British Travel Journal | Autumn 20

ContistaMedia

The rise in staycations, brought about by the coronavirus pandemic, has opened many more eyes to Britain’s amazing travel destinations.
Some are discovering for the first time, as British Travel Journal readers have always known, that our beautiful countryside, sandy shores, spectacular landmarks and world-class hotels are far from a 'second choice' holiday option. Our latest issue - brimming with inspirational travel ideas from around our glorious island - should be enough to convince even the most hardened of international traveller, that a holiday in the British Isles won’t feel like a compromise. That’s why this year we’re offering a special discount on our ‘gift’ subscriptions for families and friends (p68), spreading the word, and hoping that this surge we are seeing in popularity for UK travel experiences will be here long after the virus has gone.
Staying in the UK comes with many bonuses too, like not having to worry about what to do with our beloved four-legged friends, as we discover in our Dog-Friendly Holidays feature (p76), and giving back to our spectacular scenery and wildlife in the next of our sustainable travel series, Discovering Nature (p44).
We hope you will be feeling on top of the world with our selection of Britain’s Best Panoramas (p48), and you might enjoy painting them too, so we show you how in Nurture your Creativity (p71). We offer a taste of the New Forest in our Interview with Head Chef, Luke Matthews (p54) and discover more spectacular scenery, heading west to Wild Wales (p26), before turning south to the Polperro Heritage Coast, spending 48 Hours in Fowey (p63). Other featured destinations this issue include The Charm of Clovelly, (p88) and Scotland’s Isle of Arran where we head to Meet the Makers of Isle of Arran Gin (p58).
If you're not feeling ready to travel just yet, we hope this issue helps keep your dreams of future travel plans alive - and that planning ahead will help to give you the confidence you need for a safe and memorable trip away soon.
Finally, we're delighted to have been nominated this year for 'Best Consumer Travel Magazine' in the 2020 British Travel Awards, and would love your help to try and win! Please vote for us from our direct page britishtraveljournal.com/vote.
We look forward to continuing to share our travel adventures together.

BRITISH TRAVEL

JOURNAL

City | Coast | Country

AUTUMN/WINTER 2020 | ISSUE 07

BritishTravelJournal.com

serene

beauty

spots

FIND YOUR BREATHING SPACE WITH

TRANQUIL PANORAMAS AND HIDDEN

PLACES OFF THE BEATEN TRACK

best

UK rail

trails

HAVE YOUR OWN ADVENTURE

WITH A WALK OR CYCLE TRIP

ALONG A FORMER RAILWAY LINE

£6.75

find out why WALES is the perfect destination for a UK staycation in our 10 page special


THE NEW TR ADITI O N

RESEIGH FOOKS BRAND AND PACKAGING DESIGN CLIENT: NOBLE ISLE STAGE 3 29th June 2011

C O N T R I B U T I O N S

BRITISH TRAVEL

JOURNAL

BritishTravelJournal.com

WELCOME

editors

Editor-in-chief Jessica Way

FEATURES EDITOR Samantha Rutherford

CHIEF SUB-EDITOR Angela Harding

expert contributors

Melanie Abrams

Chantal Borciani

Helen Holmes

Adrian Mourby

Karyn Noble

Emma O’Reilly

Lydia Paleschi

Max Wooldridge

Adrienne Wyper

FRONT COVER IMAGE

St Nectan's Glen, Trethevy, North Cornwall

Photo: Editor's own

FEATURE CHOICE

48 Hours in Fowey p63

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While every care is taken prices and details are subject to

change and Contista Media Ltd take no responsibility for

omissions or errors. We reserve the right to publish

and edit any letters. All rights reserved.

THE RISE IN staycations,

brought about by the

coronavirus pandemic, has

opened many more eyes to

Britain’s amazing travel destinations.

Some are discovering for the first

time, as British Travel Journal readers

have always known, that our beautiful

countryside, sandy shores, spectacular

landmarks and world-class hotels

are far from a 'second choice' holiday

option. Our latest issue - brimming

with inspirational travel ideas from

around our glorious island - should

be enough to convince even the most

hardened of international traveller, that a holiday in the British Isles won’t feel like

a compromise. That’s why this year we’re offering a special discount on our ‘gift’

subscriptions for families and friends (p68), spreading the word, and hoping that

this surge we are seeing in popularity for UK travel experiences will be here long

after the virus has gone.

Staying in the UK comes with many bonuses too, like not having to worry

about what to do with beloved four-legged friends, as we discover in our Dog-

Friendly Holidays feature (p76), and giving back to our spectacular scenery and

wildlife in the next of our sustainable travel series, Discovering Nature (p44).

We hope you will be feeling on top of the world with our selection of Britain’s

Best Panoramas (p48), and you might enjoy painting them too, so we show you

how in Nurture your Creativity (p71). We offer a taste of the New Forest in our

Interview with Head Chef, Luke Matthews (p54) and discover more spectacular

scenery, heading west to Wild Wales (p26), before turning south to the Polperro

Heritage Coast, 48 Hours in Fowey (p63). Other featured destinations this issue

include The Charm of Clovelly, (p88) and Scotland’s Isle of Arran where we head

to Meet the Makers of Isle of Arran Gin (p58).

If you're not feeling ready to travel just yet, we hope this issue helps keep your

dreams of future travel plans alive - and that planning ahead will help to give you

the confidence you need for a safe and memorable trip away soon.

Finally, we're delighted to have been nominated this year for 'Best Consumer

Travel Magazine' in the 2020 British Travel Awards, and would love your help to

try and win! Please vote for us from our direct page britishtraveljournal.com/vote,

thank you. We look forward to continuing to share our travel adventures together. u

Pictured above: Editor visits

Clovelly (see p88)

Jessica x

Jessica Way

Editor-In-Chief

BritishTravelJournal.com 3


Fly direct with

Penzance Helicopters

Christmas off the Cornish coast

...somewhere else altogether

TRESCO.CO.UK/CHRISTMAS

SPA & WELLNESS • ACCOMMODATION • ABBEY GARDEN • DINING • GALLERY


36

CONTENTS

AUTUMN/WINTER 2020 | ISSUE 07

26

84

JOTTINGS

09

TRAVEL NEWS

A look at what’s new and travel

noteworthy in the British Isles.

10 VIEWPOINT

Captivating images from our favourite

photographers to take you there in an instant.

CULTURAL AGENDA

17 Dates for your autumn/winter diary

BRITAIN’S BEST PANORAMAS

48

From West Country tors, Scottish

mountain summits to elevated city views,

feel on top of the world with our selection of

Britain’s most awesome panoramas.

FOR YOUR JOURNEY

98 Latest travel essentials and crossword.

FEATURES

26

WILD WALES

To the west of England lies a Celtic

principality that has been attracting

English tourists for centuries.

THE BEST UK RAIL TRAILS

36 Walk or cycle along a former railway line.

DISCOVERING NATURE

44

Spend your next trip marvelling at the

richness of our native flora and fauna – and

help to ensure that our spectacular scenery and

wildlife are maintained for future generations.

COASTAL FORAGING

84 Wild edibles are in abundance across

the British Isles with a tantalising range of

fungi, plants, shellfish and seaweed on offer

countrywide.

à

BritishTravelJournal.com 5


76

E D I T O R

L O V E S

Pullman Editions original and

exclusive limited-edition Art

Deco posters of glamorous

destinations around the world,

from ski resorts in the French Alps

to Supercars in Knightsbridge.

Priced £395.

pullmaneditions.com

LIFESTYLE

54

INTERVIEW WITH LUKE

MATTHEWS, CHEWTON GLEN

Five-star Chewton Glen has stood the test of

time with aplomb, here its Executive Head

Chef reveals the secret to its timeless elegance

and tremendous new offerings

MEET THE MAKERS

58 OF ISLE OF ARRAN GIN

There’s a growing artisanal movement on

Scotland’s Isle of Arran, and now it has its first

craft gin, we meet the locals behind the brand.

68

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essential from Noble Isle worth £20 and three

issues of British Travel Journal for just £19!

NURTURE YOUR CREATIVITY

71 We show you how a painting break will

open your eyes, and supply inspiration from

our island’s wealth of spectacular scenery.

DOG-FRIENDLY HOLIDAYS

76 The woof guide to ten of the warmest

welcomes for you and your best friend.

88

ITINERARIES

63

48 HOURS IN FOWEY

Find sanctuary on the lesser-known

Polperro Heritage Coast, avoiding the crowds

and embracing the Cornish Riviera lifestyle.

THE CHARM OF CLOVELLY

88 Recently named as ‘the most

instagrammable village in the UK’, we

discover more about this stunning North

Devon harbour.

THE BIRCH

92 If you’re yearning for a UK mini-break

with a difference then you’ll be hard pushed to

find a better escape than The Birch - the UK’s

most trendy new hotel to open this year.

SCOTLAND’S ONLY LUXURY

96 FLOATING HOTEL

Treat your loved ones to something special this

year with an overnight stay aboard Fingal, a

luxury floating hotel permanently berthed on

Edinburgh’s vibrant waterfront. u

6 BritishTravelJournal.com


Holmewell House, Lake Windermere, Cumbria

Find your special place

From quintessential cottages and country houses

to quirky windmills and lighthouses.

A portfolio of over

550 luxury, self-catering

holiday properties

in the UK and Ireland.

View the properties

ruralretreats.co.uk

Call for our brochure

01386 897 959


Multi-million pound refurbishment completed in May 2020 Walking distance from many iconic landmarks WTTC Safe Travel Accredited - Covid-19 secure

the heart of London, the hotel is mere moments from Covent Garden,

Trafalgar Strand Square Palace is and surrounded the Thames, by making the best it London the perfect has location to offer. for

discovering Set in the cultural heart of icons.

the heart of London, the

London, hotel is

the mere

hotel moments

is mere from

moments Covent

from

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Trafalgar

Covent Square

Garden, and

Trafalgar the Thames,

Square making

and the it the

Thames, perfect

making location

it

for

discovering

the perfect cultural

location icons.

for discovering cultural icons.

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372 Strand, London WC2R 0JJ

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372 Strand, London WC2R 0JJ

@strandpalace

@strandpalace


TRAVEL NEWS

W H A T ' S N E W

Destinations | Renovations | Launches | Celebrations

THE MITRE

Now open as a relaxed and sophisticated

36 room boutique hotel on the banks of the

River Thames with balconies and private

courtyards (fire pits and jacuzzis) overlooking

the river. Hotel rooms from £195 a night

mitrehamptoncourt.com

LARGEST UK EXHIBITION OF OUTDOOR SCULPTURES

Influential works of British sculptor Anish Kapoor will exhibit in the grounds and historic interiors

of Houghton Hall in Norfolk. The exhibition features 24 mirror and stone sculptures as well as

drawings, challenging the classical architecture of the house and the idyllic beauty of the grounds,

whilst being in continuous dialogue and engagement with Houghton’s history. Anish Kapoor is one

of the most influential sculptors working today, known for creating ambitious public sculptures

adventurous in both form and engineering across vastly different scales and materials.

Exhibition runs until 1 Nov 2020, tickets for adults £16, students £10. houghtonhall.com

THE BEAR

Escape to this newly renovated 18th

Century Coaching Inn on the Jurassic Coast.

The quirky and cosy inn has stylish rooms,

hearty food, fabulous cakes and artisan coffees.

Prices from £290 for two nights for two

thebearwareham.co.uk

N E W P R O D U C T L A U N C H

CORNWALL’S BOUTIQUE BARNS

Escape to holiday luxury in Aria Resorts’ brandnew

boutique luxury two, three, four and six

bedroomed barns at the 5-star Retallack Resort

& Spa in Cornwall. Prices from £383 per night.

ariaresorts.co.uk/retallack-resort

THE STORY OF GARDENING

One of the UK’s most innovative new attractions,

The Story of Gardening is an immersive experience

at The Newt in Somerset, exploring gardens from

around the world and throughout time.

thenewtinsomerset.com/the-story-of-gardening

SMART CLEAN

This handy 2-in-1 UV

sanitiser and wireless

charger disinfects your

tech and accessories

in a 10-minute intensive

sterilisation, £59.99.

qdossound.com

BritishTravelJournal.com 9


10 BritishTravelJournal.com

VIEWPOINT


Captivating images from our favourite photographers to take you

there in an instant. This issue we feature Andrew Ray, a full time

professional landscape photographer, specialising in the UK

Words | Emma O'Reilly

O T T E R I S L A N D

“THIS PHOTO WAS TAKEN AT

OTTER ISLAND IN ABBOTS

BAY NEAR THE SOUTHERN

END OF DERWENTWATER

IN THE LAKE DISTRICT

NATIONAL PARK. I TOOK

THIS ON A MORNING IN LATE

OCTOBER WHEN THE SURFACE

OF THE LAKE WAS STILL

ENOUGH FOR REFLECTIONS

TO BE CAPTURED.”

BritishTravelJournal.com 11


ST MICHAEL'S

MOUNT

“THE CAUSEWAY TO ST MICHAEL'S

MOUNT IN CORNWALL PARTIALLY

COVERED BY THE INCOMING TIDE.

THE PICTURE WAS TAKEN SHORTLY

BEFORE SUNSET USING A ONE-

SECOND SHUTTER SPEED TO BLUR THE

MOVEMENT IN A BREAKING WAVE.”

BLACK ROCK

COTTAGE

“BLACK ROCK COTTAGE ON

RANNOCH MOOR IN THE

SCOTTISH HIGHLANDS WITH

SNOWCAPPED MOUNTAINS IN THE

BUACHAILLE ETIVE MOR RANGE,

AT THE ENTRANCE TO THE PASS

OF GLENCOE IN THE DISTANCE.

THE IMAGE WAS CAPTURED ON

A STORMY AFTERNOON IN EARLY

NOVEMBER.”

12 BritishTravelJournal.com


PISTYLL RHAEADR

WATERFALL

“PISTYLL RHAEADR, A 240-FOOT WATERFALL

IN POWYS, IS CLASSIFIED AS ONE OF THE

SEVEN WONDERS OF WALES. THE IMAGE WAS

SHOT FROM A HIGH VANTAGE POINT ON

THE OPPOSITE SIDE OF THE VALLEY ON A

MORNING IN EARLY NOVEMBER”

BritishTravelJournal.com 13


14 BritishTravelJournal.com


P E R R A N P O R T H

“THIS IS ONE OF THE OLDEST

AND MOST POPULAR IMAGES

IN MY PORTFOLIO. THE

NATURAL SEA ARCH ON

PERRANPORTH BEACH IN

CORNWALL WAS ILLUMINATED

BY EARLY MORNING

SUNLIGHT.”

M O R E A B O U T

O U R

P H O T O G R A P H E R

Andrew Ray lives in Cornwall, where much

of his inspiration for great photography

comes from. Mountainous destinations – the

Scottish Highlands, Wales and the Lake

District – are also favourites.


He became interested in photography in

his early twenties. ‘My doctor suggested

spending more time outside could help with

the migraines I was suffering with, so I took

up walking. Cornwall has such inspirational

scenery that photographing this was a

natural progression. Initially, after taking

an evening course, it was just a hobby, but

it quickly turned into a full-time profession

which has lasted for over 20 years’


‘I aim to create strong compositions in

quality light – particularly during the ‘golden’

hours around sunrise and sunset. All of my

photographs are captured using Canon

cameras (currently the Canon EOS 5D Mark

IV) and a tripod, along with a selection of

professional lenses and filters which are used to

balance brightness levels or for creative effect.’


Andrew’s images have received numerous

awards including Royal Photographic

Society medals for both landscape and

wildlife. He regularly features in local

and national newspapers, books, and

magazines.


