Tennessee Yearbook 2020

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2020: YEAR OF THE NURSE

Tennessee Nurses Association

VIRTUAL

CONFERENCE

Friday, October 30


TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2020: YEAR OF THE NURSE

2020: YEAR OF THE NURSE

Table of Contents

Welcome from the TNA President...................................................................3

Welcome from the TNA Executive Director. .........................................................5

General Announcements........................................................................... 7

2020 TNA Virtual Conference Schedule. ............................................................11

Disclosures to Participants, Continuing Nursing Education Instructions.................................22

2020 Membership Assembly Rules and Information..................................................23

Introduction to Robert’s Rules of Order.............................................................25

112th Membership Assembly Agenda ...............................................................28

2018-2020 Legislative and Health Policy Statements.................................................29

2020-2022 Legislative and Health Policy Statements ................................................ 31

2020 Resolutions. ...............................................................................33

2020 TNA Virtual Conference Sponsors. ...........................................................36

Tennessee Nurses Political Action Committee .......................................................37

Nightingale Tribute & Memoriam...................................................................38

TNA Board of Directors & Staff with TNA District Map .............................................. 40

2020 Slate of Candidates .........................................................................42

Poster Abstracts .................................................................................47

TNA Financials.................................................................................. 66

TNA Leadership Opportunities. ...................................................................70

Area of Interest Form............................................................................. 71

TNA Past Presidents..............................................................................72

Tennessee Nurses Foundation (TNF) - Mission - Goals - Initiatives .....................................73

TNF Board of Trust Roster. .......................................................................75

TNA Member Benefits ............................................................................77

TNA 2021 Events................................................................................ 80

Published for the Tennessee Nurses Association by:

Arthur L. Davis Publishing Agency

P.O. Box 216, Cedar Falls, IA 50613 • (319) 277-2414

www.tnaonline.org

Published by:

Arthur L. Davis

Publishing Agency, Inc.

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2020: YEAR OF THE NURSE

Welcome from the TNA President

Carla Kirkland, MSN, APRN, ACNP-BC, FNP-BC, ENP-BC

On behalf of the Tennessee Nurses Association Board of Directors and Staff, I welcome

you to the 2020 Tennessee Nurses Association (TNA) Annual Conference. I am thankful for

technology, which allows us to still be able to connect and support each other, although we,

unfortunately, cannot meet in person this year.

The theme of this year’s conference is 2020: Year of the Nurse. We have done our best,

via a virtual platform, to still bring you excellent continuing education offerings, with the

opportunity to earn up to 10 contact hours and learn at your leisure. We felt it was important

to be able to conduct the yearly business of the Association with our members through

Membership Assembly. A superb slate of candidates will be presented, all of whom are

eager to join the TNA leadership team and represent the needs of our nurses.

What a year 2020 has been! I am so proud of all of our nurses in Tennessee, who have been leaders and

caregivers during the COVID-19 pandemic. The strength, resilience, and willingness to do whatever has been

needed for our communities has been noticed and well documented. Student nurses (our future leaders)

and even nurses coming out of retirement have stepped up to help. TNA has made every effort to advocate

for our nurses, provide frequent updates and support. Tina Gerardi, our TNA Executive Director, has done an

excellent job representing nurses in the media and educating the public on a regular basis!

Nurses have always been protectors of our most vulnerable populations, including the poor, those in

underserved areas, and those with poor health literacy. COVID-19 has brought to light many deficiencies

in our health care system, many of which nurses were already aware. It has also exposed health care

disparities, especially among persons of color. TNA needs YOUR voice to join the voice of the Association,

to advocate for these people, our patients, and our families, to improve health care in our state.

Please review the resolutions submitted this year, regarding 2020: Year of the Nurse, and regarding Support

for Persons of Color, to see and understand the commitment TNA has for supporting our nurses, toward

working to eradicate institutional racism.

TNA is diligently continuing the work toward full scope of practice for Tennessee APRNs, in an effort to

improve health outcomes. We made much progress this year and will continue to work with the Coalition

for Access to Care in Tennessee in this effort. Please watch for requests from TNA regarding advocacy

opportunities.

Thank you for being a member of the Tennessee Nurses Association, for your support, and for your

attendance at our virtual conference! I encourage you to reach out to the leadership of the TNA District

where you live, to volunteer for a leadership position, or see in what area(s) your assistance is needed.

Together we will grow and succeed!

Best Regards,

Carla

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2020: YEAR OF THE NURSE

Welcome from the Executive Director

Tina Gerardi, MS, RN, CAE

Welcome to the 2020 Tennessee Nurses Association (TNA) Annual Conference. This

year is the first time in the 115-year history of TNA that the annual conference will be

conducted virtually. Who knew last year as we celebrated the theme Nurses: The Real

Super Heroes, that 2020 would show the world that nurses are indeed superheroes?

2020 started out being designated by the World Health Assembly as the Year of the

Nurse and Midwife and by the American Nurses Association and TNA as the Year of the

Nurse. 2020 was to be a celebration of the profession and intended to elevate the status

and profile of nurses by recognizing the contributions that nurses make to public health

and healthcare delivery. As coronavirus was first discovered in China in January 2020, it

spread across the globe with the pandemic infiltrating the United States. We witnessed

in real-time the incredible impact that nurses and nursing have on public health, healthcare delivery, and the

human essence of caring while delivering high-quality care to everyone across the country and around the

world.

In the spirit of the conference theme, 2020: Year of the Nurse, we were to recognize each attendee for the

extraordinary work registered nurses do every day, whether at the bedside, in the classroom, in the board

room, or at the Capitol. Each day as we promote public trust for the nursing profession, we consistently

provide quality patient care, quality nursing practice, quality nursing education, quality nursing research,

quality nursing leadership, and quality health for all Tennesseans. Unfortunately, the COVID-19 pandemic will

not allow us to do that in person this year, but we have a wonderful program for everyone.

Our opening plenary will be a panel of nurses discussing their role in addressing the COVID-19 pandemic,

lessons learned, and their perspectives on the future. Our closing plenary speaker, Lynn Pierce, will highlight

the outcomes from NSO’s most recent RN Claims Study and discuss ways to avoid malpractice while assuring

safe nursing practice in our daily work. As usual, we will offer concurrent sessions and poster presentations.

Additionally, new this year, attendees can watch the taped educational offerings from sessions they could not

attend in real-time to earn additional contact hours. The Membership Assembly will convene to do the work

of the Association – reviewing resolutions and setting direction and priorities for the upcoming year, as well as

electing new members of the board of directors. As we will not be able to have our usual Silent Auction and

PAC Basket auction, we ask that you please make a monetary donation to support the work of the Tennessee

Nurses Foundation and the Tennessee Nurses Political Action Committee. We have a very busy one day

together!

I look forward to working together to make TNA the unifying voice for nursing in Tennessee.

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2020: YEAR OF THE NURSE

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2020: YEAR OF THE NURSE

General Announcements

Welcome to the 2020 TNA Annual Conference. This is the first time TNA will be conducting our conference

virtually.

Please follow the conference schedule and be sure to connect to the appropriate YouTube or Zoom Room

for Membership Assembly and general sessions and for the concurrent sessions. A slide showing the

appropriate web address to connect to the sessions will be displayed during breaks between sessions.

Please take advantage of the chat feature while you wait for sessions to start to greet and make welcome

the new members and first-time attendees to our conference.

Since we cannot meet in person, the Tennessee Nurses Foundation Silent Auction and PAC Basket Auction

cannot take place. These events are major fundraisers for each group. Please consider making a monetary

donation to both by visiting the TNA website. Voting on motions will take place under the direction of the

President.

Not a TNA member? Don’t miss out on this opportunity to become part of the Voice for all nurses in

Tennessee. Join TNA now!

To receive the 1.0 contact hour for attending the poster presentations, you must visit ten posters. Poster

Presentations can be viewed on the poster session page on the TNA website, TNAonline.org

You will be able to do poster self-study and view concurrent sessions you were unable to attend in real-time

to receive additional contact hours for one month after the conference is over.

Tennessee Nurses Association is approved as a provider of nursing continuing professional development

by the South Carolina Nurses Association, an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing

Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

No conference speakers have indicated any conflict of interest related to their presentations.

Voting will take place via Survey Monkey from noon – 1 p.m. A link to vote will be emailed to all attendees at

11:45 a.m. on October 30.

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2020: YEAR OF THE NURSE

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2020: YEAR OF THE NURSE

TNA Virtual Conference Schedule

Friday October 30, 2020

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2020: YEAR OF THE NURSE

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2020: YEAR OF THE NURSE

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click on the Events menu.

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2020: YEAR OF THE NURSE

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2020: YEAR OF THE NURSE

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2020: YEAR OF THE NURSE

Disclosures to Participants

Outcome

Participants will gain knowledge and new tools to integrate into their practice.

Contact Hour Credit

Participants at the 2020 Virtual TNA Annual Conference can earn a maximum of 10 contact hours for

attending. Real-time contact hours and the opportunity to review and learn from recorded educational

sessions and poster sessions.

Official Accreditation Statement

The Tennessee Nurses Association is approved as a provider of nursing continuing professional

development by the South Carolina Nurses Association, an accredited approver by the American Nurses

Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

Requirements for Successful Completion for Continuing Education Credit

To receive contact hour credit for each session attended, attendees must

• Visit at least ten posters

• Miss no more than five minutes of any session.

• Remain in the session until the scheduled ending time.

• Complete and submit the Evaluation Form(s) and the Verification of Attendance/Certificate Form listing

each session attended. Survey Monkey will be used this year to complete evaluations and verification of

attendance certificates.

Conflicts of Interest

The ANCC has established guidelines whereby all speakers must disclose any affiliations which may cause a

conflict of interest.

A Conflict of Interest occurs when an individual has an opportunity to affect educational content about

health-care products or services of a commercial interest with which she/he has a financial relationship.

No conflicts of interest were disclosed.

Commercial Support

Sponsors have made contributions to Tennessee Nurses Association in support of the 2020 TNA Annual

Conference.

Non-Endorsement of Products

The Tennessee Nurses Association’s approved provider status refers only to continuing nursing education

activities and does not imply that there is real or implied endorsement of any product, service, or company

referred to in this activity nor of any company subsidizing costs related to the activity.

