CPF Magazine Fall 2020 Issue

cpfnational

A national network of volunteers, parents and stakeholders who value French as an integral part of Canada. CPF Magazine is dedicated to the promotion and creation of French-second-language learning opportunities for young Canadians.

FALL 2020

Magazine

$6.95 • FREE FOR MEMBERS

CANADIAN PARENTS FOR FRENCH

Back to School

Resources

HOW TO PRESERVE

FRENCH LEARNING

DURING SCHOOL

CLOSURES

TAKING THE CPF

NETWORK CONFERENCE

VIRTUAL IN 2020


THE LINGUISTIC DUALITY NETWORK

TWO LANGUAGES = TWICE AS STRONG

Like maple syrup on pancakes, some things are just better together. The same can be

said about Canada’s official languages, whether you speak English or French… or both!

Linguistic duality is at the heart of our identity and a unique source of pride for Canadians.

CPF Celebrates Linguistic Duality Day

The second Thursday of September is Linguistic Duality Day. This year, CPF marked the occasion by joining

its partners, French for the Future and the Canadian Foundation for Cross-Cultural Dialogue to launch the

Linguistic Duality Network’s new website and social media campaign.

Make every day Linguistic Duality Day

by showing your support

Join the Linguistic Duality Network:

Visit linguisticduality.ca and become a supporter of our

growing community!

LINGUISTIC DUALITY MAKES

CANADA MORE CANADIAN!

Visit the CPF website for ideas on how to celebrate linguistic

duality and demonstrate that we’re truly #bettertogether.

Follow us on:

@ldn.rdl

@ldn_rdl


Magazine

CANADIAN PARENTS FOR FRENCH

FALL 2020

www.cpf.ca

FALL 2020

Table of Contents

CONTRIBUTORS

Andréanne Simard, Karen Pozniak, Rebecca

Lancaster, Marcos Salaiza and other authors

and organizations, as noted in their articles.

EDITORIAL MANAGER

Marcos Salaiza

GRAPHIC DESIGN

Stripe Graphics Ltd.

PRINTING

Trico Evolution

SUBMISSIONS

Canadian Parents for French

1104 - 170 Laurier Ave. W.

Ottawa, ON K1P 5V5

(613) 235-1481, www.cpf.ca

Advertising: Cathy Stone

Canadian Parents for French

Email: advertise@cpf.ca

CPF Magazine is published three times per

year for members of Canadian Parents for

French. Our readership includes parents

of students learning French as a second

language, French language teachers,

school board or district staff, and provincial,

territorial and federal government staff

responsible for official languages education.

CHANGE OF ADDRESS

To signal a change of address,

contact Canadian Parents for French

at (613) 235-1481, or email:

cpf.magazine@cpf.ca

Editorial material contained in this

publication may not be reproduced

without permission.

Publications Mail Agreement No. 40063218

Return undeliverable mail to Canadian

Parents for French at the address above.

To become an online subscriber, email

cpf.magazine@cpf.ca. For an online version

of this issue, visit www.cpf.ca.

This issue of CPF Magazine is printed

on 70lb Endurance Silk, using vegetable

based inks. The paper is FSC certified by the

Forest Stewardship Council® (FSC®), meaning

it comes from well-managed forests and

known sources, ensuring local communities

benefit and sensitive areas are protected.

FEATURES

3 How to Preserve French Language Learning During

Coronavirus School Closures

10 Félicitations finissants de la classe de 2020 !

12 CPF and Linguistic Reality of the Canadian Territories

14 Inclusion & Exclusion:

A risk in bilingual education in Canada

REGULAR ARTICLES

2 PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

6 CPF BRANCHES

A Summer to Remember:

CPF Branches Take Camps Online

8 CPF PARTNERS

Slam This!

16 CPF EVENTS

Taking the CPF Network Conference Virtual in 2020

18 CPF PARTNERS

Learn French through Film with Resources

from the National Film Board of Canada

20 CPF RESOURCE

Resources for Going Back to School during the Pandemic

22 KEY CPF CONTACTS ACROSS CANADA

23 CPF YOUTH ACTIVITY

Apprendre de la maison

À vos marques, prêts, débranchez!

Canadian Parents for French is a nationwide, research-informed, volunteer organization

that promotes and creates opportunities to learn and use French for all those who

call Canada home.


PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

W

elcome to the fall edition of

CPF Magazine. These have been and

continue to be trying times for us all as

we deal with the global pandemic. New information

is published on a daily basis on many levels: the latest

medical and scientific data, updates about our country

and the reopening of businesses and schools. This

issue contains information about going back to school

which may help you in formulating plans to keep

you child(ren) safe and engaged in French second

language learning. Please keep your local CPF Chapter

and Branch apprised of conditions at your School

Boards or Districts. It is important for them to have

this knowledge in order to be able to advocate on students’ behalf.

This issue includes articles on some of the CPF activities that

occurred virtually over the summer. Many thanks to the Branches

and Chapters who were able to adapt their programming so that

students could continue to learn and use French. Research based

articles are also included as well as information on other available

resources for the new school year.

Our CPF Network Conference and National AGM that are

traditionally held in October, will be held virtually this year. This has

been very disappointing for those of us who have participated in

person; had the chance to attend workshops; and have, throughout

the years, renewed friendships and made new ones with likeminded

individuals from across the country.

However, the silver lining is that we now have an

opportunity to reach out to more members and

others who have been unable to attend in the past.

I invite you to read the article about the conference,

register to attend and take part. CPF Branches

whose conferences and AGMs have also been in

the fall will be hosting them virtually as well. We are

thankful for the technology that allows us to do this.

I am grateful for the powerful and dedicated

volunteers from across the country who provide

leadership on so many levels; especially the

Committee and Branch Leaders whom I have had the

pleasure of working with over the past few years. They have taken

their roles seriously and, as a result, have strengthened our Network.

Perhaps it is time for you to consider giving back to CPF with some sort

of volunteer commitment, there is a form on the National Website to

help you do this.

I look forward to meeting you in October during our virtual

conference and AGM. In the meantime, the National Board and

I are here to assist you. n

NANCY MCKERAGHAN CPF NATIONAL PRESIDENT

Université d’Ottawa | University of Ottawa

FRENCH IMMERSION

at uOttawa

A unique opportunity

with unparalleled support!