Readers can buy Andrew’s prints or book

onto his one-to-one and group photography

tuition tours in Cornwall by visiting

andrewrayphotography.com

BritishTravelJournal.com 15


CULTURAL AGENDA

H O T T H I S S E A S O N

Exhibitions | Museums | Galleries | Shows

W E LOVE

The Belles

Two steel sculptures dotted around the

town mark Scarborough as Britain’s first

seaside resort. Made by Craig Knowles,

an early Bathing Belle steps down from

a bathing machine (changing room)

on sandy North Bay. Whilst next to the

Vincent Pier lighthouse, a modern

Diving Belle heads into the sea.

discoveryorkshirecoast.com

à

Words | Melanie Abrams


W H A T W E ’ R E B O O K I N G

Michael Clark

07 OCTOBER 2020 – 03 JANUARY 2021

To celebrate dancer and choreographer,

Michael Clark’s 15 years as the Barbican’s

artistic associate, the centre’s art gallery is

holding a retrospective of his avant garde

oeuvre from 7 October. Alongside films

of his mesmerising moves, the exhibition

highlights his visual artistic collaborations,

says curator, Florence Ostend, including

his naked body sculpted by Sarah Lucas for

her installation, Cnut.

barbican.org.uk

PICTURED

LEFT: OXANA

PANCHENKO

AND CLAIR

THOMAS IN

A PUBLICITY

SHOT FOR

COME, BEEN

AND GONE,

2009. RIGHT:

MICHAEL

CLARK

Tracey Emin/Edvard Munch: The

Loneliness of the Soul

15 NOVEMBER 2020 – 28 FEBRUARY 2021

This season’s most intriguing show pits

Tracey Emin’s visceral work with that of The

Scream painter, Edvard Munch at the Royal

Academy of Arts from 15 November. Loss,

longing and other emotions inspired them

both, according to Emin, who has picked

around 44 pieces from her multi-media

archive and his to demonstrate their affinity

100 years apart.

royalacademy.org.uk

PICTURED BELOW: TRACEY

152 X 183.5 X 3.7 CM. XAVIER

EDVARD MUNCH, THE DEATH OF MARAT, 1907. OIL ON CANVAS,

153 X 149 CM. MUNCHMUSEET

Lynette Yiadom-Boakye: Fly in League

with the Night

18 NOVEMBER 2020 – 9 MAY 2021

It’s about time that British figurative artist,

Lynette Yiadom-Boakye had a major

retrospective. Now Tate Britain will hold

the first one from 18 November. With her

imaginary characters in everyday settings

– reading, lounging or in a group hug, she

makes art relatable and relevant.

tate.org.uk

18 BritishTravelJournal.com

LYNETTE YIADOM-BOAKYE

CITRINE BY THE OUNCE

2014 PRIVATE COLLECTION

© COURTESY OF LYNETTE YIADOM-BOAKYE

LYNETTE YIADOM-BOAKYE

COMPLICATION

2013 PRIVATE COLLECTION

© COURTESY OF LYNETTE YIADOM-BOAKYE


EMIN, IT - DIDNT STOP - I DIDNT STOP, 2019. ACRYLIC ON CANVAS,

HUFKENS © TRACEY EMIN. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, DACS 2020

© 2019 TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX FILM CORPORATION. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

W H A T W E ’ R E W A T C H I N G ?

West Side Story

18 DECEMBER 2020

Whilst Megxit has pit the

Sussexes against the Cambridges,

from 18 December, it’s the Jets vs

the Sharks - as Steven Spielberg’s West Side

Story remake hits the cinemas. Ansel Elgort

plays Tony, whilst newcomer Rachel Zegler

plays Maria. Watch out for Rita Moreno as

Tony’s boss. As Anita in the 1961 original, she

turned America iconic.

amblin.com/movie/west-side-story/

IMAGES BELOW (CLOCKWISE): KARL LAGERFELD APARTMENT, MONTE CARLO;

“HORIZON” BY MICHELE DE LUCCHI 1984. MEMPHIS MILANO COLLECTION;

“BURUNDI” BY NATHALIE DU PASQUIER 1981. MEMPHIS MILANO COLLECTION;

“LIDO” BY MICHELE DE LUCCHI 1982. MEMPHIS MILANO COLLECTION; MEMPHIS

DESIGNERS WITH MASANORI UMEDA'S TAWARAYA BED 1981.

S P O T L I G H T O N :

T H E M E M P H I S G R O U P

Memphis: Plastic Field

21 NOVEMBER 2020 – 24 APRIL 2021

For a design masterclass, head to Milton

Keynes’ MK Gallery. The year old space

is showing the influential work of Italian

architect and designer, Ettore Sottsass and his

1980s collective, the Memphis Group, from

21 November. See why their bold colours,

unusual materials and strong geometric style

appealed to fans like David Bowie.

mkgallery.org


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Take a relaxing walk around our Swiss Garden filled with pretty seasonal colour and two

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wildlife. Observe fantastic views of Shuttleworth House and scenic surrounding countryside

from North Park’s gentle hills, before a stroll around the paddocks overlooking the grass

airfield. Discover the Shuttleworth Collection, showcasing the best of early aviation, vintage

vehicles and Clayton & Shuttleworth industrial heritage.

FREE ENTRY FOR KIDS & MEMBERS. BOOK ADMISSION ONLINE AND RE-USE YOUR ADULT TICKETS MULTIPLE TIMES FOR UP TO A MONTH!

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UNTIL 3 JANUARY 2021

GP_MARCH_HALF—1.indd 1 19/02/2020 11:20


W H E R E W E ’ R E

S P O T T I N G A R T ?

Beacon Hill Woodwork

A wizard’s head, a quirky frog sitting

upright and a shepherd with his ram are

among the 30-odd wooden sculptures

and benches carved by Peter Leadbeater

across Beacon Hill in Leicestershire.

Meet the artist in his workshop in the

country park.

leicscountryparks.org.uk

The Scallop

Between Aldeburgh and Thorpeness

pebbly beaches in Suffolk looms the

four metre high Scallop, a stainless

steel sculpture by local artist, Maggi

Hambling. The two interlocking scallop

shells commemorate the equally iconic

composer, Benjamin Britten, who used

to stroll along these shores.

thesuffolkcoast.co.uk;

visitsuffolk.com

Grizedale Forest Sculptures

Explore art in a fresh way – walking or

cycling through Grizedale Forest in the

Lake District. Over 70 intriguing works

can be found. There’s a key fixed onto

a tree which turns and plays music by

Greyworld, say, as well as a baptism

which also forms a waterfall by Alannah

Robins.

forestryengland.uk;

grizedalesculpture.org

The Folkestone Mermaid

Overlooking Folkestone harbour sits

Cornelia Parker’s bronze mermaid.

Echoing Copenhagen’s fabled Little

Mermaid, this British version was inspired

by The Sea Lady novel by H. G. Wells

who lived nearby. Delve into the town’s

rich maritime and natural history at the

nearby Folkestone Museum.

creativefolkestone.org.uk

IMAGES LEFT COLUMN:

GRIZEDALE FOREST

SCULPTURES

THIS COLUMN, TOP-BOTTOM:

MAGGI HAMBLING'S SHELL

AT ALDEBURGH. COURTESY

OF THE SUFFOLK COAST;

CORNELIA PARKER, THE

FOLKESTONE MERMAID

PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY

OF THIERRY BAL: SCULPTURE

CARVED BY PETER LEADBEATER

ACROSS BEACON HILL IN

LEICESTERSHIRE: PETER

LEADBEATER SCULPTURER AT

HIS WORKSHOP IS BASED AT

BEACON HILL COUNTRY PARK

IN LEICESTERSHIRE.

BritishTravelJournal.com 21


PICTURED ABOVE: IRON BRIDGE; THE ROYAL PAVILION, HORSESHOE FALLS AND GARDENERS AND ORANGE TREE, OSBORNE HOUSE. BELOW: WROXETER ROMAN CITY AND DOVECOTE AT CUMBERNAULD GLEN

IMAGES © ENGLISH HERITAGE/ © TRACY LAMBERT

W H E R E W E ’ R E

D I S C O V E R I N G ?

Iron Bridge

Spanning the River Severn, linking

(once) industrial Broseley to the

coal-mining town of Madeley in

Shropshire is the world’s first cast-iron

bridge – symbolising the industrial

revolution’s birthplace. Erected in

1779 with 378 tons of local iron, the

single arch bridge was restored last

year for £3.6 million. Explore its

construction by Abraham Darby III in

the nearby original tollhouse.

english-heritage.org.uk

Cumbernauld Glen

A round 16th century dovecote that

looks like Rapunzel’s castle, old tunnels

and even older trees add mystique to

Cumbernauld Glen, the rich wildlife

reserve, north east of Glasgow. Whether

cycling, hiking or on horseback – spot

the vibrant kingfishers, badgers – and

snowdrops in the new year.

scottishwildlifetrust.org.uk

A Prince’s Treasure is revealed at the

Royal Pavilion

A spectacular loan from Her Majesty

The Queen, of art and furniture owned

by George IV, is on display at the Royal

Pavilion in Brighton this autumn. The

items, which can be seen or the first time

in 170 years, include majestic 15-foot high

porcelain pagodas, exquisite Chinese

nodding figurines and the impressive

dragon fire fenders.

brightonmuseums.org.uk/

royalpavilion/

Horseshoe Falls

A feat of 1800s engineering, The

Horseshoe (shaped) Falls on the River

Dee in North Wales was designed by

fabled British engineer, Thomas Telford,

to channel water into the Llangollen

canal. Travel there in style. Either by

vintage horse-drawn boat or by steam

engine to Berwyn Station with its

Victorian waiting room, stationmaster’s

house and more.

pontcysyllte-aqueduct.co.uk/

attraction/horseshoe-falls

22 BritishTravelJournal.com


W H E R E W E ’ R E F I N D I N G N E W

L I F E ?

PICTURED BELOW: OSBORNE HOUSE; THE LEECHWELL

Petersham Nurseries in Richmond

A stone’s throw from Richmond Park is Petersham

Nurseries with eateries serving posh nosh like

chargrilled lobster alongside plants, climbers,

trees or trowels. Look out for amaryllis with their

huge vibrant blooms, say, or the multi-coloured

Crocosmia Emily McKenzie. Or handmade wreaths

for the festive season.

petershamnurseries.com

Osborne House and Gardens

Whilst the next season of Victoria is

on TV ice, experience the real queen’s

lifestyle at Osborne House, her holiday

home on the Isle of Wight. Alongside

the home and gardens, designed by

Prince Albert, explore the family’s

private beach. For a wider regal visit on

East Cowes, there’s Carisbrooke Castle

where Charles I was imprisoned or the

Romanov monument, dedicated to the

murdered family.

english-heritage.org.uk

The Leechwell

Amongst the narrow lanes of Totnes

in South Devon is a slice of medieval

life: a 13th century healing well, The

Leechwell. The sunken stone and slate

structure with its three troughs of water

were believed to cure snake-bites, skin

diseases and more. Today, it’s a draw for

meditation and offerings with the water

flowing into Leechwell Garden nearby.

leechwellgarden.org;

visittotnes.co.uk

Worton Kitchen Garden

Home grown organic produce from its greenhouse,

garden, orchard or beehives is the hallmark of

Worton Kitchen Garden, the shop and cafe at

Worton Farm in Oxfordshire. Own brand products

are tasty surprises including quince meat for festive

mince pies – and ketchup.

wortonkitchengarden.com

Special Plants

For the most unusual foliage finds, head to

Chippenham in Wiltshire for Special Plants.

There’s an edible Sunset Hibiscius with primrose

petals, say, or for winter bloom, a rare fragrant pink

shrub, Daphne Bholua ‘Jacqueline Postill’. On a

Wednesday, explore the garden for design tips.

specialplants.net

Jekka’s

Over 400 herbs can be found at Jekka’s farm in

Bristol, where the herbetum houses diverse edible

and medicinal species with seeds, plants or kits sold

in the shop. There’s more to each herb than first

glance – like the bright orange Lion’s Tail with its

sting-treating roots. (Pre-books for groups needed

this season.)

jekkas.com

BritishTravelJournal.com 23


W H A T W E ’ R E

L I S T E N I N G T O ?

Album No 8 by Katie Melua

16 OCTOBER 2020

A cosy Cotswolds cottage is where Katie

Melua wrote tracks for her new folky

Album No 8 – including A Love Like

That. Her bell-like voice soars above the

rich arrangements from Tbilisi’s Georgian

Philharmonic Orchestra. Top track: the

rhythmic Voices In The Night.

katiemelua.com

W H E R E W E ' R E

S H O P P I N G

Browns Flagship store in Mayfair

Having discovered Alexander McQueen

and John Galliano, Browns fashion

boutique is renowned for spotting the

next fashion star. Now the store is moving

to a four storey house along Mayfair’s

Brook Street where new neighbours

include Claridge’s Hotel and music

museum, Handel & Hendrix in London.

brownsfashion.com

W H A T W E ’ R E

R E A D I N G ?

Bird’s Eye London

15 OCTOBER 2020

More than 150 stunning aerial images

by photographer, Paul Campbell, who

describes his book as a labour

of love, offer a totally fresh perspective

on some of London’s most famous landmarks,

as well as corners of the capital

that are hidden from the usual street level

view - such as in the Rooftop Secrets section.

graffeg.com

W H A T W E ' R E

S U B S C R I B I N G T O ?

Beans Coffee Club

The UK’s first ‘coffee club experience’ style

subscription service, championing the best British

independent roasters. Whether you prefer a

chocolatey, nutty or fruity coffee, using an Espresso

Machine, Moka pot or Cafetiere, Beans Coffee Club

offers the biggest selection of carefully selected British

coffees, including Hundred House and Coal Town

Roasters. Totally tailored to you expertly matched

to your individual taste. Plus, we love that all their

packaging is fully recyclable and biodegradable - and

that you can cancel anytime.

beanscoffeeclub.com

Jo Jo's Face Masks

Face masks and coverings seem to be here to stay,

so to ensure we're prepared, whether it's a trip to the

shops or our next staycation, we're subscribing to

these specially designed breathable and washable face

coverings from the UK’s first face mask subscription

service by Essex-based company, Jo Jo Creative

Designs’. Joanna Spilman, co-founder of Jo Jo Creative

Designs explains: “Life is slowly getting back to normal

with face masks here for the foreseeable future, so we

wanted to offer comfortable, stylish and safe unique

face coverings that can be worn on public transport, in

the office and on nights out.

By having a subscription delivered to your door, we are

giving customers varied, fun and chic options every

month to keep up with on-trend fashions and abide by

the rules at the same time.”

jojocreativedesigns.co.uk

24 BritishTravelJournal.com


ORIGINAL, LIMITED-EDITION ART DECO POSTERS

Limited to editions of 280, our newly-commissioned

Art Deco posters feature glamorous holiday

destinations around the world, ski resorts in the

European Alps, and the world’s greatest historic

automobiles. Over 100 designs to choose from, all

printed on 100% cotton fine art paper, measuring

97 x 65 cm.

Priced at £395 each.

Private commissions are also welcome.

Pullman Editions Ltd

94 Pimlico Road

Chelsea

London SW1W 8PL

www.pullmaneditions.com

Tel: +44 (0)20 7730 0547

info@pullmaneditions.com

Our central London gallery

All images and text copyright © Pullman Editions Ltd. 2020

View and buy online at www.pullmaneditions.com


WILD

WALES

26 BritishTravelJournal.com


To the west of England

lies a Celtic principality

that has been attracting

English tourists for

centuries.

Words | Adrian Mourby

à

BritishTravelJournal.com 27


28 BritishTravelJournal.com


THERE IS AN OLD

SAYING that if the steep

hills and deep valleys

of Wild Wales were

smoothed out, England’s western

neighbour would actually be the

bigger country. Wales used to be

considered a dangerous place

full of mountains and precipices,

deluged with rain and populated

by superstitious druids who spoke

a strange language. Then in the

eighteenth century, the English

found it was no longer safe to travel

to revolutionary Europe in search of

inspiring landscapes.

