roma children. The results of Czech children in

pretest and retest were significantly higher than the results of Roma children (however,

the differences in the retest reached the borderline of statistic significance). On the

other hand, the level of improvement (defined as retest minus pretest) was higher in the

group of Roma children. So, the worse results of Roma children cannot be explained due

to cognitive inferiority. They seem to be associated with the socio-cultural background

and with the absence of Mediated Learning Experience. The consequence of it is that

Roma children realize the potential of the Zone of the Proximal Development at the

lower level than Czech children. The results indicate that matrices cannot be considered

as a culture free test.

Psychometric properties of the Greek version of the Test Anxiety

Inventory

Georgia Papantoniou, Unong>iversityong> of Ioannina, Greece

Co – authors : Despina Moraitou, Dimitra Filippidou

The present study examined the psychometric properties of the Greek version of

Spielberger (1980) self-report measure of test anxiety, the Test Anxiety Inventory (TAI).

The total sample consisted of 231 undergraduate students (124 male, 107 female). The

results verified the well established two-factor structure for the TAI. The two factors

represented the Worry (TAI-W) and Emotionality (TAI-E) subscales, respectively.

Furthermore, on the bases of the confirmatory factor analyses, using either the set of 20

items or the set of 16 items, we found convincing support for the existing relationship

between the two subscales of the Test Anxiety Inventory. The internal consistency

of the twenty-item TAI-T scale and for the eight-item Worry and Emotionality

subscales ranged from Cronbach’s α = .81 to .94. The G-TAI and its subscales showed

differential statistically significant relationships with a self-report measure of cognitive

interference.

157


158

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

Victimization and internalizing and externalizing psychopathology in

adolescents

Clàudia Paretilla Guardi, Unong>iversityong> of Barcelona, Spain

Co – authors : Laia Soler Corbella, Maria Forns i Santacana, Teresa Kirchner Nebot,

Noemí Pereda Beltran

To experience violent events in early childhood is known to increase the risk of mental

health issues. The current study explores the occurrence of victimizing live experiences

(Conventional Crime, Child Maltreatment, Peer and Sibling Victimization, Sexual

Assault, Witnessing and Indirect Victimization and Victimization through the Internet)

in a group of 489 adolescents (from 13 to 19 years old) enrolled in five different Catalan

high schools. Pearson correlation analysis was conducted according to gender to

explore the degree of Internalizing and Externalizing psychopathology in regards to

the number of victimizations experienced. The Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire

(JVQ, Finkelhor, Hamby, Ormord & Turner, 2005) and Youth Self Report (YSR,

Achenbach & Rescorla, 2001) were used to collect the information. Data shows that

88% of the sample had experienced some kind of potentially traumatic event. The

areas of victimization with greater OR (odds ration) in relation to the gender were

Sexual Victimization, Witnessing and Indirect Victimization and Child Maltreatment.

The highest average value of victimization amongst the female group was found in

Victimization through the Internet, being higher in Peer and Sibling Victimization for

the male group. Furthermore, mild correlation (from .31 to .40) was found in both

the female and male group for Internalizing and Externalizing psychopathology when

the overall victimization score was considered. Due to the high level of victimization

observed in the sample we perceive the need for the educational institutions to take a

more active role preventing victimization in their students and promoting their mental

health and well being.

Psychometric properties of a public domain Latvian measure of the

personality five-factor model

Viktorija Perepjolkina, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

Co – authors : Līva Van Skotere, Viesturs Reņģe

Our aim was to develop a comprehensive public domain Latvian personality inventory.

A set of preliminary 400 items were generated in the framework of the five-factor

model (Costa and McCrae, 1992), which is a hierarchical model of personality traits

with five broad domains and six specific facets within each domain. Generated items

partly were based on items from the International Personality Item Pool NEO (IPIP-

NEO, Goldberg, 1999). Our strategy was not to make exact translations of the IPIP-

NEO items but to generate contextually similar items directly in Latvian language,

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATIONS ABSTRACTS

focusing on cultural, linguistic and content adequacy of items. Content validity of the

items was evaluated in 5 focus groups (6 scales of one personality domain per group).

After the replacement of ambiguous items the content validity of the initial item set

was evaluated by two experts and adequate interrater agreement was shown. During

the next step the preliminary item pool was administered to a combined community

and student sample of Latvian-speaking men and women aged 18 to 71, and the best

performing items were selected. The surviving items were further analysed, showing

adequate internal consistency across all 30 facet scales. A Principal component analysis

with Varimax rotation showed that a 5 component solution is appropriate. The revealed

component structure is similar to that which is theoretically suggested, with some

expected discrepancies. An expected pattern of convergent and divergent relationship

between facet and domain scores was found. Findings, their implications and further

validation work to be made are discussed.

Psychometric properties of R. Plutchik`s Life Style Index (LSI) for

Latvian

Alla Plaude, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

Co - author: Malgožata Raščevska, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

The purpose of this study is to adapt the Life Style Index (LSI) (Plutchik, 2000) in Latvia

and test the psychometric properties of the Latvian version of LSI. The LSI is a selfreport

method for evaluating psychological defense mechanisms. It consists of 97 items

and measures 8 defense mechanisms. The LSI was translated into Latvian using the

direct and reverse translation and based on International Test Commission Guidelines

for Translating and Adapting Tests (ITC, 2010), and administered to 215 adults (age

M=27.93; SD=6.67; 85.2% females, 14.8% males). Results show that psychometric

properties of the Latvian version are similar to the original version, although minor

differences in reliability of LSI scales are present. The Cronbach`s alphas for the

Latvian version: .78 for Denial; .81 for Regression; .66 for Compensation; .63 for

Intellectualization; .77 for Reaction Formation; .58 for Repression; .67 for Projection

and .80 for Displacement. For establishing convergent validity was used Defense

Style Questionnaire (DSQ), (Bond & Wesley, 1996). Many significant correlations

between the logically connected LSI and DSQ scales were obtained, p< .05. Limitation:

sufficiently large gender disproportion in the sample.

159


160

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

Episodic and semantic aspects of ethnic attitudes assessment, the

application of procedure of unconscious affective priming

Irina Plotka, Daugavpils Unong>iversityong>, Baltic Psychology and Management Unong>iversityong>

College, Latvia

Co – authors : Dmitry Igonin, Nina Blumenau, Marija Bambulyaka, Elena Ozola,

Laura Šimane

The aim of the research was to test the hypothesis of the influence of episodic and

semantic components of ethnic attitude on the response latency in a task of unconscious

affective priming. The hypothesis was set forth for the explanation of ambivalent

temporary effects, registered in the previous series of experiments, which reflect

ambiguity relations of primes and targets at the different intervals of stimulus-onsetasynchrony

(SOA). Participants: 200 participants (110 – Russians, 90 – Latvians), with

a median age of 23 years. Implicit method of attitude measuring – the experimental

procedure of unconscious affective priming with randomly presented intervals of

SOA. Experimental design: 4x4x12x4. For measuring those components of attitudes,

which are represented in the semantic memory the explicit measurement was used.

