RIDEFAST SEPTEMBER

foleyg

All the NEWS proudly brought to

you by HJC HELMETS

All the NEWS proudly brought to

you by HJC HELMETS

GIVI GRT 711

25Litre Rucksack

The guys and girls at DMD do bring in some really cool gear

and accessories, for instance the new GIVI GRT711 is a

practical off-road backpack with plenty of compartments. It

has been developed by the Givi R&D department to offer

the market a backpack actually designed for motorcyclists.

Dedicated mainly to off-roaders, with its -25litre capacity, it is

water resistant and anti-UV thanks to its high tenacity 1200D

polyester exterior.

Equipped with a thermoformed back panel in breathable EVA,

it offers greater comfort to the rider wearing it, avoiding heat

build-up and sweating by allowing the air to pass through.

The backpack is secured to the body using padded shoulder

straps and adjustable chest and waist straps to prevent

uncomfortable bouncing and ensure perfect adherence to the

body.

This well organised backpack has several compartments;

it has a removable inner bag and is equipped with a handy,

easily accessible zip pocket for keys, small objects and a

smart phone. This is also waterproof thanks to the hot-taped

seams. At the bottom of the backpack there is also a special

separate compartment designed to store tools or clothes. An

additional compartment is available on the back, accessible

from the outside with a bellows opening and space has been

provided for an optional liquid bag. A removable boot bag is

also included and can be attached externally. It is made in

fluorescent yellow Nylon/PVC. The extraordinary modularity

offered by this Gravel-T backpack also makes it possible to

directly connect bags and small «additional loads», such as

the Givi GRT717 tool carrier.

Finally, there are side slots to attach small objects using a

set of 4 accessories for the M.O.L.L.E. System, provided as

standard: 2 D-rings and 2 universal hooks. The new GRT711

has everything it takes to be the ideal travel companion for

everyone, not just enduro bikers, because it not only meets

the needs of the most extreme riders but also of those who

use their bike every day and need a backpack that is strong

and technical.

For more info and to find your nearest stockist click on

www.dmd.co.za

Bent frame?

Wheel alignment?

AS Racing’s - Rapid Laser Alignment system:

Now, here is something that caught our attention, something

that we have wondered about from time to time. Do you need

to do wheel alignment or any kind of alignment on your bike

and if so - how?

As it turns out you do. You can do a quick and easy test

on your own bike... Find a flat, smooth paved surface like

a concrete slab or something. Grab some baby powder or

even a bit of very fine sand, anything that will make a print.

Spread it over the surface at about a metre wide and about 3

metres long. Then push your bike through it as straight as you

possibly can. If your bikes alignment is true then there should

only be one line made by the tyres, as the rear wheel should

track directly behind the front wheel. If there are two lines …

Well then you need to get your bike down to Alfie at AS

Racing out on Van der Hoff road on the western side of

Pretoria. Alfie has just procured the latest in motorcycle

alignment technology by HealTech Electronics. The RAPID

LASER ‘Professional frame and chassis check-up tool’ uses

some pretty fancy lasers, measuring tapes and a whole bunch

of other cool tech that we don’t quite understand to check the

whether your frame is twisted, (even if it is ever so slightly),

same with your swing arm, sub frame, head stock, triple

clamps and can even be used to make sure your chain is

running true between the sprockets. Sadly, those little marks

on your swingarm are not exactly micro-millimetre perfect. So

when every milli-second counts during a race so does every

micron that can rob you of that little bit of advantage over

your competitors. Thus a true and straight race bike will be

more stable and agile in the corners, more a focused under

acceleration and braking and more compliant and confidence

inspiring to the rider.

But how does this affect us mere mortals you may ask?

Well, for one, as in alignment with cars, your tyres should

last a bit longer, as would your chain and sprockets, wheel

bearing, swing arm and head stock bearings. And in today’s

day and age, anything that can save you a bit of money is

a good thing. But there is also the safety as well as the fun

factor. A proper handling bike is always more fun to ride, being

able to out manoeuver your mates in an impromptu dice and

whip their asses is even better fun and being able to do that

with a bike that won’t try kill you with a sudden wobble or try

to chuck you off … well … need we say more?

Give Alfie a shout on 084 523 9229, or drop

him a mail on asracing123@gmail.com

Triumph Trident

Concept

This is a design concept for a new Triumph Trident, which

the brand says will take on the class leading middleweights.

Currently the entry-level models into the Triumph brand are

the Street Twin and the Street Triple S. «This bike is going to

be aimed at people who have been riding a while but this is

their first, new large-capacity machine,» says Steve Sargent,

Chief Product Officer at Triumph. «It’s going to be very

competitively priced but we’re sticking with Triumph’s roots to

maintain a premium presence in that market.»

For now Triumph aren’t releasing any figures about the new

power plant.

The frame is new, designed just for this bike to deliver the sort

of ‘roadster’ handling Triumph has become famous for.

The styling is fresh, taking hints from Honda’s ‘neo-café’ retro

meets-modern approach where classic Triumph design cues,

such as the cut-outs in the tank, work alongside the modern

shapes of the subframe.

There’s even a dash of Italian flair with the work of Rodolfo

Frascoli, whose previous penmanship has brought us the

fantastic Tiger 900.

The new bike should be right up there technology-wise, with

all new switchgear clearly visible, alongside a brand new

dash and funky LED lights. There’s no indication what tech to

expect, but based on the Hinckley operation’s current models,

that switchgear and a desire to outdo the competition, don’t

be surprised to see riding modes, cornering ABS and leansensitive

traction control.

Triumph plans to reveal the full machine, along with all the

specs and price in just a few weeks, ahead of its arrival in

dealers early next year…

www.triumph-motorcycles.co.za

www.motomedia.co.za

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines