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Mountain Times - Volume 49, Number 43- Oct. 21-27, 2020

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T

MOU NTA I N TI I M E S

Volume 49, Number 43

Oct. 21-27, 2020

SPOOKTACULAR

ACTIVITIES

Check out what

Halloween has in store

for this week.

Page 24

FOOD GIVEAWAY

Killington Resort

announced the next

food giveaway will

be Thursday, Oct. 29.

The resort will provide

300 bags of food to

help families in need.

Residents of Killington

and the surrounding

areas can pick up bags

at Snowshed Base

Lodge from 3-6 p.m.

GRACE CHURCH

WELCOMES NEW

PASTOR

DJ Dave interviews

Rev. Dr. Wallace in

her new intentional

interim position at

Grace Congregational

UCC in Rutland.

Page 32

By Krista Johnston

A skeleton chauffeur drives a wagon hearse with a skeleton horse on Bellevue Avenue in Rutland. The extensive display is illuminated at night.

Spartan television show filmed in Pittsfield

By Katy Savage

When the pandemic hit, Joe

De Sena, the founder of Spartan

Race, spent 120 days quarantined

in the place where Spartan

first began back in 2010.

De Sena retreated to his

Riverside Farm in Pittsfield,

which is called the birthplace of

Spartan —the obstacle course

race series, which has since

expanded to include 250 events

in 45 countries. While almost all

of the races were canceled this

year, De Sena was determined

to make one work.

“I said I wanted to have an

event on the farm and the team

came up with this brilliant

format,” De Sena said.

A group of 24 elite athletes

from a variety of disciplines

stayed in Pittsfield Oct. 9-13 to

be part of a new Spartan television

series.

The goal? “To see who’s the

fittest of them all, what type

of athlete, what type of mindset,”

De Sena said in a phone

interview.

The athletes included Curtis

Maggitt, a former linebacker

for the Indiana Colts; Kellyn

Taylor, one of the fastest women

marathoners in the nation; and

Max Fennell, the first African

American pro triathlete, among

Spartan > 14

By Brent Doscher/Spartan

Curtis Maggitt, former professional linebacker

By Melissa Wyman

HARTLAND GETS

TOWN PIZZA OVEN

Grand unveiling of the

oven was a big hit at

last week's drive-thru

farmers' market.

Page 28

CALENDAR

A lot is happening in

the area this week,

look for this icon

for Halloween-style

events.

Page 16

Kids with runny noses sent

home, creating havoc

with jobs, child care

By Lola Duffort/VTDigger

Amanda Durand’s 3-year-old daughter was at child

care for about an hour in September when a center worker

called to say she had to go home. The toddler had a runny

nose and “one green booger,” the West Rutland mom

recalled.

“I got lucky. I work from home, so I was able to even keep

my kiddo at home and still get a fraction of my work done.

But some parents don’t have that,” Durand said.

The lengthy checklist of symptoms that state guidelines

require that schools and child care centers use to screen

children amid the pandemic has emerged as a point of

contention for many parents, many of whom say it is unrealistic

to keep kids home with symptoms that overlap with

allergies and the common cold, including runny noses.

Durand, for her part, is sympathetic. A case manager at

the Southwestern Vermont Council on Aging, she said

Sick days > 18

Gov. Phil Scott extends state of

emergency until Nov. 15

Governor Phil

Scott announced

Oct. 15 that the

state of emergency

is now extended to

Nov.15 to ensure

the state can continue

to suppress the spread of Covid-19.

The executive order has been extended

with no additional changes.

“Vermont has led the nation in responding

to this virus. We’ve worked

together to keep each other safe and

prevent our healthcare system from being

overwhelmed, allowing us to methodically

reopen our economy and keep it

open while many other states have had

to take steps backward,” said Governor

Scott. “But we cannot become complacent.

While our success has allowed us to

"We can continue to

move forward if we stay

vigilant," said Gov. Scott

do more, we must

keep making smart

choices. This means

staying six feet

apart and wearing a

mask (even around

friends), avoiding

crowds, following travel guidance and

washing our hands. We can continue to

move forward if we stay vigilant.”

In addition to helping the state manage

the public health risks, the emergency

declaration keeps numerous supports

in place to mitigate economic hardship

resulting from the pandemic.

These protections include expanded

housing and meal delivery systems,

expanded eligibility for unemployment

insurance, resources for businesses and

federal emergency funding.


2 • LOCAL NEWS

The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020

OBITUARY

Robert Arnold Buttner, age 68

Robert Arnold Buttner, age 68, formerly of Killington,

died Feb. 26, 2020, surrounded by family during his last

hours in a hospital in his current residence of Venice,

Florida. Bob Buttner was born in Flushing, New York on

Oct. 22, 1951, and was the son of Arnold and Emilia Buttner.

He grew up in Flushing and summered in Candlewood

Lake, New Fairfield,

Connecticut where

he started his love of

swimming — including

holding some unbreakable

records (mostly due

to regulation changes

in length of swim laps).

He attended Brooklyn

Technical High School,

where he was a great

asset to the swim team;

then went onto SUNY

Maritime College in

Bronx, New York, where

he was competitively

successful in swimming and baseball. He graduated with

a Bachelors Degree and as a United States Coast Guard

Licensed Officer in charge of the Navigational Watch. After

graduation Bob sailed for the Exxon Shipping Company/

Seariver Maritime, and there acquired his Captain’s License.

During his lengthy vacations from sea, Bob Buttner

became an avid skier who resided in Killington, Vermont.

It was there that he met another avid skier who was part of

a share house, but lived in New York City — June Hughes.

They were married in 1982 at a Our Lady of Good Counsel

Chapel in White Plains, New York. When they were ready,

the happy couple chose to raise a family in Killington. Bob

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Farm fresh ideas

Greg Cox, Democrat for state senate

By Lee J. Kahrs

WEST RUTLAND —

Vermont’s farm culture is

far from dead, and if Greg

Cox has anything to do

with it, agriculture will

bring young people back

to Vermont and grow the

economy again.

“If we’re going to grow

more farms, we need

more farmers,” he said.

“Ag is the easy one and will

bring young people back

to Vermont. They leave,

they sow their oats, and

then they say it’s time to

start a family. We want the

boomerangs.”

Cox, 69, is a Democrat

running for one of three

Rutland County Senate

seats in a crowded field of

nine candidates, including

two incumbents. A

longtime farmer and

educator, for the last 38

years, Cox has owned and

operated Boardman Hill

Farm in West Rutland.

He also founded Rutland

Area Farm and Food Link

(RAFFL) and the Vermont

Farmer’s Education

Centers.

From hippie to home

Cox isn’t just waxing

poetic about bolstering

agriculture and improving

economic development

through farming. He uses

Boardman Hill Farm as an

incubator space, drawing

young farmers and helping

those with the most

potential get a foothold in

the business.

“I offer land, equipment,

help with a business

plan and I work with

the Vermont Land Trust

to hook them up with established

farms,” he said.

“We’re trying to bend that

age curve. I grow my own

competition.”

Cox grew up in

Lamoille County and attended

Johnson State College

majoring in education,

until the day he knew

teaching wasn’t what he

wanted to do.

“My mother was distraught,”

he said. “But, I

do teach after all.”

Cox has been working

with at-risk youth most of

his life. He also taught agriculture

classes at Green

Mountain College.

But it was his experience

coming of age in

the 1960s that led him to

agriculture, and helped

form his views on what

Vermont needs, right now.

“I was one of those back

to the land food growing

hippies back in 1968,” he

said. “We were 100,000

strong. We changed

Vermont and Vermont

changed us. We need that

same influx again. The

low-hanging fruit is food

and food business.”

Cox describes Rutland

County as “the food

mecca of Vermont,” ripe

for an infusion of young

blood, energy and new

ideas to enhance what

Rutland County already

has going for it.

“Youth and entrepreneurial

spirit, we need to

bring that back to Rutland

County,” he said. “Agriculture

can be an economic

engine and it can backfill

a lot of those industrial

jobs we’ve lost.”

Is dairy dead?

With the shuttering

of more dairy farms all

over the state each year,

and the recent news that

Rutland’s own Thomas

Dairy would close for

good on Oct. 1 due to the

pandemic and loss of

demand, Cox was asked:

Is dairy dead?

“No, dairy is not dead,”

Cox said emphatically.

“But we need people with

new, fresher ideas. The ‘get

bigger’ idea and the Agency

of Agriculture, they’re

system thinkers and they

can’t get out of the rut

they’re in. They can’t see

a new way and Covid is

the perfect change agent

because it’s exposed all of

our weaknesses in our institutions:

social, judicial,

agricultural, education,

healthcare.”

Cox said he thinks the

Agency of Agriculture

could use some new

blood and an overall of its

approach to agriculture in

Vermont, or else nothing

will change.

“It’s not the individual,

it’s the system,” he said.

“So people are stuck in

a system, not equipped

to deal with the new

problems, so this is a

time to evaluate all these

systems, but they have no

new ideas. That’s where

you need someone who

doesn’t own a suit and tie,

who works with people

and sees these things from

the outside.”

Inside out

That person is Cox, but

he has no illusions about

how he would fit in on the

Senate Agriculture Committee,

his first committee

choice, should he be

elected.

“They want you to

play,” he said. “I want to be

on that committee on my

terms and I’m qualified to

“For every $100 you spend at a

locally owned business, $48 dollars

stays in Rutland County,” Cox

said. “At a chain store, only $16

stays local. We really need to work

together to create a local economy."

do it.”

Cox would also like

to serve on the Senate

Economic Development

Committee, understandably:

his philosophies on

Greg Cox

agriculture and economic

development intermingled

and reliant on each

other to succeed.

“We need to invest in

us,” he said. “The only

thing Applebee’s has on

the neighborhood is a

method for extracting our

dollars and sending them

elsewhere. Any business

is not what we should be

going after.”

Cox said he wants to

see Rutland County encourage

small, community-based

business owned

by local folks.

“For every $100 you

spend at a locally owned

business, $48 dollars stays

in Rutland County,” he

said. “At a chain store, only

Submitted

$16 stays local. We really

need to work together to

create a local economy.

If elected, Cox would

also try and steer more

state funding to Rutland

County, saying that the

Rutland County delegation

doesn’t work well

enough with Montpelier

to secure funding for the

county.

“I want more state

resources coming to Rutland

County,” he said. “We

don’t play well with others

at the state level because

we are a more conservative

county. I would like to

make sure Rutland gets at

least 10% of funding we

get from the state.”

Not party time

The father of three,

married for 29 years to

Cox > 10


The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020 LOCAL NEWS • 3

CU announces plans for

spring semester

Castleton University’s spring 2021 semester

will feature an adjusted schedule

and more options for students to receive

their courses.

To keep its community as safe as possible

throughout the Covid-19 pandemic,

as well as the upcoming flu season, the

university will adjust its academic calendar

in the following ways:

• The spring semester will be delayed,

with classes beginning on Feb. 1.

• Winter break and spring break will

be eliminated

• Refresh days for faculty and students

will be built into the schedule

to provide breaks

• Courses will be delivered in a mix

of modalities, including in-person,

online synchronous, and online

asynchronous options

• The semester will end with commencement

on May 15, as it was

originally scheduled.

Faculty members chose the modality

for their courses for the spring semester.

Roughly a third of CU's spring courses will

be taught in-person, half will be taught

online (most with scheduled meetings),

and the rest will be hybrid (a combination

of in-person and online).

“Allowing our professors to choose

their method of delivery creates options

for students who may have varying needs

and gives our faculty the opportunity to

deliver their courses in the way they are

most comfortable,” said Jonathan Spiro,

interim president.

The plan offers the benefits of online and

in-person instruction as well as a residential

campus experience. Under the plan, any

student who chooses to live in the residence

halls or visit campus may do so by signing

the Spartan Pledge, through which every

member of the CU community agrees to

protect themselves and others through social

distancing and face-covering protocols.

The university will also follow the recommendations

and guidelines put in place by

Vermont Dept. of Health and the federal

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Arriving students will be tested and follow

state travel guidelines for quarantine before

joining the campus community.

Residential students and commuters

to campus will again have access to the

offices, services, and resources the campus

provides. Those who wish to remain offcampus

can remotely access services such

as the Academic Support Center, Wellness

Center, and Career Services.

“I would like to thank our students,

faculty, and staff for their diligence in following

the Spartan Pledge and helping to

keep our community as safe as possible,”

Spiro said. “Our community’s dedication

to preserving public health has allowed us

to offer more options for the spring in the

safest possible way.”

Submitted

A group of volunteers in Pomfret gathered to clean up the Connecticut River last month.

Volunteers unite for cleaner rivers

POMFRET— This year’s

annual Source to Sea

Cleanup, organized by the

Connecticut River Conservancy

(CRC), continued the

tradition of cleaning up rivers

despite the challenges

of the Covid-19 pandemic.

“More and more people

turned to their rivers this

summer, since social

distancing limited other

activities,” said Stacey

Lennard, CRC’s cleanup

coordinator. “Unfortunately,

the increased use

led to more trash in many

locations. It was clear the

Source to Sea Cleanup was

needed, it just had to be

different this year.”

The volunteer event was

expanded from the typical

two days to the entire

month of September.

Hundreds of volunteers

with masks, work gloves,

and trash bags gathered

in small groups across the

four-state Connecticut

River basin (NH, VT, MA,

CT) from Stratford, New

Hampshire near the Canadian

border all the way to

Old Saybrook, Connecticut

near the Long Island

Sound.

“Source to Sea Cleanup

volunteers’ hard work and

dedication is inspiring and

makes a real difference for

our rivers. We were heartened

to see volunteers

rallying to protect their

rivers from trash pollution,”

continued Lennard.

“Everyone was happy to

get outside to connect with

nature while also making

a big difference for their

communities. They shared

Clean up > 39

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4 • LOCAL NEWS

The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020

RRMC cuts the ribbon on Thomas W. Huebner Medical Office Building

The Thomas W. Huebner Medical Office

Building at Rutland Regional Medical

Center was officially dedicated on Monday,

Oct.19. The new building, which is

adjacent to the hospital on Allen Street in

Rutland, is the new home for the Vermont

Orthopaedic Clinic, Physiatry services

and ENT & Audiology.

The ribbon cutting ceremony took

place outside of the building with participants

flanking the building’s namesake,

Tom Huebner, former president

and CEO of the hospital.

Rutland Regional Medical Center

broke ground on the new 37,000 square

foot, two-story medical office building

in April 2019. The projected cost of the

project was $23,883,569 and it ended on

budget despite a two-month delay due

to Covid-19 pandemic. The building was

expected to open in June 2020 but with a

several-week construction shutdown due

to Covid-19, the opening was pushed out

several months.

In March of 2018, the Rutland Regional

board of directors announced

the naming of the building after the

hospital’s long-time CEO and President,

Tom Huebner. At the time, Huebner was

understandably modest in his acceptance

of this honor. Since then he humbly took

part in the ground-breaking in April 2019

and today’s ribbon cutting ceremony.

“When I retired 2-1/2 years ago it was

bittersweet, but one of the most touching

moments that took my breath away,

was when the Board of Directors decided

to name this building after me,” said

Huebner. “I kind of feel weird about that

to be honest. It feels sort of inappropriate.

But it is an honor that I accepted,

and I do truly, truly appreciate. I am so

glad the building is here and for years to

come, it will be providing such a great

service to our patients.”

The principal partners in this project

include HP Cummings Construction,

LaVallee Brensinger Architects, Artisan

Courtesy of RRMC

Engineering, Krebs & Lansing Engineers,

and LN Consulting and financial partners

USDA Rural Development, ECHO Financial

and TD Bank.

“Our construction manager H.P Cummings

and the many partners and local

subcontractors did an outstanding job to

complete this project safely and on budget,

despite the significant challenges

brought on by Covid-19,” added RRMC

CEO Claudio Fort. “I am truly grateful for

the teamwork and dedication demonstrated

throughout this project from the

ground-breaking to the build out to the

move-in. It was an incredible display of

the Vermont work ethic.”

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The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020 LOCAL NEWS • 5

Man leads VSP on highspeed

chase though

Quechee, West Hartford

On Oct. 19, VSP Royalton

attempted to stop Robert

Blanchard, 50, after he

made threats to harm others,

including law enforcement.

Blanchard refused

to stop when the troopers

activated their lights and

sirens. The pursuit exceeded

the speed limit several

times and proceeded

through Quechee and West

Hartford, onto Route 14

in Sharon. Troopers set up

with tire deflation strips and

were able to deflate both

On Oct. 17 just after midnight, the West Rutland Fire

Department responded to 416 Main St. in West Rutland

for a reported structure fire. Upon first arriving, fire crews

found the structure with heavy smoke and fire coming from

the first floor and beginning to extend to the second floor.

Due to the quick response and fire suppression efforts,

the building was saved. All occupants and pets within the

residence were able to escape without injury.

As part of his scene assessment, the VT Dept of Public

Safety Fire & Explosion Investigation Unit was called for

assistance in determining the origin and cause.

The investigation revealed the origin of the fire; however

the cause of this fire is currently undetermined.

This fire is considered suspicious at this time.

Anyone with information is asked to call 802-442-5421

or the tip hotline at 1-800-32-ARSON (1-800-322-7766). A

$5,000 reward is offered if a tips leads to an arrest.