The episodic components of attitudes were estimated by the specially designed

questionnaire. The results of self-report methods were used as a base for selection of the

participants for the implicit assessment of attitudes. The results proved the suitability of

the hypothesis for an explanation of the revealed data, however, further experimental

tests are necessary.

Premorbid personality and cognitive functioning level in patients with

beginning Alzheimer disease

Cornelia Pocnet, Institute of Psychology, Unong>iversityong> of Lausanne, Switzerland

Co – authors : Jérôme Rossier, Jean-Philippe Antonietti, Armin von Gunten

We explored the relationship between premorbid personality features and cognitive

functioning level in patients with beginning Alzheimer disease (AD). 54 patients with

beginning AD according to ICD and 64 control subjects answer to the Mini Mental

State (MMSE) for determination of their global cognitive status. Family members filled

in the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPIQ) to evaluate their proxies’ current behavioral

and psychological symptoms (BPS), filled in the Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive

Decline (IQCODE), the scales Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (ADL and IADL)

to evaluate their proxies’ cognitive and daily functioning level, and the NEO Personality

Inventory Revised, Form R (NEO-PI-R) to assess their proxies’ current personality

traits in comparison to premorbid traits, i.e. those 5 years previous to the estimated

beginning of AD or 5 years earlier for the control subjects. A retest of cognitive skills

was repeated after 2 years. As regards the cognitive functioning status, the evolution of

the AD group is very heterogeneous, and the results of ADL and IADL show that their

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATIONS ABSTRACTS

capacities deteriorate slowly and progressively. Concerning the premorbid personality,

no significant correlations with cognitive axis emerged. However, we found a negative

association between NPQ scores and IADL (r=-.29, p=0.002) and significant links

between personality changes during last 5 years and modify of cognitive functioning

status after 2 years for AD group. The relation between premorbid personality domains

and cognitive functioning level in beginning AD patients were non-linear. An intricate

combination of risk factors might enhance prediction of cognitive decline in patients

with AD.

Zuckerman’s Revised Alternative Five-Factor Model: Validation of the

Zuckerman-Kuhlman-Aluja Personality Questionnaire in four French

speaking countries

Cornelia Pocnet, Institute of Psychology, Unong>iversityong> of Lausanne, Switzerland,

Co – authors : Michel Hansenne, Nicolas Baudin, Julien Morizot, Jérôme Rossier

The aim of this study was to analyze the replicability of Zuckerman’s revised Alternative

Five-Factor Model (AFFM) in a French-speaking context by validating the Zuckerman-

Kuhlman-Aluja Personality Questionnaire (ZKA-PQ) simultaneously in four Frenchspeaking

countries. The total sample was made up of 1,497 subjects from Belgium,

Canada, France and Switzerland. The internal consistencies for all countries were

generally similar to those found for the normative American and Spanish samples.

A factor analysis confirmed that the normative structure replicated well and was

stable within this French-speaking context. Moreover, multi-group confirmatory

factor analyses have shown that the ZKA-PQ reaches scalar invariance across these

four countries. Mean scores were slightly different for women and men, with women

scoring higher on Neuroticism but lower on Sensation Seeking. Globally, mean score

differences across countries were small. Overall, the ZKA-PQ seems an interesting

alternative to assess both lower- and higher-order personality traits for applied or

research purposes.

Assessing teachers’ personality in 6 seconds: What leads to high

consensus?

Johanna Pretsch, Unong>iversityong> of Koblenz-Landau, Germany

Co – author : Manfred Schmitt

When studying teachers’ personality, information from self-report is often not

available or might be subject to bias. One possibility to overcome these problems

is to use personality ratings based on thin slices of behavior at zero acquaintance.

Given acceptable consensus among judges about the teachers’ traits, these ratings can

provide a useful approach to assess personality. But how can consensus be increased

to an acceptable level? Establishing a shared meaning system about the traits to be

161


162

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

judged by giving trait descriptions and holding judges accountable for their ratings

may increase consensus. Furthermore, properties of the traits might affect consensus.

In the present study, judges saw 6s video clips of teachers and rated each teacher

on the facets of the Big Five. In a 2 x 2 factorial design, judges were provided/ not

provided with facet descriptions and were held/ not held accountable for their ratings.

In order to explore effects of trait properties, observability, desirability, and frequency

were rated for each trait by independent judges. For neuroticism, accountability had a

positive effect on consensus, but only when descriptions of the neuroticism facets had

been given. Inversely, when judges had received facet descriptions for openness and

agreeableness, negative effects of accountability on consensus revealed. High consensus

under all conditions was found for extraversion and conscientiousness. Positive effects

of observability and frequency on consensus occurred under all conditions, negative

effects of desirability on consensus revealed under high accountability.

Is there a universal trajectory of self-esteem across

the life span?

Helle Pullmann, Department of Psychology, Unong>iversityong> of Tartu, Estonia

Co – authors : Jüri Allik, Anu Realo

A recent proposal about a universal normative trajectory of self-esteem is based on

a huge dataset collected over the Internet (Robins & Trzesniewski, 2005). However,

we present some results that challenge generalization of this universal self-esteem

trajectory across different cultures. Two nationally representative samples were selected

from the National Census by strict random probability methods for the ong>Europeanong> Social

Survey in 2004 and 2006 consisting of 1,419 and 931 native Estonians, respectively.

Self-recruited sample consisted of Estonian-speaking Internet users (n=23,248).

To measure general self-regard, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (Pullmann &

Allik, 2000) and the Single-Item Self-Esteem Scale (Robins et al., 2001) were used.

The results revealed that different sampling methods and self-esteem scales led to a

remarkable congruence between cross-sectional trajectories of self-esteem across the

life span within a culture: (a) self-esteem trajectories were identical for two nationally

representative samples, (b) two self-esteem scales demonstrated fairly similar normative

age trends on a representative sample, and (c) a representative and self-recruited

Internet sample revealed rather similar age trajectories. However, any of the normative

self-esteem trajectories established on Estonian samples did not resemble the trajectory

of the multinational Internet sample (Robins et al., 2002). Moreover, the congruence

coefficients between the mean levels of self-esteem trajectories of the international and

nationally representative samples were highly negative, r(8) = -.59 and -.78, p < .05.

Therefore, the normative development of general self-regard across the life-span may

be culture-specific and the recently reported universal trajectory of self-esteem can not

be generalized across different cultures.

