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African Emigrants Magazine. October Issue. 2020

Emigrants are brave. African emigrants are even more brave to leave a rich continent behind. Let's know them. Let's celebrate them.

Emigrants are brave. African emigrants are even more brave to leave a rich continent behind. Let's know them. Let's celebrate them.

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AFRICAN

EMIGRANTS

M A G A Z I N E

Leaders

THABO MBEKI

Artists

BURNA BOY

Public Citizens

EVERYONE

O C T O B E R * 2 0 2 0 * I S S U E 1


CONTENTS

Editor's Word

Thabo Mbeki

Lupita Nyong'o

Bridget Dore

Burna Boy

Opinions by Africans

Miriam Makeba

Fela Kuti

Trevor Noah

Yvone Vera

Charlize Theron

Elon Musk

Hugh Masekela

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

2

4

8

11

12

16

18

22

24

26

30

32

34

36


P A G E 1

ADVERTISE WITH US

Email: contact@mittaxinindlu.com


P A G E 2

EDITOR'S

WORD

― Mitta Xinindlu

Hello Emigrants and friends!

www.mittaxinindlu

I welcome everyone who's joining us

in celebrating and remembering all

African Emigrants. We're celebrating

those who had the bravery to leave

the rich continent. They left hoping

to expand their knowledge. And

some left due to tough

circumstances.

My team and I would like to invite to

send us any stories of emigrants that

you'd like celebrated by the world.

I would also like to thank the

countries that have welcomed us.

They have ensured that we had a

humane integration.

This project is personal to me as I am

one of those brave Africans. I send

my great thanks to the French

people for hosting me in the country.

P A G E 1


“As soon as I had crossed the ocean, I made sure to tell everyone about my Xhosa

people, our culture, and our language isiXhosa. I was proud. I wanted everyone to

know about us.”― Mitta Xinindlu

P A G E 3


P A G E 4

THABO MBEKI

S O U T H A F R I C A N P R E S I D E N T

( J U N E 1 9 9 9 - S E P T E M B E R 2 0 0 8 )

E M I G R A T E D T O L O N D O N &

M O S C O W ( 1 9 6 2 - 1 9 7 1 ) ,

Mr. Thabo Mbeki is a noble

intellectual. He emigrated to study,

and later for military training.

A decisive Xhosa leader, most

remembered for his 1996 'I Am

An African' speech.

"Gloom and despondency have

never defeated adversity. Trying

times need courage and resilience.

Our strength as a people is not

tested during the best of times. As

we said before, we should never

become despondent because the

weather is bad nor should we turn

triumphalist because the sun

shines." Mbeki, in his resignation

speech.

Image by @PhumulaniNdlov2


P A G E 5

"I am an African. I owe my being to

the hills and the valleys, the

mountains and the glades, the

rivers, the deserts, the trees, the

flowers, the seas and the everchanging

seasons that define the

face of our native land."

-- Thabo Mbeki, 1996

Image by @samkelemaseko


AN ECONOMIST

"Our experience over the last 20 years

has shown that indeed people must

themselves become their own

liberators. You cannot wait for

somebody else to come and rescue

you."

"Many of our own people here in this

country do not ask about computers,

telephones and television sets. They

ask - when will we get a road to our

village."

"A global human society, characterised

by islands of wealth, surrounded by a

sea of poverty, is unsustainable."

"As Africans, we need to share

common recognition that all of us

stand to lose if we fail to transform

our continent."

IImage by @Gallevien

"We will continue to count on your

unwavering support and commitment

to working with leaders of our

continent in bringing about the

desired renaissance of Africa."

"In Africa you have space...there a

profound sense of space here, space

and sky."

P A G E 6


WORTH TO REMEMBER

WHAT THABO MBEKI SAID

Leadership

"We do not accept that human

society should be constructed on the

basis of a savage principle of the

survival of the fittest."

"... the most important thing about

our education was that it taught us to

question even those things we

thought we knew."

Image by @samkelemaseko

"Science is always inquiring."

"I get a sense that we've all been

educated into one school of thought.

I'm not surprised at all to find among

the overwhelming majority of

scientists, are people who would hold

one particular view because that's all

they're exposed to."

"If you sit in a position where

decisions that you take would have a

serious effect on people, you can't

ignore a lot of experience around the

world..."

“"The poor prey on one another

because their lives offer no hope and

communicate the tragic message to

these human beings that they have

no possibility to attain a decent

standard of living."