Off-label Product Use

This CNE activity does not include any unannounced information about off-label use of a product for a

purpose other than that for which it was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2020: YEAR OF THE NURSE

2020 Virtual Membership Assembly

Attending the Meeting via Virtual Technology

Rules and Information

1. Participants should join this virtual meeting online via the link provided to registrants.

2. All participants should begin joining the meeting 30 minutes prior to the stated call in order to facilitate

attendance and quorum determination. Participants may join the meeting on any computer or smart

device with an internet connection. Participants using desktop or laptop computers should use their

computer microphones and speakers for audio connection.

3. Each participant is responsible for his or her connection to the internet and conference based on these

Rules; no action will be invalidated on the grounds that the loss of, or poor quality of, a member’s

individual connection prevented him or her from participating in the meeting, provided that at least a

quorum of participants was connected and able to participate.

4. Upon entering the meeting, all participants should mute their audio and remain muted unless being

recognized to speak or vote.

5. Each TNA member should name themselves via appropriate technology.

6. Each non-TNA member participant needs to “rename” themselves with a “NM-“ prefix (ex. NM-Jane

Doe), this will facilitate voting as nonmembers may not vote on any TNA issues.

7. Attendance and quorum will be based on the prefix and names of the participants.

8. Chat messages/short comments will be sent to everyone. The Q&A box will not be monitored.

9. Use the Chat message feature to pose a question to the chair, speaker, or staff. Questions will be

answered by the chair, speaker or be read aloud so that the appropriate person can be requested to

answer

10. A member intending to make a main motion, to offer an amendment, or to propose instructions to a

committee, shall type the motion in the chat window. Having this prepared beforehand will provide a

better understanding of the motion to be considered. Only members may propose or vote on motions.

Membership Assembly (MA) General Rules of Order

1. All TNA members may speak. Before addressing the MA, it is necessary to secure the floor

by raising your hand or asking to speak in the chat box using Zoom technology. After

recognition by the President, the member shall state his or her name and district before

speaking.

2. Any TNA member may make motions.

3. All motions shall be presented to the President in writing via the chat box using Zoom

technology.

4. Only emergency motions or courtesy resolutions may be presented outside of the reference

process.

5. TNA members shall be limited to three minutes when speaking.

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2020: YEAR OF THE NURSE

6. No member who has already had the floor in debate on the immediate pending question shall

be entitled to the floor a second time until others who wish to be heard on the question have

had an opportunity to speak.

7. The voting body shall consist of the Board of Directors and TNA members in attendance.

8. Only the resolves of resolutions/proposals shall be acted upon by the MA.

9. The President may suspend the Rules in order to allow a nonmember to speak.

10. All attendees should place themselves on mute throughout meetings during MA unless they

are speaking.

Guidelines for Discussion on Resolutions/Proposals

1. Only new proposals/resolutions will be open for amendment.

2. To facilitate discussion, comments will be limited to those received via chat box. No member may speak

more than once to a question if someone who has not spoken wishes to do so.

3. Individuals who suggest substantial changes in the wording of any proposal are asked to submit those

changes in writing via the chat box before the hearing is adjourned.

4. The sponsor may withdraw a resolution/proposal at any point in the review process.

5. Only the resolves of resolutions/proposals shall be acted upon by the MA.

Continuing Nursing Education (CNE) Credit

RN participants attending CE sessions will be awarded contact hours. The procedure is as follows:

1. Complete the Survey Monkey Evaluation and return within the time frame established on the

evaluation.

2. Complete an Attendance Verification of CNE Activity listing the sessions you attend via the

Survey Monkey link sent to attendees. Participants must attend an entire CNE session to

receive credit.

3. Make a copy of the Survey Monkey form for your records.

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2020: YEAR OF THE NURSE

Introduction to Robert’s Rules of Order

What Is Parliamentary Procedure?

It is a set of rules for conduct at meetings that allows everyone to be heard and to make decisions without

confusion.

Why is Parliamentary Procedure Important?

Because it’s a time tested method of conducting business at meetings and public gatherings. It can be

adapted to fit the needs of any organization. Today, Robert’s Rules of Order newly revised is the basic

handbook of operation for most clubs, organizations and other groups. So it’s important that everyone

know these basic rules!

Organizations using parliamentary procedure usually follow a fixed order of business.

Below is a typical example:

1. Call to order.

2. Roll call of members present.

3. Reading of minutes of last meeting.

4. Officers reports.

5. Committee reports.

6. Special orders – Important business previously designated for consideration at this meeting.

7. Unfinished business.

8. New business.

9. Announcements.

10. Adjournment.

The method used by members to express themselves is in the form of moving motions. A motion is a

proposal that the entire membership take action or a stand on an issue. Individual members can:

1. Call to order.

2. Second motions.

3. Debate motions.

4. Vote on motions.

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There are four Basic Types of Motions:

TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2020: YEAR OF THE NURSE

1. Main Motions: The purpose of a main motion is to introduce items to the membership for their

consideration. They cannot be made when any other motion is on the floor, and yield to privileged,

subsidiary, and incidental motions.

2. Subsidiary Motions: Their purpose is to change or affect how a main motion is handled, and is voted

on before a main motion.

3. Privileged Motions: Their purpose is to bring up items that are urgent about special or important

matters unrelated to pending business.

4. Incidental Motions: Their purpose is to provide a means of questioning procedure concerning other

motions and must be considered before the other motion.

How are Motions Presented?

1. Obtaining the floor

a. Wait until the last speaker has finished.

b. Rise and wait in line at microphone.

c. Wait until the Chairman recognizes you.

2. Make Your Motion

a. Speak in a clear and concise manner.

b. Always state a motion affirmatively. Say, “I move that we ...” rather than,

“I move that we do not ...”.

c. Avoid personalities and stay on your subject.

3. Wait for Someone to Second Your Motion

4. Another member will second your motion or the Chairman will call for a second.

5. If there is no second, your motion is lost.

6. The Chairman States Your Motion

a. The Chairman will say, “it has been moved and seconded that we ...” Thus placing your motion

before the membership for consideration and action.

b. The membership then either debates your motion, or may move directly to a vote.

c. Once your motion is presented to the membership by the chairman it becomes “assembly

property”, and cannot be changed by you without the consent of the members.

7. Expanding on Your Motion

a. The time for you to speak in favor of your motion is at this point in time, rather than at

the time you present it.

b. The mover is always allowed to speak first.

c. All comments and debate must be directed to the chairman.

d. Keep to the time limit for speaking that has been established.

e. The mover may speak again only after other speakers are finished, unless called upon

by the Chairman.

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2020: YEAR OF THE NURSE

8. Putting the Question to the Membership

a. The Chairman asks, “Are you ready to vote on the question?”

b. If there is no more discussion, a vote is taken.

c. On a motion to move the previous question may be adapted.

Voting on a Motion:

The method of vote on any motion depends on the situation and the by-laws of policy of your

organization. There are five methods used to vote by most organizations, they are:

1. By Voice – The Chairman asks those in favor to say, “aye”, those opposed to say “no”. Any member

may move for an exact count.

2. By Roll Call – Each member answers “yes” or “no” as his name is called. This method is used when a

record of each person’s vote is required.

3. By General Consent – When a motion is not likely to be opposed, the Chairman says, “if there is no

objection ...” The membership shows agreement by their silence, however if one member says, “I

object,” the item must be put to a vote.

4. By Division – This is a slight verification of a voice vote. It does not require a count unless the chairman

so desires. Members raise their hands or stand.

5. By Ballot – Members write their vote on a slip of paper; this method is used when secrecy is desired.

There are two other motions that are commonly used that relate to voting.

1. Motion to Table – This motion is often used in the attempt to “kill” a motion. The option is always

present, however, to “take from the table”, for reconsideration by the membership.

2. Motion to Postpone Indefinitely – This is often used as a means of parliamentary strategy and allows

opponents of motion to test their strength without an actual vote being taken. Also, debate is once

again open on the main motion.

Parliamentary Procedure is the best way to get things done at your meetings.

But, it will only work if you use it properly.

1. Allow motions that are in order.

2. Have members obtain the floor properly.

3. Speak clearly and concisely.

4. Obey the rules of debate.

Most importantly, BE COURTEOUS.

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2020: YEAR OF THE NURSE

112th Membership Assembly Agenda

Friday, October 30, 2020 | Virtual

8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

Call to Order and Pledge of Allegiance – Carla Kirkland, TNA President

Greetings/President’s Address – Carla Kirkland

Introduction of Reference Committee – Alvin Jeffery, Chair

Adoption of the Membership Assembly Agenda – Carla Kirkland

Adoption of Rules of Order – Jeny Conrad Rendon, TNA Secretary

Treasurer’s Report – Heather Jackson, TNA Treasurer

Slate of Candidates/Nominations – Raven Wentworth, Nominating Committee Chair

Candidate Forum

Announcements – Tina Gerardi, TNA Executive Director

Recess – Carla Kirkland

Noon – 1:00 p.m.

Virtual Voting

1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Call to Order – Carla Kirkland

Updates on 2019 Resolutions – Carla Kirkland

Introduction of 2020 Resolutions – Alvin Jeffery

Executive Director Remarks – Tina Gerardi

Announcements – Tina Gerardi

Recess – Carla Kirkland

4:20 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Call to Order – Carla Kirkland

Report of Tellers – Raven Wentworth

Introduction of New Board President and Members – Carla Kirkland

Board of Directors Oath of Office – Tina Gerardi

Adjournment – Carla Kirkland

SEE YOU NEXT YEAR IN CHATTANOOGA AT THE CHATTANOOGAN ON OCTOBER 15 – 17, 2021

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2020: YEAR OF THE NURSE

2018-2020 Legislative and

Health Policy Statements

Introduction: The Tennessee Nurses Association (TNA) is the professional association representing over

110,000 Tennessee registered nurses. This position paper outlines the basic philosophy of the TNA’s

Membership Assembly relative to health care policy which may be addressed by the Tennessee General

Assembly and the U.S. Congress.

Mission: To improve health and health care for all Tennesseans and residents of the state, advance nurse

leaders and the practice of nursing as essential to improvement efforts and transformational change, and

serve as the voice for professional nurses.

The American Nurses Association’s Code of Ethics outlines foundational provisions that

frame TNA’s initiatives and actions.

Vision: TNA supports a transformed health care delivery system that ensures that all Tennesseans and

residents of the state are able to access equitable and affordable essential services when and where they

need them. The transformed system envisioned by TNA is patient-centered, promotes inter-professional

collaboration and care coordination to improve patient outcomes and experiences, primary care and

prevention are priorities, value is emphasized, and there is expanded use of information technology to

promote efficiency and effectiveness.

Goals: TNA is supportive of initiatives that improve health and health care and advance the following goals:

Optimal health system performance, including:

Improved patient care experiences;

Improved population health; and

Reduced per capita cost for health care.