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATIONS ABSTRACTS

Ethnic identity research in multicultural society

Vitaly Raschevsky, Daugavpils Unong>iversityong>, Latvia

Co – author : Aleksejs Vorobjovs

The objective of the given study is to investigate the ethnic identity of adolescents

living in multicultural society. Wide variety of theoretical and empirical approaches

and world practice induce the question of their relevance to modern Latvian society.

In order to measure the ethnic identity two methods were used in this study: Finney’s

Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure (MEIM) and Soldatova’s Types of the ethnic

identity (TEI). 256 adolescents 17-22 years old representing Latvia’s major ethnic

groups (126-Latvians, 65-Russians and 65-Bilingual) have participated in this research.

In the process of the research a substantial modification of MIEM was done. Three

factors were distinguished by means of factor analysis in relation to cognitive, emotional

and behavioral components of the ethnic identity. The high reliability index of MEIM

components and consistency of the results received during analysis of correlations with

types of ethnic identity provide possibilities for using these instruments for measuring

ethnic identity on Latvian sample.

Testing personality traits and vocational orientations in career

counselling

Liisa Raudsepp, Assessment Centre Tripod, Unong>iversityong> of Tartu, Estonia

Co – authors : Maria Veltmann, Helle Pullmann

The main goal of this study was to examine relationships between two widely accepted

models for classifying individual differences – Holland\’s RIASEC occupational

types and the five-factor model of personality. As there were no contemporary

standardized measures available for career counseling in Estonia, original new tools

were constructed. In total 2,393 individuals participated in this study in 2010. First,

the adolescent sample consisted of 831 adolescents (58% females) with mean age of

17.2 years (SD = 0.82). Second, the adult sample comprised 1,562 individuals (73%

females) with mean age of 31.1 (SD = 10.4). All participants filled in a new Big Five

based personality inventory Tripod-IK (the internal reliability coefficients of the scales

varied from .77 to .92) and a 110-item questionnaire Tripod-TASK that was developed

to assess Holland’s occupational types (the internal reliability coefficients (Cronbach

α) varied from .80 to .91). The results showed moderate correlations between some

personality traits and vocational orientations. Only a few correlations exceeded .25,

namely Artistic-Openness, Social-Extraversion, Enterprising-Openness, Enterprising-

Extraversion, and Enterprising-Emotional Stability. We conclude that although there is

some correspondence between vocational interests and personality traits, the limited

overlap suggests that assessment of both domains remains important, providing unique

information about the client and contributing to more effective career decisions.

163


164

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

Polish validation of the Student Styles Questionnaire

Tomasz Rowinski, Cardinal Stefan Wyszyński Unong>iversityong> in Warsaw, Poland

Co – author : Jan Cieciuch

The Student Styles Questionnaire (SSQ, Oakland, Glutting, Horton, 1996) is a self-report

paper and pencil administered measurement of children and adolescents’ temperament.

This scale is based on Jung’s theory of temperament. The SSQ is based on the premise

that temperament results from an interaction between biologically coded qualities,

environmental qualities and personal choice. The SSQ comprises 69 forced-choice

items. In each item the respondent can choose between two possibilities that provide

for an assessment of behaviors associated with one of the four bipolar temperament

traits: extroversion – introversion, practical – imaginative, thinking – feeling, and

organized – flexible. We prepared the Polish version of the SSQ according to guidelines

on International Test Commission. In the Polish validation, we have constructed a

measurement model in confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). We followed the procedure

of parceling, used by Benson, Oakland and Shermis (2009). On the basis of model in

CFA we calculated the index of quality as it is proposed by Sarris and Gallhofer (2007).

The psychometrics properties suggest that the Polish version of the SSQ is a valid and

reliable instrument to measure temperament. Therefore, the instrument is supposed to

promote research on children’s temperament in Poland. The temperament influences

child’s motivation, learning, values, and interpersonal relationships. Knowing children’s

temperament helps us to better understand their behavior. And in turn it can be used

to improve the process of learning and performance as well as minimize problematic

behaviors.

The humorous temperament of children and youth:

Development of an age based version of the State-Trait-

Cheerfulness-Inventory (STCI)

Willibald Ruch, Unong>iversityong> of Zurich, Switzerland

Co – authors : Sarah Auerbach, Karin Sommer, Karin Hösli

Findings from humour research in adulthood lead to conclude that the three concepts

of cheerfulness, seriousness, and bad mood form the temperamental basis of humour

in adults, and can account for intra- and interindividual differences in exhilaratability

(Ruch & Köhler, 2007). The State-Trait-Cheerfulness-Inventory (STCI, Ruch, Köhler

& van Thriel, 1996, 1997) provides a reliable and valid instrument to assess the three

concepts both as traits and states in adulthood. This poster presents the development

of an age-based version of the STCI suitable for children and youth aged 10 to 14 years.

The development involved (a) informal interviews with children (N = 10) to simplify

items of the adult standard trait and state versions, (b) a rating of comprehension

difficulty for each item (N = 68), (c) testing of the pilot version in a construction sample

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATIONS ABSTRACTS

(N = 333), (d) induction of bad mood to test the sensitivity of the state scales towards

mood change (N = 18), (e) item reduction from 60 to 30 items (trait) and from 30

to 20 items (state), (f) inspection of convergence of self and peer rating of the traits

(N = 231), and (g) validation of the children’s version of the STCI (N = 159). Good

psychometric properties as well as given structural validity lead to the conclusion that

the children and youth version of the STCI is a suitable instrument for the assessment

of the temperamental basis of the sense of humour at young age.

Measuring job search intentions and behaviour

Sanita Saitere, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

Three studies (251 participants in total) were conducted to test the impact of several

predictors of job search intentions of the unemployed. In Studies 1 and 2, job search

intentions were assessed using open answering format. For Study 3, a 21-item scale was

constructed, measuring quantity, clarity, and planned time of the intended job search

activities and recent job search activities. To identify relevant job search activities for

the scale, measures of job search intentions and behaviour used in earlier research and

most recent literature were scrutinized and items characteristic of the practice of job

search in Latvia from Studies 1 and 2 were added. The study found that job search

intentions (quantity of job search activities and time planned for them) correlated

with actual job search behaviour, however quantity of intended job search activities

did not correlate with time planned for them. It is also suggested that the job search

scale stimulated reporting more intended job search activities than open answering

format. Differences in relationships between predictors and job search intentions were

found depending on the measure of job search intentions, stimulating discussion about

advantages of different measures and their validity for the assessment of job search

intentions and behaviour.

Specific objectivity of depression: Rasch analysis

of the Simplified Beck Depression Inventory

Sebastian Sauer, Generation Research Program, Ludwig-Maximilians-Unong>iversityong>

Munich, Germany

Co – authors : Matthias Ziegler, Manfred Schmitt

The BDI-S is a simplified version of the Beck’s Depression Inventory (BDI) with only

20 items compared to the 84 items in the present version of the original BDI. Classical

test theory approaches including correlation analysis with external criteria have

provided evidence for the internal and external validity of the instrument. The present

study employs a Rasch model approach to further scrutinize the internal validity of

the BDI-S in a sample of N = 245 non-clinical German adults using a cross-sectional

design. Results showed that the scale misfits the Rasch model, especially item 20 was

165


166

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

problematic. A reanalysis without this item and with a dichotomized answer scale

yielded acceptable results although some doubts remained regarding unidimensionality

and measurement invariance across subgroups. Additionally, also the revised form

showed substantial evidence of floor and ceiling effects which limits the capability of

the scale to distinguish between respondents with very low or very high depression

scores. We conclude that the BDI-S is appropriate for many practical contexts but is in

need of improvement.

Assessment of social skills and problem behaviors:

A validity study of the PKBS-2

Maria João Seabra-Santos, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences - Unong>iversityong>

of Coimbra, Portugal

Co – authors : Andreia Azevedo, Maria Filomena Gaspar, Sofia Major,

Tatiana Homem, Sara Leitão

The Preschool and Kindergarten Behavioral Scales – 2nd Edition (PKBS-2, Merrell,

2003) have recently been standardized to Portuguese preschool children. These

rating scales are aimed to assess positive as well as negative aspects of preschoolers’

socio-emotional functioning, using two different subscales: Social Skills and Problem

Behaviors. This paper presents a study conducted in the context of the validation

process, with the objective of testing the usefulness of the PKBS-2 to differentiate

children with some kind of disruptive behavior (DB) from children of the general

population (GP). Subjects: DB – 78 preschoolers (55 boys and 23 girls) who scored

above the borderline or clinical cut-off points on the problem behavior markers of

the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, Werry-Weiss-Peters Hyperactivity Scale,

or Parental Account of Child’s Symptoms, GP – Portuguese standardization sample

of the PKBS-2 (n=1000). Instrument: PKBS-2 filled in both by parents and teachers.

Analyses: Mean values of the DB sample were compared with equivalent values of

the standardization sample (GP, taken as reference values) using one-sample t tests.

Four different comparisons were performed (separately for boys and for girls, rated

by parents and by teachers), both for social skills and for problem behaviors. Results:

All the differences between DB and GP are statistically significant (p < .05), with the

exception of social skills for girls, as rated by teachers. Conclusions: The Portuguese

version of the PKBS-2 is a valid instrument that can effectively differentiate children

with different levels of social skills and problem behaviors.

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATIONS ABSTRACTS

Spiritual well-being and suicidal ideation in patients with major

depressive disorder and paranoid schizophrenia

Elina Selevica, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

Co – authors : Evija Strika, Elmars Terauds

According to World Health Organization data every 40 seconds someone commits

suicide. Every year almost one million people die from suicide and these figures do

not include suicide attempts which are up to 20 times more frequent than completed

suicide. Mental disorders (particularly depression and alcohol use disorders) are a

major risk factor for suicide in Europe and North America. Scientists around the world

are looking for an explanation of what forces people to make that choice. Recently there

have been a large number of studies exploring suicide intent and factors influencing

suicide. Most of them have focused on risk factors and psychopathological predictors

of suicidal ideation and behavior, but undeservedly little attention has been given to

protective factors and resources. Relatively many studies have examined the association

between spirituality and suicidal ideation and/or behavior, but most of them investigate

a single component of spirituality (including religiosity) and its relation to suicidality.

However, it would be important to focus on both dimensions of spiritual life – inside

and outside religious traditions, in addition, paying attention to psychiatric patients.

This study examines the association between spiritual well-being, suicidal ideation and

severity of depression in two psychiatric groups: 45 paranoid schizophrenia inpatients

and 45 major depression inpatients (according to DSM-4). Spiritual well-being is

measured using the Spiritual Well-Being Scale (SWBS, Paloutzian&Ellison, 1991),

suicidal ideation is measured with Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C-SSRS,

Posner et al., 2007) and severity of depression is measured with Hamilton Depression

Rating Scale (HDRS24, Hamilton, 1960).

The great power of Item Response theory:

Using IRT to compare ability levels

Anders Sjöberg, Assessio International, Sweden

This study provides an example on how to apply Item Response Theory, IRT, when

comparing ability levels from of general mental ability, GMA, using different samples.

The results from three tests of GMA, Matrigma, WAIS III (subtest Matrices), and

Raven Advanced, were compared. The hypothesis was that Matrices in WAIS III would

have a slightly lower difficulty level compared with Matrigma and Raven Advanced.

The matrices in WAIS III are developed to measure lower levels of aptitude in clinical

environments, while Matrigma and Raven Advanced are developed primarily to

measure the level of GMA in an occupational context. The results show that WAIS

III Matrices, as hypothesized, have a somewhat lower difficulty level compared to the

other two tests, especially at the lower ability-levels. Raven Advanced and Matrigma

have the same level of difficulty. The result supports the notion that IRT is a sample-

167


168

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

independent method and therefore a powerful tool to test hypothesis regarding ability

levels in measures of GMA.

The heritability of traits predicting job performance: A twin study

Anders Sjöberg, Assessio International, Sweden

Results of previous meta-analyses suggests that two of the Big Five personality

traits —Conscientiousness and Emotional Stability— and measures of general mental

ability, GMA are valid for predicting performance in essentially all jobs. In selection

these variables are commonly assessed with standardized tests and therefore it’s of great

importance to estimate the magnitude that is inherent and not due to environmental

factors. In this study, we present findings for heritability estimates of Conscientiousness,

Emotional Stability and GMA by comparing resemblances between twins. The three

traits are measured with the psychological test Predicting Job Performance, PJP using

a sample of 353 identical (MZ) twins and 149 fraternal (DZ) twins. The results indicate

that the measures of Conscientiousness (h2=.38), Emotional Stability (h2=.64) and

GMA (h2=.56) have an important genetic component of variation. The results also

demonstrate that a substantial proportion of the individual differences in these traits

are due to environmental factors.

Observational and self-report assessment in evaluation of parent

training program: impact of doing homework

Inga Skreitule-Pikše, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

Co – author : Sandra Sebre

The broader aim of this study was to assess changes in mother-child interaction,

mother’s sense of competence and child behavior after mother’s participation in a

parent training program, and to examine factors facilitating these changes, including

the frequency of completing homework assigned in the training program. Twenty

mothers of preschool-age children participated in a 10-week parent training program,

and completed the Parenting Sense of Competence Scale (Johnston & Mash, 1989) and

Child Behavior Checklist (Achenbach & Rescorla, 2000) pre and post training. Video

observations of mother and child dyads in a play session were also conducted pre and

post training. The Emotional Availability Scales, 4th edition (Biringen, 2008) were used

for assessing mother-child interaction. During the post-training assessment mothers

overall reported increased parenting sense of competence and decreased child behavior

problems. Coding of the video observations showed increased mother-child emotional

availability during the post training play sessions. Results showed that for mothers

who completed assigned homework more frequently, greater mother-child emotional

availability was observed post-training, but no such changes were observed for mothers

who completed homework less frequently. The frequency of completing homework did

not have an effect on changes in mother’s sense of competence or mother- reported

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATIONS ABSTRACTS

child behavior problems. The results indicate that more active involvement of mothers

in the training process may advance more positive changes in mother-child interaction.