So Wales became popular with

poets and artists, clutching their

notebooks and phrasebooks.

Once the railways arrived in the

nineteenth century, Wales became

a place for affordable holidays,

with the Welsh coastline turning

into a string of pretty Victorian

seaside resorts.

Today Wales remains another

country to be discovered just across

the English border and the perfect

place for a UK staycation. Here

are ten of its top attractions.

à

BritishTravelJournal.com 29


BEST MOUNTAIN

SNOWDON

Although there are hills everywhere you look in Wales there

aren’t that many mountains. Snowdon, the tallest at 3,560 feet is

the most popular because it has a mountain railway that will take

you to the top if you’re not up to the 5 to 7-hour ascent. There are

more dramatic ranges – the Brecon Beacons (which are just under

3,000 feet) form a four-mountain horseshoe that resemble the

Drakensbergs in South Africa. But Snowdon dominates in terms

of visitor numbers. Moreover the view from the top – Ireland on a

clear day - is unmissable. The team that conquered Mount Everest

in 1953 trained on Snowdon and stayed at the Pen Y Gwryd Hotel

nearby. Today the hotel has a room filled with Edmund Hilary

and Tenzing Norgay memorabilia.

snowdonrailway.co.uk

BEST GARDENS

POWIS CASTLE

Both Chirk Castle and Plas Newydd in North Wales have splendidly

cultivated gardens but the stately formal gardens of Powis Castle near

Welshpool are unique in Wales. Using terraces and perfectly clipped

hedges, Powis Castle presents a hanging garden in classic French

baroque style. There was originally a Dutch water garden too, but that

was converted into the Great Lawn in the early nineteenth century.

Although Powis Castle itself is full of treasures – some bequeathed to

Lord Powis by Clive of India whose son married into the Powis family

– it is these rare gardens and the surrounding deer park that make the

castle essential viewing. The Bothy, an Edwardian cottage within the

grounds is now a National Trust holiday cottage meaning you can have

the gardens to yourself after all the visitors go home.

nationaltrust.org.uk/powis-castle

30 BritishTravelJournal.com


BEST MUSIC

WELSH NATIONAL OPERA

Welsh National Opera, based in Cardiff

operates out of the Wales Millennium Centre,

a dramatic modern building that dominates

Cardiff Bay. WNO was started 75 years ago

and has since developed a splendid choir and an

expertise in the Italian and Russian repertoire.

The company almost always open their new

productions in the Millennium Centre and then

tour them round Wales and into various venues

in England. WNO has also toured to La Scala,

to Paris and Tokyo. At the Metropolitan Opera in

New York City, the New York Times called it "one

of the finest operatic ensembles in Europe". The

company has had a long relationship with Bryn

Terfel who refused all offers to sing Hans Sachs

in Die Meistersinger until he had debuted the role

with WNO in their new Cardiff home in 2010.

wno.org.uk

BritishTravelJournal.com 31


32 BritishTravelJournal.com

BEST WATERFALL

SWALLOW FALLS

Wales has lots of rivers and plenty of rain to

feed them, so it’s not surprising there are many

impressive waterfalls. Pistyll Rhaeadr in the Berwen

Mountains is 240 feet high, making it Britain’s

highest single-drop waterfall.

In Snowdonia there are a number of dramatic

plunges in the rush down towards the sea and one

of the most popular is Swallow Falls. Here the River

Llugwy drops 138 feet in white torrents cascading

over limestone rocks. So popular was the waterfall

in the nineteenth century that a Swallow Falls Hotel

was built alongside it to cater for visitors. Nearby

on the River Llugwy stands Waterloo Bridge at

Betws y Coed. Its plaque announces that it was

built by the great engineer Thomas Telford to

celebrate Wellington’s victory over Napoleon.

visitsnowdonia.info/swallow-falls


BEST CASTLE

CARDIFF

Wales has many, many castles. Most of them were built by English

kings to stop the Welsh declaring independence, which they tended to

do whenever the Plantagenets were looking the other way. Nowadays

these strongholds are impressive tourist attractions. Caernarvon is

where Prince Charles was installed as Prince of Wales and Beaumaris

Castle is a perfect example of turreted medieval defences, but

Cardiff Castle is the one to visit. Begun by the Romans, remodelled

by the Normans and Tudors, Cardiff Castle was transformed into a

palace in the nineteenth century for the 3rd Marquis of Bute. Bute

commissioned the eccentric architect William Burges to spare no

expense in reconstructing the castle so the marquis could live in a

medieval world divorced from grubby Victorian reality. The exterior is

impressive, like a Welsh Neuschwanstein, and the interior exquisite.

cardiffcastle.com

BEST SEASIDE

BARMOUTH

Wales can offer some dramatic seascapes, like Harlech perched

on a rock above a huge wilderness of sand dunes, or Rhossili with its great

stretches of surfing beach but for a touch of Victorian seaside resort it’s

hard to beat Barmouth. Developed because of a quick train connection

back to Birmingham, Wolverhampton and other parts of England’s Black

Country, Barmouth retains its nineteenth-century slate boarding houses and

colourful shopfronts facing a sandy beach. Look closer however and there

are remnants of the port when it was a mediaeval centre of fishing and shipbuilding.

T Gwyn is an old tower house on the quayside that is now a pub,

and T Crwn a roundhouse prison with a cell on one side for men and another

for women on the other. The poet William Wordsworth, a visitor to Barmouth

in the 19th century, wrote glowingly "With a fine sea view in front [and] the

mountains behind Barmouth can always hold its own against any rival.”

barmouth-wales.co.uk

BritishTravelJournal.com 33


BEST FESTIVAL

HAY ON WYE

Wales has its own National Eisteddfod, the largest

festival of competitive music and poetry in Europe staged

predominantly in the Welsh language, but the best-known

festival in Wales these days is the Hay Festival of Literature

& Arts. This takes place in Hay-on-Wye close to the

Herefordshire border and was famously described by Bill

Clinton as “The Woodstock of the Mind”. Hay regularly

attracts the biggest names in writing worldwide: Arthur

Miller, Mario Vargas Llosa, Salman Rushdie, Martin Amis,

Hilary Mantel. The festival has taken on responsibility

for the nearby Brecon Jazz Festival to provide a musical

element. It’s also spawned a dozen sister festivals around

the world from Beirut to Cartagena in Colombia. The town

of Hay, with its castle and over 30 second-hand book shops,

is worth visiting even when the festival isn’t running.

hayfestival.com


BEST TOWN

CONWY

There are some lovely, unspoilt towns in Wales.

Montgomery in Powis looks unchanged since the

eighteenth century, Monmouth named Agincourt Square

after its most famous son, King Henry V, and Machynlleth

contains the building where the rebel, Owain Glyndwr

set up a Welsh Parliament in 1404. Nevertheless Conwy

stands out. It’s a small, cozy settlement on a North Walian

estuary. This garrison town was built by Edward I and

today it has an almost complete set of thirteenth-century

walls. You can walk the three quarter mile circuit of

ramparts with its 21 towers or stroll along the quayside,

visit the smallest house in Britain (just 10 feet tall) or call

in to drink at one of the many old pubs like the Victorian

Erskine Arms or the 1920s Albion Ale House.

visitconwy.org.uk

34 BritishTravelJournal.com


BEST NATURE RESERVE

RSPB LAKE VYRNWY

Developed in the 1880s as a reservoir to fulfil

Liverpool’s water needs, Lake Vyrnwy in Powys, is

an RSPB Nature Reserve with an award-winning

sculpture trail to boot. Mixing nature with heritage

and history in the middle of the Mid-Wales

countryside, the reserve has something to keep

those of all ages entertained. Birdlife can be spotted

around the waters all year round, although keen birdwatchers

should look out for autumn arrivals including

mallards, oystercatchers and teals, alongside otters

and other rare wildlife. Dotted along the shores of the

lake, the sculpture trail features wooden works by a

diverse mix of local and international artists, including

Simon O’Rourke’s The Giant Hand of Vyrnwy, a

15-metre-high carving made from what was once the

tallest tree in Wales! Lake Vyrnwy is free to visit and

does not need to be booked in advance.

rspb.org.uk

Different locations and attractions across

Britain have various measures in place to enable

guests to explore with confidence. Visitors are

encouraged to look at the official websites prior to

travel for the latest information.

BritishTravelJournal.com 35


THE BEST UK

RAIL

TRAILS

Walk or cycle along a former railway line

Words | Adrienne Wyper

36 BritishTravelJournal.com


TAKING TO A former railway line trail makes for

an easy-to-follow route that’s easy on the legs,

whether you’re walking or cycling. That’s because

you can rely on ‘rail trails’ to be reasonably level

(as trains struggle with steep gradients) with no stiles to

negotiate, which makes it possible to walk the dog or push

a pram. They’re well marked, and dotted alongside are

cycle-hire centres, pubs, cafés, picnic areas and artworks.

You’ll see traces of the stations they used to serve along the

way – like platforms, signal-boxes and ancient rolling stock –

as you go along, over and through embankments, cuttings,

viaducts, bridges and tunnels. There are over 100 ‘rail trails’

in the UK, stretching for over 10,000 miles, and some of

them are dauntingly lengthy – but you don’t have to take on

the challenge of completing an entire route from end to end;

you can opt for a shorter section. Here’s six of the best…


à

à

BritishTravelJournal.com 37


38 BritishTravelJournal.com


WATER RAIL WAY,

LINCOLNSHIRE

Based on the former Lincoln to

Boston Railway Line, the path

follows the river Witham

through the marshy Fens with their dykes

and drainage channels. The full route is 33

miles, with around nine on quiet roads.

Its apt name, which won a competition,

comes from the elusive water rail bird.

Expect wide skies and expansive views,

particularly from the specially designed

viewing platforms which offer impressive

vistas across the wide-open flat fens or

towards Lincoln Cathedral’s square spires.

As well as several former station

buildings, at Southrey and Stixwould, even

the cast-iron station signs can be seen on

still-standing platforms. A highlight is the

imaginative sculpture trail along the way,

featuring works based on local sheep,

cow and pig breeds, or inspired by the

surrounding environment, all themed on

local poet Alfred Lord Tennyson’s quote: ‘I

am part of all that I have met’.

visitlincoln.com/things-to-do/

water-rail-way

CRAB AND WINKLE

WAY, KENT

Linking the cathedral city of

Canterbury to the arty seaside

town of Whitstable, the sevenand-a-half-mile

route follows the world’s

first passenger railway line, which opened

in 1830. As well as people, it carried

seafood inland, hence the line’s nickname.

Mainly flat, the trail passes through

a university campus, open fields and

the ancient woodlands of Blean Woods

nature reserve, before bringing you

through Whitstable’s back streets onto

the shingly shore and the town’s bustling

harbour, with its fishing fleet and artisan

makers’ market stalls – and the chance

to sample seafood such as Whitstable’s

famous native oysters.

explorekent.org/crab-and-winkle-way



BritishTravelJournal.com 39


MAWDDACH

TRAIL, GWYNEDD

Acclaimed as one of the

best walks in Wales, this is a

favourite of former Ramblers

president Julia Bradbury. Start the nineand-a-half-mile

route on a tree-lined trail

from the stone-built town of Dolgellau,

set beneath Cadr Idris in Snowdonia

National Park. As the path itself is flat, it’s

a relaxing way to admire the decidedly

hilly scenery all around. At Penmaenpool

by an original wooden toll bridge, a signal

box is now a bird hide, and signals still

stand beside the former tracks. Stop off

for refreshments in the former station,

now the George III pub. The river, and its

valley, widens out and laps at the stonebuilt

embankment of the trackbed. Finally,

cross the half-mile railway bridge that

spans the estuary, where Cambrian Coast

line trains still run, into the sandy seaside

resort of Barmouth.

mawddachtrail.co.uk

HIGH PEAK TRAIL,

DERBYSHIRE

Completed in 1830, the

Cromford and High Peak

Railway was one of the world’s

first, built to transport minerals

between two canals. Nowadays, the

17-mile route runs between Dowlow,

south of Buxton to High Peak Junction,

Cromford, linking in with a whole network

of converted railway lines.

Set in the stunning scenery of the

Derbyshire Dales, with trackside drystone

walls and rocky outcrops, it has

unusually steep sections, where wagons

were pulled up by steam-powered beam

engines using cables. (The official advice

today is not to cycle down these sections!)

High by name and high by nature (up to

1,266 feet), the path’s elevation above

sea level makes for wild and windswept

views over the limestone landscape of the

Peak District, particularly at the northern

end. The southern end is rich in relics of

this industrial heritage, including engine

houses (Middleton Top engine house is

open to the public), rusting machinery,

pulley wheels, remains of winch houses,

and old wagons.

letsgopeakdistrict.co.uk/the-highpeak-trail/



40 BritishTravelJournal.com


BritishTravelJournal.com 41


42 BritishTravelJournal.com


TWO TUNNELS

GREENWAY,

SOMERSET

Follow the former Somerset

and Dorset Railway through

city, country and canalside settings on this

13-mile circular route. Take in superb views

of Bath’s curving Georgian crescents,

before plunging beneath the city through

the Devonshire Tunnel, just a quarter

of a mile long. Next is Combe Down,

the longest cycling tunnel in Europe, at

just over a mile, with a subterranean

son-et-lumière show. Beyond is Midford

Castle, an 18th-century folly (owned

by actor Nicolas Cage for a couple of

years). After the pretty village of Monkton

Combe comes the towpath of the narrow

Somerset Coal Canal, joining the Kennet

& Avon Canal at the imposing Dundas

Aqueduct, now a Scheduled Ancient

Monument, dizzyingly high above the

river Avon. Back in Bath, the Greenway

passes through the heart of the city, over

Pulteney Bridge and beside the Avon back

to the start. Find out more:

twotunnels.org.uk

SPEYSIDE WAY,

HIGHLANDS AND

MORAYSHIRE

Skirting the Cairngorm mountain

range, home to five of the UK’s six

highest peaks, the Way runs for 65 miles from

the winter sports hotspot of Aviemore to the

coastal town of Buckie. Its route runs alongside

the river Spey, a favourite haunt of salmon –

and tweed-clad anglers – following the track

of the former great North of Scotland Railway

between Boat of Garten and Dufftown, which

was primarily used for transporting whisky

from the distilleries beside the river, many of

which are open for tasting tours. For real rail

enthusiasts, there’s an opportunity to do a

round trip with a steam train on the Strathspey

Railway, between Aviemore and Broomhill.

Find out more:

speysideway.org



BritishTravelJournal.com 43


Discovering Nature

SUSTAINABLE

TRAVEL

Spend your next trip marvelling at

the richness of our native flora and

fauna – and help to ensure that our

spectacular scenery and wildlife are

maintained for future generations

BELOW: RED SQUIRREL. RIGHT: ROE BUCK

Words | Helen Holmes

THE BRITISH ISLES contain a huge

range of natural habitats, from ancient

pine forests, to tiny islands with their

own unique ecosystems. An incredible

variety of plants and animals make their home

here with us – so you don’t have to travel far at all

to see something new and amazing.

Sadly, many of these ecosystems have been

under threat, thanks largely to human activities.

However, a handful of small companies are

both giving people an opportunity to explore

Britain’s native wildlife, and working with local

conservators to ensure that they preserve existing

habitats, and regain some that have been lost.

Taking time out to learn more about the

fascinating plants and animals that share our

islands is rewarding in itself, but it also means

coming home with a renewed enthusiasm for

living sustainably, so that we can continue to coexist

with so many amazing species.

AUTUMN IN THE

CAIRNGORMS

“In autumn the colours of the landscape light up.