Access to high-quality, affordable and acceptable care for all Tennesseans and residents of the state,

including:

Provision of a standardized package of essential health care services provided and financed by public and

private plans with protection against catastrophic costs and impoverishment;

Expanded primary care capacity by allowing RNs to practice to the full extent of their license to provide

chronic care management, care coordination, and preventive care in primary care settings;

Enhanced access to efficient, cost –effective, high-quality, equitable, and comprehensive healthcare

services by allowing APRNs to practice to the full extent to which their education and training prepare

them;

Allow APRNs with appropriate training to prescribe buprenorphine to increase access to medicationassisted

treatment (MAT) to combat the state’s opioid crisis; and

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2020: YEAR OF THE NURSE

Full practice authority and enhanced participation in the delivery of care and policymaking for all

professional nurses, including:

Support for the Tennessee Board of Nursing as the sole regulatory authority over nursing education and

practice;

Adoption of the Consensus Model for APRN Regulation: Licensure, Accreditation, Certification, and

Education (2008);

Elimination of financial, regulatory, organizational, and institutional barriers to the practice of professional

nursing;

Participation of registered nurses on all local, state, and national health care advisory, policymaking, and

governing boards, committees, and task forces; and

Inclusion of APRNs as licensed independent providers (LIPs) in hospital licensure rules, health plans, and

health care facilities.

Assuring an adequate, competent and diverse nursing workforce to meet current and projected health

care demands, including:

Improved data collection and information infrastructure to inform policymaking, planning, and evaluation;

Promotion of higher levels of education and training through seamless academic progression, interprofessional

education of health professionals, and lifelong learning;

Funding for nursing students and faculty, including loan forgiveness programs; and

Support for nurse safety in the patient care environment, staffing effectiveness plans, whistleblower

protection, and bans on mandatory overtime.

Restricting the use of the title “nurse” to only those individuals who have fulfilled the requirements

for licensure as outlined in the state’s nurse practice act. Nurse practice acts describe entry level

qualifications such as education, practice standards and code of conduct for continued privilege to

practice nursing.

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2020: YEAR OF THE NURSE

2020-2022 LEGISLATIVE AND

HEALTH POLICY STATEMENTS

Introduction: The Tennessee Nurses Association (TNA) is the professional association representing over

115,000 Tennessee registered nurses. This position paper outlines the basic philosophy of the TNA’s

Membership Assembly relative to health care policy, which may be addressed by the Tennessee General

Assembly and the U.S. Congress.

Mission: To improve health and health care for all Tennesseans and residents of the state, advance nurse

leaders, and the practice of nursing as essential to improvement efforts and transformational change and

serve as the voice for professional nurses.

The American Nurses Association’s Code of Ethics outlines foundational provisions that frame TNA’s

initiatives and actions.

Vision: TNA supports a transformed and modern health care delivery system that ensures that all

Tennesseans and residents of the State have access to equitable and affordable essential services no matter

where they live or when they are needed. The transformed modern system envisioned by TNA is patientcentered,

where primary care and prevention are priorities, promotes inter-professional collaboration

and care coordination, emphasizes values, and has expanded use of information technology to promote

efficiency and effectiveness in improving patient outcomes for all Tennesseans.

Goals: TNA is supportive of initiatives that improve health and health care and advance the following goals:

Optimal health system performance, including:

• Improved patient care experiences; and

• Improved population health; and

• Expanded opportunities for technology such as telehealth; and

• Reduced per capita cost for health care.

Access to high-quality, affordable and acceptable care for all Tennesseans and residents of the state,

including:

• Supporting the expansion of Medicaid in Tennessee; and

• Provision of a standardized package of essential health care services provided and financed by public

and private plans with protection against catastrophic costs and impoverishment; and

• Expanding primary care capacity by allowing RNs to practice to the full extent of their license by

diagnosing, providing chronic care management, care coordination, and preventive care in primary care

settings; and

• Enhanced access to efficient, cost–effective, high-quality, equitable, and comprehensive healthcare

services by allowing APRNs to practice to the full extent to which their education and training prepare

them by removing the economic barriers and burden of collaborative agreements and allowing for full

prescriptive authority; and

• Allow all APRNs with appropriate training to prescribe buprenorphine to increase access to medicationassisted

treatment (MAT) to combat the state’s opioid crisis regardless of the medical setting;

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Full practice authority and enhanced participation in the delivery of care and policymaking for all

professional nurses, including:

• Support for the Tennessee Board of Nursing as the sole regulatory authority over nursing education and

practice; and

• Adoption of the Consensus Model for APRN Regulation: Licensure, Accreditation, Certification, and

Education (2008); and

• Elimination of financial, regulatory, organizational, and institutional barriers to the practice of

professional nursing; and

• Participation of registered nurses on all local, state, and national health care advisory, policymaking, and

governing boards, committees, and task forces; and

• Inclusion of APRNs as licensed independent providers (LIPs) in hospital licensure rules, health plans, and

health care facilities.

Assuring an adequate, competent and diverse nursing workforce to meet current and projected health

care demands, including:

• Improved data collection and information infrastructure to inform policymaking, planning, and

evaluation; and

• Promotion of higher levels of education and training through seamless academic progression, interprofessional

education of health professionals, and lifelong learning; and

• Funding for nursing students and faculty, including loan forgiveness programs; and

• Support for nurse safety in the patient care environment, staffing effectiveness plans, whistleblower

protection, and bans on mandatory overtime; and

• Protecting that nurse practice acts describe entry level qualifications such as education, practice

standards, and code of conduct for continued privilege to practice nursing.

Protecting and advancing the nursing profession:

• Working with the Tennessee State Legislature and Local Governments to modernize their regulations,

laws, ordinances and policies to include provider neutral language; and

• Continue to work with partners and stakeholders to prevent workplace violence and discrimination.

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2020: YEAR OF THE NURSE

2020 Year of the Nurse

Whereas, the year 2020 was designated as The Year of the Nurse and Midwife by the World Health

Organization and the Year of the Nurse by the American Nurses Association;

Whereas, 2020 denotes the 200th Birthday of Florence Nightingale, the founder of modern nursing,

and saw the emergence of a new coronavirus (COVID-19) that resulted in a global pandemic and the

unprecedented challenges it presents;

Whereas, nurses have risen and continue to rise to the challenge of caring for patients on the front lines of

the COVID-19 pandemic;

Whereas, Tennessee was affected by the pandemic with 175,000 positive cases and 2,500 fatalities due to

this virus at the time this resolution was written in September;

Whereas, nurses are the largest single group of health care professionals and provided care from front line

testing tents to critical care COVID-19 units 24 hours per day, seven days per week;

Whereas, due to strict public health and infectious disease policies implemented to prevent the spread of

COVID-19, nurses filled the role of both caregiver and family member to support their patients due to no

visitor policies;

Whereas, nurses did not always have the proper personal protective equipment necessary to protect

themselves while caring for COVID-19 patients, but continued to care for and protect the lives of the

individuals under their care;

Whereas, COVID-19 caused an economic crisis for Tennesseans resulting in an estimated three to five years

to recover as stated by some economists;

Whereas, COVID-19 has affected all people, but has had a more significant impact on people of color and

lower socioeconomic status, nurses continuously educate communities on disease prevention and health

promotion; therefore, be it

Resolved, that the Tennessee Nurses Association will advocate with elected officials throughout our state

to continue to provide appropriate personal protective equipment to all nurses working with COVID-19

patients; and be it further

Resolved, that the Tennessee Nurses Association will stand with and support all nurses affected by the

economic impact that COVID-19 has had on their healthcare practice; and be it further

Resolved, that the Tennessee Nurses Association will support the ideals of the Year of the Nurse and

recognizes the significant contributions of nurses during the unprecedented COVID-19 Pandemic.

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2020: YEAR OF THE NURSE

Support for Persons of Color

Whereas, the year 2020 will forever be remembered by the COVID-19 pandemic, as named by the World

Health Organization;

Whereas, thousands of Americans became ill, died, and many were unable to work due to restrictions and/

or closure of businesses and due to quarantines during the pandemic, causing housing and economic

instability;

Whereas, according to the CDC patients of color are being hospitalized at a rate approximately five

times that of White patients, Black patients are dying at a rate approximately 2.4 times higher than

White patients, and persons of color have also suffered greater disparities from COVID-19 with respect to

economic impact;

Whereas, healthcare disparities are known to affect persons of color more often;

Whereas, the year 2020 will serve as a renewed reminder of the presence of implicit and explicit racism and

racial bias created by systemic racism, with persistent reports of social and economic inequities, unequal

treatment, threats, racial profiling, brutality, and dehumanization of people of color;

Whereas, the lasting effects of racial health disparities that can be linked to racism include the increased

risk of emotional and physical health problems, such as, depression, obesity, hypertension, and premature

death;

Whereas, racial disparities can be explained by scholarly research as stemming from poor living conditions,

low economic status and high levels of stress directly tied to the historical and contemporary manifestation

of discriminatory policies that have adversely affected people of color in this country. Often one’s zip code

determines the quality of schools, neighborhood resources and public services one has access to. The

explanation for these health disparities is racism, not race;

Whereas, racism negatively impacts the health of our state by preventing the opportunity for some people,

citizens or non-citizens, to attain their highest level of health;

Whereas, racism is an ongoing public health crisis;

Whereas, systemic and institutional racism is often evident and perpetuated by inaction in the face of need,

created by people in power and affects people with no power;

Whereas, Tennessee ranks 44th in health outcomes;

Whereas, the year 2020 will also be remembered as the Year of the Nurse, and nurses have risen to

advocate for and care for critically ill COVID-19 patients, without families by their sides as they were ill and

dying;

Whereas, nurses daily care for, educate, and advocate for, the well and unwell, without regard to age, color,

creed, disability, gender, lifestyle, nationality, race, religion, or sexual orientation; therefore, be it

Resolved, that the Tennessee Nurses Association will stand with and support persons of color, in an effort to

dispel a false belief in our society that any people are superior to others based on their skin color; and be it

further

Resolved, that the Tennessee Nurses Association will work diligently for diversity and inclusion, treating all

people with equity and respect, helping them feel valued and belonging, empowering them to grow toward

optimal physical, mental, and social health; and be it further

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2020: YEAR OF THE NURSE

Resolved, that the Tennessee Nurses Association will work with elected officials throughout our state

and advocate to create equitable health, educational, and economic opportunities for people of color

throughout the state; and be it further

Resolved, that the Tennessee Nurses Association will work with elected officials throughout our state and

advocate to eradicate institutionalized racism, and demand that governmental structures, policies, practices,

norms and values which permit barriers to health care reform, be addressed and removed.