This study also points to the benefits of using various assessment methods – both

maternal-report and video observations – in order to understand the mechanisms of

change more completely.

Psychometric properties of the Latvian Version of the Mathematics

Anxiety Rating Scale

Daina Skuskovnika, School of Business Administration Turiba, Latvia

Co – authors : Inta Tiltina-Kapele, Inese Ābele

The purpose of this study was to adapt the Mathematics Anxiety Rating Scale: Short

Version (MARS, Suinn, 1982) in Latvia, using the Latvian language. Internal consistency,

test-retest reliability, concurrent validity and construct validity of the Mathematics

Anxiety Rating Scale of the Latvian version were examined. Results indicate that the

psychometric properties of the MARS Latvian version are consistent with the original

version. It is concluded that the MARS Latvian version is suitable for use in scientific

research and in psychological assessment in Latvia.

The three diagnostic strategies – which is the best?

Anna Słysz, Adam Mickiewicz Unong>iversityong> of Poznań, Poland

Many cognitive strategies employed by psychologists limit the reliability of their

diagnosis. For instance, they tend to see abnormalities where they do not exist.

Sometimes they tend to ignore a part of diagnostic data at the same time overestimating

another. The purpose of my study was to examine the relationships between

psychologists’ cognitive preferences (such as: type of mind, need for cognitive closure),

clinical experience and strategies used in assessment. Case Study – Simulation was the

main instrument used in this investigation. Three strategies were identified during

the research process: maximal strategy, heuristic strategy, mixed (analytic-heuristic)

strategy. The main hypothesis of this research was confirmed – diagnostic strategy is

connected to cognitive orientation. Relying on the results shown in this study it can be

concluded that the maximal diagnostic strategy is the least effective. The mixed strategy

was the most effective what can be explained in the following way. Intuition allows for a

fast matching of the information about an examined person with a particular diagnostic

category, without a detailed differentiation. Although the formulated hypothesis can be

wrong, they can be verified by means of further research and reasoning (differential,

eliminative). A diagnostician who tends to use only one dominant cognitive function

can gather and process diagnostic data in a tendentious, and therefore ineffective, way.

169


170

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

Relationship between victimization and psycopathology:

Mediator role of self-esteem

Laia Soler Corbella, Unong>iversityong> of Barcelona, Spain

Co – authors : Clàudia Paretilla Guardi, Maria Forns i Santacana, Teresa Kirchner

Nebot, Judit Abad Gil

In line with previous research, child victimization represents a big stressor and an

important etiological factor for the development of various psychiatric disorders

(Molnar, Buka & Kessler, 2001, Terr, 1991). Several studies (Montt & Chavez, 1996,

Dumont & Provost, 1998, Takakura & Sakihara, 2001, Garaigordobil, Durá & Perez,

2005) link high self-esteem with psychological wellbeing. The present study examines

the role that self-esteem plays buffering the negative psychological consequences of

victimization in adolescence. Furthermore, it aims to analyze gender differences on

its mediator effect for both internalizing and externalizing problems. A total of 422

victimized adolescents (M= 15.80 years, SD= 1.17) were recruited from five different

secondary schools in Catalonia. The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), the Juvenile

Victimization Questionnaire (JVQ) and the Youth Self Report (YSR) were employed

to assess self-esteem, victimization and psychopathology respectively. Three different

measures of self-esteem were taken into account: 1) Positive self-esteem (PS), as the

personal appraisal of having high positive qualities, 2) Negative self-esteem (NS),

as the personal appraisal of having low negative qualities, and, 3) Total self-esteem

(TS). Results, analyzed through Baron and Kenny steps and Sobel Test, show that the

meditational effect of PS is limited and statistically non-significant. On the contrary,

NS and TS play a significant role as a mediator for both internalizing problems (in boys

and girls), and externalizing problems (only in girls).

Development of a Latvian Social Conservatism Scale

Ingrida Trups-Kalne, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Faculty of Education, Psychology and Art,

Latvia

Co – author : Girts Dimdins

Previous reserarch in political psychology suggests operationalizing political ideology

using two orthogonal factors: social conservatism (SC) and economic egalitarianism

(Jost, 2009). Studies of political ideology in Latvia have revealed that respondents often

experience difficulties evaluating their political orientation, because the concepts of

liberalism and conservatism are not clearly defined in post-Soviet political cultures.

The aim of this study was to develop a social conservatism scale appropriate for Latvian

cultural context, and to test its reliability and some aspects of construct validity. The

participants were 361 residents of Latvia aged 16 to 74. In the first stage of the study,

a number of statements were formulated regarding social phenomena that, according

to previous research, typically polarize the opinions of liberals and conservatives

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATIONS ABSTRACTS

(Graham, Haidt & Nosek, 2009). The statements were evaluated by the participants.

After an exploratory factor analysis and item analysis, 8 statements were selected,

forming a summated rating scale of SC. The SC scale had a high internal reliability.

Analysis of contsruct validity revealed the predicted positive correlations between SC

and respondents’ self-placement on liberal-conservative scale, importance of religion,

importance of binding moral foundations, and respondents’ age, as well as the predicted

negative correlation between SC and respondents’ moral competence.

Life satisfaction judgments in Latvia: Quantitative and

qualitative approach

Anda Upmane, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

Co – author : Sandra Sebre

Various research results show that there is no common answer to what underlies life

satisfaction judgments – the individual’s own evaluation of their life may be influenced

by various subjective, objective, stable and situational factors. The purpose of the

current study was to examine sources of life satisfaction judgments for respondents

in Latvia using both a quantitative and qualitative approach. Respondents (N=600)

from different socioeconomic backgrounds, aged 18 – 70, participated in this study.

Self report measures were used to assess life satisfaction (SWLS), satisfaction with life

domains, stressful life events and positive and negative affects (PANAS). Immediately

after completing the life satisfaction questionnaire respondents were asked to write

down the thoughts they had while completing the questionnaire items. Content analysis

was used to code these narrative responses, and the categories from these narrations

were analyzed and compared to results from the self- report questionnaires. This

comparison highlights the tendency for many respondents to indicate high satisfaction

in their narrative comments, but quite low scores on the questionnaires. Their comments

indicate that for many people in Latvia the concepts of ‘‘ideal life” and excellent life’’

seem far beyond that which could be possible. This implies that responses to the SWLS

questionnaire items may provide misleading information about the actual subjectively

experienced level of life satisfaction. This finding raises questions of culture-specific

interpretations involved in life satisfaction judgments and researchers should interpret

such results carefully, especially if the specific features of the culture are unknown.