• French immersion available in 86 undergraduate programs

• Open to core, extended and French immersion students

• Special courses to make the transition to bilingual

university studies

• An extra $1,000 per year for studying bilingually

• An authentic bilingual environment in Canada’s capital

immersion@uOttawa.ca

www.immersion.uOttawa.ca

2 CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2020


How to Preserve French

Language Learning During

Coronavirus School Closures

BY CHANTAL MAYER-CRITTENDEN ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR FOR THE

SCHOOL OF SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY, LAURENTIAN UNIVERSITY, ONTARIO

This article was first published in The Conversation on June 18, 2020

https://theconversation.com/how-to-preserve-french-language-learning

-during-coronavirus-school-closures-139179

D

uring this time of confinement due

to coronavirus, children educated

in French outside Québec are

less-frequently exposed to the French

language. Studies have shown that

exposure is vital to maintaining their

skills. It is safe to assume that exposure is

also necessary for children to undertake

online learning in French successfully

In Canada outside of Québec, there

are approximately 3.9 million children

enrolled in schools. More than half a million

of them, or 12.8 per cent, are educated

in French. According to Statistics Canada,

430,119 students (11 per cent of all

students in Canada outside Québec) were

enrolled in French immersion programs and

167,259 students (four per cent) in Frenchlanguage

schools in 2017-18.

The linguistic context, expectations,

teaching approach, social context,

classroom dynamics, teachers and

students vary considerably between

French schools outside Québec in Canada

and French-immersion schools. This is

because the former were established

to teach in ways that assume children’s

first language is French and to protect

linguistic rights in a minority-language

context, and immersion programs are

intended for the linguistic majority

learning a second language.

That said, in 2018, the vast majority

of students in kindergarten classes in

French-language schools in northeastern

Ontario were anglophone.

Who attends French-language

schools?

The intent of Section 23 of the Canadian

Charter of Rights and Freedoms is to

preserve and promote both French and

English as official languages of Canada.

Section 23 stipulates which citizens hold

rights to have their children receive

school instruction in an official language

minority context (and how these rights

can be exercised). For example, if parents

are francophones or went to French

school in Ontario, they hold rights to

French-language education in Ontario for

their children.

A 2016 report by the Office of the

Commissioner of Official Languages

indicates that between 1986 and 2006,

the estimated number of children aged

five to 17 who were eligible for Frenchlanguage

education under Section 23 of

the Charter decreased continuously by

over one-quarter.

According to Statistics Canada, the

overall population of French speakers

continued >>

CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2020 3


outside Québec got smaller between

1971 to 2016. In 1981, 4.9 per cent of

the population outside Quebec identified

French as their first official language, but

the figure was 3.6 per cent in 2016.

Parents who aren’t francophones or

didn’t attend French schools may still, if

they wish, seek to enrol their child in a

French-language school. To do so, the

child and the parent must appear before

an admissions committee. Many Frenchlanguage

schools have students whose

mother tongue is English.

Maintaining French

exposure

Given the current pandemic, and the

confinement it imposes, many parents

and teachers are concerned about

maintaining the French-language skills

of their children or students who live in

linguistic minority communities where

English predominates. With the increase

in free time, and inevitably screen time,

comes an increase in exposure to English

among these students. According to

a national study, the vast majority of

children (approximately 70 per cent)

consume English-language media in the

home under normal circumstances. We

can therefore likely assume that this

consumption is increased during

a lockdown.

As a speech-language pathologist

and associate professor at Laurentian

University, my research focuses on

Despite differences in

French-language and

French immersion schooling,

there is one thing that

brings these two modes

of teaching and learning

together: in order to learn

and maintain a language,

whether it is our first or

second language, we must

be sufficiently exposed

to it. It is imperative that

children have several

opportunities to hear

and use the language.

minority-language acquisition and

maintenance in an English-dominant

context and the impacts of bilingualism

and attention deficit hyperactivity

disorder (ADHD) on the language skills of

children with developmental language

disorders. I am the founder of a research

and discussion group as well as the

host of a podcast to raise awareness

about communication.

Significant exposure

to French needed

Despite differences in French-language

and French immersion schooling, there

is one thing that brings these two modes

of teaching and learning together: in

order to learn and maintain a language,

whether it is our first or second language,

we must be sufficiently exposed to it.

It is imperative that children have

several opportunities to hear and

use the language.

According to a Canadian study,

bilingual children must be exposed to

a language at least 40 per cent of their

waking hours in order to understand it as

well as a native speaker of that language.

However, a minimum of 60 per cent of

exposure is necessary in order for the

expressive vocabulary of bilingual children

to be comparable to that of monolingual

native speakers of that language. Thus,

in order to achieve proficiency in French,

children need rich, consistent and quality

interactions in that language.

How can the French language be

preserved during the pandemic when

exposure to it is drastically reduced?

Several school boards have posted

strategies on their websites to help

parents increase exposure to French

during the pandemic. For example,

watching English television programs

dubbed into French (such as on Netflix),

watching French television programs

(ICI TOU.TV for example), using French

4 CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2020


applications such as Jeux pour lire for

younger children and 1jour1actu for

teens, listening to podcasts in French,

reading books in French, listening to

audio books (such as from Audible),

chatting with friends and extended

family members, video chatting, etc.

Strategies to

maintain French

Most of the strategies listed above are

passive in nature, meaning that children

hear French, but are not required to

actively use it. The saying “use it or lose

it” is relevant. It’s important to create

opportunities during the day when

children use French, either orally or in

writing. This allows them to consolidate

what they’ve learned and develop the

skills that will help them maintain the

minority language.

I have prepared resources for

parents with many of the strategies

listed above, among others. They can be

found on my website. These strategies

include creating videos or photo albums

with French subtitles, video calls with

French-speaking family members, using

applications that require word spelling

(such as Scrabble) and speaking key

words throughout the day. These words

are more sustained or literary words

that are not necessarily encountered

in children’s daily lives, but are very

important for school learning as well

as for reading comprehension.

One thing is certain, doing

a little is better than doing

nothing. The important

thing is to establish a home

routine to try to increase

exposure to French. Parents

need to find opportunities

for their child to speak

French every day and

stick to it.

I have recorded episodes of The Parlé

Podcast in French and English to help

parents choose these key words and use

them in a variety of contexts. Several

studies have shown that even children in

preschool and kindergarten can learn

them and that the benefits are many.

In fact, the vocabulary understood by

kindergarten students is strongly related

to the end of seventh grade vocabulary

and reading comprehension.

Better a little than

none at all

However, even with the strategies

listed in this article, it remains difficult

for many families to achieve a level of

exposure to French of 40 to 60 per

cent of the child’s waking hours. These

strategies, whether passive or active,

rely on the support of parents already

overworked by the countless tasks that

have been added to their daily activities

since COVID-19 disruptions.

One thing is certain, doing a little is

better than doing nothing. The important

thing is to establish a home routine to try

to increase exposure to French. Parents

need to find opportunities for their child

to speak French every day and stick to it.

This can be a meal, a particular activity

such as bath time, a TV show, reading a

book, video chatting with family members

or with French-speaking friends. When

organizing video calls, I suggest making a

plan to give structure to the conversation.

For younger children, it can be a

kind of scavenger hunt (for example,

describing something yellow in a room,

what they ate for breakfast). For older

children, it can be a discussion about a

French-language program that they’re

watching. Activities for video calls can be

found on my website.

