( ReaD ) Move Your Bus An Extraordinary New Approach to Accelerating Success in Work and Life DOWNLOAD EBOOK PDF KINDLE

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( ReaD ) Move Your Bus: An Extraordinary New Approach to Accelerating Success in Work

and Life DOWNLOAD EBOOK PDF KINDLE


( ReaD ) Move Your Bus: An Extraordinary New Approach to Accelerating Success in Work and Life

DOWNLOAD EBOOK PDF KINDLE

( ReaD ) Move Your

Bus: An Extraordinary

New Approach to

Accelerating Success in

Work and Life

DOWNLOAD EBOOK

PDF KINDLE

Description

Ron Clark is the New York Times bestselling author of The Essential 55, which has sold more than one

million copies in twenty-five different languages. He has been named “American Teacher of the Year―

by Disney and was Oprah Winfreyâ€s pick as her “Phenomenal Man.― He founded The Ron Clark

Academy in Atlanta, Georgia, which more than 25,000 educators from around the world have visited to learn

about the extraordinary ways that teachers and parents of RCA have helped children achieve great success.

Clark has been featured on the Today show and CNN, and his experiences have been turned into the

uplifting film, The Ron Clark Story, starring Matthew Perry. Read more Excerpt. © Reprinted by

permission. All rights reserved. Move Your Bus 1 Runners need support Rufus is one of the many people

pulling that bus. Every day he arrives at the bus depot bright and early, ready to shift into high gear and run

like the wind to keep the bus moving forward. As one of those people with a real need for speed, Rufus loves

the momentum, the exhilaration of the wind on his face, and the thrill of passing every other bus on the road.

Yet, it isnâ€t so much that he wants to cross the finish line first or beat his own personal best. It is more

that Rufus longs to be part of something really special, something out of the ordinary—a bus that could fly,

perhaps. Oh, it may sound farfetched to you! But Rufus has plenty of ideas about how to make that happen,

and heâ€s well known on this bus for his passion. Rufus can make things happen, and he has a way to get

things done! Within every type of organization, it is the Runners, like Rufus, who provide the locomotion.

These individuals are working as hard as possible, and they essentially carry the load of the bus. They come

early or they stay late. They never complain, and they provide a positive spirit. Their work ethic is strong,

and their attention to detail is spot on. They are the strongest members of the team, and they are the driving

force behind the success of the organization. Runners are driven by the goal of professional excellence, and

they take pride in contributing to a movement or an entity that is top-notch. Their impetus to work hard is

often less about their personal accomplishments and more about the good of the organization as a whole.

They truly want to see system-wide success, rather than merely reaping individual accolades, raises,

promotions, or awards. Runners donâ€t let their egos keep them from tackling the task at hand. They just

have an attitude of It has to be done, letâ€s knock it out, letâ€s do it. I witness this at RCA all the time.

For example, recently we were preparing for a big event—a sneak peek of a beautiful new addition to our

school. The brand-new womenâ€s restroom in the newly constructed wing was on display and part of the

tour we were conducting; it was gorgeously decorated and sparkling clean, so we didnâ€t want it to be

used. But how were we going to make it clear to our guests that the restroom was for viewing only? The

easiest way was to make sure all the stalls were locked. One of our teachers, Wade King, said, “I got

you.― Heâ€s a phenomenal educator, heâ€s widely respected, he has been recognized as a District

Choice Teacher and Teacher of the Year during his career—and yet he dropped to the floor and was


crawling around under all the bathroom stalls to lock the stall doors from the inside. And he was happy to do

it! So Runners donâ€t make excuses, and they donâ€t feel above basic tasks. They just want things to

get done right. I spend a lot of time in meetings with corporate executives, including our board members and

the corporate sponsors who support RCA. Sometimes I sit back and watch, and I notice a certain way that

Runners act in meetings—how they make eye contact with the room, how they donâ€t talk over others.

There are some people who know how to lead a meeting so it keeps progressing, and then there are other

people who run over other peopleâ€s ideas and donâ€t add anything of value. Runners have a knack of

keeping the meetings moving without missing opportunities. They keep it going, keep it focused, and they

recognize the good ideas. And when a Runner is attending a meeting without leading it, he doesnâ€t get in

the way of the meetingâ€s forward momentum. In any organization, the Runners usually prove themselves

quickly, so they tend to move up in whatever hierarchy exists in that particular organization. In the corporate

world, a top performer is often asked to supervise—and, hopefully, motivate—others, as a first step up the

ladder. Itâ€s an added responsibility, an added chance to shine by helping others boost their own

performance. Big corporations tend to have a clearly defined progression with titles that range from

supervisor to department manager to director to vice president. And Runners tend to recognize what they

need to do

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