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2020: YEAR OF THE NURSE

Thank you to our Sponsors who make

our 2020 Conference a huge success!

(At Press Time)

Silver Level Sponsorship

BlueCare

HCA Healthcare - TriStar Division

Bronze Level Sponsorship

Arthur L. Davis Publishing Agency, Inc.

The University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Vanderbilt School of Nursing

Sponsor Level

Comfort Care Hospice

East Tennessee State University

Loewenberg College of Nursing-University of Memphis

Matchwell. LLC

Restorative Health Services

Western Governors University

Year of the Nurse Sponsors:

Marcia Barnes Tina Gerardi Julie Hamm

Tammy Howard Carla Kirkland Raven Wentworth

Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse

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2020 TNA Board of Directors & Staff

Carla Kirkland

MSN, APRN, ACNP-BC,

FNP-BC, ENP-BC

President

Collierville

Haley Vance

DNP, APRN, CPNP-AC

Past-President

Nashville

Julie Hamm

BSN, MSN, ACNP-BC

Vice President

Hermitage

Jeny Conrad-Rendon

NP-C

Secretary

Arlington

Heather Jackson

MSN, RN, FNP-BC

Treasurer

Franklin

J. Ted Nelson

MSN, RN, NEA-BC,

CCRN-K, FACHE

Director – Operations

Soddy Daisy

Tracy Collins

DNP, FNP-BC

Director - Membership

Memphis

Nancy Stevens

DNP, APRN-BC, CEN

TRN-C, FAEN

Director - Education

Ooltewah

Marcia Barnes, DNP,

ACNP-BC, CWS, CPSN

Director –

Government Affairs

Lebanon

Laura Reed

DNP, APRN, FNP-BC

Director - Practice

Olive Branch, MS

TNA Staff

Tina Gerardi

MS, RN, CAE

Executive Director

Diane

Cunningham

Office Manager

Kathleen Murphy

Director,

Government

Affairs/Chief Lobbyist

Kathryn Denton

Director, Computer/

Network Systems

Managing Editor -Tennessee

Nurse, TNF Program Mgr.

Sharon Hinton

MSN, NPD-BC,

RN-BC, D. Min

Nurse Peer Review

Leader

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2020: YEAR OF THE NURSE

Tennessee Nurses Association

District Map

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2020: YEAR OF THE NURSE

Tennessee Nurses Association’s

2020 Slate of Candidates and Statements

PRESIDENT-ELECT Vote for one (1)

Julie Hamm, BSN, MSN, ACNP-BC

Serving on the board previously, I understand the time and commitment that it takes

for this very important role. I look forward to serving more time on the board and

advocating for TN nurses across this great state of TN.

Nicollette “Nikki” Stephens, DNP, APRN, FNP-C

I am proud to be a nurse! I love my profession! I consider myself a strong advocate

for the nursing profession. I love to meet new people and develop relationships.

Relationships allow trust to be built. Change occurs when people trust. Nurses are

the most trusted profession for 20 years!! I want to use this 20-years of trust that

our profession worked so diligently to achieve to leverage positive change for our

profession.

I currently serve as the Middle TN ARPN President/Chair. I would consider it a great honor to serve in

a leadership role such as President-Elect and ultimately President for the TNA. In 2019, according to

AmericasHealthRankings.org, Tennessee is ranked 44 out of 50 states in the USA. Tennessee desperately

needs to improve the healthcare environment for its residents! Tennessee nurses have so much to offer to

improve the health of Tennesseans! Nurses should be working at the top of their license in every single role.

I want to help lead our profession to do just that. :)

The profession of nursing recently received much recognition for the heroic work we do every single day,

caring for our patients. However, it seems as though that is now a fleeting thought. We need to continue

leading by example, but we also must have strong leadership in place to forge ahead and realize positive

change that will improve the healthcare environment in Tennessee. I would be honored to be one of those

leaders!

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VICE PRESIDENT Vote for one (1)

Heather Jackson, PhD, APRN, FNP-BC

Over the past two years, I have served as the Tennessee Nurses Association (TNA)

treasurer. During this time, I have come to appreciate, even more so, the work TNA

performs on behalf of our profession. In my own clinical practice as a pain specialist,

I have been limited by unfounded prescription legislation and understand firsthand

the need and importance of nursing representation in our government. I have

advocated for nurses and nurse practitioners on many fronts by serving within

TNA as well as remaining active in multiple national organizations, presenting and

publishing evidenced base practices that promote nursing roles. I would like to continue to provide such

representation for our profession as TNA Vice-President.

TREASURER Vote for one (1)

Nancy Stevens, DNP, APRN-BC, TRN-C, CEN, FAEN

I am currently the Director of Education for TNA. This has been a crazy, crazy time,

but I have immensely enjoyed the relationship with TNA and the Board. I have learned

so very much during this time.

As the Treasurer of TNA, I would become more involved in the operations, and I

believe it would be a rewarding, exciting, and varied experience that would help me

learn more about the organization and develop stronger relationships with the Board.

I believe that the main qualifications for the Treasurer are good communication and interpersonal skills.

I do not know what software that is used by the Treasurer; however, I am able to quickly learn and have an

openness to conforming to TNA’s standards.

DIRECTOR-EDUCATION Vote for one (1)

Kerry Copeland, MSN, RN, CNRN, CRRN, NPD-BC

I am interested in being considered for the position of Director - Education. I am

currently the Primary Nurse Planner at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and

work in the Nursing Education and Professional Development Department. I am also

the lead for our nursing specialty certification review and reimbursement program. I

partner with external vendors and internal staff for certification course offerings.

I have held several positions focused on clinical education. Prior to working at

Vanderbilt, I was the Education Manager for the Society of Critical Care Medicine. I was responsible for the

scientific education and abstracts for their annual education meeting, which had over 5000 attendees. The

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2020: YEAR OF THE NURSE

meeting took place over five days, with more than 75 education sessions, including abstract presentations.

I led their Education Committee of over 60 members in the design, development, implementation, and

evaluation of the annual scientific program, abstract review, and abstract award process.

The Director of Education position would allow me to use my expertise in education planning and program

management to serve the TNA.

Colleen Moss, DNP, APRN, NNP-BC

I joined TNA in 2018. After attending a TNA board meeting and the inaugural

Leadership Academy in 2019, I was inspired to give back to the organization through

a leadership position.

Nursing emphasizes a commitment to lifelong learning and service. Supporting the

valuable work of our colleagues in the areas of clinical practice, research, advocacy,

and education are fundamental to the success of our organization. My roles in both

an academic medical center, community hospital, and university setting provide me with solid leadership

skills and a unique perspective to consider the learning needs of nursing students and nurses at all practice

levels.

I earned my BS in 2000 from Vanderbilt University and MSN in 2001 from Vanderbilt University School of

Nursing. In 2019, I earned my DNP from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. I have practiced as an

NNP for the past 17 years, starting my advanced practice career at The Children’s Hospital in Denver, CO,

before returning in 2007 to Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, TN. During my time at VUMC,

I have been a leader for several QI projects involving house staff orientation and documentation. I maintain

an active clinical practice at the level IV NICU at Monroe Carrel Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt and a

level II NICU in Columbia, TN. I recently accepted a full-time faculty position at Vanderbilt University School

of Nursing, teaching in both the Neonatal Nurse Practitioner and the Doctor of Nursing Practice programs.

Sherry Raber, DNP, MMHC, MSN, RN

I would like to express my sincere interest for the position of a Board Member with

the Tennessee Nursing Association (TNA).

I am currently an active member of the TNA, the American Nursing Association

(ANA), and National League for Nursing (NLN). I would be honored to be part of an

organization whose mission statement empowers registered nurses (RNs), advocates

for nursing practice, and supports quality health care for everyone in the state of

Tennessee.

I am a registered nurse (RN) with an extensive background in the healthcare arena and have served in a

variety of leadership positions. My expertise is in nursing leadership and nursing education. As a nursing

leader, I am very familiar with budgets, policy and procedures, and nursing scope of practice. I have an

understanding of business protocols, boardroom etiquette, and the voting processes that is required as a

board member.

I am confident my extensive experience working in nursing education, coupled with my leadership skills and

leadership background, I would be an asset to the TNA as an active Board Member.

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DIRECTOR-MEMBERSHIP Vote for one (1)

Chisa Huffman, DNP, MSN, MBA, RN-BC

I joined TNA in 2018. After attending a TNA board meeting and the inaugural

Leadership Academy in 2019, as a half black/half Latina, I feel I am qualified to serve

TNA in the capacity of Director of Membership because:

1. I can bring diversity into TNA

2. I have a business background and can bring diverse strategies to the forefront to

engage all generations

3. I am very active within my community and love motivating and inspiring our

leaders of tomorrow

4. I am a mixture of transformational and servant leadership and role model this

through how I live my life

I have seen here in East Tennessee, there is a need for diversity. To me, diversity is not about colors.

Diversity includes anything that is different, whether it be religion, politics, socioeconomic background, and

culture.

I moved here in 2008 and quickly began my path towards becoming a nurse. I attended Knoxville Red Cross

Certified Nursing Assistant Program (graduated). Then attended and graduated from Blount Memorial’s

LPN Diploma program. Shortly after, I was accepted and graduated from Pellissippi State’s first LPN to RN

program. Being at the top of my classes, I was contacted by The University of Tennessee (UTK) to attend

their RN-BSN program. In December 2016, I graduated UTK’s Master’s program and moved into UTK’s DNP

program. As a recent graduate (August 2019), I completed my MBA with a concentration in Healthcare

Management at Cumberland University in Lebanon, TN. I continue to seek knowledge and will begin my Phd

in Organizational Leadership in Education in 2021.

Originally born and raised in Dallas/Fort Worth, TX, I’ve built my life here in Maryville, TN. I’ve lived here for

about 12 years, have been happily married for ten years to a native of Maryville, and have an eight year old

little boy (EJ - Edward Jr.). I’ve been a TN Achieves Mentor since 2015 (still current) and coach my son’s

soccer team (3 years).

I have established my life, education, and career here in Maryville over the past 12 years and would like to

establish myself with TNA. Always having my plate too full, I’ve never been able to allot time to give myself

completely to TNA. However, I’m to the point where I can and have the time. I am choosing TNA to serve

and put my focus. I would love the opportunity to be part of and grow with TNA during the nation’s current

climate (Covid-19 & Racial tensions).

I respectfully request the opportunity to serve our community as the Director of Membership. My hope is to

become the VP or President-Elect in the next ten years.

I look forward to learning and growing with you, TNA.

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2020: YEAR OF THE NURSE

NOMINATING COMMITTEE Vote for two (2)

Kimberly Kennel, PhD, RN-BC, CCRN, CNE

I have been a nurse for almost thirty years in a variety of settings. My career started

as a CNA-LPN-RN- RN-BSN, MSN, and then culminated with a PhD. I believe I have

the ability to understand roles and responsibilities for all health care workers since

I have made education in nursing a priority for myself. I started as a bedside critical

care nurse and have transitioned to academia.

I currently have a PhD in nursing and teach in a BSN program. I have been involved in multiple professional

organizations, including ANA and TNA. I have certifications in Medical Surgical Nursing, Critical care, and

nursing education. I attended the TNA leadership academy in July 2019 to prepare myself for leadership

roles in organizations. I am currently on the state TNA awards committee and serve on the nominating

committee for District One. I was an election teller at the State convention in October 2019. I am committed

to the goals of ANA/TNA as a professional organization that advocates for all nurses. I hope to serve on the

nominating committee to recruit new volunteers into TNA leadership positions.

Hillary Sexton, BSN, RN, CCRN

As I have served on the nominating committee for the past year, I look forward to

continuing in this position as I continue to be a member of TNA. I have also served on

the Nominating Committee for the APSU Alumni Association for two years. Currently,

I work in the Surgical Intensive Care Unit at Vanderbilt University Medical Center as a

Clinical Staff Leader. I have the opportunity to see the changing face of our frontline

nurses daily as well as connect our rich nursing culture to the roots that have been

established by our seasoned professionals.

I believe that choosing good leadership for this organization will allow it to flourish in its support of our

state’s nursing community, which is so essential in these chaotic times, especially in healthcare with the

ongoing pandemic and unknown answers. I have almost ten years of experience in healthcare and am most

passionate about advocating and supporting my fellow nurses. Each nurse is an integral part of how we

work together to provide care in Tennessee, and we need associations to continue to provide us with the

chance to connect.

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Poster Presentation Abstracts

Problem Addressed:

Appreciative Advising in Freshman Seminar for Nursing Students

Cassie Burks, RN, MSN, FNP-BC, CEN, A-EMT (Presenter)

An insufficient number of students graduating from the nursing program was a problem when considering

the nursing shortage. A program with adequate faculty and a proven record of graduating nurses who

successfully pass NCLEX and obtain employment was a prime location to create more nurses. Unfortunately,

the number of nursing students was declining at this institution, both from students changing their major at

the freshman level and low completion rates of students in the nursing program.

Appreciative advising (AA) implemented in a freshman seminar course was the method used to enhance

student satisfaction and empower students to progress through the program. Graduating more nursing

students would help combat the nursing shortage.

Objectives:

The research question was: In nursing students enrolled in freshman seminar, does appreciative advising

influence academic major satisfaction?

Methods/Procedures:

1. 6 Phases of Appreciative Advising with Implementation

2. Disarm: Advisors should bond with student. Greet student and offer hospitality

3. Discover: Elicit student’s talents, skills, and competencies. Verify student’s strengths

4. Dream: Discuss student’s aspirations

5. Design: Co-develop a plan

6. Deliver: Encourage goal achievement

7. Don’t settle: Reiterate development and improvement importance. Continual self-improvement is

imperative.

This project was a comparative study that provided quantitative data after a one-group pretest-posttest

analysis.

Because the data was not normally distributed, the Wilcoxon signed rank test identified the related nature

of the independent variable (appreciative advising) to the dependent variable (AMS) by comparing pretest

and posttest scores in one group of participants.

Findings:

The Wilcoxon signed rank test revealed statistically significant improved academic major satisfaction scores

following the appreciative advising (AA) sessions with a medium effect size (r = .32). Students’ median

scores increased from 2.33 (IQR: 2.33, 2.67) to 2.66 (IQR: 2.33, 2.92) after AA.

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Recommendations for Practice/Research:

TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2020: YEAR OF THE NURSE

Appreciative advising is a low cost intervention applicable to most students. Integrating AA into freshman

seminar courses is an intervention aimed early in students’ academic career. Improving students academic

major satisfaction may be an important component to retention.

Ninety percent of educational facilities provide freshman seminar courses (The National Resource Center for

The First-Year Experience and Students in Transition, n.d.). However, little evidence is available concerning

nursing directed freshman seminar. According to Black et al., (2015), specialized (M = 85.8%, SD = 0.086)

freshman seminars, including nursing, had some of the highest statistically significant (p = .0001) retention

rates from first to second semester. Black et al. (2015) recommended universities incorporate major-related

content into freshman seminar courses, yet insufficient evidence is available to differentiate the nursing

content that belongs in freshman seminar. Qualitative studies assessing nursing students’ expectations for

a freshman seminar course would contribute valuable feedback. As would investigating faculty’s opinion of

what belongs in a nursing freshman seminar course.

Another recommendation is that Faculty should consider adopting appreciative advising practices and

integrating them into their courses.

Problem Addressed:

Blood Culture Contamination Improvement Project

William Simmons, RN, MSN (Presenter)

In 2019, the Emergency Department had a contamination rate of 3.28%, which was above the Veteran

Affairs goal of 3.0% and well above the national goal of 2.17%.

Objectives:

A decrease in blood culture contamination to an acceptable rate of 3.0% or below to meet the VA standard.

Methods/Procedures:

The new blood culture collection trial started December 12, 2019, and went through February 14, 2020.

An in-service was provided by the ED educator for ED nurses and health techs on proper blood culture

collection techniques. Training was also completed by the ED staff regarding appropriate use of the

Kurin collection system. Blood cultures were collected by ED staff and sent to lab where lab staff tracked

both compliance of Kurin use and blood culture contamination rate. At the conclusion of the trial, these

contamination rates were compared to those taken monthly in 2019.

Findings:

The contamination rate from January 1, 2019, through December 12, 2019, was 3.28%. The Kurin trial was

from December 13, 2019, through February 14, 2020, and yielded a contamination rate of 2.15%. This analysis

shows a correlation between re-education of staff on blood culture collection technique/Kurin collection

system use and improved blood culture contamination rate.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Recommend adoption of the Kurin devices for collection of blood cultures in the VAMC of Memphis.

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Bulimia Through the Lens of QSEN

Madalyn Vincent (Student Presenter)

Amy Blake, MSN, RN, CNE (Mentor)

Problem Addressed:

Improving care for individuals who are suffering from Bulimia Nervosa.

Objectives:

Identify QSEN knowledge, skills, and attitudes relating to the care of individuals with Bulimia Nervosa to

help nurses achieve better outcomes.

Methods/Procedures:

Evidence-Based Education

Findings:

Using evidence-based knowledge, skills, and attitudes will help provide individuals with Bulimia more

holistic care and better outcomes

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Implementing knowledge, skills, and attitudes to care for individuals with Bulimia should be implemented to

provide holistic patient care and achieve better outcomes.

Problem Addressed:

Capnography Use and Early Detection of Respiratory

Depression on Adult Medical-Surgical Units

Lisa Murphree, EdD, MSN, RN, CMSRN (Presenter)

The problem my presentation addresses is respiratory depression prevention and monitoring of at risk

patients on medical-surgical units.

Objectives:

Learning Outcome: The participant will be able to identify risk factors, factors affecting patient monitoring,

and interventions for respiratory depression among medical-surgical patients

Methods/Procedures:

A search for 2015-2020 PubMed studies in MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Nursing and Allied Health databases

using key words: medical surgical nursing + capnography and capnography + respiratory depression. Other

limits used included human subjects, adult patients, English.

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Findings:

n/a

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

n/a

Problem Addressed:

Comprehensive Diabetic Foot-Care Bundle

Maria Akpotu, B.L., LL.B., BNS, CLNC, ICP, RN (Presenter)

To reduce care cost from diabetic foot complications, reduce frequency of hospital visits due to diabetic

foot complications, reduce patient stay in hospital as a result of diabetic foot complications, and to provide

diabetic education at the level of patient understanding.

Objectives:

To generate educational materials that will aid patients. These will supplement patient’s immediate and

long-term diabetic self-care education. Ultimately geared towards positive patient care outcomes.

Methods/Procedures:

Questionnaires encompassing the cost of diabetes related amputations, long-term diabetes care, the

impact of diabetes on length of stay at the VAMC, VAMC Registered Nurse’s ability to educate inpatient and

outpatient population regarding diabetic foot care, as well as, investigating and/or evaluating patient self

foot care.

Findings:

This project has led to the introduction of a Hand Held Telescopic Expandable Flexible Lighted (HHTEFL)

Mirror. Sharing this innovative tool has led to increase in staff and patient interest and awareness on ways

to improve patient care by crafting and promoting patient and staff knowledge. VA Physician has described

this project as shark-tank quality. Occupational Therapy (OT) team provided a write-up stating the need

for adaptive technology and incorporating footcare in their OT prescription and activity for patients. The

comprehensive diabetic foot care bundle has been published on the VA internet, intranet, Facebook, and

Vintage- a VA Podcast. This innovation has received enormous buzz and acceptance, VA-wide

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

1. Help establish a VA-wide Diabetes Inpatient/Outpatient patient care team for each VA.

2. Ensuring a HHTEFL is issued to high-risk diabetes patient at discharge (with clear instructions on use)

3. Ensure regular education to ensure nursing staff, physician team, and patient/family are aware of proper

diabetes foot care and amputation risk

4. Ensure education includes how to detect change and prevention of small wounds developing

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Handwashing Project

Chloe Flora (Student Presenter)

Viktoriya Marushka (Student Nurse Co-Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

Living in the times of COVID-19, handwashing has been broadcasted as a paramount piece to prevent

pathogenesis of infection and achievement of community health. It is hypothesized by the “Health Belief

Model’’ that individuals are likely to be involved in healthy behavior to the extent that the person is able to

successfully target 1) barriers, 2) benefits, 3) self-efficacy, and 4) threat. Although, while most individuals

have begun to implement handwashing routinely, it has been found that there is a substantial need for

further education. This is evidenced by a recent study at Michigan State University, revealing that only five

percent of the population have proper handwashing technique. Due to the current pandemic, the public is

acutely attentive to the subject of hand washing. As future healthcare workers, we are uniquely positioned

to expand knowledge concerning vital handwashing education as developed by the “Health Belief Model.”