Should we expect a decline of French

language skills in children from bilingual

or anglophone homes? Only time

will tell. n

The Parlé Podcast

To listen to the author’s podcast,

visit her blog,

theparlepodcast.com

CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2020 5


CPF BRANCHES

A Summer to Remember

CPF SASKATCHEWAN Virtual French Summer Camp Attracts International Audience

BY KAREN POZNIAK EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, CPF SK BRANCH

W

hen the COVID-19 pandemic

hit the globe, one immediate

professional impact was the need

for organizations to evaluate if programs

and activities could still be offered. Everyone

was forced to stop and think... and then,

to reinvent themselves. As the saying goes,

"necessity is the mother of invention".

Normally, Canadian Parents for French –

Saskatchewan (CPF SK) would have held

its popular Fête du soleil summer camp in

locations around the province for students

entering kindergarten to grade 5.

Because the in-person camp could no

longer happen, the Virtual Fête du soleil -

Fun at Home! concept was created. The idea

was to provide an online camp, but it would

take the form of a television-like program.

Think Sesame Street and Mr. Dressup. The

motivator was threefold: to keep as much

normalcy as possible for children in this most

unusual and unprecedented time – to still

offer a program that was very familiar and

loved; to provide an opportunity for children

to continue learning and practicing their

French language skills over the summer,

as well as create a resource that could be

used into the school year and beyond; and

finally, to deliver meaningful employment

to the four university students who would

be needed to carry out this ambitious

programming plan.

Melissa Longworth returned as the

Branch's Lead Bilingual Monitor. Joining her

were Nicole Gerber, Emily Rieder and Sierra

Kalthoff. They started Virtual Fête du soleil

- Fun at Home! by creating a theme song,

which had already been pre-developed last

summer during the Saskatoon camp – on

a bus ride home from an excursion while

singing French songs with the day campers.

Last year's jingle was further expanded and

was then used to introduce each of this

year's episodes. Next, the Monitors worked

hard to develop 35 themes to cover the

seven week time period allocated for the

virtual summer camp to take place.

Together the Monitors filmed 21 one

hour episodes, uploaded to YouTube, and

developed 14 "do-it-yourself" activity guides,

posted to the CPF SK website. At the beginning,

this was a brand new experience for them

as they were unfamiliar with the filming

process. With time, they gained familiarity and

expertise and produced great quality videos,

even using tools like the green screen.

In following pandemic protocols, the

Monitors needed to creatively provide

activities that could be done while

maintaining social distancing. For example,

with tag games, they used long objects such

as pool noodles to be physically distanced.

They also utilized different locations such as

parks, playgrounds and houses to provide

the needed space, as well as generate visual

variety for the viewers.

On behalf of the Monitors,

Ms. Longworth said, "We are incredibly

grateful to be a part of this summer project

that allowed kids to feel like they could still

attend Fête du soleil camp. We wanted them

to have as much fun watching these videos

as we did in making them. We also wanted

children to recognize that French can be

learned in a fun environment from home.

During the course of the summer, our videos

only got better, and we hope that they will

continue to be enjoyed by families to come."

Of the many themes created, four of their

favourites included Quarantine Olympics,

Pirates, Camping, and Day at the Beach.

By the end of August, more than

2,000 families had already participated

in the Virtual Fête du soleil - Fun at

Home! Program. These high numbers

clearly demonstrate that the virtual camp

served the purpose it set out to achieve.

Engagement came from households in

Saskatchewan and all across Canada, as

well as in the United States and in Europe.

Thank you Melissa, Nicole, Emily, and Sierra

for a job so well done!

Much gratitude must also go out

to Brooklyn Barré, CPF SK's Admin &

Communications Officer, for her massive

contribution over the summer. She cut film

clips, added titles and music, assembled and

posted activity guides for every theme,

and promoted each video and activity on

social media.

When asked to describe her experience

over the summer, Ms. Barré said, "In editing

the videos, it was cool to watch all the

crafts, games, cooking activities, and science

experiments that couldn’t necessarily be easily

done in the face-to-face format of camp.

I hope that these videos and themes

show children that learning French is fun

and that they can use French at home and

maybe even teach their parents a few words

that they learned in the videos."

Moving forward, the videos and "do-ityourself"

guides will remain available on the

Branch's website sk.cpf.ca. We sincerely

hope that Virtual Fête du soleil - Fun at

Home! will continue to be used by children

learning French and that this free resource

will continue to provide immeasurable value

and enjoyment to all who access it. It is our

gift to you! n

6 CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2020


CPF BRANCHES

CPF Branches Take Camps Online

Last Summer, CPF Branches responded to the pandemic in a creative

way by adapting their popular summer camps to a virtual format.

CPF NOVA SCOTIA Camps D’Été Virtuel! Mes amis et moi en ligne!

BY REBECCA LANCASTER EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, CPF NS BRANCH

C

anadian Parents for French, Nova

Scotia has a long tradition of

summer camps. We have been

organizing French camps since 1985.

Our normal camp season is a mixture of

chapter camps, overnight camps, day

camps, nautical camp and a group who

visit the Francoforum in St-Pierre, France.

Our French camp program is supported by

Canadian Heritage and NS Education and

Early Childhood Development.

In Nova Scotia, overnight camps were

cancelled by NS Public Health at the end

of May. Day camps were given the go

ahead in June but with many restrictions

involved. It was not possible at the time to

continue with our day camp program

as the venues were not available.

With some brainstorming and

planning, CPF Nova Scotia moved the

camps online with options for parents to

register campers for a full week or half

week, and for one-on-one conversation.

When the schools closed in Nova Scotia,

the students moved online to Zoom to

do classroom work with their teachers. It

was decided to use the same platform as

students were already familiar with Zoom.

Camp started each morning for an

hour and a half, then a lunch break with

a further hour and a half. One-on-one

conversations were booked before or

after camp, so that campers could

participate in both. Each day started off

with a 5-10 minute introduction, allowing

campers to join if they were running

late. The introduction was followed by

a 20-minute activity new to that day or

a homework assignment from the day

before. Morning activities included exercise

routines, zumba, show and tell, bingo,

guess who, etc.

Virtual workshop: Alain Clavette, Le monde des poules

The warm up activity was followed

by a 30-minute lesson consisting of

one of the following; dictée, writing a

story, annotating a song, learning new

vocabulary to a specific theme, writing a

poem, interviewing peers, and many other

educational practices. To wrap up and

reinforce the morning’s activities, there

was 30 minutes of an activity relating to

the lesson, such as vocabulary related

translations, scrabble, hangman, jeopardy,

French-word dominoes, and many others.

Campers and staff would do a quick

recap before the lunch break from 12:00-

1:00. The afternoon session would follow

the same process as the morning. At the

end of the day, there would be a group

activity to sum up what was learned that

day and to give a homework or activity

assignment for the following day.

On Fridays, campers received

certificates for attending camp and awards

for most improved camper were handed

out. A random draw was held on Fridays to

give out a gift card for $25 in books from

Moi et Mes Livres, a local independent

bookseller specializing in French books.

Camp Director Jake MacLellan gave

his feedback on how the camp ran, “

everything is working great. I feel we are

doing the best we can and

the students seem to love

it.” Jake has been with

our camp program for

many years. He started

as a camper at 12 and

soon moved through

junior counsellor, senior

counsellor and Prof

to Camp Director. His

experience at camp was

instrumental in his choice

to enter the Bachelor of

Education program at the University of PEI.

CPF Nova Scotia also developed

a series of pre-recorded videos and

workshops that older campers could

access. These pre-recorded resources

included how to care for chickens, cooking

classes, dance, horseback riding, 3D make

up workshops, and more. Eventually

these resources will be available on our

CPF Nova Scotia YouTube channel for

educators, parents and students to access.

As with any new activity, there are

improvements to make and some technical

glitches along the way. However we knew

that it would be a learning curve as it is

the first time CPF Nova Scotia has ever

offered activities online. Feedback from a

camper’s parent was, “I don’t listen in on

the camp, but I can hear my kids enjoying

themselves, laughing a lot. Once camp

is over they want to speak more French

with me and with each other. It’s a great

confidence booster.” In view of what CPF

Nova Scotia set out to achieve given the

circumstances, I think our camp team did

a great job. Merci à Jake, Alexa, Alexandre,

Alexanne, Ben et Daniel! n

CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2020 7


CPF PARTNERS

Slam

this!

Unique teaching methods are being used to help French as a Second Language (FSL) thrive

around the world. This year, Canadian Parents for French National and Canadian Parents for

French Québec and Nunavut (CPF QNCU) had the chance to collaborate with the Centre de la

Francophonie des Amériques (CFA) on the contest Slame tes accents.

BY ANDRÉANNE SIMARD REGIONAL ACTIVITIES COORDINATOR, CPF QUÉBEC AND NUNAVUT

Slam is a creative form of spoken art

that allows students to have fun

with language, regardless of their

level of comfort and ability. This type of

performance art is not yet well-known

within the field of education but it has big

potential as a learning tool. First, it has

the ability to act as a source of inspiration

when introducing students to the world

of poetry because of its fun nature. It

also emphasizes the importance of the

language arts in our society, in addition

to developing speaking and writing skills,

slam poetry can act as a healthy outlet

for difficult emotions that all students

experience from time to time.

Slame tes accents:

The Contest

Slame tes accents is a fantastic opportunity

for youth to have fun with words and

accents. The contest is open to all

students. French could be a student’s first

or second language. Students could be

just starting their FSL journey or perfecting

it. It doesn’t matter. All are welcome! To

participate, students had seven months

to write a class slam and create a 60 to 90

second video of their performance. They

had to use a minimum of 5 out of 20 words

outlined by the organization. In total, more

than $15 000 in prizes were offered! Lots

of fun and new discoveries were made at

the different workshops. The workshops

sought to stimulate participants’ creativity,

rhythm and writing skills. Students also

witnessed the evocative power of slam

under the inspiration of artist and Slame

tes accents spokesperson Mathieu Lippé.

Workshops and A

Vibrant Spokesperson!

Mathieu Lippé is a Québecois artist

who was the spokesperson for the

competition. He had the chance to share

his knowledge through educational

workshops in Montreal, Chicago and

Detroit. Plus, he made several slam

videos available to participants to

further their understanding of the

art. An educational guide was made

available to teachers to help facilitate

students’ development of speaking

and writing skills.

The CPF QCNU team also offered more

than six workshops in schools across the

province. The goal of our partnership with

Slame tes accents was to also promote

O'Poésie, our national poetry competition,

with a slightly different angle for 2020.

CPF was pleased to join in support of the

Centre de la Francophonie des Amériques'

well honed international competition.

CFA received over 40 videos from

seven regions across the Americas,

including Costa Rica, Canada (British

8 CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2020


Columbia, Québec, Saskatchewan and

Prince Edward Island), Cuba, Haiti,

and Mexico.

The Judging Experience

The CPF QCNU team got to be part of

the judging panel for this edition of the

competition and were very impressed by

the students’ imagination and the power of

their words. The team was delighted by the

originality, love of the French language and

courage to have fun with French. It was a

rewarding experience to see francophones

and francophiles participating fully,

regardless of their language level.

The general public could also vote

for their favourite videos. More than

10,500 votes were collected and used to

pick the winners of the Public’s Choice

Award. The contest’s key partner, Unis

TV, and the Minister of International

Relations and La Francophonie of

Québec, Ms. Nadine Girault, also

offered special prizes.

The Winners of the

CPF QCNU Bursary

Eleven schools from different corners of

the Americas were rewarded for their

moving performances. CPF QCNU also

offered a $500 bursary to a participating

school in Québec or Nunavut. The bursary

is to be used by the winning school to help

fund an educational activity in French or to

buy French educational materials.

Following a random draw, it was

Annie St-Jean’s class from Collège

Saint-Alexandre in Gatineau, Québec

that won this bursary! Congratulations!

Dare to Explore Slam!

This exciting competition provided

many positive outcomes. First, it was

an opportunity to highlight different

accents and reduce the stigma around

having an accent. The competition also

increased awareness on La Francophonie

across the Americas while promoting

French language learning in teaching

environments. Throughout the contest,

CPF PARTNERS

several classes attended workshops on

slam poetry to discover the art. Groups

from across the Americas participated

in the event and an international jury

judged the performances. And of course,

the judges selected the big winners of the

third edition of the competition!

Thank you again to the Centre de

la Francophonie des Amériques for

allowing our organization to be a part

of this incredible experience! CPF

encourages FSL teachers and students

across Canada to consider participating in

this fun, enrichment learning opportunity

in 2021. Visit the website at:

https://francophoniedesameriques.com/

vos-services/programmes/slame-tesaccents/3e-edition

n

Go to sk.cpf.ca to continue the adventure...

An

excellent

resource

for back

to school

learning!

Une

ressource

excellente

pour la

rentrée

scolaire!

CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2020 9


Félicitations finissants

de la classe de 2020!

Celebrating Meadow Lake’s First French Immersion Graduating Class

Last summer marked an important

milestone in the city of Meadow

Lake, Saskatchewan, as it saw its

first French immersion class finish

high school.

While graduations are always a

special occasion, for the graduating

class of Carpenter High School from the

Northwest School Division, it was even

more special as it represented years of

hard work not only in their studies but

also of advocating for access to French

second language education.

Even though Saskatchewan has seen

increased popularity and demand for

French immersion (FI), accessing these

programs has not always been easy.

Many times throughout their education

these students faced the risk of not being

able to continue their French education.

During their time in Grade 10, they did

not have a teacher but were determined

to continue in the program and ensure

its future existence so they simply moved

their classes online.

In a moving letter written by the six

students, they explained the challenges

and joys of being the first graduating

French immersion class in their school

division, “although there were some

struggles, the benefits of FI far outweigh

the negatives. Through this program, we

have learned valuable life skills, such as

the value of education, a strong work

ethic, to set goals and achieve them […]

and confidence. We have been able to

travel and communicate both in Canada

and abroad (Quebec, France).”

CPF National was thrilled to hear the

news about the first French immersion

class graduating from Meadow Lake,

as it is a reminder of the importance of

working towards creating opportunities

to learn French.

“We are so pleased for you and

hope, as trailblazers, you will commit

to advocating for the program going

forward. We loved reading your joint

letter sharing your reflections of your

experience. Hearing personal testimonials

makes all the difference – and you have a

great story to share!” said Nicole Thibault,

CPF National Executive Director.

We hope this class’s journey serves as

an inspiration to other students currently

in French immersion, along with their

parents. Know that the effort and hard

work are all worth it! In their letter, the

students concluded, “If we had to do it all

over again, we would enroll in FI without

giving it a second thought. Without a

doubt our future is shining bright.”

Today, French immersion continues

to be offered in the North West School

Division and has more than 100 students

currently enrolled.

Congratulations Claire, Emma,

Meaya, Tori, Haley and Aiden. n

10 CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2020


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BEYOND THE OF

Recognizing Indigenous/Inuit Languages

and Cultures — A Path to Reconciliation

For the past few years, Canadian Parents for French has been

working to increase its growth in the Canadian territories. New CPF

groups are emerging in Nunavut and the Northwest Territories.

northern horizons are

CPF’s broadening. However,

in Canada’s current political-cultural

setting, reconciliation with Indigenous

peoples is a must. CPF is responsible for

carefully investigating the paths that

must be taken to create strong ties with

the different communities in Canada’s

territories. The various legislative realities

concerning language and culture, the lack

of representation of Indigenous languages,

especially in schools, and the development

of French are challenges of which an

organization like CPF needs to be aware.

Understanding these realities in order to

act with tact is crucial to the development

and sustainability of French in the

territories, where most of the population

is Indigenous or Inuit. French cannot

flourish unless stakeholders become aware

of the historical, linguistic, and cultural

demands of the communities in which

they wish to develop or maintain it. This

article provides an overview of territorial

realities to present the challenges and

experiences of each of these Chapters.

In the end, strategies will be proposed

for the sustainable development and

enhancement of CPF’s relationships

with other communities.

12 CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2020

OVERVIEW OF INDIGENOUS

LANGUAGE REALITIES IN THE

CANADIAN TERRITORIES

Today, there are more than 60 Indigenous

languages and dialects spoken in Canada

(Statistics Canada, 2017). Of all these

language communities, only Cree,

Inuktitut, and Ojibwe, languages that

have existed for millennia, are considered

languages with enough speakers to be

revitalized (Walker, 2017).

Of the three Canadian territories,

only two have granted official status to

Indigenous and Inuit languages. In Nunavut,

Inuktitut and Inuinnaqtun are spoken

alongside English and French. In addition

to its official act, this territory has added

an Inuit Language Protection Act. In the

Northwest Territories, the Official Languages

Act recognizes 11 official languages,

including nine Indigenous languages, in

addition to the two official languages

of Canada. In Yukon, the use of Yukon’s

Indigenous languages is recognized by law,

but only officially recognized since 1988. 1

Several elementary schools offer a

First Nations or Inuit language option.

However, research has shown that there

was almost no teaching of Indigenous

languages in high school, which were used

primarily as a support for learning English

before being removed from the curriculum

(Aylward, 2009). With the project for the

modernization of the Official Languages

Act, many organizations, including

territorial francophone associations

and the Fédération des communautés

francophones et acadiennes (FCFA), have

taken on the challenge of including the

recognition of First Nations, Métis, and

Inuit languages so that they are identified

as an integral part of Canadian identity

(De Ciccio, 2019).

A LOOK AT THE YUKON

Glyn Lewis, Executive Director of CPF BC &

Yukon, reports that the relationships between

the Yukon Chapter and the territory’s

francophone community are very good

today. The Chapter works closely with the

Association franco-yukonnaise (AFY) to set up

French cultural activities in French language

and French immersion schools.

A few years ago, CPF BC & Yukon

was involved in a trilingual program with

Hardwicke Island in northern British

Columbia. An Indigenous Elder visited the

various schools during language courses to

share and teach the island’s mother tongue

and culture. In 2017, tensions between the

various language communities, unfortunately,

led to the end of the program, which had

initially been considered to be innovative

and inclusive. According to Lewis, CPF BC

& Yukon has learned a great deal from this

situation and about the importance of better

supporting itself and providing assistance to

various language communities.


FICIAL REALITY

BY ANDRÉANNE SIMARD REGIONAL ACTIVITIES COORDINATOR, CPF QUEBEC AND NUNAVUT

AND ÉDITH VACHON-RAYMOND JOURNALIST (B.A. IN CANADIAN STUDIES, INDIGENOUS STUDIES AND HISTORY)

A LOOK AT THE NORTHWEST

TERRITORIES

Since 2018, CPF has made significant

progress in building relationships and

recognizing other language and cultural

communities in the territories. Activities

aimed at promoting Indigenous cultures

were included in CPF NWT programming;

in particular, the Family Bike Rally in French

on June 21, 2018, a NWT statutory holiday

dedicated to the National Indigenous

Peoples Day. During this family bike ride,

the participants had the chance to discover

the origins of this celebration, as well as

several places rich in Dene history and

traditions. This was one of the highlights

of the 2018/19 programming.

In 2019/20, CPF NWT also established

closer ties with the francophone

community to promote the sharing of

human, financial, and material resources.

Some of these key partnerships already

existed, including organizing the traditional

Sugar Shack Cooking in French.

A LOOK AT NUNAVUT

Since 2017, CPF has been working to establish

CPF Québec Nunavut (QCNU) in Nunavut.

In 2019, the first CPF ‘Team’ Nunavut was

formalized. The goal of this team, which

brings together different organizations from

the community, is to provide francization

tools and services adapted to local needs,

while reducing the burden of cumbersome

administrative governance processes. 2

In addition, the CPF ‘Team’ mission is to

promote CPF QCNU within Nunavut. It has

been almost a year since the collaboration

agreement was signed, and very positive

changes are being seen.

The relationship between CPF QCNU

and the francophone community is strong

because most francophone families in

the territory are exogamous, so there

is already a regular mix of language and

culture. CPF’s activities are well received

because they allow families to have

access to French or bilingual experiences

even if they don’t have any knowledge

of the language, while also bringing

together francophones, francophiles and

anglophones in a fun environment that

facilitates French learning.

However, relationships with Inuit

communities need to be built and are,

therefore, a top priority. In 2019, the

CPF QCNU team made a strategic trip to

meet with Inuit leaders. During the next

visit, CPF QCNU would like to organize

a meeting with stakeholders from the

francophone community and a meeting

with representatives of Inuit communities

to encourage collaboration and the

development of forward-looking projects that

are focused on the needs of the community.