"We should never become

despondent because the weather is

bad, nor should we turn triumphalist

because the sun shines."

"For the first time in human history,

society has the capacity, the

knowledge and the resources to

eradicate poverty."

P A G E 7


P A G E 8

Image by @BadxDrvgs

LUPITA NYONG'O

" Lupita Nyong’o, in full Lupita Amondi Nyong’o, (born March 1, 1983), Kenyan actress who

won an Academy Award for her film debut in 12 Years a Slave (2013). Nyong'o was named

among Africa's "50 Most Powerful Women" by Forbes in 2020."

by @wmukprom


P A G E 9

Image by @wmukprom


HISTORY IN ITS BROADEST

ASPECT IS A RECORD OF MAN'S

MIGRATIONS FROM ONE

ENVIRONMENT TO ANOTHER.

~ E L L S W O R T H

H U N T I N G T O N

P A G E 4

P A G E 1 0


AFRICA SMILED

Image by mediaupdate.co.za

Africa smiled a little,

when you left “We know you,” Africa

said.

“We have seen and watched you,

We can learn to live without you, but

we know we needn't yet.”

And Africa smiled a little, when you

left “You cannot leave Africa,”

Africa said. “It is always with you,

there inside your head.

Our rivers run in currents in the

swirl of your thumbprints; our

drumbeat counting out your pulse,

our coastline, the silhouette of your

soul.”

So Africa smiled a little, when you

left “We are in you,” Africa said. “You

have not left us, yet.”

© Bridget Dore

Quoted by Writer

KHOLOFELO TLADI

@thatKholofelo

P A G E 1 1


P A G E 1 2

BURNA BOY

E M I G R A T E D T O L O N D O N

( B E T W E E N 2 0 0 8 A N D 2 0 0 9 )

Known as 'African giant', Burna Boy is a

Nigerian artist. He is a global icon and a

well accomplished musician. He is

known for being the pioneer of Afrofusion.

“The pressure is a man that is

wondering how he’s going to feed his

five kids today.”

"I'm Nigerian. I'm African. I have a lot to

say. Apart from what I say, though, is

the feeling. People can relate to that

feeling. It's a reciprocal relationship.

They feed off me and I feed off them."

"Way I see it, everyone plays their own

role in the world, and no role is more

important than the other."

Image by @txt_mag


P A G E 1 3

AFRICAN GIANT

"If I had children, as soon as I have

them, I'm teaching them

everything I know. I don't want to

feed you fairytales. Fairytales are

nice. But they come to an end,

and then you have to face reality."

"I would find myself being

inspired by things that I've heard

as a kid: Nigerian music or African

music, some French music or

some Jamaican music. When it's

time for music to be made, it's

almost like my ancestors just

come into me and then it's them."

"You are only as rich as where

you come from, and Nigeria has a

lot of poverty."

"When something happens in

Africa, an artist will sing about it

and stuff. We have all the records;

we have everything."

"At the end of the day, everything

you chase will run."

Image by @banterCLIQ


P A G E 1 4

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P A G E 1 5

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P A G E 1 6

WHAT DO AFRICANS

Image by @IkElevates

Image by @DonCooper

“Most people write me off when

they see me. They do not know my story. They

say I am just an African. They judge me before

they get to know me. What they do not know

is the pride I have in the blood that runs

through my veins. The pride I have in my rich

culture and the history of my people. The

pride I have in my strong family ties and the

deep connection to my community. The pride

I have in the African music, African art, and

African dance. The pride I have in my name

and the meaning behind it. Just as my name

has meaning, I too will live my life with

meaning. So you think I am nothing? Don’t

worry about what I am now, for what I will be, I

am gradually becoming. I will raise my head

high wherever I go because of my African

pride, and nobody will take that away from

me.”― Idowu koyenikan, Wealth for all

Africans: How Every African Can Live the Life of

Their Dreams

“You don't necessarily need atomic

bombs to destroy a nation. Politicians who

value their pockets than the life of citizens

always do that every day.”― Israelmore Ayivor,

Leaders' Ladder

Image by Afrikkit


P A G E 1 7

SAY ABOUT LIFE IN AFRICA?

“Hide nothing from the

masses of our people.