Objectives:

This presentation’s objective is to communicate the impact that beginning nursing students can have in

actively teaching proper handwashing during the current COVID-19 pandemic. When tasked with teaching

others how to hand wash, university nursing students can set an example and reach people within their

sphere of influence, far reaching the university campus.

Methods/Procedures:

As an assignment for Freshmen in NURS-102 (Clinical Lab Seminar) and Juniors in NURS-302

(Introduction to Leadership) Students were asked to teach proper handwashing to five or more people that

they were quarantined with or near through work, facetime, zoom, etc. Data was collected by surveying

these students of the location of their outreach, alongside photo evidence. Through this “Handwashing

Project,” Lee University nursing students were able to educate peers, family members, and coworkers of a

fundamental practice to improve their health and the people’s around them

Findings:

The outbreak of COVID-19 has made it difficult to detect the signs and symptoms of infection and to

implement timely intervention during the very early stage of infection because the duration ranges from 1-2

days before and 7-10 days after the onset of symptoms. Thus, finding and isolating symptomatic patients

may not be sufficient to contain this epidemic. Therefore, it is important to take personal precautions, such

as hand washing, to achieve source control and stop transmission. Handwashing is the most successful

way of preventing the spread of infectious illnesses because effective hand washing breaks the chain of

infection to ultimately reduce the spread of infection and decrease illness rates within the population. A

study published in April 2016 in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology found that washing hands for

even just forty-two seconds can remove up to 67% of the bacteria on hands. Due to hand washing being

a foundational skill for nursing students, they have the capability to prevent the spread of infection by

teaching others how to effectively hand wash. Although the ‘Handwashing Project’s purpose was not to

research the disinfection rates of our teaching, it allows us to discuss how many people we influenced and

taught, with emphasis on how they are located in many places, of all ages and occupations. To keep in mind,

Lee University nursing students were able to reach beyond their families, to friends and coworkers during

quarantine. Overall, we found that nursing students from Cleveland, TN can impact a much larger area with

a simple yet powerful skill, one that can save lives worldwide. We believe this project stems as a basis for

what nursing students across the world can accomplish, even early on in their programs.

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Recommendations for Practice/Research:

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Wash your hands after coming into contact with a frequently touched surface in a public space before

touching your eyes, nose, or mouth. Early nursing students can make an impact on many in times of need

by empowering others to learn, grow, and flourish in times of pressure and difficulties. By taking the

initiative to educate their communities, beginning nursing students have the ability to save lives. No matter

what age or degree, health care facilities, schools, nurses, and future nurses, should be pushed to be their

greatest. We believe that by encouraging nurses to teach the skills they have acquired, we can make a

difference in a big way. After all, whether a Freshman nursing student or an experienced nurse, we should

all continue to find ways to develop compassion, trustworthiness, humility, accountability and curiosity in

all that we do. We recommend nursing students to take the big picture into account and set an example

to those around them. What seems like a small effort can become a life-changing movement towards the

betterment of world health.

Problem Addressed:

The Impact of a Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention on

Test Anxiety in a BSN Program

Alissa Parrish, MSN, RN (Presenter)

Students face stressors each time they are faced with evaluations. Stressors trigger the cognitive

domain, which is described by Townsend, 2015, as thinking and reasoning through a situation. Anxiety

is an acceptable response to stress; however, the ability to cope can be either adaptive or maladaptive.

Adaptive coping leads to motivation, valuing a challenge, and finding personal satisfaction, according to

Blouin-Hudon, Gaudreau, & Gareau, 2016. When a student has maladaptive coping, this anxiety becomes

disproportionate to the situation manifesting as dread or worry, leading to poor performance and attrition.

High attrition rates, faculty shortages, and an aging population are causing a nursing shortage. And CBI

offers an opportunity to increase retention with positive coping.

CBI is a cognitive-behavioral intervention stemming from cognitive-behavioral therapy. Cognitive

interventions focus on positive thoughts and desensitization. Behavioral interventions focus on alleviating

physical symptoms of anxiety. CBI combines both methods to capture the mental and physical aspects of

anxiety.

Objectives:

Research question: Does a cognitive-behavioral intervention influence test anxiety scores in first semester

BSN students?

Methods/Procedures:

The research study used a quantitative, quasi-experimental, before and after design. Data was collected

from the Cognitive Test Anxiety Survey- 2nd edition before and after the intervention.

The independent variable was the CBI.

The dependent variables of measure were survey scores at time one and time two.

A convenience sample of first-semester nursing students was used from a rural, public university setting.

The intervention was a digital recording written and presented by Dr. Richard Driscoll titled Tame Test

Anxiety. Permission for use of the intervention was granted with the purchase of the album and has been

granted by the author. Students practiced the entire CBI one two separate occasions during class and were

provided with an 8-minute excerpt immediately before the remaining exams in a Foundations of Nursing

course.

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A dependent-samples t-test was used for data analysis.

Findings:

There was a statistically significant decrease in CTAS-2 scores from time 1 to time 2, with a probability of

< .001. The mean decrease in CTAS-2 scores was 10.8 points, with a 95% confidence interval.

Cohen’s d calculations and a post-hoc analysis resulted in a large effect size (d = .936), further supporting

the significance of the results. The null hypothesis indicted that a cognitive-behavioral intervention will not

influence test anxiety scores in first semester BSN students. Results from the dependent-samples t-test

indicated there was a significant decrease in cognitive test anxiety scores after the CBI, thereby allowing for

the rejection of the null hypothesis.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

This project demonstrates that test anxiety interventions do not require a significant amount of time or

financial resources. Programs and institutions benefit from low attrition. New graduates can benefit from

decreased test anxiety resulting in improved NCLEX pass rates.

An increase in positive coping mechanisms may improve patient care. Nurses are leaving the profession at a

rapid rate because of the high work stress levels (Yang et al.). Positive coping strategies assist nurses to find

physical, mental, and emotional balance according to Akbar et al. Education on coping strategies should

begin early in nursing school to aid in success, as well as ease of transition into the workforce.

Problem Addressed:

Improving NICU Parent Perception Through Nurse Leader Rounds

Stephanie Abbu, DNP, RN, CNML (Presenter)

Nurse leader rounding initiative in a 100-bed Level IV Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) within an

academic medical center. Every year nearly 15 percent of babies born in the United States (about half a

million) are admitted to the NICU for a variety of health conditions. The most common reason is prematurity

(born before 37 weeks gestation). NICU admissions also include birth defects, breathing difficulties, and

infections, among other factors. Providing family-centered care and excellent patient care experiences is a

priority for many NICUs, yet the challenge remains to create and sustain measurable success.

Objectives:

After attending this presentation/discussion, the conference participant will identify steps in effective

nurse leader rounding: how to include parents and families as improvement partners, measure and manage

patient experience in real-time, and automate the process to ‘manage up’ staff members.

Methods/Procedures:

Set out to create an effective, standardized approach to daily nurse leader rounding with the goals of

integrating parents and families as improvement partners, measure and manage patient experience in realtime,

and automate the process to ‘manage up’ staff members. Held team huddle to decide to implement

rounds. Brainstormed ways to round (Ask about patient experience so far? Anyone that made hospital

stay ‘extra special’? Concerns that need to be addressed. Follow-up if needed.), process for tracking unit

admissions and discharges, and plan for documenting rounding and follow-up process. Set targets for

timeline to round on a family, communication among leadership team to ensure families are seen as soon

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as possible after admission, and rounding results reviewed weekly at unit leadership meetings. Conducted

regular review of patient experience data to assess progress, recognize improvements, and address gaps in

performance

Findings:

Within four months of implementation, >400 families were rounded on. Nurse leader time requirement

found to be manageable and valuable *Challenges de-escalated *Unit improvements made, such as visiting

policy revised, technology embraced - providers used ipads to facetime with inpatient mothers separated

from their infant (outside facility / medically unable to visit from Vanderbilt Postpartum unit), Pack n Play

purchased for discharged twin visits – able to reinforce ‘safe sleep’, process change for transferring calls

to the bedside. After two months, staff thank you notes were added, and nearly 100 notes were sent. Press

Ganey patient satisfaction scores reflect improvements in service excellence - likelihood to recommend

increase from 50% to 100%, and friendliness of nurses increased from 50% to 90%.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Results demonstrate the effective implementation of nurse leader rounds can improve parent perception

of care, increase engagement of bedside nurses, and improve the perception of care reported in patient

satisfaction survey results.

Insight on Use and Effects of Cannabidiol from Patients: Nursing Implication

Problem Addressed:

Michelle Ryan, MSN, AGACNP-BC (Co-Presenter)

Taylor Butler, PharmD, BCOP, BCPS (Co-Presenter)

Karen Hande, DNP, ANP-BC, CNE, FAAP (Co-Presenter)

Heather Jackson, PhD, APRN, FNP-BC (Co-Presenter)

Rachel McDowell, ACNP-BC (Co-Presenter)

There is limited information about patient use and perspective of CBD products for chronic cancer-related

symptoms.

Objectives:

Gather information in a supportive oncology clinic and educate nursing professionals about CBD oil use.

Methods/Procedures:

Survey distributed to patients seen in chronic cancer-related symptom management clinic. Analyzed data

using descriptive statistics.

Findings:

There were some interesting findings, including only a limited amount of patients obtained their knowledge

of CBD from a health care professional. Our patient also had limited knowledge on risks of CBD, and over

50% who tried CBD did not continue CBD. While the survey was not powered to produce any definite

conclusions, this provides an idea where to focus for appropriate education for patients interested in CBD.

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Recommendations for Practice/Research:

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More research is needed to know if CBD can benefit patients with cancer-related symptoms, but there may

be an opportunity for nursing to educate patients about risk and benefits with CBD product use.

Integration of Acupuncture Treatment Within the Standard of

Care for Opioid Withdrawal

Heather Jackson, PhD, APRN, FNP-BC (Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

How to integrate alternative therapies within the standard of care in treating withdrawal and/or dependence

during the opioid epidemic.

Objectives:

1. Discuss the current opioid epidemic and identify the need for additional treatments

2. Identify acupuncture techniques that may be integrated within the standard of care for opioid

withdrawal

3. Describe how acupuncture has been integrated at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) in the

adult and neonatal populations

Methods/Procedures:

Power point presentation providing a background and need for alternative treatments for chronic pain

patients, adults and neonates experiencing withdrawal. Outline indications for NADA protocol in these

populations and discuss studies performed at VUMC by speaker.

Findings:

1. Acupressure was safely and feasibly implemented within the standard of care at VUMC for the treatment

of NAS.