THE BOTTOM LINE...

There are many key issues in the northern

territories, including the high turnover

of staff, historical misunderstanding of

Indigenous and Inuit issues, the high

community mobility, the lack of resources,

etc. Everything seems to indicate that

creating meaningful relationships and

developing forward looking projects

among the various language communities

of a territory benefits the vitality and

development of each one. CPF is fortunate

to be a strong organization. In a pivotal time

of reconciliation and in conjunction with

the modernization of the Official Languages

Act, CPF has the unique opportunity to

take a leadership role in shaping a healthy

development of Canada’s language identity

that is respectful, inclusive, and restorative.

To achieve this, proposed strategies such as

the following could be implemented:

Proposed strategies to foster the vitality

of Canadian language identity:

1) Recognize and defend Indigenous

and Inuit languages as fundamental

languages in Canada;

2) Promote the creation of meaningful

bridges between the various language

communities (First Nations, Métis,

Indigenous, francophone, etc.) by

addressing their issues and needs, while

promoting the sharing of resources;

3) Develop partnerships between

Indigenous and francophone

organizations so meaningful projects or

actions can be implemented;

4) Respectfully include the culture and

history of Indigenous and Inuit peoples

in annual programming (e.g., CPF NWT’s

biking activity on National Indigenous

Peoples Day in Yellowknife, 2018). n

1

Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages. “Yukon adopts its Language Act.”

https://www.clo-ocol.gc.ca/en/timeline-event/yukon-adopts-its-languages-act

2

In the north, there is a high turnover of staff, so it is difficult to ensure the sustainability of projects. CPF QCNU

sees itself as a kind of support, both an administrative officer and an organizational memory that promotes the

creation of relationships between the different language communities.

CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2020 13


Inclusion&

Exclusion

A risk in bilingual education in Canada

BY MONICA TANG FRENCH IMMERSION TEACHER AND

FACULTY ASSOCIATE AT SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY, BRITISH COLUMBIA

TRANSLATED BY NATALIE BALLARD LANGUAGE PORTAL OF CANADA

14 CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2020


French immersion contributes greatly to the development of a bilingual Canada. But its

existence could be threatened if, in the long term, Francophile teachers are increasingly

willing to give up French to teach in English instead, gaining a greater sense of belonging

and legitimacy at the expense of a part of their bilingual or multilingual identity.

I

was born in Montreal to parents from

Hong Kong. We spoke Cantonese at

home, but my brother and I spoke to

each other in English, the language of

television. Our parents wouldn’t allow us

to speak English in front of them, thinking

that this rule would motivate us to learn

and use Cantonese. But in spite of this

rule, English was my dominant language.

And because of this rule, I can now

speak Cantonese.

On Sundays, we went to Chinese

school to learn Mandarin, which we

hated. The best students sat at the front

and knew all the answers. My brother and

I sat at the back and whispered to each

other in English, a language that many

other students, and sometimes even the

teacher, didn’t understand. My brother

and I went to French schools. Because our

parents couldn’t read French very well,

they didn’t always understand notices

from school. From the time I was young,

these experiences of exclusion shaped

my linguistic journey.

When I arrived in British Columbia

in 2000 during a teacher shortage, I was

quickly steered toward a career teaching

French. Overnight, my power shifted.

I had only just finished my training to

become a French teacher, but from

that moment on I was recognized and

valued as a bilingual person. My language

skills were considered professional

assets. Becoming part of a professional

community gave me a certain legitimacy

and the power to influence. After having

felt excluded for a long time, I was

now included.

Today, I teach in the French

immersion program and in the

undergraduate and continuing

professional education programs

at a university. I see my colleagues

from British Columbia experiencing

similar tension between inclusion and

exclusion. When they were younger, as

immersion students, they experienced the

“French fries” versus “English muffins”

phenomenon, which still exists today.

Then, when these students in turn

became French teachers in a minority

setting, they wondered if they were as

legitimate as their colleagues whose first

language was French. I’ve noticed that a

number of teachers who were once good

students in their immersion classes now

work hard to hide their insecurity. For

example, their students aren’t allowed

to speak English at all in class. I’ve also

known teachers who would erase all

traces of writing on the chalkboard at

the end of the day, for fear that their

colleagues or, worse, parents who read

French, might find grammar mistakes in

their writing. These teachers say that

they’re proud to teach French, but many

of them don’t dare speak it in front of

their colleagues whose mother tongue

is French.

I see a division here in the

professional community of French

teachers. French immersion contributes

greatly to the development of a

bilingual Canada. But its existence could

be threatened if, in the long term,

Francophile teachers are increasingly

willing to give up French to teach in

English instead, gaining a greater sense of

belonging and legitimacy at the expense

of a part of their bilingual or multilingual

identity. That would be a shame, because

teachers who work in their second

language are excellent role models for

young Canadians. If they look up to these

bilingual or multilingual teachers, young

people will be better able to imagine

living a bilingual or multilingual personal

or professional life of their own!

Fifty years after the Official

Languages Act came into force, has our

vision of official bilingualism evolved? n

This article was first published on December 2, 2019 in the Language Portal of Canada’s

Our Languages blog. A Translation Bureau initiative, the Language Portal provides Canadians

with a wide range of resources to help them communicate more effectively in English and

French, and publishes weekly articles by language lovers on the Our Languages blog.

https://www.noslangues-ourlanguages.gc.ca/en/blogue-blog/risque-education-bilinguerisk-bilingual-edication-eng

CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2020 15


CPF EVENTS

CPF Network Virtual Conference

The CPF Network Conference is our signature event for members and volunteers

2020

has been a challenging year for parents with

school aged children. Education and French

language learning are changing. CPF is committed to offering

our support along this new path, rich with opportunity.

A virtual format gives us an exciting opportunity to

reach our largest audience in conference history.

Connect with other like-minded parents, FSL experts

ready to answer questions as well as bilingual youth

sharing their unique ‘Winning with French’ stories.

So if you missed it in years past, come join the fun!

REGISTER TODAY!

The six day program is jam-packed with inspiring

stories, learning opportunities as well as fun cultural

activities. It will run from October 13 to 18 and offer

both pre-recorded and live sessions and Q and As.

The registration fee of $49.95 gives full program

access for a 3 month period and is open to all CPF members

across Canada. SPECIAL BONUS: CPF Branch registration

sponsorships are available using this promo code,

BRANCHSPONSOR, for the fee to be waived.

To register: https://pheedloop.com/register/cpfraiseyourflag/attendee

16 CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2020


PROGRAM 2020 SNEAK PEEK

Keynotes

CPF EVENTS

A FIRESIDE CHAT WITH …

CLARA HUGHES is a multiple Olympic medalist in cycling and speed skating and will be sharing her story

on the value of sport and play, her mental health advocacy work, and how learning French helped contribute

to her success.