It’s not just the trees, but the moorland grasses

too – the whole landscape just glows. The fungi

are fascinating and the changing smells of the

vegetation bring a particular atmosphere to being

in the forests at this time of year. The sounds of

the returning geese and the mass movement of

thousands of other birds, some journeying many

thousands of miles, make you feel really connected

to the whole process of seasonal change and that

wonderful mystery of migration.”

44 BritishTravelJournal.com


CRESTED TIT

Sally Nowell has been guiding trips in

the Cairngorms for four years, and has

lived in this beautiful part of the Scottish

Highlands for 27 years. Each year she

shares this magical season with a small

group of guests, who are here to catch the

first call of the whooper swans returning

from their summer breeding grounds, and

the frantic feeding of winter thrushes,

against the backdrop of huge swathes

of vibrant autumn-hued woodland, and

breathtaking mountain ranges. The red

deer rut is a highlight of the trip – you

might hear the sound of stags proclaiming

their territory with roars that echo around

the glen, or hear the clash of antlers in the

steep-sided glacial valleys.

The Cairngorms are also home to some

of the largest remaining tracts of ancient

Caledonian pine forest, and contain a

multitude of wildlife that depends on this

unique habitat – the crested tit, Scottish

crossbill and red squirrel, to name a few.

And the flora is as distinctive as the fauna,

with many orchid species to be found in

the forest, as well as the rare twinflower.

“I love witnessing the turning of the

seasons and the changing of the guard,

as our summer visitors gather to leave and

the winter visitors arrive,” says Sally. “The

deciduous forests change from vibrant

green to rich rust reds and the glowing

yellow of the aspens. The colours can be

outstanding and the autumn light and

shade provides a feast for the eyes.”

The Autumn in the Cairngorms trip is

available from Speyside Wildlife, who are

supporting RSPB Abernethy in their work

to extend the Caledonian pine forest, and

have also received a Gold Green Tourism

Award for their sustainable business

practices. speysidewildlife.co.uk

à

BritishTravelJournal.com 45


SKOMER’S

PERFECT PUFFINS

The island of Skomer lies just off the

Pembrokeshire coast and covers less

than three square kilometres – however,

it is home to Atlantic Puffins, as well as

the world’s largest population of Manx

shearwater. “Skomer is a wildlife lover’s

dream,” says Bret Charman, who has

led puffin-watching tours to the island

for the past four years. “Our dedicated

photography tours are timed to coincide

with the peak of the puffin nesting

season, when the birds spend more

time on land. There is also an endemic

species of vole found on the island – this

is the only place on the planet it exists.

And there are nesting short-eared owls,

and countless other seabird species

including guillemot, razorbill and

fulmar, as well as grey seals.”

It’s possible to take a day trip to

the island, but to see everything that

Skomer has to offer, you need to be one

of a handful of people staying the night.

The simple accommodation on offer is

more than compensated by the riches

of the wildlife. This is the only way that

you will get to see the Manx shearwater,

which return to the island under the

cover of darkness to feed and care for

their chicks – and create an eerie, but

magical cacophony as they arrive.

“To be one of only 16 visitors staying

on the island overnight, it feels like you

have your own slice of puffin paradise,”

says Bret. “By staying overnight you

get the best puffin encounters and

the best photography opportunities.

Nothing beats being surrounded

by thousands of puffins on a warm

summer’s evening. Staying on the

island allows you to escape the hustle

and bustle of the 21st century, put

technology to one side and immerse

yourself in the natural world”.

Skomer’s Perfect Puffins is run by

Wildlife Worldwide, and the island

itself is managed by The Wildlife

Trust of South and West Wales, so

money from the tours goes back in

to the trust’s conservation efforts.

wildlifeworldwide.com

ATLANTIC PUFFIN WITH FISH

ABOVE: SHORT-EARED OWL. BELOW: SKOMER SUNRISE AND A SKOMER VOLE . ALL PHOTOS BY BRET CHARMAN

46 BritishTravelJournal.com


YORKSHIRE

WINTER BIRDING

You might think of spring or summer

as the time to go bird watching, but

winter offers unique opportunities

– both in terms of the species you

might see, and the ease of spotting

them. “There’s, surprisingly, a lot to

see in winter,” says Richard Baines,

who runs winter birding and wildlife

photography trips in East and North

Yorkshire. “Everywhere is much

quieter, and less human disturbance

means more birds.”

Guests on the trip stay at

comfortable Highfield Farm, and

from this base explore a huge range

of landscapes, from the towering sea

cliffs of Flamborough to the wetlands

BELOW: WAXWING

of Top Hill Low nature reserve.

A short drive away, Hornsea

Mere is Yorkshire’s largest

freshwater lake, and is one of the

best places in the county to see

winter wildfowl, from Slavonian

grebe to goldeneye. Some of

Richard’s favourite spots on the

winter trip over the past couple

of years include waxwings and

kingfishers.

The Yorkshire winter birding

and photography trip is run by

Yorkshire Coast Nature, who have

set up partnerships with nature

conservation organizations,

including the RSPB and the North

Sea Wildlife Trust, to ensure

that their organisation benefits

wildlife and local communities.

yorkshirecoastnature.co.uk

ABOVE: EARLY MARSH ORCHIDS. BELOW: RED-NECKED PHALAROPE

OUTER HEBRIDES:

MAGICAL WILDLIFE

SPECTACULAR

This seven-night tour of the Outer

Hebrides takes in multiple islands

and offers the opportunity to see a

huge diversity of wildlife in this remote

region. David Rosair has been running

the tours for over twenty years. “I love

the remoteness, the wildness, the

romanticism, the special wildlife – from

hen harriers to short-eared owls, golden

and white-tailed eagles, red-necked

phalaropes and corncrakes, otters,

and the famous machair, covered with

orchids, knapweed, wild pansies and

buttercups – it's fabulous!”

Accommodation on the trip is very

comfortable, with hotels providing

excellent local food – and having been

hand-picked for their environmental

credentials. As well as unrivalled naturespotting

opportunities, guests can look

forward to stunning scenery, deserted

beaches, and the fabulous sunsets

beyond the western shores of Benbecula.

The Magical Wildlife Spectacular is run

by Island Ventures. islandventures.co.uk

BritishTravelJournal.com 47


BRITAIN’S BEST

PANORAMAS

From West Country tors, Scottish mountain summits

to elevated city views, feel on top of the world with our

selection of Britain’s most awesome panoramas.

Words | Max Wooldridge

48 BritishTravelJournal.com


ZIP WORLD

WALES AND

LIVERPOOL

See Liverpool like never before when the UK’s first

urban zipwire opens in summer 2021. This fun new

400m aerial wire will run from the top of St John's

Beacon over St George's Place, St John's Gardens and

William Brown Street before touchdown on the roof of

Liverpool Central Library. If you can’t wait until next

summer to fly, Zip World already operates at three

sites in North Wales - including Penrhyn Slate Quarry

(as pictured) - the fastest zip line in the world and the

longest in Europe! zipworld.co.uk

BritishTravelJournal.com 49


GLASTONBURY TOR

SOMERSET

Rising 158m above the Somerset Levels, this

conical hill offers a visual feast, especially come

sunrise or sunset. From St Michael’s Tower at the

top you can often see the Quantock and Mendip

Hills, even the Welsh mountains. A place of

pagan beliefs, and steeped in Arthurian legend,

it’s one of England’s most spiritual sites.


PEN Y FAN

WALES

Some of the best walks often

include a worthwhile bounty en

route. Head to Pen Y Fan – part

of the Beacons Way footpath - for

marvellous views of the Brecon

Beacons National Park. On a

clear day you’ll also be rewarded

breathtaking panorama of the

Cambrian Mountains, the Gower

Peninsula and Carmarthen Bay.

At 886 metres, this is the highest

peak in South Wales.

ARTHUR’S

SEAT

EDINBURGH

There are few more iconic

views in Scotland than from

Arthur’s Seat, the ancient extinct

volcano perched 251m above the

Scottish capital. This panoramic

landscape of Edinburgh and

beyond are great all year round

but particularly magical during

the city’s Hogmanay New Year

celebrations and fireworks

display.

BritishTravelJournal.com 51


GREENWICH PARK LONDON

Even North Londoners head south of the river for the best view of the capital.

Atop a steep hill beside the Royal Observatory centuries of London’s past, and

present, is laid out like a picnic. There’s Greenwich’s Old Royal Naval College

and the famous curve in the Thames, then Canary Wharf, the City of London

and St. Paul's Cathedral. Nearby Nunhead cemetery offers another magical

city view that few Londoners know about.

LEITH HILL

SURREY

Enjoy great views from the

loftiest point in South East

England at Leith Hill, a few

miles southwest of Dorking.

The London skyline, over 10

different counties and the

English Channel are all visible

on a clear day. An 18thcentury

Gothic tower crowns

this Surrey Hills peak, and

there’s excellent walking and

cycling routes, with several

different ways to reach the

294m summit.

52 BritishTravelJournal.com


BEALACH NA B À

SCOTTISH

HIGHLANDS

Breathtaking panoramas and an exhilarating

mountain drive await you at the top of this Alpinelike

mountain pass in Wester Ross, in the Scottish

Highlands. Once a drovers' road, Bealach na Bà

(the Pass of the Cattle) rises to 626m, and with

sharp hairpin bends and gradients of nearly 20%,

welcome to the UK’s steepest road ascent. On clear

days get set for an awesome horizon of the Cuillin

Ridge on the Isle of Skye, and the Western Isles.

BritishTravelJournal.com 53


I N T E R V I E W W I T H

LUKE

MATTHEWS

Chewton Glen

Five-star Chewton Glen has stood the test of time with

aplomb, here its Executive Head Chef reveals the secret to

its timeless elegance and tremendous new offerings

Words | Chantal Borciani

54 BritishTravelJournal.com


NOW MORE THAN ever travellers are looking

for a safe haven where they can spend time

with their nearest and dearest in reassuring

comfort. Chewton Glen is just this type of

sanctuary – one of the first iconic British countryside

hotels, the five-star Hampshire residence is only a few

minutes’ walk from the sea and features an awardwinning

restaurant, world-class spa, nine-hole golf

course, croquet lawn, tennis courts, walled gardens,

orchard, a cookery school, and 72 individually designed

bedrooms and suites including 14 tree-house suites

nestled in the canopy of the woodland grounds.

REINVENTING A CLASSIC

Country chic blended with a charming quintessential

Britishness, Chewton welcomes guests with the

cocooning warmth of an old friend. Just the ticket then

for a holiday in these somewhat testing times.

Like Chewton’s many patrons who return year upon

year Executive Head Chef Luke Matthews has been

similarly charmed by Chewton Glen – with 2021 marking

his 28th year at the hotel.

“We really push the envelope here; the goal posts

are always moving and that drives me and has kept me

here for all these years. It's a beautiful hotel; fabulous

grounds, lovely spa - we're a proper resort destination.

We want people to feel relaxed the minute they à

BritishTravelJournal.com 55


arrive and I think every part of Chewton

complements the other. The tree houses are

incredible [the hotel is one of the first in the

UK to offer treetop luxury suites complete

with hot tubs overlooking lush woodland] and

we've got the new restaurant and cookery

school which again, is a fantastic addition,”

says Luke.

Inspired by his mother’s home cooking

from an early age, at 16 Luke started an

apprenticeship in The Green Park Hotel,

Bournemouth, before moving to the Dormy

Hotel at Ferndown, and later completed work

experience at Chewton Glen.

Recalling his stint of work experience, Luke

says: “I just remember thinking, ‘this place

is on another level’. It was ground-breaking,

Chewton really was one of the first luxury spa

hotels in the UK,” Luke adds.

In 1993, Luke joined Chewton as sous

chef and rose through the ranks until in

November 2003, he was appointed Executive

Head Chef. Winning England’s AA Hotel

of the Year in 2019, Chewton’s dining is a

key part of its allure. Guests can dine at the

elegant Dining Room overlooking the hotel’s

immaculate grounds and croquet lawn,

and The Kitchen; a more informal, relaxed

restaurant that also boasts a fabulous new

cookery school and open kitchen. There are

also a host of private dining options for more

intimate feasts.

56 BritishTravelJournal.com


NEW-AGE NEW FOREST

In today’s changing world, Luke and his brigade have

been able to adapt easily to guests’ needs. “We’ve

got a lot of space at Chewton in the two main hotel

restaurants and we run long opening hours for the

restaurant, so there hasn’t been a problem looking after

everyone. What we are finding is that guests are tending

to stay for a week rather than just a few days and dine

with us almost the entire time. I think when they arrive

here they feel secure and can really relax. It’s brilliant as

every day the restaurant is buzzing.”

While times have changed, it’s comforting to see

that many things at Chewton remain reassuringly

untouched.

“I think for us the key is to cook great food with good

ingredients and to cook what our guests want to eat.

We tweak the menu seasonally to make the most of

the new season produce but we don’t do a complete

menu change because there are a lot of dishes that

have become absolute Chewton Glen classics. We do a

twice-baked Emmental soufflé starter, which has been

on the menu for decades. Over the last 20 years we’ve

probably taken it off two or three times and when we

do the letters start to roll in from diners asking where it’s

gone. So, we’ve made a pact; the soufflé will never move

again!”

Another of Chewton’s iconic dishes, the lobster curry,

makes it on to Luke’s desert island dish menu, alongside

his dressed crab starter and “something chocolatey for

dessert”.

Luke’s recent projects include working with Estate

Manager Darren Venables to develop a thriving walled

kitchen garden, nursery and heritage orchard, which

produces a vast array of ingredients for the hotels’ own

kitchens.

In addition to harvesting produce on-site, the

New Forest hotel uses local and British suppliers

wherever possible. “Especially after the Covid crisis,

we need to support local suppliers as much as we

can.” This includes sourcing their eggs from a farmer

in neighbouring Hordle who “hand picks every one for

us”, grabbing the best daily catch from a fishmonger in

Bournemouth and using mozzarella from Hampshire’s

Laverstoke Park.

The most recent addition to Chewton’s culinary

offering is The Kitchen, a relaxed restaurant concept

which has opened in association with TV chef James

Martin. “I've known James for 27 years, we worked

together here in the very early days, he on pastry, me as

sous chef. He’s returned for charity dinners and other

events at Chewton over the years so it was an easy

partnership and a great synergy. The cookery school has

been a great success and is such a wonderful space.”

SPA SECRETS

During summer 2020, the new-look spa was also

unveiled featuring a refreshed interior, and a cool,

calming palette to complement the 17-metre indoor

pool. In addition to the revamped space, Chewton’s new

spa treatment menu includes two alfresco treehouse

treatments.

Next to the indoor pool, guests can enjoy the

hydrotherapy spa, which centres around the ancient

tradition of water therapy and offers six hi-tech therapy

options including an ‘air-tub’, which provides an all-over

bubbly Jacuzzi-like effect.

Double height floor to ceiling windows drench the

pool area with light and the domed hydrotherapy spa

also overlooks the stunning grounds. An outdoor hot

tub is cocooned away on a private deck for ultimate

relaxation, while the spa’s flower-clad balcony deck

provides a perfect spot for an afternoon siesta. Loungers

dot the undulating lawns in the summer, with views to

a horizon of trees, and every wall, trellis and border is

blessed with a festoon of seasonal blooms year round.