2. The NADA protocol has been integrated within VUMC treatments, performed by nurse practitioners.

Patients have reported improved pain scores, less use of rescue medications, and reduced psychological

distress.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Consider the NADA protocol acupuncture technique as an adjunct treatment option for chronic pain

patients and neonates dependent on opioids.

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Men in Nursing

Cody McSwain (Student Presenter)

Raven Wentworth, DNP, RN, APRN, AGPCNP-BC, FNP-BC (Co-Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

Nurses serve a diverse population, but the workforce does not reflect this.

Objectives:

1. Identify some reasons why men enter the nursing profession

2. Discuss common barriers that prevent men from entering the nursing profession

Methods/Procedures:

poster/handout

Findings:

Men are more likely to enter the profession to seek advancement, for job security, and gain a meaningful

salary. Consistent with the female students is the theme of “caring” for individuals. Some barriers include

gender stereotyping and marginalization.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

n/a

Problem Addressed:

Moral Distress in Critical Care

J. Ted Nelson, MSN, RN, NEA-BC, CCRN-K, FACHE (Presenter)

Moral distress is a complex phenomenon often identified by many healthcare workers, especially those

working in critical care environments. Moral distress is associated with intense work settings, ethical

divergences, and end of life decisions. Organizations, including the American Nurses Association, American

Association Critical-care Nurses, and the American Medical Association, have recognized Moral Distress to

be detrimental to the multidisciplinary health care team contributing to burnout and turnover.

Objectives:

The objective is to share the findings within the literature and my DNP translational project to bring

awareness to the phenomenon of moral distress/injury. Additionally, I will share what interventions have

been used to decrease or prevent moral distress from occurring.

Methods/Procedures:

Quantitive Pre/Post-intervention data collection with qualitative components.

Findings:

A moderate amount of moral distress according to the sample responses. Comparative findings will be

available after the DNP translational project.

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Recommendations for Practice/Research:

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Additionally, research is needed to identify additional best practices to improve/ reduce moral distress.

Problem Addressed:

The Power of Music: Affirming Elderly Refugees’ Cultural Identity

Holly Harris (Student Presenter)

Carina Anderson (Student Co-Presenter)

Lydia Lee (Student Co-Presenter)

Lauren Schwarz (Student Co-Presenter)

Brooke Simpson (Student Co-Presenter)

Rebeccah Tovar (Student Co-Presenter)

Jade Vergara, AGPCNP-C, MSN (Co-Presenter)

Currently, there are over 80,0000 individuals claiming foreign citizenship in Tennessee. Between 2016 and

2018, Davidson County/Nashville alone received over 2,500 refugees, the majority of them coming from

war torn and impoverished countries. Current literature supports many refugees suffer from mental health

issues related to trauma and stress, social isolation, and feelings of cultural loss. Music, social engagement,

and affirmation of individual cultural identity is shown to have positive outcomes for refugees, specifically

elderly refugees.

Objectives:

VUSN students sought to increase psychosocial well-being and group cohesiveness in elderly refugees

at Catholic Charities by strengthening cultural identity. Students aimed to increase these facets of

psychosocial health from baseline by 20% by two months.

Methods/Procedures:

Over two months, students implemented a bi-monthly intervention of group activities with and without

culturally relevant music. After collecting music specific to each participants’ country of origin, the music

was played during Bingo and a field day designed by VUSN students. Our intervention was evaluated

by using participant pre and post FACES mood surveys, volunteer post questionnaires, and volunteer

structured exit interviews.

Findings:

With music interventions, FACES mood surveys measuring psychosocial well-being improved from 4.17 to

4.71, and volunteer questionnaires measuring group cohesiveness improved from 4.23 to 4.46. Additionally,

volunteer exit interviews reflected intervention success in accomplishing aims. Key interview themes

included increased cheerfulness, love of meeting new people and activities, increased interaction and

engagement, and sharing of culture.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Affirming cultural identity by providing culturally relevant music during activities positively impacts

observed psychosocial well-being and group cohesiveness in elderly refugees. Use of Catholic Charities

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translator services and digitization of music may address future barriers, including language and distance

requirements, respectively. Additionally, leveraging input of family members may provide improved insight

into the elder’s interests and needs.

The Prevention of Stasis and Deep Vein Thrombosis by Utilization of Sequential

Compression Devices

Problem Addressed:

Sonia Steward-Brown, BSN, RN (Presenter)

Teresa Bills, RN (Co-Presenter)

Sandra Foster, MSN, RN (Co-Presenter)

Gabriele Macklin, BSN, RN (Co-Presenter)

Diana Pierce, BSN, RN (Co-Presenter)

1. The important risk factors of VTE in hospitalized patients.

2. Compared the use and risk of pharmacological, mechanical prophylactic with SCD, or combination in

VTE patients.

Objectives:

1. To be 100% compliant with sequential compression devices.

2. To ensure nurse’s education and awareness of DVT prophylactic.

3. To ensure staff is aware of high risk patients and to act appropriately (sequential compression devices)

placements)

4. Decrease the chance of developing a DVT on inpatient veteran ward.

Methods/Procedures:

Powerpoint, posters, educational materials.

Findings:

Less than 50% compliant with placement of Sequential compression devices

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

n/a

Provider Recommendation and the Positive Impact on Vaccination Rates

Brie LaJeret, DNP, AGPCNP-BC (Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

1. Low vaccination rates in America

2. Improving public health

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Objectives:

Objectives of Capstone Project:

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1. To determine if verbal provider recommendation has a positive impact on adult influenza vaccination

rates

2. To provide vaccination education to providers

3. To empower providers to make strong verbal vaccination recommendations

4. To determine if there are biases when a recommendation is not made

Methods/Procedures:

A “lunch and learn” education program was given to the providers. Providers then made a deliberate effort

to discuss and recommend the influenza vaccine at each routine clinic visit with eligible adult patients

seen at the Vanderbilt Primary Care Clinic. A chart review was conducted to evaluate how the provider

recommendation impacted influenza vaccination rates.

Findings:

1. Rate of vaccination rose by almost 100%

2. From 48.2% in 2018 to 81.5% during the two-week implementation period.

3. Rate of provider recommendation rose from 23% to over 90%.

4. There were no biases identified

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

1. Providers should make strong, individualized verbal vaccination recommendations.

2. Providers should use this opportunity to educate patients and discuss any concerns they may have.

3. Providers need to be aware of unconscious biases in order to prevent inconsistent recommendation

Putting Teamwork and Leadership Skills into Action Using Escape Rooms

Problem Addressed:

Amy Blake, MSN, RN, CNE (Presenter)

This class assignment integrates leadership and followership skills using fun and active learning. This

activity provides a real life experience for students (most of which have no clinical experience)to put into

action many of the skills learned in this personal leadership course.

Objectives:

Using a fun, inconsequential strategy, the student will utilize leadership and teamwork skills to escape a

chosen scenario. Communication, time management, prioritization, critical thinking, teamwork, conflict

resolution, and delegation are some skills that may be used. Debriefing and reflection at the conclusion of

the activity lead to the student being able to analyze his/her performance and feelings and acknowledge

strengths and weaknesses that emerged during the exercise

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Methods/Procedures:

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In teams of 4 or 5, students work together to “escape” from a chosen scenario at a local escape room.

Drawing on multiple topics that have been discussed in class, the team attempts to escape in under an hour.

The team solves puzzles and riddles using clues and critical thinking to complete the scenario and thus

escape the room. The team then debriefs as a team, in a reflection write up and as a class.

Findings:

The intended outcome of putting teamwork and leadership into action is very evident from the student

comments and feedback. Having an opportunity to implement the course skills and note their effectiveness

promotes confidence and eagerness to either retain or modify behavior in future opportunities. Students

comment that they are smarter than they thought, that nursing leadership skills can be used everywhere,

that they found their peers had great ideas, that the team benefited from having various viewpoints, and

that because the team was respectful and like-minded in the mission, they were successful.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

This activity puts key teamwork and leadership skills into action. These are not skills solely for nursing

practice, but skills for life. This exercise reveals many actions and attitudes that are both positive and

negative, and this revelation promotes discussion. It is fun, and the only consequence is bragging rights

from the team to team competition.

Problem Addressed:

Raising Awareness of Addiction Stigma Using Artistic Mediums

Kendra Todt, PhD, RN (Presenter)

Every 19 minutes, someone dies from a drug overdose, with an estimated 130 Americans dying each day.

In 2017, 70,200 lives were lost. The estimated cost to society is $78.5 billion dollars from expenditures

related to law enforcement, health care, and lost productivity. The proliferation of the opioid crisis is rooted

in stigma as individuals suffering with substance use disorder (SUD) have been invisible, marginalized,

stigmatized, and criminalized. Stigma is a Greek word denoting a visual sign or mark that signifies a

person as tainted and unfit for inclusion in society, a person to avoid. Sadly, the attitudes of health care

professionals towards patients with SUD are largely pejorative, with nurses amongst the most punitive.

Prognostic pessimism is a problem, as nurses may view patients with SUD as unlikely to recover. Across

the literature, nurses struggle to view addiction as a chronic disease. Nurses noted a lack of addiction

science education, preservice, and work related, leaving them feeling unprepared to care for this vulnerable

population.

For this reason, education is a strategy to raise awareness of the stigma that exists in spaces and places

that are designated for healing. Employing artistic mediums such as visual thinking strategies may bring

addiction to the forefront and facilitate a greater understanding of the detriment of stigma to population

health. The root of stigma stems from personal beliefs, attitudes, and societal views, which then overshadow

care delivery. The introduction of a talking circle as a place to share burdens, personal and professional, may

facilitate awareness of stigma and its origins to construct a platform for change using a dialogic process.

Reducing stigma has the potential to improve environments in which patients and nurses coexist as well as

to improve treatment outcomes for patients suffering from addiction.

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Objectives:

1. Define stigmatization.

2. Discuss the origins of stigmatization surrounding addiction.

3. Identify stigmatizing language and actions.

4. Discuss the effect of stigmatization on treatment and recovery for people suffering from addiction.

5. Identify art forms that will facilitate the awareness of addiction as a chronic disease.

6. Introduce the concept of professional talking circles and safe spaces to share burdens.

Methods/Procedures:

n/a

Findings:

n/a

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

n/a

Problem Addressed:

Rates of Gastrointestinal Disease in United States Military Veterans

Kelsey Kent, PhD, PMHNP (Presenter)

Current statistics reveal rates of GI disease in the general American population, but there is minimal data

available on the rates of GI disease in U.S. military Veterans.