HOW TO PREPARE YOUR TEEN FOR JOBS THAT DON’T EXIST YET

JP MICHEL is a bilingual career coach and will share how to prepare your teen for jobs that don’t exist yet,

explain how to have a ‘challenge mindset,’ and reinforce the benefits of speaking both languages in the

global world.

EMPOWERING STUDENTS THROUGH ADVENTURE

ELIA SAIKALY is a global adventurer and award-winning filmmaker who will share his vision that combines

adventure, education, technology and charitable initiatives to inspire youth to create positive change.

Audiences are inspired with endless creative ideas of how to use technology to engage online communities.

WHERE ARE THEY NOW? ONE FSL GRADUATE STORY

HENRY ANNAN is the past president of the Canadian Federation of Medical Students and a graduate of

Dalhousie Medical School. An advocate for bilingualism since high school, he participated as a French for the

Future youth ambassador and participated in the CPF Concours d’art oratoire. In medical school he was involved

in the FrancoDoc program which aims to enhance French-speaking medical human resources in Canada.

HOW EVENTS HELP ENHANCE SCHOOL LEARNING

MARC TARDIF « Le magicien » is a very successful professional magician who has been working on school

and family stages for the past 35 years across Canada. He has the ability to promote languages through his

fun and surprisingly beautiful illusions.

Workshops:

Supporting Your Child’s FSL Journey at Home; Creating Calm: A Family Approach to Managing Anxiety for School; Parents' Well-Being

in the Times of COVID-19; The Hybrid Approach in French Immersion; Fighting for French in Rural BC; What Does It Mean to Become

Bilingual? and more ...

Family Socio-Cultural Activities:

• The MAGIC of Bilingualism (bilingual magic show),

Marc Tardif

• French Fun and Games with Camp Tournesol

• Kahoot en français, Family Game Night with Glenn Cake

• Haunted Stories of Canada - Bilingual Storytelling

• Concert de musique with Nova Scotia one-woman-band,

Mary Beth Carty

• RAZZAMATAZZ Family Concert

• French Movie Screenings: Ma Famille et le Loup (France, 2019)

and La Course des Tuques (Quebec, 2018)

Visit https://pheedloop.com/cpfraiseyourflag/site/schedule for full program information

and to register for the Conference. The program has something for everyone!

CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2020 17


CPF PARTNERS

Learn French through

Film with the National Film

Board of Canada

Y

es, it’s possible to learn to French

while watching television! The

National Film Board of Canada

(NFB) - L’Office nationale du film du

Canada (ONF) is Canada’s public film

producer and distributor. They create

social-issue documentaries, auteur

animation, and digital content. Their

website hosts award-winning content

in both official languages. The NFB

has resources for teachers, students

and their families. And they do all this

while providing the world with a unique

Canadian perspective!

Canadian Parents for French is

proud to have partnered with the NFB

this summer. This collaboration began

as a way to encourage youth to put

their French into practice. We enjoyed

success through the National Canadian

Film Day Contest and the Stop Motion

Animation workshop and contest. We

want to highlight the many projects that

the NFB has available for FSL learners

and teachers. These projects are all great

opportunities to learn and use French.

The 2020-2021 school year will be

very different from previous ones. Online

and distance learning will continue to be

a reality in Canadian schools. With this

in mind, the NFB has put together the

following resources:

CAMPUS

CAMPUS is an online media portal for

learning in the 21st century. It is a tool

designed for teachers to help students

see, understand, and experience the

world in new ways.

CAMPUS has a collection of more

than 5,800 documentaries, films, and

interactive productions in English and

French. The educational resources

available foster deep learning and

creativity. They also sharpen critical

thinking and promote digital literacy.

CAMPUS also hosts a wide selection

of study guides, a chaptering tool, and

learning bundles connected to the most

recent world issues.

Although CAMPUS is for teachers,

librarians, and community workers,

parents can sign up and use it at home.

Many of the educational tools available

connect to school curricula.

Teachers (and parents) can help

learners make a difference in their

communities with CAMPUS. And they

can do it while practicing French at

the same time! To learn more, visit

www.nfb.ca/education/campus.

Educational Playlists

Educational Playlists include film

selections connected with Canadian

curricula and other relevant issues. Many

of the playlists are also linked to the NFB

study guides. The playlists include films in

English and French. They are available to

stream for free at www.nfb.ca/education/

educational-playlists.

Mini-Lessons – Mini leçons

Mini-Lessons are for students from

Kindergarten to Grade 12. These lessons

are short, 45 to 75-minute-long classes.

They include activities, questions, and

topics to lead discussions with students.

Although designed for a class format, you

can try them at home with your children

as well! They are available for everyone

on their website: https://blog.nfb.ca/

blog/tag/mini-lessons.

Ocean School -

L'École de l'Océan

Ocean School is an educational

experience that focuses on the

importance of discovering and preserving

the ocean. It uses short videos, interactive

media, and educational activities to learn

from home.

Ocean School features a four-week

learning plan with a student activity for

each day of the week. Put your kids’

creativity to the test, let them discover

the ocean, and have fun at their

own pace!

Available for free at the Ocean

School (oceanschool.nfb.ca), in French

and English.

Interactive Production

and Apps

The NFB releases new interactive

productions and apps to support the

transformation of the way we learn on

a regular basis. These tools focus on

immersion, participation, and helping

students master the digital world. Parents

can explore them at home and teachers

can use them in their lessons.

For more information, visit the

education section of the NFB,

nfb.ca/education.

The NFB blog

There are articles for everyone on the

NFB’s blog (blog.nfb.ca). Topics range

from education, culture, film suggestions,

and more! Follow the NFB Blog as new

learning tools and resources are added

all the time. n

18 CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2020


TM

EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

IN FRENCH & ENGLISH

ATELIERS PARASCOLAIRES

EN FRANÇAIS ET EN ANGLAIS

Get Explorin’

with EXPLORUM

EXPLORUM offers virtual

Speak French programs, hands-on Science and

DIY’Art workshops, and Birthday parties!

EXPLORUM offre des ateliers virtuels

Parle français, Science et Bricol’Art, et des Fêtes

d’anniversaire !

Speaking FRENCH

is the new FUN!

Improve your child’s French today with

our immersive Speak French program!

Encourage children to learn the language by

“living” it. We are not a school that teaches

“grammaire, conjugaison, and memorisation,”

we teach the immersive way that is used in

French programs!

Virtual EXPLORation

Workshops

Exciting yet educational workshops

to elevate your child’s afterschool

experience.

Virtual French or English programs your kids can

do from the comfort and safety of your home! Our

workshops have an array of inspiring and stimulating

activities that they will–without a doubt–love and

have plenty of stories to share with you!

Learn more | Plus de renseignements :

explorum.ca

Contact us directly | Contactez-nous

directement : info@explorum.ca


CPF RESOURCE

RESOURCES FOR

GOING BACK …

20 CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2020


CPF RESOURCE

It’s that time of year again! Back to school and there are

new challenges this year. The COVID-19 pandemic took us

all by surprise but it showed us that we can adapt. It has

also shown us that we can continue to support learning with

alternative tools and resources. Many organizations have

demonstrated flexibility by providing online learning

initiatives. CPF is no exception.