Tell no lies. Expose lies whenever they

are told. Mask no difficulties, mistakes,

failures. Claim no easy victories...”―

Amilcar Cabral, Revolution in Guinea:

Selected Texts

Image by @MuammerGokcin

“When I look at Africa

many questions come to

mind, many times I have asked myself

what would happen if Dr Kwame

Nkrumah and Patrice Lumumba were to

rise up and see what is happening,

many times I have asked myself what

would happen if Nelson Madiba

Mandela were to rise up and see what

is happening, because what they will be

confronted with is an Africa where the

Democratic Republic of Congo is

unsettled, there is a war going on there,

but it's not on the front pages of our

newspapers because we don't even

control our newspapers and the

media.”― PLO Lumumba

Image by @IamMzilikazi


MIRRIAM MAKEBA

South African Musician

Emigrated to America in 1959

"I look at an ant and I see myself: a

native South African, endowed by

nature with a strength much greater

than my size so I might cope with the

weight of a racism that crushes my

spirit."

"Girls are the future mothers of our

society, and it is important that we

focus on their well-being."

"Well there is a lot of work here for

younger and older musicians now.

Our Ministry of Culture has now

really embarked on changing things

for artists, and it is getting much

better. We just have to organize

ourselves as artists, and then things

will be better."

"Age is getting to know all the ways

the world turns, so that if you cannot

turn the world the way you want, you

can at least get out of the way so you

won't get run over."

Image by @KayosIsImmortal

"In the mind, in the heart, I was

always home. I always imagined,

really, going back home."

P A G E 1 8


P A G E 1 9

A XHOSA MUSICIAN

"You are damned and praised, or

encouraged or discouraged by those

who listen to you, and those who come

to applaud you. And to me, those

people are very important."

"But if you are going to wear blinders

then you do not know the world."

"And I believe that it becomes a

troubled continent because there are

those who must always cause

confusion so that we do not keep these

natural resources."

"And I believe that it becomes a

troubled continent because there are

those who must always cause

confusion so that we do not keep these

natural resources."

“I look at a stream and I see myself: a

native South African, flowing irresistibly

over hard obstacles until they become

smooth and, one day, disappear -

flowing from an origin that has been

forgotten toward an end that will never

be.”

"Be careful, think about the effect of

what you say."

Image by @KayosIsImmortal


BOOKS

TO READ

P A G E 2 0


P A G E 2 1

Our

Picks

The Boyfriend Project

by Farrah Rochon

Knocked Down but Not Out

*by Bongani Puotsana

Branna's Imaginary Friends

by Branna Reign Griffith

Growing with Nature

by Joshua Colbert

The Melt-Away Boy

by Jeedisa Reid


P A G E 2 2

FELA KUTI

NIGERIAN MUSICIAN,

EMIGRATED TO LONDON IN 1959

“I must identify myself with Africa.

Then I will have an identity.”

“A radical is he who has no sense…

fights without reason…I have a

reason. I am authentic. Yes, that’s

what I am.”

“Everything I did wrongly was for

experience. That’s how I see it. Once

a man is looking for a better

knowledge and he tries to be honest

and truthful in all endeavours, then

his life is just an experience. It cannot

be a regret.”

“To be spiritual is not by praying and

going to church. Spiritualism is the

understanding of the universe so

that it can be a better place to live

in."

“With my music, I create change…I

am using my music as a weapon.”

Image by @MightyKingChris


P A G E 2 3

A LEGEND

"The rhythm, the sounds, the tonality,

the chord sequences, the individual

effect of each instrument and each

section of the band - I'm talking about a

whole continent in my music."

"“I don't tell lies about anybody. That's

why i win all my wars.”

“The music of Africa is big sound: it's the

sound of a community.”

"“My people are scared of the air

around them, they always have an

excuse not to fight for freedom.”

“Music is a weapon of the future / music

is the weapon of the progressives /

music is the weapon of the givers of

life.”

“I want peace. Happiness. Not only for

myself. For everybody.”

“The secret of life is to have no fear.”

“I hold death in my pouch, I cannot die.”

"Being African didn't mean anything to

me until later in my life." -- Fela Kuti

Image by @BoomRadioNG1


Image by @mathyadriana

P A G E 2 4

TREVOR NOAH

SOUTH AFRICAN. EMIGRATED TO THE U.S. BETWEEN 2014 AND 2015.

"I like the anonymity, the fact that

you're a stranger making strangers

laugh. You aren't forcing them to

laugh - it's involuntary, and that's

when they give the most honest

response."

I'm not an abrasive person. I do

speak my mind, but my goal is never

to offend. I don't intentionally want

to strike a chord."