COUNTRY ICON

He’s actually closing in on his fourth decade there as

he’s on his 28th year. The charm of this hotel shows no

sign of abating for Luke: “I am thrilled and extremely

fortunate to have had the opportunity to be at the helm

of the kitchen brigade at Chewton Glen. To have cooked

for royalty, movie stars, sporting heroes and remarkable

public figures has been an incredible experience and

I genuinely feel very proud to be part of the history of

this great hotel, which has for well over 50 years been

delighting guests with its tradition of excellent service

and world-class hospitality.” u

BritishTravelJournal.com 57


58 BritishTravelJournal.com


Meet the Makers

ISLE OF

ARRAN GIN

There’s a growing artisanal

movement on Scotland’s Isle of

Arran, and now it has its first

craft gin. From a cosy lounge

by the crackling fire at Cladach

Beach House, we meet the

locals behind the brand

Words | Karyn Noble

Asmall island off the southwest coast

of Scotland, Arran is accessed via the

daily car ferry from the mainland; the

occasionally-snow-capped Goat Fell,

its highest mountain, looming dramatically into

view. It’s a trip that takes just under an hour from

Ardrossan, wild weather pending, but the island’s

peaceful charm is immediate. Popular with hikers

and cyclists for its stunning landscapes, Arran

is also home to some impressive food and drink

producers, with whisky, cheese and ice cream

being strong drawcards.

But the island has a secret: one of the most

joyful gin distillery locations you may ever

stumble across. Isle of Arran Gin co-founders

Stuart Fraser and George Grassie still revel

in visitor reactions to their rustic set-up at the

Cladach Beach House, tucked away on the

coast near Brodick Castle. “I love watching it

happen the first time,” says George. “This is a

very magical little corner. I think people respond

to that.” A locally loved cabin that was once the

Arran Nature Centre, and then home à

BritishTravelJournal.com 59


to a stained-glass maker, has been

sensitively renovated by the lads, using

furniture they’ve either found or made.

The result is an endearing lounge-roommeets-botanical-lab

vibe, complete

with an open fire, a casual piano in

the corner, and stacks of vinyl records

piled beside uninterrupted views from

a sunroom across the Firth of Clyde.

And some random dinosaur sculptures

on the beach. “We weren’t looking

for something as quirky as this, to be

perfectly honest,” says Stuart. “But we

want to try and reimagine the distillery

experience a bit and put people really

close into the production as much as

possible. So, while you’re sitting here

having a tasting session, rather than

standing about a boardroom kind of

environment, you sit here by the fire,

you have a little taste, we have a blether

about it.”

A GAP IN THE SCOTTISH

GIN MARKET

Far from having distilling or drinks

industry experience, Stuart and

George have come to the business in

a roundabout way. George regularly

forages for botanicals on Arran, but

primarily to use in the kitchen: he’s

an artisanal baker at Blackwater

Bakehouse at Blackwaterfoot on the

southwestern side of the island, having

previously honed his craft in Norway.

Stuart and his wife own the Bay

Kitchen & Stores, a cafe and grocery

shop that stocks George’s bread in

Whiting Bay, a 20-minute drive south of

the Beach House, which they purchased

in 2013 after running a hair salon in

New York. “Straight away I noticed we

were selling a lot of craft gins and craft

beers,” says Stuart. “I said to George

‘we’re selling a lot of gin from all these

different [Scottish] islands, why not

our own? There’s no other Arran gin.

I spotted a gap in the market and we

jumped in.”

A New York–based friend of Stuart’s,

Ross Hamilton, is the third (mostly

silent) Scottish partner in the business.

While the business was launched

in 2017, the visitor experience at the

Cladach Beach House has been a

work in progress, with a series of event

pop-ups across the summer of 2019

helping them hone the offering, as well

as establish partnerships with local food

vendors.

A VERY LOCAL GIN

While they might be novice ginmakers,

they have had some expert

advice and guidance, and become

almost evangelical of their ‘shorelineto-mountain’

approach as they bring

out boxes of the local ingredients that

comprise Arran Gin, recalling foraging

expeditions with their friend Mark

Williams, of Galloway Fine Foods. “He’s

worked with other gin companies and he

had a good handle on what grows here…

because he [also] grew up here,” says

George. “And he does a lot of wild booze

as part of his repertoire.” Initially picking

between 50 and 60 plants, of the Arrangrown

botanicals they eventually settled

on six for their gin: sea lettuce (“salad

fresh, but very full of that rockpool

brine…sort of coastal scent”), hogweed

(“the seeds are incredibly punchy in

flavour: orange bitters, coriander-like

aromas…a real belter”), meadowsweet

(“one of the big flavours”), lemon balm

(“our idea for citrus… but you also

get [notes of] forest floor, woodland

tobacco box”), noble fir shoots (“more

of a grapefruit pine not a floor-cleaner

pine”) and fuchsia flowers (“rifled from

the [Brodick Castle] National Trust

gardeners’ hedge…they actually quite

like it now”).

And while they use other ingredients

common to most London dry gins –

juniper, a little bit of orange peel, cassia

bark and angelica – they venture that

the microclimate on Arran lends the

locally grown ingredients a somewhat

mystical, unfathomable power, citing an

experiment they did with a friend who

picked the same plants on the mainland

in Largs. “It’s the same stretch of water

60 BritishTravelJournal.com


ut the Arran ones are much stronger.

Why are the plants bigger and better

here?” Stuart shrugs. “We’re not asking

too many questions…just accept it and

enjoy them.”

While the Cladach Beach House was

being readied, the gin has been distilled

on the mainland at Glenshee Craft

Distillery in Perthshire with advice from

Simon Fairclough (of Persie Gin), who

they met at a drinks event in Glasgow a

few years ago. “We could go somewhere

a lot closer to do some of our work than

go all the way up into Glenshee but he’s

our guy,” says Stuart. “We just have

that connection; we’re almost like his

apprentices.”

They make between 300 to 400

bottles a month and the gin is sold mostly

on Arran as well as some bars and shops

on the Ayrshire coast, part of a deliberate

‘anti-distribution’ philosophy. “We want

to try and have a personal relationship as

much as possible with the people selling

the gin, because it does require a bit of

education,” says Stuart. “It’s not trying to

be a supermarket brand.”

FUTURE EXPANSION OF

THE BUSINESS

Having dipped their toes in the gin

waters, the boys already have another

product: Arran Cassis made from

blackcurrants in Whiting Bay. There’s

potential for an Isle of Arran kombucha

and/or kefir down the track, expanding

the brand more broadly into a drinks

company. “It’ll be whatever it’ll be,”

says Stuart. “We really don’t have a

particularly explicit business plan. I think

we are to some extent just going where it

takes us.” u

STUART & GEORGE’S FOOD TIPS ON ARRAN

The local lads favour independent places that are in keeping with their rustic,

pared-back, community-spirited ethos.

Mara Fish Bar & Deli: “Offers an

authentic taste of the windswept, salty

Arran coastline. It’s not a fishmongers or

a fish-and-chip shop, it’s proper cheffy

fish. Local catches always come with a

twist; think of it as a premium takeaway

served up right by the beach.”

mara-arran.co.uk

The French Fox: “The best of traditional

French cooking sold from a cute

old Peugeot van, which they drive

around the island.” facebook.com/

thefrenchfoxfood

The Sandwich Station: “It’s a hut in the

middle of nowhere which is so cosy you

think ‘I shouldn’t be getting a sandwich

this good from this hut in this place’.”

thesandwichstation.weebly.com


Isle of Arran Cheese Shop:

“You have to get the Arran Blue

cheese from Bellevue Creamery,

I use the creamery’s

whey to make my croissants (at

Blackwater Bakehouse: facebook.

com/bakehouseblackwater). Calum’s

the only real cheesemaker left on the

island now and it’s the best blue you’ll

taste bar none. He’s a milk whisperer.”

arranscheeseshop.co.uk

The Wineport: “Our next-door

neighbours in Cladach, serving

great-value lunches… and they have

outdoor tables. It often doubles as

a pop-up space for other foodie

events. Right up our street (and on

our street).”

wineport.co.uk

BritishTravelJournal.com 61


NESTLED IN THE ROLLING VALLEYS OF

DARTMOOR NATIONAL PARK,

YOU WILL FIND AWARD WINNING LUXURY AT BOVEY CASTLE

Escape to Bovey Castle

Set in 275 acres of beautiful countryside within Devon’s Dartmoor National Park.

The hotel offers 60 bedrooms and 22 self catering country lodges tucked away in the

grounds, fashioned from local granite and vaulted with English oak. Smith’s Brasserie,

luxury ‘Elan Spa’, award-winning 18 hole championship golf course and an array of

outdoor pursuits and activities.

@boveycastlehotel @BoveyCastle /BoveyCastleHotel

WWW.BOVEYCASTLE.COM | 01647 445000

BritishTravelJournal - 120mmx191mm - 17_09_2020.indd 1 17/09/2020 13:37


4 8 H O U R S I N

FOWEY

With its open spaces and beautiful beaches, it comes as no surprise that

Cornwall tops the table as one of the most sought-after destinations to visit post

lockdown. Jessica Way finds sanctuary on the lesser-known Polperro Heritage

Coast, avoiding the crowds and embracing the Cornish Riviera lifestyle

Words | Jessica Way

à

BritishTravelJournal.com 63


WHERE WE STAYED

FOWEY HALL HOTEL

Perched up high on the hillside we stand together for a moment,

bags down by our sides, in awe of the sweeping views, beautiful

sounds from the harbour, the glistening blue river and the small

fishing village of Polruan on the opposite bank. We’d arrived

at our luxury home-from-home getaway for the weekend, the

majestic Fowey Hall Hotel, South Cornwall.

The original inspiration for Toad Hall in The Wind in the

Willows, this luxurious country-house hotel is one of the Luxury

Family Hotels’ five stunning hotels, renowned for their individual

character and exceptional family-focused hospitality. And, as

almost every parent with young children will know, it really is

the small details and finer touches that can make or break your

holiday experience.

Complimentary childcare, baby monitoring services and a

morning breakfast club can be a godsend for exhausted parents

in need of some extra shut-eye on a Sunday morning. Take the

opportunity for some additional precious couple’s time, a guiltfree

pamper in the spa or to simply enjoy the sea views over a

glass of locally-made Camel Valley wine.

And it’s far from a half-hearted ‘family-friendly’ approach,

we discover that at Fowey being family-focused is at the heart of

‘everything’ they do. The warmth and friendliness from the staff

meant there were big smiles all around. The fully-fledged games

room, cinema room, children’s library, and Wind in the Willowsinspired

outdoor play area with a zip line help to keep those

smiles in place throughout the stay.

For guests with babies in tow, heated bottles and fresh

morning and evening milk can be brought up to your room

(free of charge) - and the chef is able to make puréed food from

morning to evening. There is an all-day welcome hours policy for

babies and children at the swimming pool, and lots of places

to relax quietly without the feeling of being on top of other

guests.

The hotel’s recent multi-million-pound refurbishment has

highlighted many of the hotel's impressive original features, to

include feature fireplaces and a beautiful parquet floor dating

back to 1899 when Fowey Hall was built as a private house by

local businessman Sir Charles Hanson.

Inside the hotel’s historic lobby, you are welcomed by a

roaring log fire, and antique white walls lit by an eye-catching

Jamb globe chandelier on the ceiling. Sofas have been

upholstered in a combination of British heritage-inspired luxury

fabrics including tweeds, hounds tooth, and herringbone

with velvet and leather accents and striped canvas and rustic

reclaimed stools add a playful twist.

Everywhere you look there’s something interesting to catch

your eye, from handmade smoked oak coffee tables to creative

wallpapers and beautiful artwork by local artists taking

inspiration from the surrounding landscape. My daughters

especially enjoyed seeing the charcoal prints of characterful

dogs by Cornish artist Justine Osbourne, an ode to the dogfriendly

ethos of the hotel.

Our Family Room was located in the Mansion House, one

of 16 bedrooms that have been refurbished featuring oak

wooden floors painted in soft grey, vintage pieces of furniture,

oversized wool rugs, and bespoke handmade turned oak beds

made by Cornwall furniture and homeware designer-maker

Headandhaft.

There was ample space, even an additional play room,

which would be the ideal setting for reading a bedtime story.

My girls are a bit too old for that now, but still young enough

64 BritishTravelJournal.com


to adore the ‘softhead’

dogs in top hat and glasses

displayed on the walls, which

we also enjoyed spotting

elsewhere around the hotel.

The bathroom was designed

in an authentic Victorian

style finished in two-tone

crackle glaze tiles - and I was delighted to find Elemis shampoo,

conditioner and body wash.

There are 36 rooms in total, 12 family rooms and plenty of

interconnecting bedrooms, to include the Garden Wing and

separate Coach House, around a minute’s walk from the hotel.

Bedrooms in the two-storey Garden Wing have a more modern

feel, designer furnishings and a deep rust coloured freestanding

bath to enjoy a long, relaxing soak. While the hotel’s rustic Coach

House bedrooms feature four-poster beds and a mix of new and

antique furniture.

Over in the restaurant, Head Chef Wesley Pratt and his team

have certainly got to know their local suppliers. Seafood is sourced

from a small family business, Fish For Thought, while their eggs are

laid by free-range hens at Colin Carter’s Eggs, near Truro.

Their award-winning artisan

ice cream comes from Treleavens,

churned at Tretoil Farm in the

north Cornish countryside. Not

to mention the finest Cornish

tipples such as Fowey Brewery ales

and Tarquin’s gin, distilled in the

southwest.

(Rooms from £249, bed and breakfast).

ABOUT FOWEY

Fowey is an ancient Cornish seaport, with narrow winding

streets, flower-bedecked houses and pretty cottages jostling

side by side.

Quaint shops and ancient pubs stand beside the new

trendy restaurants, luxury hotels and fancy icecream parlours.

Fowey has held on impressively well to its picture-perfect

harbour charm.

Today Fowey is regarded as one of the most stylish and

picturesque towns in Cornwall - with a flourishing food and

drink scene.

Set in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, its deepwater

harbour is the perfect pull for sailing fans and the old town is a

vibrant reminder of its fascinating maritime history. For foodies

the many bistros, cafes and restaurants, offering the best in

local produce, will certainly not disappoint either.

It’s no surprise that Fowey attracts tourism and homeowners

from across the globe, to include famous actress, writer and

comedian Dawn French, whose beautiful £3million coastal

mansion overlooks the Fowey River.

Fowey’s history has an equally extraordinary story to tell, as

it was home to author Daphne du Maurier in the 1920s - and

references to her work can be found everywhere in and around

the town.

Daphne took much of her inspiration for writing her novels

from Fowey, including this beautifully descriptive extract from

‘Vanishing Cornwall’: "There was a smell in the air of tar

and rope and rusted chain, a smell of tidal water. Down

harbour, around the point, was the open sea. Here was the

freedom I desired, long sought for, not yet known. Freedom

to write, to walk, to wander, freedom to climb hills, to pull a

boat, to be alone." à

BritishTravelJournal.com 65


DAY ONE

Following a delicious stress-free breakfast, a game of table

tennis, a couple of rounds of Pac Man and then Space

Invaders, beach towels and picnic lunches in our hands,

we head out on our way to discover Readymoney Cove. It’s

a fifteen-minute walk from the gate at the bottom of the

garden to this beautiful sandy hidden beach sheltered by the

surrounding cliffs. The shimmering water was clear and still,

and we enjoyed a swim followed by a coffee and cake from the

Readymoney Cove Beach Shop. We decided to take a stroll a

little further around the coastline, and headed up a pathway

leading us onto the South West Coast Path, where we

discovered the medieval St Catherine’s Castle with views back

down to Readymoney Cove and to the harbour entrance.

Later that afternoon we decide to head into the old town,

passing the grand parade of Edwardian and Victorian houses.

A special highlight was discovering the Quiet Gardens, a

wonderful collection of planting by local garden designer Ali

Siddell with a fascinating history.

More than 300 years ago, Fowey landowner John Treffry

donated land to the town to build a free school, Fowey

Grammar School, where 30 poor boys could be educated in

maths, history and navigation. The school has long since been

demolished, but this garden, planted in the school grounds,

still survives as a very special place - and view.