C

PF is remaining true to our mission

of providing opportunities for

youth to learn and use French. The

way we deliver our mission is changing

but we remain committed to supporting

our members.

Reach out to your CPF Branch and/

or local Chapter to find out about their

services and to share information. We

offer FSL support and resources for

students, parents, and teachers across the

country. Keep an eye on our CPF website

and social media channels. Information

is changing all the time. For specific

inquiries please send us an email at

cpf@cpf.ca

Here are some of the things

we will be doing to support

families this Fall – Programs

vary according to the CPF

Branch and the Province/

Territory needs:

n FSL Virtual Tutoring

Program

Launched last Spring as a pilot

program, our goal is to help young

students practice French outside the

classroom. Within an online workshop

children tried a variety of activities,

including reading clubs and games,

all en français. The pilot program

started in Ontario with the support of

the Toronto West Chapter and, this

September we have enrolled learners

in Alberta, British Columbia, and by

October in Atlantic Canada.

n Virtual Adult

French Lessons

CPF is hosting weekly lessons for

parents who want to join their

children’s second language learning.

It is never too late to learn French

and build confidence to support and

encourage your children! The classes

are open to all CPF members across

Canada. Schedules are being adapted

to accommodate different time zones.

n Resource Lists,

Activity Pages,

Virtual Travel Guide

A compilation of online resources

available to students, parents, and

teachers was shared in the spring.

This is an ongoing project with new

resources being added and is available

via CPF websites.

n Virtual Forums, French

Clubs, Socio-Cultural

Activities

Branch coordinated programing varies

according to the regions. For example,

CPF Alberta will be coordinating

French for the Future virtual forums

for middle and high school French

immersion, francophone, and other

FSL students. The forums motivate

students to continue their French

language education and use French

in their future careers. CPF Manitoba

took their social cultural school

tours on the road virtually this past

spring – and are planning on a

repeat performance!

n Virtual Activities

and Contests

Summer Art, Stop Mo Animation Film…

These initiatives were a huge success

and we will continue to roll out new

ones this Fall allowing students to use

French in fun and interactive ways. Get

ready for a new French “BD” Reading

Marathon and the O’Poésie National

Poetry contest to return.

n Virtual Support Sessions

for Parents and Chapter

Leaders

Webinars and workshops to further

support FSL learning at home, your

French immersion student during

remote learning and building resiliency

– reducing anxiety.

Now more than ever, a CPF membership

provides access to supports for the whole

family. Invite your neighbours and family

members into our community – for free

– in support of French language learning

during this school year! n

CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2020 21


KEY CPF CONTACTS ACROSS CANADA

National office

1104 - 170 Laurier Ave. W., Ottawa, ON K1P 5V5

T: 613.235.1481

cpf@cpf.ca cpf.ca

Quebec office & Nunavut support

P.O. Box 393 Westmount, Westmount, QC H3Z 2T5

infoqcnu@cpf.ca qc.cpf.ca

British Columbia & Yukon

227-1555 W 7th Ave., Vancouver, BC V6J 1S1

T: 778.329.9115 TF: 1.800.665.1222 (in BC & Yukon only)

info@cpf.bc.ca bc-yk.cpf.ca

Alberta

211-15120 104 Ave. NW, Edmonton, AB T5P 0R5

T: 780.433.7311

cpfab@ab.cpf.ca

ab.cpf.ca

Northwest Territories

PO Box 1538, Yellowknife, NT X1A 2P2

cpf-nwt@northwestel.net nwt.cpf.ca

Saskatchewan

303-115 2nd Ave. N., Saskatoon, SK S7K 2B1

T: 306.244.6151 TF: 1.800.561.6151 (in Saskatchewan only)

cpfsask@sasktel.net sk.cpf.ca

Manitoba

101-475 Provencher Blvd., Winnipeg, MB R2J 4A7

T: 204.222.6537 TF: 1.877.737.7036 (in Manitoba only)

cpfmb@cpfmb.com mb.cpf.ca

Ontario

103-2055 Dundas St. E., Mississauga, ON L4X 1M2

T: 905.366.1012 TF: 1.800.667.0594 (in Ontario only)

info@on.cpf.ca on.cpf.ca

New Brunswick

PO Box 4462, Sussex, NB E4E 5L6

T: 506.434.8052 TF: 1.877.273.2800 (in New Brunswick only)

cpfnb@cpfnb.net nb.cpf.ca

Nova Scotia

8 Flamingo Dr., Halifax, NS B3M 4N8

T: 902.453.2048 TF: 1.877.273.5233 (in Nova Scotia only)

cpf@ns.sympatico.ca ns.cpf.ca

Prince Edward Island

PO Box 2785, Charlottetown, PE CIA 8C4

T: 902.368.3703 ed@cpfpei.pe.ca pei.cpf.ca

Newfoundland & Labrador

PO Box 8601, Stn A, St. John’s, NL A1B 3P2

T: 709.579.1776 ed@cpfnl.ca nl.cpf.ca

TF: 1.877.576.1776 (in Newfoundland & Labrador only)

EDU-INTER FRENCH SCHOOL

IN QUEBEC CITY

Treat yourself or your loved ones to a 100% French immersion

in Quebec City. French programs for all ages with different activities

every day. On vous attend à Québec!

Adult programs

(16 years and over)

• Core and Intensive

programs available

• Small groups that allow more

speaking opportunities

• Multiple French levels are

available at all times

Complete your immersion

program by staying with one

of our homestay families

• Practice your French with

real “Québécois”

• Learn firsthand about Quebec’s

rich culture and history

• Enjoy a private room and a meal

plan during your whole stay

Can’t come right now?

Don’t worry, we have the

perfect virtual option for you!

Day and evening sessions

are available.

Teen and High School programs

(10 to 17 years)

• 10 different French summer

camp options (multiactivities,

sports, arts and much more)

• Residence and homestay

accommodation are available

• Students from 43 different

countries participate every year

• Semester and academic years

in French are possible through

our local high schools

Learn more

about Edu-inter!

learningfrenchinquebec.com

info@edu-inter.net

22 CPF MAGAZINE FALL 2020


CPF YOUTH ACTIVITY


CPF YOUTH ACTIVITY


Discover

the arts

in french

Welcome to a new resource designed

to make learning French an engaging

experience all over Canada!

FrenchStreet.ca

®

Visit FrenchStreet.ca ®

to

get on the road to unique

French experiences.

Field Trips

Arts &

Culture

Camps

Exchanges &

Programs

Francophone

Centres

Post-Secondary

Opportunities

Guest

Speakers

Parent

Support

Contests &

Events


The method that decodes the language.

read.

write.

speak

understand

lire.

écrire.

parler

comprendre

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