Prognostic validity of the Offender Assessment System (OASys) in

Lithuanian offender sample

Laura Ustinaviciute, Mykolo romerio universitetas, Lithuania

Co – authors : Alfredas Laurinavicius, Rita Zukauskiene

The study examines the relation between rates of reconviction and statistic and

dynamic factors of reoffending based on OASys assessments. The predictive validity

171


172

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

of Offender Assessment system OASys was tested in a sample of 254 offenders from

12 Lithuanian custodial settings. Offenders’ criminogenic needs were assessed using

OASys. OASys was administered to a sample of 254 incarcerated adult offenders aged

18 to 62 (M – 32.77, SD – 9.96). 118 offenders were convicted for general, 122 – violent,

14 – sexual offending. Static and dynamic measures of offenders were assessed one

month prior to release. Recidivism was coded during the 12-months follow-up

period of the 166 males and 47 females who were released from custodial settings.

ROC analysis was conducted to assess predictive validity of the OASys. Power of each

reconviction prediction model in female, male and general groups was measured.

Prediction of reconviction using OASys was better than random guess. In general

sample AUC = .718, p = .0001, in female offenders’ sample AUC = .861, p = .0001, in

male‘s sample AUC = .670, p = .0001. The strongest predictive power of recidivism in

males sample had Financial management and income (AUC = .678, p = .0001) and

Education, training and employability AUC = .671, p = .0001), in females sample –

Thinking and behaviour (AUC = .866, p = .0001). The results of the study show good

prognostic validity of the OASys in Lithuanian sample. The OASys can be used for

assessment of risk of reconviction for male and female offenders.

A new assessment tool of spatial abilities for Information

Technology professionals

Aare Värk, Assessment Centre Tripod, Estonia, Unong>iversityong> of Tartu, Estonia

Co – authors : Maria Veltmann, Helle Pullmann

Spatial ability has emerged as a salient psychological characteristic among young

adolescents who go on to develop expertise in STEM (science, technology, engineering,

and mathematics) domains (e.g. Lubinski, 2010). As there were no appropriate tools

for measuring spatial abilities in Estonia, the first goal of this study was to construct an

original standardised scale to assess the ability to generate, retain, retrieve, and transform

well-structured visual images. The second aim was to compare the performance levels in

the spatial abilities scale between IT and non-IT professionals. The data were collected

in 2010 using two groups of Estonian-speaking individuals with similar educational

backgrounds. First, the IT professionals (n = 176) were drawn from 7 leading companies

operating in the field of information technology and telecommunication in Estonia.

Second, 59 professionals were recruited as a reference group from fields of activity not

related to IT. The constructed Spatial Abilities Scale (RVS by Tripod) consisted of four

subscales (embedded figure task, form rotation, surface development, 3D rotation),

each containing 12 time-limited tasks. The RVS had good psychometric properties and

all the scores were distributed as a normal curve. The internal reliability of the scale was

a = .81 for the IT specialists. Analyses revealed that the mean scores were statistically

significantly higher for the IT professionals compared to the reference group across

all the subscales and total score of the RVS. To conclude, the RVS scale by Tripod has

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATIONS ABSTRACTS

considerable potential to be applied in personnel assessment procedures in the field

of IT.

Spatial abilities vary across job complexity:

A case of Ericsson Supply Site Tallinn

Aare Värk, Assessment Centre Tripod, Unong>iversityong> of Tartu, Estonia

Co – author : Maria Veltmann

The main goal of this study was to investigate whether workers’ spatial abilities

vary across job complexity in the electronic manufacturing industry. The data

were collected from the Ericsson Supply Site Tallinn which operates in the field of

electronic components assembly. The sample consisted of 283 employees (50% males)

with a mean age of 38 (SD=12) years. The workers were divided into three groups

according to the level of job complexity: low (n=93; e.g. assembly workers, kitting

operators, transportation workers), medium (n=99; e.g. tuning operators, inspectors,

electricians-mechanicians), and high (n=91; e.g. team leaders, maintenance workers,

troubleshooters, programmers) complexity. Spatial abilities were measured by the

short version of Tripod’s Spatial Abilities Scale (S-RVS; Värk et al., 2011), consisting of

two subtests (Embedded figure task, Surface development) with 28 progressive timelimited

tasks in total. Spearman’s rank order correlation between the S-RVS composite

score and job complexity level was .25 (p


174

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

attending grades 7th to 12th. The sample was drawn from 10 Estonian-speaking public

secondary schools in 2010. Written consent was obtained from adolescents’ parents.

General intelligence was measured by the Student’s Mental Abilities Scale (ÕP-VVS)

developed by Tripod, consisting of four subscales: verbal, numerical, visuo-spatial

abilities and logical thinking. Grades in Mathematics were available for 629 students.

There was a remarkable cross-sectional growth of intelligence between ages 13 to 18.

The mean levels of total ÕP-VVS scores differed statistically significantly between high

and low academic achievement groups in all ages. The average level of mental abilities

was representative of students with average mathematical achievement. Across all age

groups, successful students in Mathematics performed above average in mental abilities

test. Contrarily, students with low academic achievement in Mathematics obtained

below the average intelligence scores. There was no interaction between students’

age and Mathematics grade. Individual differences in general mental ability indicate

differences in mathematical achievement at school. Higher cognitive ability refers to a

potential to outperform average students in mathematics.

Personality traits and mental abilities of Estonian leaders

Maria Veltmann, Assessment Centre Tripod, Estonia

Co – author : Helle Pullmann

The studies demonstrate that top executives have specific personality profiles and more

complex positions require higher level of mental abilities. The goal of this study was to

investigate whether Estonian managers’ personality profiles and mental abilities levels

differ from individuals representing non-managerial job positions. The total sample

consisted of 816 Estonians (55% males) with a mean age of 36 years (SD=11). The

participants were divided into four groups according to their managerial level: executives

(n=156), managers (n=269), specialists (n=153), and other non-managerial professions

(n=184). The Manager’s Personality Inventory (MPI/IK-JUHT) developed by Tripod

was used to measure five personality domains: Emotional Stability, General Activity,

Relationship Orientation, Activity Orientation, and General Responsiveness. The

Manager’s Mental Ability Scale (MMAS/VVS-JUHT) developed by Tripod consisted of

four subscales: Comprehension of Verbal and Numerical Information, Mathematical-

Logical and Spatial Thinking. In line with previous studies (e.g., Sangster, 2011),

Estonian executives and managers were much more emotionally stable, extraverted and

open to experience compared to non-managerial professionals. The levels of mental

abilities varied significantly across managerial level groups. The results indicated that,

in comparison to non-managerial employees, executives scored significantly higher

on all cognitive abilities scales. The mean level differences remained when gender,

age, and educational level were taken into account. There is considerable evidence of

heteromorphic nature of top executive personality and intelligence with respect to

the non-managerial individuals. These findings attest to the utility of personality and

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATIONS ABSTRACTS

intelligence tests used within the occupational community, for selection and assessment

of suitability for promotion to senior managerial roles.