Reach the main Fore Street and you will find many small,

independent shops selling unusual gifts, artwork, clothing and

books. If you’re a foodie then Fowey is home to many bistros,

cafes and restaurants where you’ll find menus offering the best

in local produce. We ate dinner at Sam’s, a bright bistro with

pop memorabilia hung all over the walls - wherever you choose

to dine, Fowey River mussels are a recommended choice!

DAY TWO

After another leisurely morning at

the hotel, today’s main adventure

is a two-hour kayaking river safari

adventure with Fowey River Hire. On

our wander down to meet Ben, our

tour guide, we stumble across a blue

telephone box transformed into what

must be one of the UK's smallest

libraries.

We also pass the magnificent St Fimbarras church, rebuilt

in 1460 by the Earl of Warwick after being destroyed by French

marauders -and don't miss The Ship Inn, Fowey's oldest pub,

also known as ‘The Old Lady of Fowey'.

We arrive at our meeting base, the Caffa Mill car park

where we meet Ben and his daughter, keen to share their

passion for the Fowey Estuary with us right from the get-go.

It’s high tide, so we head up river towards Golant, admiring

the views, paddling around the river, spotting the birdlife,

while looking out for seals or dolphins.

Ben and his daughter guide us under a bridge to see

what must be

Cornwall’s

most unusual

waterside

property, The

Old Sawmills in

its own private

inlet with no

road access,

surrounded by

woodland. The


EDITOR'S HIGHLIGHTS

YOU MIGHT ALSO ENJOY

“As far as an enjoyable family

staycation goes, Fowey Hall comes

out on top - an ultra-stylish and

luxurious hotel, located in one

of the most quaint and relaxing

seaside settings in the British Isles”

hidden creek, known as Bodmin Pill, was used by merchants

in medieval times, as a landing point to avoid paying landing

dues upriver at Lostwithiel (the ancient county capital). In

the 1970s, owner Dennis Smith, a music-industry mentor

transformed the 3,135sq ft main building into one of the UK’s

first-ever residential recording studios! We were floating

outside the legendary studio, where bands such as The Stone

Roses, Oasis, The Verve, Supergrass and Muse worked by

day and partied by night, and where Oasis recorded their

breakout album, Definitely, Maybe in 1990.

We stop in at Ruby’s, Fowey’s newest ice cream parlour

before heading home; I chose a limited edition Tarquin's gin

and berry sorbet - and I don’t want the moment to end.

It’s no wonder the location has already had so much

fame, inspiring authors, songwriters, and comedians, and

leaving a special mark on all who visit. As far as an enjoyable

family staycation goes, Fowey Hall comes out on top - an

ultra-stylish and luxurious hotel, located in one of the most

quaint and relaxing seaside settings in the British Isles”. u

To book your stay at Fowey Hall call +44 (0) 208 0765555

or visit luxuryfamilyhotels.co.uk

Visiting the Fowey Aquarium: Pop into the

charmingly old fashioned Fowey Aquarium on the

Town Quay where you can literally get in touch

with local sea creatures in the petting pool. A great

nostalgic fishy fix.

Taking a ferry trip to Polruan: Take the

passenger ferry across the harbour to Polruan

and explore the narrow lanes that climb steeply

through the village, or out towards the medieval

blockhouse.

Hiring an open cockpit canoe: Take to the

water yourself on an escorted river trip in an open

cockpit canoe, perfect for observing the abundant

river wildlife and a real adventure even if you’re a

total novice.

Taking a countryside hike: There are many

fantastic coastal and woodland walks around the

area including The Hall Walk which links Polruan

with Bodinnick via the hidden creek at Pont.

Taking a River Cruise: See the town from the

water with a trip on board one of the pleasure

boats that regularly depart from the Town Quay

steps. Cruises take you upriver past the docks,

where you will see huge china clay ships being

loaded with cargo, and out to sea taking in the

best views of the town.

Visiting the Fowey Museum: Located in

the town centre the Fowey Museum holds an

interesting collection recording Fowey’s rich and

varied history. Includes the Daphne Du Maurier

collection, Mayoral Regalia, costumes, old

photographs, models of old sailing ships and

postcards.

BritishTravelJournal.com 67


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NURTURE YOUR

CREATIVITY

Whether you’re a complete beginner, or an experienced

artist, a painting break will open your eyes, and supply

inspiration from our island’s wealth of spectacular scenery

Words | Helen Holmes

With our lifestyles

having had an

enforced change

of pace over the

past year, many people have

found themselves discovering, or

re-discovering their creative side.

For some this may even lead to a

permanent change of direction,

but whether you feel the calling of

a new, more creative career, or are

looking for a rewarding hobby, it can

be hard to find the time and space

that creativity needs to flourish when

the concerns of day to day life start

creeping back in..

A holiday which combines a

visit to a stunning part of the UK

with expert artistic guidance is the

perfect way to ensure that your

muse doesn’t get neglected – while

giving you a relaxing break in the

company of like-minded people.

There are a great range of courses

and locations out there – all offering

the opportunity to develop your

artistic style in truly extraordinary

environments. à

BritishTravelJournal.com 71


WHITEHOUSE

STUDIO

Set on the west coast of Argyll,

amongst spectacular beaches and

rock formations, courses at the

Whitehouse Studio encourage

students to take inspiration

from the magnificent changing

landscape throughout the seasons

– scenery which has inspired

famous groups of artists such as the

Glasgow Boys and Glasgow Girls.

Founder of Whitehouse, Karen

Beauchamp, welcomes students

of all levels, “I always take the

students along a path which covers

the basic rudiments of shape,

form, tone and colour – even

experienced artists often like to

reset their appreciation of these

fundamental principles. I especially

enjoy teaching beginners – as a

self-taught artist myself, I know

how the journey feels and can tailor

the tasks to help them on their own

journey.”

Accommodation is in

Glenreasdale House – a light

and airy arts and crafts style

house, which is part of a hunting

lodge built in 1905 by a whisky

entrepreneur. The rooms are

large and comfortable – with

Karen having used her previous

experience as an architect and

interior specialist to decorate in an

eclectic style. The rooms overlook

either the loch and the Kilberry

peninsula, or the walled garden,

and the atmosphere is friendly and

welcoming, “Everyone congregates

in the kitchen or the south west

facing sitting room by the log fire,”

says Karen.

whitehouseart.co.uk

CALLINGTON

SCHOOL OF ART

Tessa Sulston and her husband Peter

moved to Cornwall in 2006 and founded

the Callington School of Art. Located

in the Tamar Valley, the school is within

easy reach of Bodmin Moor, Dartmoor,

and both the north and south coasts of

Cornwall, and accommodation is provided

in Tessa and Peter’s spacious Georgian

townhouse.

The school mainly runs six day courses,

which Tessa believes enables students to

become immersed in their art. “We supply

a wide variety of materials so artists can

experiment with different media.

There is a structured element to all

courses but an important part of our

philosophy is that each artist, with

guidance, follows their own path.”

This philosophy works, as guests will

testify – one student, Mileva Novkovic, has

returned seven times: “Tessa and Peter

look after guests really well. Tessa provides

invaluable art tuition – she’s a talented

artist and an experienced teacher. Peter is

a great chef and delights guests with his

beautifully cooked and presented dishes,

taking into account the whole range of

dietary needs.”

“These holidays are about art and fine

food in an authentic Cornish setting, run

by people who really do know their stuff

and make it all such fun. There’s always

an element of surprise because at first

you don’t know the other guests but it’s

fascinating to meet new people and see

what inspires their work.”

callingtonartschool.com

72 BritishTravelJournal.com


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BIG SKY ART

Big Sky Art, on the stunning North

Norfolk coast, offers painting

courses in a range of mediums

led by well-known artists, and the

accommodation is in a luxurious

country house. Non painting partners

are welcome too – so while you receive

expert tuition, your other half can

explore the nearby harbours and

beaches, shop in Burnham Market, or

visit RSPB Titchwell Marsh.

The location is ideal for painting

seascapes in the open air. Regular

tutor at Big Sky and watercolour

artist, Jem Bowden, loves the area,

“There are superb painting locations –

picturesque small harbours, creeks and

inland village scenery all of a type that

is full of character and unspoiled by

time. People who enjoy coastal scenes,

boaty things and water – and of course

big open skies will be in their element.”

As the co-ordinator of Big Sky Art,

Janie Preece, and recent student,

Liz Monk, testify – time to focus

on your art alongside fellow

enthusiasts complements the

scenery perfectly. “It’s so lovely to

be able to concentrate on what you

want to do,” says Janie, “it’s also

a wonderful opportunity to relax,

to be looked after, well fed and

comfortably accommodated.”

“I can’t choose one favourite

thing”, adds Liz, “the facilities, the

catering, the studio, the plein air

locations, the guests, the staff and

our tutor all combined to provide

an unforgettable painting and

learning experience. The company,

the conversations and the laughs

we had during our painting sessions

and over dinner provided the icing

on the cake.”

bigskyartcourses.com

74 BritishTravelJournal.com


THE LAKE DISTRICT

SCHOOL OF ART

The Lake District is famous for inspiring

artists and poets, and local artist Colin

Halliday is passionate about sharing his

skills, and knowledge of the region, with

visiting students. “I’m from Cumbria

originally, so I know the area very well,

and we take students to some spectacular

locations.” Colin’s speciality is working in

oils with a palette knife, “We work with

only eight colours and I show students

how they can mix any colour they need.

They learn to look and see colour and

understand it better – to see them get

better at it over the days is wonderful.”

Guests stay in Keswick, but travel

around the surrounding area to paint in

a variety of dramatic outdoor locations.

Lucy Wickens studied with Colin

last year, “The accommodation and

hospitality were excellent – a gorgeous,

spacious house, perfect to accommodate

the painting group, and the location of

central Keswick was perfect. Colin was

an exceptional tutor and I’ve taken a

huge amount from working with him.”

artpaintingholidays.co.uk

ST IVES SCHOOL

OF PAINTING

The St Ives School of Painting was

established in 1938 by painter Leonard

Fuller, and the school have been

running art classes from the same

studios overlooking Porthmeor Beach

ever since.

St Ives is an iconic destination for

artists and art lovers, with a wealth

of art to look at, as well as coastal

scenery to inspire. Tutors at the school

are all experienced practising artists,

and the studios are the very same

spaces where famous residents of

St Ives, such as Ben Nicholson and

Barbara Hepworth once came to life

drawing classes.

The school offers a huge range of

courses, though accommodation is not

provided, so visitors need to find their

own – there are plenty of options in

bustling St Ives.

schoolofpainting.co.uk

YOU MIGHT ALSO ENJOY

RENOIR WALK

This new art trail in Guernsey lets you

follow in the footsteps of the famous

French impressionist, Pierre-Auguste

Renoir - showcasing how the island

inspired some of the artist’s greatest

works.

Located in the Moulin Huet valley on

the island’s south coast, the Renoir Walk

is a short, self-guided trail that takes

visitors to locations where Renoir painted

during a summer holiday in 1883.

The famous Impressionist spent just

over a month on Guernsey and created

15 paintings during his stay, the majority

of which depict views of Moulin Huet bay

and beach, and which are considered to

be among his best pieces of work.

The Renoir Walk follows his footsteps

around the bay and is marked by five

empty picture frames, which are placed

in the exact spots where Renoir worked

on his own paintings. The frames –

especially commissioned to echo the

ornate frames Renoir chose for his own

artworks – allow viewers to see Moulin

Huet from the same perspectives as the

Frenchman did. Next to each frame,

a panel offers further information plus

a QR code that can be scanned with a

smartphone to play an audio guide by Mr

Cyrille Sciama, Director of the Musée des

Impressionnismes in Giverny and a world

authority on Renoir. A PDF guide is also

available to download at artforguernsey.

com/renoir. Or visit visitguernsey.com

BritishTravelJournal.com 75


1FOR BEACH LOVING DOGS

If your pet loves nothing better than tiring themselves out with

runs and ball games on the sand, the Bijou Apartment in

trendy Rock, Cornwall, should be on your holiday wishlist.

As the name suggests this is a cute little crash pad for

two with stonking sea views and the beach just steps away across

the coastal road. The huge windows and decked balcony afford

sweeping vistas across the Camel Estuary. Rock is a great place to

hang out year round, with sophisticated eateries both here and in

nearby Padstow from the likes of Nathan Outlaw and Rick Stein.

beachretreats.co.uk

2FOR DOWN WITH IT DOGS

Hipster hounds should get themselves and their humans

down to South Place Hotel in London, near Liverpool Street

station. Glamorous Conran-designed interiors include

contemporary art from emerging London artists. You can eat

with your dog in any of the bars, or in the Secret Garden, a

magical outdoor space with retractable roof. Some of London’s

coolest neighbourhoods are on the doorstep, such as Shoreditch,

Spitalfields and Hoxton. When walkies call, you can both explore the

area with the hotel’s walking/jogging map of the best sights, calling in

at Spitalfields Market and dog-friendly cafes and pubs nearby.

southplacehotel.com

76 BritishTravelJournal.com


10OF THE BEST

DOG

FRIENDLY

HOLIDAYS

Words | Emma O'Reilly

BritishTravelJournal.com 77


3FOR WATER LOVING DOGS

Undercastle Cottage is a fairytale hideaway in a magical

setting on the edge of a river, deep in the New Forest.

When it’s too cold to swim in the river, your dog or dogs (two

are allowed) can accompany you on fishing trips along it in

the rowing boat – just bring your own rods. Or, delve into the forest

on long walks or cycle rides – there’s a hire shop nearby. Back at

the house, all is cosy and comfortable, with beautifully decorated

light filled rooms. Two double bedrooms are in the main house and

there’s an extra twin room in the separate fishing lodge.

boutique-retreats.co.uk

78 BritishTravelJournal.com


5FOR DOGS WHO PREFER

THE BEST OF BOTH

Just five minutes away from the rugged beaches of

Cornwall’s north coast, set within its own attractive gardens,

Wren Cottage is a beautiful countryside escape. Scandi-inspired

contemporary styling with beautiful, restored traditional

architecture and a postcard-perfect serene garden. There is plenty of

choice for incredible walks and places to discover, from the doorstep.

With easy access in minutes to Perranporth, St Agnes and Newquay,

you can spend your days flipping between the coast and countryside.

cornishgems.com

4FOR ANTI-SOCIAL DOGS

If your dog likes to socially distance, pandemic or not, then

The House at Mackay’s could be the perfect holiday choice.

This thoughtfully designed bolthole sleeping six people is

close to Durness, the most northerly village on mainland Britain.

The house is remote (four wheel drive recommended in the winter

months) but within easy reach of shops, restaurants and cafes.

Guests can enjoy mile upon mile of walks through the rugged countryside,

including cliff and beach walks. When the weather is wild, hole up and enjoy

the panoramic views towards the ocean from the big windows (look out for

the Northern Lights after dark) or curl up next to the wood burner!

coolstays.com

6

FOR ROCK ‘N’ ROLL DOGS

Candyland Studios is a cool, fun, open plan log cabin – just

the place to hang out for a few days or more, with family,

friends and up to two dogs. There’s lots to occupy, especially

for the musically minded. Grab a guitar or a ukulele or have

a tinkle on the baby grand piano. Or, record your own song in the

recording studio (it’s actually in the cabin!). You can even hire a

technician to figure out all the fiddly bits for you. Outside, play in the

woods, or have a campfire. Jump in the car and head to the Tarka Trail,

a former railway line, for 31 miles of traffic free walks and cycling, or

explore the wild North Devon coastline. There’s never a dull moment here.

canopyandstars.co.uk

BritishTravelJournal.com 79


7

EDITOR'S CHOICE

FOR DOGS WHO LOVE

THE SEASIDE

Who doesn’t love a traditional British seaside holiday? Especially

with the revival of exquisite beach hut accommodation lining our

coastlines and offering simple fun by the pier while staying in luxury

in your own beachside sumptuous suite. Coupled with the recent rise

we’ve seen in staycations, I think it’s fair to say that old-fashioned

‘bucket and spade’ fun is making a powerful come-back. The newest

arrival to the scene are the Beachcroft Beach Huts in West Sussex -

which have made a huge splash in our desire for a high-end holiday

hut. The four adjoining luxurious two-bedroom suites are located

on the beach front in Felpham Village. Each is furnished in a modern

beachside art-deco style complete with bathroom and stylish lounge

area with a cosy corner sofa, and wall to wall glass doors opening

out onto your own private terrace overlooking the beach. You and

your four-legged companions can enjoy fresh sea air, sandy toes

and relaxing sounds of gently lapping waves from morning to

night, regardless of the weather. Dogs can even enjoy a swim on the

beach all year round. Wrap up in your dressing robe and gaze out

to the sea over a morning coffee, or be mesmerised by the evening

sunset while dining with your guests (furry or not!) alfresco-style.