Objectives:

To determine rates of GI disease in U.S. military Veterans as compared to rates of GI disease in the general

American population

Methods/Procedures:

This project is a retrospective, observational study using a large data set of 6,352,586 participants. Data

was collected from patient records at the Veterans Health Administration on GI diseases with greater

than 500,000 annual ambulatory care visits in the United States, to include: peptic ulcer disease,

gastroesophageal reflux disease, diverticular disease, inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s

disease, irritable bowel syndrome, constipation, nausea/vomiting, and functional dyspepsia.

Findings:

Over a 20 year period, the rates of GI disease in Veterans were identified as:

1. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease 25.52%

2. Peptic Ulcer Disease 1.82%

3. Functional Dyspepsia 20.99%

4. Crohn’s Disease 2.82%

5. Ulcerative Colitis .75%

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6. Diverticular Disease 10.22%

7. Irritable Bowel Syndrome 2.11%

8. Constipation 6.37%

9. Nausea/Vomiting 15.80%

Findings will also be broken down by year and compared to the most recent published rates of GI disease in

the general American population in tables.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Bedside nurses should be aware of the unique needs of U.S. military Veterans, including the higher

prevalence of gastrointestinal disease as compared to the general American population.

Seeing Red? Touch Green! What is the Impact of Horticultural/Gardening Therapy

on Agitation in Adult Alzheimer’s Patients Residing in an Inpatient Setting?

Problem Addressed:

Lauren Schwarz (Student Presenter)

Christine Nguyen (Student Co-Presenter)

Sean Norton (Student Co-Presenter)

Eve Rodenmeyer (Student Co-Presenter)

Pamela Waynick-Rogers, DNP, APRN-BC (Co-Presenter)

According to the Alzheimer’s Association’s 2019 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures Report, an

estimated 5.8 million Americans are living with the disease, this number is expected to double by 2050, and

15-20% of patients with dementia develop violent behaviors. Behavioral and psychological symptoms of

dementia are associated with increased use of physical and chemical restraints and other adverse clinical

outcomes in patients (Lu, 2019). Cheng studied caregivers and concluded that the strongest predictor

of burden and depressive symptoms was disruptive behavior (Cheng, 2017). Studies show that access to

gardens in inpatient settings can have a positive influence on Alzheimer’s patients’ behavior by promoting

relaxation and sensory stimulation (Guaita et al., 2011; Li-Chin et al., 2019, Ulrich et al., 2018, Uwajeh et al.,

2019; Whear, 2014).

Objectives:

The purpose of this project is to encourage the implementation of garden spaces for patients with

Alzheimer’s and dementia in inpatient facilities. The goal is to increase awareness of the benefits of gardens

for patients with Alzheimer’s and/or dementia who reside in long term care facilities or another inpatient

setting, particularly in terms of decreased agitation.

Methods/Procedures:

Evaluated articles were determined to be between Level 1 and Level 6 evidence according to the evidencebased

practice nursing research categorization guidelines. The majority of articles included in the review

utilized the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (Cohen-Mansfield et al., 1989) to assess agitation levels

before and after an intervention. Forms of horticulture interventions across studies included: leisure time in

green spaces, structured gardening programs, purposeful placement of plants, audiovisual presentations of

natural scenes, and use of an activity garden vs. quiet garden. According to Whear

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(2014) The mechanisms causing benefit of garden include reminiscence and sensory stimulation. The key

terms used in the literature review include: Dementia, Alzheimer’s, agitation, aggressive behaviors, garden

therapy, horticulture therapy, green spaces, long-term care, and inpatient

Findings:

All studies evaluated reported decreased agitation levels associated with visiting the garden and/or being

in the presence of purposeful plants. “Benefits of the garden were thought to occur through 2 mechanisms:

reminiscence and sensory stimulation. The evidence suggests that these mechanisms work partly by

encouraging a relaxing and calming environment, while also providing an opportunity to maintain life skills

and habits.” (Whear, 2014)

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

In order to gather the best evidence, further research should standardize the garden intervention with

specific features and methods. Additional randomized control trials are indicated for this topic since there

are a limited number. Improved patient outcomes increases quality of life and reduces the burden for

healthcare workers and caregivers. Recommendations for practice include incorporating gardens or at least

indoor plants in inpatient setting with adults with Alzheimer’s and dementia

Teaching BSN Clinical During a World Pandemic: Online OB Simulation

Problem Addressed:

Tammy Howard, MSN, RNC-OB, WHNP-BC (Presenter)

Nursing programs clinical and lab educational programs were disrupted during the worldwide pandemic as

the pandemic moved into the USA.

Universities moved to 100% online education platforms. Even clinical rotations were cancelled by facilities

& nursing programs and moved to online learning status. This presentation demonstrates how one BSN

programs OB simulations moved from the simulation lab setting to a synchronous online platform.

Objectives:

1. Participants will become aware of methods used to deliver interactive synchronous online OB

simulation.

2. Participants will view examples of online simulation.

Methods/Procedures:

Poster with description and pictures that demonstrate how Laerdal Sim Mom simulator was utilized in online

simulations during TN mandated “Safer at Home” status/University conversion to 100% online classes,

including labs (March 2020-July 2020).

Findings:

n/a

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

n/a

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Using the Experience of COVID-19 to Develop Your Educational Emergency Toolkit

Jennifer Wissemann, DNP, RNC-LRN, RNC-OB, CNE (Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

Knowledge of how to effectively develop and implement educational offerings during challenging times.

Objectives:

1. Participants will be able to the impact of pandemics as it relates to staff education.

2. Participants will be able to describe barriers/facilitators of experienced nurse transitions between work

assignments.

3. Participants will be able to apply lessons learned to their own educational offerings.

Methods/Procedures:

Summary of findings from published literature plus personal experience.

Findings:

n/a

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Outlines recommendations for planning for alternate educational offerings amidst current pandemic setting.

Problem Addressed:

Virtual OSCEs

Diane Butler, DNP, FNP/GNP-BC, NP-C (Presenter)

1. On campus participation for MSN FNP student learning and skills check off prohibited during the

Covid-19 Pandemic

2. MSN FNP faculty needed a way to confirm students knowledge and practice skills with patients at end

of semester

Objectives:

1. Describe the Observed Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) for FNP students

2. Discuss the move of the on-ground simulation OSCE format to the virtual online simulation OSCE format

for FNP students

Methods/Procedures:

FNP Faculty developed an virtual online simulation approach to conduct Observed Structured Clinical

Examination (OSCE) for FNP students.

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Findings:

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All FNP students successfully completed OSCEs.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

In view of limited, if not prohibited, on-campus time for clinical simulation during the Covid-19 pandemic,

this virtual online simulation format proved to be highly accepted and successful for faculty and students.

Why Medical Record Documentation is Critical

Teresa Bills, RN (Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

Insufficient charting

Objectives:

Improve medical documentation, improve communication critical information to physicians and to improve

communication

Methods/Procedures:

Chart audits

Findings:

Lack of sufficient charting as 50 % lacking progress noted on continued care

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Education 2x quarter, poster presentation, legal case studies, weekly huddles, lay down foundation for

standardized requirements for charting, along with chart audits

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Tennessee Nurses Association

Statements of Financial Position,

December 31, 2019 and 2018

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Tennessee Nurses Association

Statements of Activities and Changes in Net Assets

For the Year Ended December 31, 2019

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Tennessee Nurses Association

Statements of Activities and Changes in Net Assets (Continued)

For the Year Ended December 31, 2018

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Tennessee Nurses Association

Statements of Cash Flows

For the Years Ended December 31, 2019 and 2018

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TNA Past Presidents

*Mrs. Lena A. Warner...............................................1905-1918

*Nina E. Wootton........................................................1918-1919

*Myrtle Marion Archer.............................................1920-1921

*Mrs. Daisy Gould......................................................1921-1923

*Mrs. Myrtle E. Blair..................................................1924-1925

*Abbie Roberts..........................................................1926-1927

*Mrs. Corrine B. Hunn.............................................1928-1929

*Hazel Lee Goff........................................................1930-1932

*Nancy Rice (Nashville)..........................................1933-1935

*Aurelia B. Potts (Nashville).................................1936-1937

*Mattie E. Malone (Memphis)...............................1938-1939

*Lennis Ault (Knoxville).........................................1940-1942

*Frances H. Cunningham (Memphis)...............1942-1944

*Beatrice M. Clutch (Nashville)...........................1944-1948

*Ruth Neil Murry (Memphis)................................1948-1950

*Elizabeth H. Killeffer (Cookeville)....................1950-1952

*Violet M. Crook (Union City).............................1952-1955

*Catherine M. Sterling (Memphis)......................1956-1959

*Vesta L. Swartz (Johnson City)........................1960-1961

*Mary Frances Smith (Memphis)........................1962-1966

*Dorothy L. Griscom (Memphis)........................1966-1969

*Dorothy Hocker (Nashville).................................1969-1971

*Mary Evelyn Kemp (Nashville)............................1971-1973

*Patsy B. McClure (Knoxville)...............................1975-1977

*Emma Lou Harris (Chattanooga).....................1977-1979

*Mary Windham (Clarksville)................................1979-1981

Annie J. Carter (Nashville).....................................1981-1983

Margaret Heins (Knoxville)...................................1983-1985

Virginia(Ginna)Trotter Betts(Nashville)...........1985-1987

Margaret Heins (Knoxville)...................................1987-1989

Frances Edwards (Nashville)...............................1989-1993

Carol Blankenship (Johnson City)....................1993-1995

Sharon Adkins (Nashville).....................................1995-1997

Margaret (Peggy) Strong (Memphis)...............1997-1999

Gary Crotty (Knoxville).........................................1999-2001

Wanda Neal Hooper (Nashville)......................2001-2003

*Maureen Nalle (Knoxville)................................2003-2005

Susan Sanders (Lynchburg).............................2005-2007

Laura Beth Brown (Nashville)..........................2007-2009

Elizabeth (Beth) H. Smith (Piney Flats).........2009-2011

Lena Patterson (Ooltewah)..................................2011-2012

Jill S. Kinch (Nashville) (Interim President)..........2012-2013

Frances (Billie) Sills (Johnson City).................2013-2015

Sandra (Sandy) Murabito (Nashville)..............2015-2017

Haley Vance, (Nashville).......................................2017-2019

*deceased

*Erline Gore (Nashville)..........................................1973-1975

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2020-2021 TNF Board of Trust & Staff

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2020-2021 TNF Board of Trust & Staff

Staff

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