A pilot study: Level of nonverbal attunement between mother and

children with secure and insecure attachment style

Kristīne Vende, Unong>iversityong> of Latvia, Latvia

Co – author : Ervins Cukurs

Effective communication and mother’s adequate sensitivity and response to the child’s

needs are the basis for the child’s emotional and cognitive growth. By examining

how non-verbal communication is happening and how it impacts the mother-child

relationship, it can be possible for professionals to provide more effective prophylactic

help to young parents and as a result of that to improve early mother-child interaction

and facilitate a healthier child’s development. Six mother child dyads participated in

this pilot study (childrens’ age was from 12–18 months). Each dyads was observed

twice for one hour and thirty minutes. During each observation period the dyad was

also filmed for 15 minutes. Several observations research methods (Attachment Q-Sort

Version 3; Kestenberg Movement profile) were used in order to determine the child’s

attachment style as well as a movement profile of each participant. All dyads were

divided into two groups depending on the child’s attachment style (secure or insecure).

The analysis showed that there is a correlation between mother’s ability to attune nonverbally

to her child and the child’s attachment style

Specifics of Psychosocial Well-being Model of unong>iversityong> students

in Latvia

Santa Vorone, Daugavpils Unong>iversityong>, Latvia

In positive psychology research we now more often see trends of comparative analysis,

comparing levels and content of well-being in different cultures. Indicators of wellbeing

in Latvia are changing rapidly along with changes in the economic situation,

therefore researching well-being is very important. In past years negativism has

become a problem in our society, creating a need to research the specifics of content of

well-being, the determining factors that may be influencing the indicators revealing the

rise or fall in society’s psychosocial well-being and to make comparisons with similar

experiences in other countries. Due to the complicated life that individuals have in

our society, the amount of knowledge and skills that need to be passed on to next

generations, has been increasing and that can create changes in the way people evaluate

their life. At the same time the forms and specifics of this process differ, thereby creating

an interest to study specifically the components and levels of psychosocial well-being

among youth in relation to everyday life and academic life. In this research an approach

to surveying the way Latvian students evaluate their lives in levels of psychosocial

175


176

ABSTRACTS : POSTER PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

well-being is offered. A comparative analysis with samples of North American and

Romanian students is done. The paper also examines the specifics of the psychosocial

model of well-being: subjective, psychological and social, including the hedonic and

eudemonic approaches to well-being. Within the theoretical analysis of the concept of

well-being a multidimensional methodological analysis is used, based on theories and

empirical research of positive psychology.

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


RUNDĀLE CASTLE, BAUSKA BREWERY

(1 DAY. Sunday, September 4th)

Riga – Rundale – Bauska brewery – Riga

9.00 departure from LU main building to Rundale castle

• Rundale castle 10.30 – a.m. 13.30

Rundale Palace is one of the most outstanding Baroque and Rococo historical monument

in Baltic States. It was built from 1736 to 1740 as a summer residence for the Duke of

Courland Ernst Johann Biron, favourite of the Russian Empress Anna Joanovna. The

Palace was designed by the renowned Russian court architect F.B. Rastrelli and built

under his supervision.

• 13.30–14.30 lunch in guest house BERZKALNI

• at 15.00 Bauska brewery & degustation

Departure to Riga at 17.00 p.m., arrival in Riga at 18.30 p.m.

Price per person: 41.00 Ls (about 58.50 EUR) /If at least 10 persons are going/

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

177


178

SIGULDA, CESIS

(1 DAY. Sunday, September 4th)

Riga – Sigulda – Turaida – Cesis – Riga

9.00 departure from LU main building to Turaida castle

• 10:00–12:30 Turaida castle and Sigulda

The Turaida irregularly planned Bishop’s Castle was built in 1214. Castle’s portentous

dwelling tower – Don John – was built in the 13th century. The old medieval castle was

regularly extended up to the 17th century.

Now the picturesque castle is a part of Turaida Museum-reserve. Systematic

archaeological excavations and restoration works take place in the territory of the

castle. Visitors there can see an exposition about the castle history and ancient Livs’ life

at the Gauja River (ong>11thong>–13th centuries) in the restored buildings.

• 12:30–13:30 lunch in restaurant “Pilsmuiža”

• 14:00–15:30 Cesis castle visit and Cesis Old town

Cesis castle ruins are one of the most majestic castle ruins in the Baltic countries. Once

the most important castle of the Livonian order that also has been the official residence

for orders chief. Cesis castle was destroyed during the great northern war.