Fancy a movie night in? There are all the latest mod-cons including

BRITISH

TRAVEL

JOURNAL

L O V E S

2 0 2 0

80 BritishTravelJournal.com


EDITOR'S HIGHLIGHTS

ALFRESCO DINING

Enjoy traditional English dishes freshly

prepared with a modern twist. Order from the

3 course à la carte menu or selection of lighter

bites and home cooked classics. The food is

delicious and can be delivered to your door,

to be enjoyed on your terrace, or to your own

private dining Pod in the garden.

COASTAL FOOTPATHS

The Beachcroft Beach Huts are situated on

a seven mile coastal footpath, and with a

plethora of doggy friendly trails including the

stunning South Down Way and local heritage

trails on your doorstep you are spoilt for choice.

smart TV with Netflix, Nespresso machine, Smeg fridge, and a welcome

amenity bottle of Rose, decanter of Sloe Gin - perfect for warming the

body up again after a dip in the sea! Dogs are offered the same fivestar

treatment, with dog beds, toys, water and food bowls, biscuits and

chews, dog bags, and doggie ice cream vouchers to spend in the local

Pinks Parlour. As the suites are owned by the adjacent Beachcroft Hotel,

guests are also welcome to enjoy the hotel facilities including the bar

and restaurant, the bistro garden and indoor heated swimming pool.

Breakfast is included in all room rates and can be enjoyed by breakfast

hamper delivered to your door. You can also order picnic lunches and

even borrow deckchairs from the hotel! beachcroftbeachhuts.co.uk

ENJOYING THE WATER

West Wittering is the place to go for watersports,

including paddleboarding and windsurfing hire

- its about a half an hour drive. Or if you prefer

to stay closer to home you might enjoy a spot

of rockpooling. Nets, buckets and spades are

available for guests to enjoy.

LOCAL AREA

The Beachcroft Beach Huts make a fantastic

base for exploring other popular attractions in

West Sussex, including Goodwood, Arundel

Castle, Chichester Cathedral, Chichester

Theatre and Portsmouth Historic Dockyard.

Beach Hut Suites are priced from £250 bed and

breakfast per night based on 2 adults sharing.

BritishTravelJournal.com 81


8FOR ENERGETIC DOGS

Modern country chic abounds at The Fish Hotel, on the

Farncombe Estate in the glorious Cotswolds. Pull on some

wellies to roam 400 acres of wooftastic walks. Not enough

exercise for your bouncy companion? Then try out the hotel’s

own agility course for size. After all that exercise, afternoon tea calls

and your best friend can accompany you here, too. In fact they are

welcome most places, except in the restaurant. Dog friendly rooms,

suites and even luxe tree houses are all available, with dog beds,

bowls and towels making it easy for owners. There are some doggie

treats too – they are also on holiday after all!

thefishhotel.co.uk

9

FOR GOURMET DOGS

The Lake District is world famous for its wonderful walks.

Your dog can fuel up for them with a gourmet stay at the

Broadoaks Country House, Windermere. The owners’

cavapoos, Flo and Scout, encourage well behaved new friends

to visit their home, enticing first with a welcome pack of treats, then

offering DBB (that’s Doggie Bed & Breakfast) or DDBB

(Doggie Dinner, Bed & Breakfast). Dinner choices might include

salmon bite canapes, lamb with carrots or roast chicken breast,

while breakfast features warm bacon or sausage with gravy.

Dogs aren’t allowed in the main restaurant but welcome to hang

out with their owners in the bar and music room. When nature calls,

the hotel’s dog walking field is just across the road.

broadoakscountryhouse.co.uk

82 BritishTravelJournal.com


10

FOR DOGS WHO ENJOY

THE WILD SIDE OF LIFE

Skye has to be one of Scotland's most exquisite islands and

one which has inspired many notable people, from Agatha

Christie to Virginia Woolf, with its wild beauty. Corry Bothy is a

romantic Scottish beauty, nestled on the water's edge, formerly a

fisherman's shelter (which is what Bothy means in Gaelic).

Today, Corry Bothy has been lovingly restored by its owners and

turned into a beautiful dog friendly abode for couples. Situated

close to the village of Broadford, this wonderful retreat is perfectly

situated to explore the simply epic beauty of Skye, whether you're

hiking around the Old Man of Storr, marvelling at the Fairy Pools,

taking a boat trip to spot sea eagles or enjoying a tipple at one of

the islands' three whiskey distilleries.

boutique-retreats.co.uk

BritishTravelJournal.com 83


84 BritishTravelJournal.com


COASTAL

FORAGING

Wild edibles are in abundance across the British

Isles with a tantalising range of fungi, plants,

shellfish and seaweed on offer countrywide

Words | Lydia Paleschi

Whether you’re looking to

expand your knowledge of

your local ecosystem, spend

more time outdoors or make

your dinner parties all the more interesting,

coastal foraging promises the discovery of a

world full of beauty, flavour and intrigue, all

whilst providing you with the opportunity to

visit Britain’s beautiful coastlines.

Expert forager Matt Vernon gives me an

introduction to coastal foraging and his top

tips for heading to the coast and giving it a go.

Originally from Lacock,

Matt has been foraging

since his childhood and

spent years researching

and honing his skills.

He has featured

on multiple television

programmes and worked with many of the

most prestigious restaurants in Cornwall,

supplying them with wild edibles from

around the coast. He now holds both

coastal and woodland foraging walks and

pop-up feasts around the county.

à

BritishTravelJournal.com 85


Why we should forage

Matt begins by explaining that wild foraging is

important for our countryside. Much like pruning

your garden plants, by picking some species,

foraging enables others to grow. However, he

emphasises the only way this to be the case is to

forage sustainably. “Safe foraging is sustainable

foraging. By picking new leaves from plants you

lower the risk of taking poisonous varieties home,

whilst ensuring you’re not taking away huge

handfuls of plant growth at a time”. Whilst it is

important to be aware of plants with toxins, there

are many others with immense health benefits.

“Take wild nettles for example, they are pretty

much classed as a superfood and have higher

nutritional values than spinach and almost as

much protein as pulses. They’re the perfect

compliment to a vegan diet as they’re high in iron

and calcium.” One of the reasons Matt enjoys

foraging so much is because finding wild edibles

around the coast is possible all year round and

helps us to develop an affinity with our natural

surroundings. “You develop a connection with

nature and feel a part of it. When you become

a part of something you become protective of

it, so many foragers are also environmental

campaigners.”

How to give it a go

The first thing Matt advises is don’t try to forage

a whole meal. “The idea is to incorporate wild

food into your everyday diet. This also means

that you’re not setting yourself up for failure

or disappointment when you can't forage your

whole dinner.” Having done some homework

and equipped with a couple of books (Matt

recommends that Emma Gunn’s Never Mind the

Burdocks is one of them) it’s time to head to the

coast. “At your local beach start in the splash

zone, just above the high tide mark and look for

small areas of soil where plants will be able to

grow. Sea beet is the easiest one to look for and

has similar characteristics to chard, with green

leaves and purple stalks. You can use different

parts of the sea beet plant at different times of

the year. For example, during spring you can

make a salad from the leaves and when it goes

into flower during the summer the flower stalks

have a crunchy texture.”

Next on the list is Rock Samphire. Well known

for its popularity in Michelin star restaurants, it

is also found above the high tide line and even

grows out of sea walls. “It’s easily recognisable

and therefore easy to identify, but is a strong

flavour so should be paired with other things.

The flowers are also delicious, especially when

they’ve been dipped in tempura batter.” Sea

Radish can be found in the splash zone too,

further up than sea beet and also in sand dunes.

From late summer to late spring, the many

varieties of seaweed are at their best for foraging.

Matt’s favourite is Thong Weed, alternatively

known as Sea Spaghetti. “It’s a lovely seaweed to

eat and is great for kids. It starts a khaki colour

but when submerged in boiling water for 10-20

seconds turns bright green.”

OUR FAVOURITE FORAGING

EXPERIENCES ACROSS THE

BRITISH ISLES:

Cornish Wild Food, Cornwall, England

Specialising in wild food education and wild

cooking, Matt offers coastal foraging walks and

feasts at various sites around the Cornish coast.

cornishwildfood.co.uk

Coastal Foraging, Pembrokeshire and

Camarthenshire, Wales

Discover sea vegetables and shellfish whilst

learning about the seashore environment. At low

tide, discover deep water species such as crabs

and lobster. Craig, accompanied by his dog, aims

to inspire people in their knowledge of the coastal

environment and to promote its conservation.

coastalforaging.co.uk

Coastal Survival School, UK

Based in the South West but available across

the UK, Coastal Survival School brings together

a range of experts to provide you with fantastic

foraging experiences on the British coast. Choose

from a wide range of courses including foraging for

coastal plants or for seaweed and shellfish.

coastalsurvival.com

Wildwood Bushcraft, Moidart, Scotland

For the all out coastal foraging experience,

Wildwood Bushcraft holds full day courses

where you will learn to fish, forage and cook.

Finds include seaweed, crustaceans, shellfish

and fish.

86 BritishTravelJournal.com


FORAGING SAFETY

Matt makes it very clear that it is crucial to be aware of

the health and safety risks of coastal foraging. “Don’t

eat anything unless you’re one hundred percent

certain. It’s as important to be able to identify the

poisonous plants as it is the edible ones, as there are

some toxic species such as Hemlock Water Dropwort

which can often prove fatal upon consumption.”

Here are his top tips for keeping safe:

Don't rush it: Practice sustainable foraging by

picking one leaf at a time

Cross-reference: Use two or more books to crossreference

during identification

Be safe: Never eat anything unless you are certain of

your identification

Be sure: Double check your harvest when you get

home

Use social media: Use social media groups to

contact foragers and botanists to help you with

identification. They will have seen species in their

multiple stages of growth, whereas a book may only

show you one.

Having said this, Matt tells me that this shouldn’t put

people off from heading to the coast and foraging

at their local beaches. For those who find it difficult

to access the beach or rockpools, you can look for

edibles in car parks, gardens, or anywhere with a

hedgerow. Wherever you go, it’s worth going foraging

with an expert to begin with, to learn the fascinating

history and etymology of the plants, including their

historical botanical usage. Matt tells me, “You will

also learn about sustainable foraging and woodland

management, useful knowledge for helping you find

wild edibles, to appreciate and understand habitats,

and help us to protect them more.” u

BritishTravelJournal.com 87


THE CHARM OF

CLOVELLY

Recently named as ‘the most instagrammable village in the UK’,

British Travel Journal's Editor checks in at the new Sail Loft harbour suites

in Clovelly to discover more about this stunning North Devon village

Words | Jessica Way

IAM GOING TO BE HONEST, even if a

little embarrasing to admit, that yes, it was

one of the 134,353 Instagram captures,

giving Clovelly its title as the UK’s most

Instagrammable village, which inspired me to visit

for the first time.

Seeing the extraordinary view of the famous

cobbled street, built of stones from the beach,

know as 'Up-a-long' or 'Down-a-long', with a

glistening sea and inviting blue sky in the vista -

this was more than enough to tempt me.

I soon discovered, however, that as wonderful

as this well-acclaimed snapshot might be, it's

not the only reason for visiting Clovelly - in fact,

there are many more incredible highlights just

waiting to be discovered in this little village.

Most incredibly, Clovelly is very special in

that it has been privately owned, managed and

preserved by the same family since 1738. There

is a small community of around 400 residents

(known as the cobblers) who rent their pictureperfect

houses from the family's Clovelly Estate

Company, and together, they run the village.

There are no holiday homes allowed and no

option to buy. However together with the owners,

the residents look after the village and enjoy living

in it just as it would have been in the mid 19th

century - making this one of the most unique,

famous and beautiful villages in the world.

Properties in the village do not become

available very often, but when they do, potential

newcomers are interviewed, as they must have a

skill or business attribute where they are able to

personally contribute to the community if they

are going to live there. All residents are expected

to join some of the village groups and take an

active and supportive role in village life.

If you are born living on the cobbles however

(a cobbler baby) then you are exempt from this

interview process - instead, you will be given

priority status on rental opportunities when

looking for a home of your own.

This exceptional sense of community spirit

gives Clovelly its unrivalled charm - the tour

guides, restaurant staff, museum workers to

the local fisherman, everyone’s a team, living

and working together on the cobbles - and this

includes entire families who have lived in the

village for generations.

Take the Perham family, for example, one of

the oldest families in Clovelly - they have been

cobblers now for six generations. Artist siblings

Rachel and Stephen (Perham) follow in their

Mother's tradition of painting on pebbles, their

88 BritishTravelJournal.com


naïve and folk art paintings are displays

of Clovelly as they see it through their

eyes today.

For day visitors to the village, there

is a modest admission charge, which

includes parking, an informative video

on Clovelly’s history in the Visitor

Centre, the museums in the village,

and free admission to Clovelly Court

Gardens. The profits made from this

charge, the pubs, hotels, restaurants

and shops, are invested straight back

into preserving the village. And that

comes at an eye-watering price!

Just the upkeep of the stonework in

the village has cost the Clovelly Estate

Company over £76,000 in the last

few years, upkeep of the Harbour wall

and quay around £50,000, and over

£200,000 on exterior decorations alone.

For day visitors the large Visitor

Centre offers plenty of parking spaces

at the top of the hill. From here it is a

short downhill walk to the top of the

high street, passing the donkey stables

and craft workshops of pottery, silk and

soap (don't miss watching the skilled

craftsmen at work in the converted

stable-yard), before tumbling its way

all the way down to the ancient fishing

harbour and 14th Century quay.

Clinging to a 400-foot cliff, once you

are in the village, there is no traffic, just

donkeys and man-powered sledges to

transport all goods, from groceries to

furniture. Donkeys used to be the main

form of transport for centuries, but now

they are mainly seen giving children rides

around their meadow during the summer

or posing for photographs in the street.

It is a joy to gently meander your

way past the whitewashed cottages

lining the streets, while navigating the

passageways and winding lanes that

lead off to further picturesque treasures.

It is as if the illustrations from your

favourite childhood book of the most à

BritishTravelJournal.com 89


eautiful village you could possibly imagine comes

to life around you. The purring cats greet you from

the doorsteps of their homes, beautifully decorated

with blooming flowerbeds, pastel-colours and

ornamental shells. Children play without a care

in the world, carrying with them crab buckets,

bodyboards and just the smell of sweet roses.

It is no wonder with all this magic in the air that

Clovelly has so many literary and artist connections;

Charles Kingsley lived here, Charles Dickens wrote

about it, William Turner painted it and Rex Whistler

featured it in much of his work too.

In the village, you can visit the Kingsley Museum

where you’ll see Charles sitting at his desk in his

“It is as if the

illustrations from

your favourite

childhood

book of the

most beautiful

village you could

possibly imagine

comes to life

around you.”

study composing a letter to his bride-to-be. There’s

also the Fisherman’s Cottage, where you can see

how a Clovelly fisherman and his family lived in the

1930s.