P A G E 2 5

Image by Trevor Noah

"I live in South Africa. I'm proud to

live there. I've always said I want

to be a comedian from South

Africa in the world. I will stay in

places for a bit here and there and

pop into New York for a while,

maybe stay in London for a year,

but my home will always be South

Africa. I enjoy it too much."

"We get angry about the small

things sometimes, I feel, so that we

feel like we're doing something, so

that we don't have to tackle the big

things. And it's fine; let people do

that. But I'm not gonna now

change because of that. You know?

Like, the worst thing that happens

to me is you don't like me. And

then what?"


Image by Eric Beauchemin


P A G E 2 7

YVONNE VERA

ZIMBABWEAN WRITER

EMIGRATED TO CANADA IN 2004

“Time is as necessary for remembering

as it is for forgetting. Even the smallest

embrace of pain needs time larger than

a pause; the greatest pause requires an

eternity, the greatest hurt a lifetime. A

lifetime is longer than eternity: an

eternity can exist without human

presence.”

“For me writing is light, a radiance

that captures everything in a fine

profile. This light searches and

illuminates, it is a safe place from

which to uncover the emotional

havoc of our experience. Light is a

bright warmth which heals. Writing

can be this kind of light.”

Image by @BrezhMalaba


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P A G E 3 0

Picture by @GentIemanLadies

CHARLIZE THERON

SOUTH AFRICAN ACTRESS


P A G E 3 1

"I'd love to get pajamas. Good, nice and

warm flannel ones."

"If they ever do my life story, whoever

plays me needs lots of hair color and

high heels."

"And I do think that earlier in my career,

I did make a very conscious decision to

make sure that I was doing work that

wasn't necessarily given to me, and that

people didn't necessarily think that I

would be able to do."

"I am human, and, yeah, I have very bad

days."

"I have been working a lot, and I like it.

And you know, it's hard for me not to. I

guess I've been working a lot because I

get to play with brilliant people."

"I mean I tried to transform myself

through characters throughout my

career."

EMIGRATED TO AMERICA AT AGE 16.


P A G E 3 2

ELON MUSK

"There have to be reasons that you get up

in the morning and you want to live. Why

do you want to live? What's the point?

What inspires you? What do you love about

the future? If the future does not include

being out there among the stars and being

a multi-planet species, I find that incredibly

depressing."

"With artificial intelligence, we are

summoning the demon. You know all

those stories where there's the guy with

the pentagram and the holy water, and

he's like, yeah, he's sure he can control the

demon? Doesn't work out."

"A battery by definition is a collection of

cells. So the cell is a little can of chemicals.

And the challenge is taking a very highenergy

cell, and a large number of them,

and combining them safely into a large

battery."

Image by @ayishas4

"Yeah, well I think anyone who likes fast

cars will love the Tesla. And it has fantastic

handling by the way. I mean this car will

crush a Porsche on the track, just crush it.

So if you like fast cars, you'll love this car.

And then oh, by the way, it happens to be

electric and it's twice the efficiency of a

Prius."


P A G E 3 3

ELON MUSK X TESLA

EMIGRATED TO CANADA IN 1988

"I think it's very important to have a

feedback loop, where you're

constantly thinking about what

you've done and how you could be

doing it better."

"Cybertruck, ATV, Roadster and Semi

CARS".

"Land on Mars, a round-trip ticket -

half a million dollars. It can be done."

"If you get up in the morning and

think the future is going to be better,

it is a bright day. Otherwise, it's not."

"The reality is gas prices should be

much more expensive then they are

because we're not incorporating the

true damage to the environment and

the hidden costs of mining oil and

transporting it to the U.S. Whenever

you have an unpriced externality, you

have a bit of a market failure, to the

degree that eternality remains

unpriced."

"I think that's the single best piece of

advice: constantly think about how

you could be doing things better and

questioning yourself."

Image by Elon Musk


P A G E 3 4

"Africa has been troubled for a long time -

well, the world has been troubled ever

since I was born."

HUGH

"I've always stood on one fact - that all over

the world, there are only two things, the

Establishment and the poor people. The

poor people are a massive majority and

across the world they are exploited in

different kinds of ways. The Establishment

depends on exploiting raw materials and

the poor."

"I'm travelling more than ever. I don't have

the answer as to why, but the demand

seems to have grown as I've got older."

"I just came from South Africa, a place that

had been in a perpetual uprising since

1653, so the uprising had become a way of

life in our culture and we grew up with

rallies and strikes and marches and

boycotts."

"I don't think what I do is influenced by

suffering. I come from a talented people

who are prolific in music and dance."