• Visit jeweller Daumans Kalniņš in Cesis castle

• Arrival in Riga 19:00 p.m

Price per person: 39.00 Ls (about 55.50 EUR) /If at least 10 persons are going/

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


INDEx


A

Abad Gil, Judit 44, 170

Abele, Inese 43, 169

Ahonen, Arto 50

Aigner, Nadine 72

Aikawa, Atsushi 122

Alewyn, Nel 67

Allik, Jüri 42, 162

Allwood, Carl Martin 31, 73

Alonso-Arbiol, Itziar 5, 6, 19, 26, 27,

50, 53, 64, 95

Andrejeva, Aleksandra 24, 86

Anton, O. 80

Antonietti, Jean-Philippe 42, 160

Araki, Misako 38, 40, 139, 151

Arendasy, Martin 120

Asseburg, Regine 21, 86

Auerbach, Sarah 33, 43, 84, 164

Augustiniene, Aldona 39, 144

Aus, Kati 37, 131

Austers, Ivars 5

Azaiza, Faisal 39, 146

Azevedo, Andreia 43, 166

B

Bäckström, Martin 28, 87

Bacon, Elisabeth 31, 74

INDEx

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

Bambulyaka, Marija 42, 160

Bartram, David 6, 9, 14, 15, 47

Baudin, Nicolas 42, 161

Becker, Birgit 25, 62

Beierlein, Constanze 39, 143

Berg, Michael 27, 87

Bilican, Safiye 90

Birle, Delia Luliana 37, 131

Bite, Ieva 5, 31, 38, 114, 121, 140

Björklund, Fredrik 87

Blumenau, Nina 42, 160

Boehnke, Jan R. 129

Boehnke, Klaus 6, 9, 14, 16, 27, 48, 65

Bonchis, Elena 37, 132

Borg, I. 63

Borodimou, Anthi 106

Bozo-Irkin, Ozlem 119, 120

Braet, Caroline 117

Breslavs, Gershons 24, 88

Brunner, Martin 71

Brzezinska, Urszula 23, 78

Buchanan, Tom 21, 54

Bucik, Valentin 5

Buliņa, Renāte 37, 132

Bully, Paola 37, 41, 133, 153

Bušmeistere, Undīne 30, 89

Butkienė, Dovilė 37, 134

181


182

INDEx

C

Callens, Justine 117

Care, Esther 19, 50

Care, Ruta 39, 145

Carrasco, Miguel Angel 33, 37, 81, 134

Carstensen, Claus H. 129

Caspers, Juliane 21, 89

Cieciuch, Jan 37, 40, 42, 135, 148, 164

Claes, Laurence 5

Contardi, Anna 30, 90, 93, 116, 123

Continisio, Massimo 90

Crayen, Claudia 33, 84

Cukurs, Ervins 44, 175

Čėsnienė, Ilona 40, 152

D

Damberga, Ilze 38, 135

Danay, Erik 25, 62

de la Osa, Nuria 5, 6, 32, 38, 79, 136

Deimann, Pia 72

Del Barrio, Victoria 37, 81, 134

Demirtaşlı, R.Nükhet 20, 90, 126

De Monte, Ettore 30, 90, 93 116, 123

Denglerova, Denisa 24, 91

Dimdins, Girts 5, 44, 170

Dindelegan, Camelia 132

Dinou, Magda 112

Dislich, Friederike 9, 23, 91, 118, 130

Dmitrieva, Elena 38, 137

Domenech, Josep Maria 38, 79, 136

Druart, Celina 117

Durak, Mithat 119, 120

E

Efklides, Anastasia 5, 6, 31, 33, 73, 92

Eid, Michael 84

Elagoz, Feride Ozlem 119, 120

Elosua, Paula 37, 41, 133, 153

Ennok, Margus 38, 137, 138

Ezpeleta, Lourdes 32, 38, 79, 136

F

Ferdmane, Inna 89

Ferreira, Aristides 24, 26, 93, 94

Fieulaine, Nicolas 52

Filippidou, Dimitra 41, 112, 157

Flehmig, Hagen C. 128

Fontaine, Johnny 5, 6, 22, 56, 57, 58

Forns i Santacana, Maria 41, 43, 158,

170

Frebort, Martina 25, 60

Freund, Philipp Alexander 27, 94

Frey, Andreas 86

Furuya, Atsushi 122, 38, 139

G

Gaitniece-Putāne, Anda 38, 139

Gallarin, Miriam 26, 95

Garred, Melinda 95

Gaspar, Maria Filomena 43, 166

Gausaite, Skina 39, 142

Gelman, Victor 38, 137

Gevorkian, Mary 124

Giannouli, Vaitsa 106

Gilmore, Linda 27, 95

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:


Gintilienė, Gražina 37, 134

Gioka, Mara 106

Girdzijauskiene, Sigita 23, 77

Godoy, Antonio 6, 9, 14, 16, 49

Golz, Martin 98

Gomula, Jerzy 111

Gonzalez, L. 80

Gonzalez, Paloma 37, 81, 134

Gordeeva, Tamara 110

Granero, Roser 38, 79, 136

Grass, Julia 60

Graudiņa, Liena 27, 96

Griffin, Patrick 50

Grigutyte, Neringa 24, 96

Griskevica, Inguna 5, 38, 139

Gross-Paju, Katrin 38, 137

Gruber, Elke 120

Gülleroglu, H. Deniz 90

H

Hagger, Martin 97

Hansenne, Michel 42, 161

Haritaki, Hara 105

Hartmann, F. 63

Harzer, Claudia 69

Hashimoto, Taiko 38, 40, 139, 151

He, Jamis 19, 52

Heine, Jörg-Henrik 25, 63

Heinze, Christian 98

Hell, Benedikt 59, 129

Hernández, José Manuel 115

Hildebrandt, Andrea 109

11 th ong>Europeanong> ong>Conferenceong> on Psychological Assessment:

Hirschmann, Nicole 29, 70, 72

Hof, Jeremy 65

Höfer, Stefan 29, 69

Hofmann, Wilhelm 130

Homem, Tatiana 43, 166

Hong, Sehee 108

Horcajo, Javier 115

Hornke, Lutz F. 25, 59

Hösli, Karin 43, 164

I

Icekson, Tamar 29, 70

Igonin, Dmitry 42, 160

Ivanova, Natalija 39, 147

J

Jansone, Ginta 38, 40, 140, 152

Jung, Song 23, 108

Jusiene, Roma 119

K

Kalis, Emils 38, 141

Kalpokienė, Vaida 96

Kangro, Eva-Maria 31, 97

Kankaanranta, Marja 50

Karpova, Arija 5

Kasten, Nadine 94

Kastner-Koller, Ursula 72

Katsadima, Effie 112

Katšena, Lāsma 86

Kaulina, Anda 38, 141

Kazlauskas, Evaldas 39,142

INDEx

183


184

INDEx

Kehr, Hugo 40, 149

Keller, Ulrich 71

Kemper, Christoph. J. 25, 39, 61, 62, 63,

142, 143

Khavenson, Tatiana 41, 155

Kiliçlı, Mhemet Fatih 119, 120

Kirchner Nebot, Teresa 41, 43, 158,

170

Kislali-Erginbilgic, Altinay 52

Klein, Mira Céline 39, 143

Knezevic, Goran 51

Kolesnikova, Jelena 39, 143

Kolesovs, Aleksandrs 5, 39, 144

Kolic-Vehovec, Svjetlana 31, 75

Kouimtzi, Eleni Maria 20, 114

Kovalchuk, Olena 39, 144

Kovaleva, Anastassiya 39, 143

Krajewski, Jarek 22, 26, 28, 97, 98, 99,

118

Kreitler, Michal M. 99

Kreitler, Shulamith 28, 99

Kronina, Liga 39, 145

Kubinger, Klaus D. 28, 60, 100

Kurz, Rainer 22, 26, 100, 101

Kyllonen, Patrick C. 21, 55

L

Lagakou, Evdokia 34, 105, 111

Laizane, Ilona 39, 146

Laizane, Vineta 24, 102

Lanz, Margherita 122

Latour, Thibaud 71

Laufenberg, Tom 99

Laurinavicius, Alfredas 44, 171

Lavy, Shiri 33, 39, 83, 146

Leitão, Sara 43, 166

Leontiev, Dmitry 39, 147

Levina, Elena 39, 147

Libbrecht, Nele 58

Lischetzke, Tanja 84

Littman-Ovadia, Hadassah 83

Loredana, Rosiello 123

Ludāne, Maruta 40, 148

Lyusin, Dmitry 32, 102, 125

M