You could easily spend the entire day exploring

the village shops, museums, pubs and picturesque

harbour, and when hunger calls there are several

options of restaurants and bars.

Stop off for a famous Devon Cream Tea at

Hamlyn’s, located in the New Inn, a magnificently

beam-hung room featuring a portrait of Christine

Hamlyn in her wedding dress. Or for delicious

home-cooked pub grub while watching the world

go by there’s the beer garden at the Upalong Bar,

90 BritishTravelJournal.com


outside at the back of the Inn. You might

also enjoy walking in the footsteps of Lily

James with a visit to the Snug, as seen in

The Guernsey Literary And Potato Peel Pie

Society, with views looking out across the

harbour and bay.

Fresh fish, crabs and lobster land on

the quay at Clovelly daily - straight off

local boats into the Harbour Restaurant,

so sampling some of their famous

Clovelly lobsters is an absolute must.

The Harbour Restaurant is open for

dinner every evening with stunning views

across the quay and harbour.

For those who do not want to walk

back up, there is a fare-paying Land

Rover service for much of the year to

return you to the top of the village.

CLOVELLY COURT

GARDENS

Back at the top is where you will discover

a true gem in the village - one that is

often be overlooked by visitors. Clovelly

Court Gardens, located adjacent to the

13th Century parish church of All Saints,

is a perfect example of a real working

Victorian kitchen garden.

The gardens are a contrast to the rest

of the village, protected from the winds

and bounded by an avenue of lofty lime

trees, bordered by herbaceous beds,

which in summer are a blaze of colour.

Several blissful hours could be spent

admiring its splendid herbaceous borders

and magnificently restored Victorian

glasshouses. In the run of glasshouses,

you will find apricots, peaches,

nectarines, melons, grapes, lemons and

figs, ripening in the warmth, along with

cucumbers, peppers, chillies, aubergines

– and a tropical Abutilon.

Outside there are apples, pears, quinces,

medlars, soft fruit, and two mulberry trees

– and even Chinese gooseberries. The

Red Lion and the New Inn at Clovelly are

both supplied with the fruit and vegetable

produce from the gardens.

WHERE TO STAY

There are two hotels, the 400 year old

New Inn, in the heart of the village and

the 18th Century Red Lion on the quay,

or Hamlyn’s hostel - a simple no-frills bed

and breakfast opposite the New Inn.

The Red Lion has recently launched

six beautifully refurbished Sail Loft

bedroom suites following an impressive

a conversion of an old Grade II listed

building store adjacent to pub, previously

used as a cobbler’s shop and store room

for the Coastguards gig rowing boat and

fishing tackle.

The bedrooms are stylishly decorated,

and you just can’t beat the spectacular

sea and harbour views. The private guest

parking offers you the unique opportunity

to enjoy the harbour and the village

before, during and after-hours from the

day visitors, and of course access to the

harbour by car (rather than on foot). The

evenings in Clovelly have a very different

feel. Calm and serene, the village reverts

back to a peaceful village of residents.u

You might also enjoy:

Book on a village tour: Joining a village

tour is a perfect way to learn more about

the village history and traditions.

A romantic boat trip to Lundy:

Lundy (Norse for island of puffins) lies

twelve miles off the coast from Clovelly.

This three and a half mile-long granite

outcrop sits on the edge of the Atlantic

Ocean, with nothing but sea between

it and North America, three thousand

miles away. You can book a trip there

from the Quay at Clovelly

Walking the South West Coast Path:

From the very top of the high street

Clovelly offers breathtaking scenery and

lengthy walks along the cliff tops.There

are lovely signposted walks on the South

West Coast Path in both directions.

Join in the fun:

Time your visit and experience one of the

annual festivals including the “Seaweed

Festival” in June, “Maritime Festival” in July,

“Lobster and Crab Feast” in September and

the “Herring Festival” in November.

BritishTravelJournal.com 91


92 BritishTravelJournal.com


THE BIRCH

If you’re yearning for a UK mini-break with a difference then you’ll be hard pushed

to find a better escape than The Birch - the UK’s most trendy new hotel to open this

year. Unleash your creativity, feel at peace and be prepared to be impressed.

Words | Jessica Way

IT IS EASY TO INTRODUCE The Birch as you

would for any luxury new hotel launch, it’s a

140-bedroom converted Georgian Mansion, set

in Theobalds 55-acre Estate, Hertfordshire, just

30 minutes from London’s Liverpool Street Station.

However, this is where the comparison ends, as The

Birch is not like any other hotel, it’s a totally new

concept - I expect you’re either going to love it or

hate it.

Even the name, Birch (handle.silk.comet), takes on

an innovative approach - as the first British brand to

use new location technology, what3words, an app

which enables people around the world to share

precise locations, with every 3 metres square having

a unique combination of three words.

The brainchild behind it is Chris Penn, former

Managing Director of The Ace Hotel London

Shoreditch, recently the highest-placed hospitality

operator on the CoolBrands list, he leaves behind

one cutting edge hotel to launch another.

The Birch is a members club, but one where

everyone’s welcome, as you do not need to be a

member to stay here. Non-member hotel guests

and restaurant diners still get access to everything

“The Birch

is not like any

other hotel,

it’s a totally

new concept - I

expect you’re

either going to

love it or

hate it”

on offer. The incentive to become a member,

for a cost of £120 a month (and a £200 joining

fee), offers you full access to the Wellness Space,

two restaurants, three bars, co-working space...

and the daily-run programme of classes and

events (including wild yoga on the lawn, ceramics

workshops in the pottery studio, sourdoughmaking,

beekeeping and foraging walks around the

grounds). There are a few other perks too, such as

discounts on room rates, spa treatments and food

and drink.

The concept is both bold and brave, and

although (it seems) aimed principally at the Gen-Z

and Millennials generations who work in the city,

amongst the many fashionable city-dwellers the

hotel was bustling with multi-generational families

and parents with young children too. The mornings

took on a very different feel to the party-vibe in

the evenings, where cocktails were flowing and

DJs were playing their latest sets on the lawn. The

hotel was much quieter, people were few and far

between during breakfast time, with just a handful

queuing for coffee dressed in their gym gear, or

taking their pampered pooch out for a stroll. à

BritishTravelJournal.com 93


The Birch is described to look like a hotel, and to feel like a festival. And

I think this is quite an accurate description - a boutique festival mind,

more Larmer Tree and Wilderness rather than Glastonbury.

The number of classes and activities on offer is really what sets it

apart from your more usual hotel stay, and with so much going on it is

unstuffy and feels non-judgemental. Everyone is made to feel welcome

and encouraged to give it a go, to try something new. With so much

variety to choose from, every visit is likely to offer a personal and

individual experience. Here’s how we spent our time...

GETTING INTO THE GROOVE

The sun was shining so once we had settled in we headed out onto

the lawn where we had our own evening BBQ pit. You have the option

to book a BBQ pit by day or by evening, with both meat and veg

boxes available - it’s a DIY-style affair, although you’re provided with

instructions, tongs, and all the treats you need. We also had our QR

code to hand, given to us when we checked in - this was the link to our

food ordering app, another unique idea from The Birch’s chef Robin

Gill who wanted to create new ways for guests to feast on food. You

simply order your food and drinks from the online menus, then collect

from Valeries who will call or text you when it’s ready. You can then

choose to sit and dine in the restaurant, or, take your food away and

eat wherever you like. You are encouraged to quite literally eat and

drink anywhere, be it on a deckchair in the movie room, on a blanket or

hammock in the back lawn, or even in the Library.

There is plenty of space and beautifully furnished rooms to

choose from - especially in the Grade ll-listed Mansion House with

its impressive entrance, mosaic floors, grand staircase and original

paintings uncovered on some of the ceilings during the two-year-long

renovation. In fact, we spent much of our first evening exploring the

94 BritishTravelJournal.com


ooms, wandering our way through the creative

corridors, stopping in at the games room, popping

our head into the pottery studio, and taking a peek

at the think pods, art studios and music rooms.

Originally The Birch was home to the eccentric

Victorian socialite Lady Meux, who it is claimed,

used to ride through Mayfair in a zebra-drawn

carriage, once had a menagerie and her own roller

skating rink at the house (now the wellness space -

a separate building just across from the Mansion).

ACTIVITIES AND CLASSES

First on our activities schedule, Wild Yoga outdoors

on the lawn. We were lucky with the weather, it was

a beautiful morning. The stretching and the sound

of the gentle breeze through the trees restored our

energy and set us up for the day ahead.

Following a coffee and breakfast from The Store

we popped into the bakery for one of their drop-in

sessions and joined the bakers in one of their daily

rituals making delicious sourdough. We enjoyed it

so much that we returned in the afternoon where

we made Pain au chocolat.

One of my highlights was attending a guided

nature walk with farmer Tom Morphew around the

Birch grounds. Tom’s passion for nature and biodiversity

and knowledge in his field was fascinating.

We met his pigs, collected eggs from the chickens

and admired the kitchen-garden.

Tom explained his vision, and how together

with chef Robin Gill, they had ambitious plans to

grow much more estate-made produce and be

as self-sustainable as possible. Tom also told us

about the garden walkabouts and farmer days he

would be launching, where he’ll be teaching guests

how to grow and compost as well as forage in the

woodland.

You can’t leave The Birch without trying

something new, for me, this was Watercolour

botanicals. Illustrator Katie Rose Johnston led

the workshop designed to help you relax and

unwind through painting. Inspired by the flowers

and nature surrounding Birch we learned some

simple techniques to paint plants and foliage in

watercolour.

I took a look around the Wellness Centre, it

was fully kitted out with state-of-the-art fitness

equipment - and is a huge space. As is often the

case in hotels there was no-one actually working

out there at the time. I imagine when they open the

eagerly anticipated Lido - a 25-metre outdoor pool

surrounded by nature with poolside BBQ and Lido

bar - it will become more popular.

“The number

of classes and

activities on

offer is really

what sets it

apart from your

more usual hotel

stay, and with

so much going

on it is unstuffy

and feels nonjudgemental.

Everyone is

made to feel

welcome and

encouraged to

give it a go, to

try something

new. ”

THE ZEBRA RIDING CLUB

The culinary heartbeat of The Birch, The Zebra

Riding Club restaurant is a much more ‘normal’

dining experience than that of the grab-and-go

concept at Valeries. Here you must book a table

in advance, you then order from the waiter or

waitress, and dine in the restaurant. With much of

the produce from the growing farm, woods, and

local surroundings, the unfussy menu is described

as being led by nature. I ordered oysters sourced

fresh from Achill Island off the West Coast of

Ireland and they were delicious.

THE FUTURE

The Birch (handle.silk.comet) is the first to open,

with no secret that the vision is to roll out the

concept with further hotels launching close to

other major cities across the UK. And you could

suggest the timing is impeccable too, with more

people searching for work-life balance following

the coronavirus pandemic lockdown having had

an opportunity to reflect while on Furlough. Plus,

with more businesses closing their offices and

previous commuters now working from home, The

Birch might also fulfil the demand for a co-working

sociable space, especially important for those in the

media and creative industries. So the questions is,

could this community-centred creative work-play

hub become the hotel of the future? Personally I am

one of the lovers (not haters) - I really enjoyed my

time at The Birch and I definitely plan to return. u

BritishTravelJournal.com 95


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96 BritishTravelJournal.com


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BritishTravelJournal.com 97


BRITISH TRAVEL JOURNAL CROSSWORD 07

ACROSS

8 Tree whose product is used in

making soap (3,4)

9 Symbol of Christmas (4,3)

10 Card game or brandy (8)

11 Wifely word (6)

12 Grand National site (7)

13 Point at the western end of the

Jurassic Coast (7)

14 Invasion vessels of 1944 (1,1,2)

17 Loch with the Falls of Lora at

its mouth (5)

19 Fake (4)

23 Chairs fit for kings (7)

24 Skye's --- Hills (7)

25 Major West Country rock

festival (6)

26 Fantastic liar (8)

27 Unthankful person (7)

28 The Farne ---, where the

Forfarshire was wrecked (7)

DOWN

1 Westernmost English county (8)

2 Movable rope fastening (4,4)

3 Tars (7)

4 Full of oneself (8)

5 Dive (8)

6 Preludes to conflict (8)

7 Female personification of the

United States (8)

15 Where 10 Across died (2,6)

16 Residents north of the Mersey

(8)

17 Theme you messed up for a

Berwickshire town (8)

18 Memorial in front of Buckingham

Palace (8)

20 Approximately the last 10,000

years (8)

21 Port in the north of Angus (8)

22 Of considerable proportion (7)

Answers will be printed in the Spring Issue out 5 February 2021

The first correct crossword received will be rewarded with a free gift from

The Travelling Reader. Simply send your completed crossword (or the answers)

with your choice of The Original, The London, or Simply British Tastes box,

(thetravellingreader.com) and your postal address, by post to British Travel

Journal, Mitchell House, Brook Avenue, Warsash, Southampton, Hampshire,

SO31 9HP, or email the answers to crossword@britishtraveljournal.com

W E LOVE

ANSWERS TO CROSSWORD 06 | SUMMER 2020

ACROSS: 9 Neutron 10 Abusive 11 Inductees 12 Ethic 13 At a gallop

15 Major 16 Portchester 20 Osier 22 Yorkshire 24 Lucid 25 Gravelled 26

Kashmir 27 Glutton. DOWN: 1 Anti-war 2 Tundra 3 Armchair 4 Inverlochy 5

Oaks 6 Museum 7 Nightjar 8 Keycard 14 Prearrange 16 Princess 17 Tossed up

18 Hoylake 19 Leading 21 Radome 23 Islets 25 Gore.

FOR YOUR JOURNEY

Books, travel gadgets and crossword

SAFETY WITH STYLE

Initially set up to provide free bicycle lights for

students in Stockholm, Bookman has launched

some brand-new colourways. Whether cycling,

running, walking the dog, or taking a midnight

stroll, these super-convenient and popular

magnetic reflectors are as stylish as they are safe.

bookman.se

98 BritishTravelJournal.com

SNOOOZE PILLOW

This Danish-designed Snoooze pillow (spelt

with three 'o's) is a hygienic luxury travel pillow

that can be used both on the go and at your

final destination. With ‘hygiene’ fast becoming

the new ‘hygge’, could this be the new travel

essential? Available in UK airports and online.

snooozeworld.com

NATURE LOVERS

With birding on the rise in the UK

and wildlife enthusiasts spending

more time outdoors, Swarovski’s new

visionary NL Pure Binoculars are

designed to provide the best possible

image for long-distance viewing.

swarovskioptik.com

MOUNTAIN MAN

James Forrest broke records when he

climbed all 446 Mountains in England

and Wales in just six months. Read his

captivating and amazing story - and be

inspired to embark on your own adventure,

no matter how big or small! £16.99

blackwells.co.uk


SHOP

DISCOVER

LEARN

Welcome to the oldest teashop in London.

Our Twinings historical flagship store is over 300 years old. SHOP with us for your

favourite tea blends, gifts and premium teas from all around the world. DISCOVER new

flavours at our refurbished, state-of-the-art Loose Leaf Tasting Bar or LEARN something

new at one of our Tea Masterclasses – visit our website for more information.


DESIGNED & MADE IN ORKNEY, SCOTLAND

Seasons

WINTER

Inspired by special memories

as Sheila and her husband,

Rick, walked through falling

leaves on the paths of

Inverewe’s tranquil gardens.

Created in silver, with

yellow and rose gold leaves,

hand-enamelled in Winter hues.

Also available in Spring, Summer

and Autumn enamel colours.

Book an Appointment

Discuss your designer ring and jewellery

options with a one-to-one appointment.

Book online at sheilafleet.com/shops

ORKNEY | EDINBURGH | GLASGOW

01856 861 203 | sheilafleet.com

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