EMIGRATED TO LONDON in the 1960s.

Image by @Andiey_M


P A G E 3 5

MASEKELA

“I've got to where I am in

life not because of

something I brought to

the world but through

something I found - the

wealth of African

culture.”-- Hugh

Masekela


P A G E 3 8

CHIMAMANDA NGOZI ADICHIE

Image by @ncambirwa

An accomplished Nigerian author, Chimamanda was born in nigeria and

emigrated to North America in 1996 to study.

"My own definition of feminist is: a feminist is a man or a woman who says –

a feminist is a man or a woman who says “Yes, there’s a problem with gender

as it is today, and we must fix it. We must do better.”


P A G E 3 7

"Some people will say that a woman being

subordinate to a man is our culture. But culture

is constantly changing. I have beautiful twin

nieces who are fifteen and live in Lagos, if they

had been born a hundred years ago they would

have been taken away and killed. Because it was

our culture, it was our culture to kill twins.So

what is the point of culture? I mean there’s the

decorative, the dancing…but also, culture really is

about preservation and continuity of a people. In

my family, I am the child who is most interested

in the story of who we are, in our tradition, in the

knowledge about ancestral lands. My brothers

are not as interested as I am. But I cannot

participate, I cannot go to their meetings, I

cannot have a say. Because I’m female."

"Culture does not make people, people make

culture. So if it’s in fact true that the full humanity

of women is not our culture, then we must make

it our culture. I think very often of my dear friend

Okuloma, may he and all the others that passed

away in that Sosoliso Crash continue to rest in

peace. He will always be remembered by those

of us who loved him. And he was right that day

many years ago when he called me a feminist. I

am a feminist. And when I looked up the word in

the dictionary that day, this is what it said:

Feminist, a person who believes in the social,

political and economic equality of the sexes."

"We should all

be feminists."


“We teach girls to shrink themselves, to make themselves smaller. We say to girls, you

can have ambition, but not too much. You should aim to be successful, but not too

successful. Otherwise, you would threaten the man. Because I am female, I am expected

to aspire to marriage. I am expected to make my life choices always keeping in mind that

marriage is the most important. Now marriage can be a source of joy and love and

mutual support but why do we teach girls to aspire to marriage and we don’t teach boys

the same? We raise girls to see each other as competitors not for jobs or

accomplishments, which I think can be a good thing, but for the attention of men. We

teach girls that they cannot be sexual beings in the way that boys are.”― Chimamanda

Ngozi Adichie, We Should All Be Feminists


WRITER & AUTHOR

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

"...All of these stories make me who I

am. But to insist on only these negative

stories is to flatten my experience, and

to overlook the many other stories that

formed me. The single story creates

stereotypes. And the problem with

stereotypes is not that they are untrue,

but that they are incomplete. They

make one story become the only story.

Of course, Africa is a continent full of

catastrophes. There are immense ones,

such as the horrific rapes in Congo. And

depressing ones, such as the fact that

5,000 people apply for one job vacancy

in Nigeria. But there are other stories

that are not about catastrophe. And it is

very important, it is just as important, to

talk about them.

I've always felt that it is impossible to

engage properly with a place or a

person without engaging with all of the

stories of that place and that person.

The consequence of the single story is

this: It robs people of dignity. It makes

our recognition of our equal humanity

difficult. It emphasizes how we are

different rather than how we are

similar."

"...Men and women are different. We

have different hormones and different

sexual organs and different biological

abilities – women can have babies, men

cannot. Men have more testosterone

and are, in general, physically stronger

than women. There are slightly more

women than men in the world – 52

percent of the world’s population is

female but most of the positions of

power and prestige are occupied by

men. The late Kenyan Nobel peace

laureate Wangari Maathai put it simply

and well when she said, ‘The higher you

go, the fewer women there are."

"...So in a literal way, men rule the

world. This made sense – a thousand

years ago. Because human beings lived

then in a world in which physical

strength was the most important

attribute for survival; the physically

stronger person was more likely to

lead. And men in general are physically

stronger. (There are of course many

exceptions.) Today, we live in a vastly

different world. The person more

qualified to lead is not the physically

stronger person. It is the more

intelligent,.."


“A rose can never

be a sunflower,

and a sunflower

can never be a

rose. All flowers

are beautiful in

their own way,

and that’s like

women too.”

— Miranda Kerr


“Be the healer you wished you had growing up.”

― Mitta Xinindlu


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