On Monday, Oct. 19

at 2:25 p.m., officials

with U.S. Customs

and Border Protection

at Derby Line notified

the Vermont State Police

that a fugitive had

been apprehended at

the border by Canadian

authorities after

attempting to flee the

United States on foot.

State police learned that the

suspect was Corey Ramos, 30, of

Bridgeport, Connecticut.

Ramos was wanted in Connecticut

on a warrant for two counts of

violating a protective order related to

a former girlfriend, Jennifer Brelsford.

The warrant indicated the court

set bail at $500,000. Ramos also was

wanted for questioning in connection

with the homicide of Brelsford

that had occurred on Sunday, Oct.

18, 2020, at her home in Bridgeport.

The Vermont State Police learned

that Ramos also has ties to Rutland,

including recent involvements with

law enforcement in the area and a

front tires of the fleeing

vehicle.

Troopers then boxed

the vehicle in to bring it to

a stop, in a field off Route

14. After ascertaining that

Blanchard was unarmed,

he and his dog (both

unharmed) were removed

peacefully from the vehicle.

The dog was taken to

a friend’s residence to be

cared for, and Blanchard

was taken into custody.

Windsor and Hartford PD

assisted VSP with this case.

pending criminal case

on charges including

sexual assault without

consent and seconddegree

unlawful restraint.

Police further

learned that Ramos

fled Connecticut following

the homicide

in Vermont-registered

vehicle, which was

later found abandoned

near the Vermont-Canada border.

The Vermont State Police and Rutland

City Police Dept. were actively

looking for Ramos.

Following Ramos’s apprehension

by Canadian authorities, he was

returned to the Port of Entry and the

custody of U.S. Customs and Border

Protection agents, who contacted the

Vermont State Police. Responding

troopers took Ramos into state custody

on suspicion of being a fugitive

from justice. Ramos was jailed without

bail pending a court appearance

scheduled for 1 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 20,

at the Criminal Division of Vermont

Superior Court in Newport.

West Rutland Stewart's

robbed at knifepoint

On Oct. 15 at about

10 p.m., troopers from

the Vermont State Police

responded to an armed

robbery complaint at the

Stewart's Shop located

at 116 Main St. in West

Rutland.

Upon meeting with

store employees and

reviewing video footage,

it was learned that at 9:57

p.m., a lone white male

approximately 5 feet, 5

inches tall and weighing

approximately 200-230

pounds entered the store,

wearing a dark hooded

sweatshirt, grey sweat

pants, camouflage baseball

hat, and a dark face

covering/mask. The man

brandished a knife and

ordered the clerk to give

him the money from the

cash drawer.

The clerk opened the

cash drawer and handed

over a large sum of cash.

The robber left the store

and was last seen walking

west on Business Route 4.

Anyone with information

is asked to contact

the Rutland Barracks,

802-773-9101.

Police respond to suspicious fire in West Rutland

VSP arrest suspect in Connecticut

homicide, has Rutland ties

Corey Ramos

Courtesy VSP

A historic building in West Rutland suffers a blaze.

Kingsley Bridge

damaged by

oversize vehicle;

police seek

information

Police are seeking information

about the driver of a box truck who

drove through Kingsley covered bridge

on East Road in Clarendon on Wednesday,

Oct. 14, causing significant damage.

A oversized vehicle caused damage

to the fascia boards and support braces

of the bridge. The bridge was closed

while AOT determined if the bridge remained

structurally safe. On Monday,

it was determined safe.

According to the Rutland County

Sheriff’s Facebook page, Wednesday,

Oct. 14: "The investigation has revealed

that a white box truck, with out

of state plates, went through the bridge

at approximately 8:30 this morning."

Later reports revealed the plates to

be from New York state. Anyone with

information or who may have received

a package from a truck in that area on

Wednesday is asked to call Sgt. Andrew

Cross at 802-775-8002.

KILLINGTON

FOOD SHELF

We are stocked with nonperishable food, paper goods

& cleaning supplies. Any person in need, please call to

arrange a pickup. Donations accepted. Please call Nan

Salamon, 422-9244 or Ron Willis, 422-3843.

Sherburne UCC “Little White Church,” Killington, VT

Table of contents

Local news ...................................................................2

State news ....................................................................7

Opinion ......................................................................12

Calendar .....................................................................16

Puzzles........................................................................19

Living ADE .................................................................20

Halloween ..................................................................24

Food matters ..............................................................26

Pets .............................................................................30

Horoscopes ................................................................31

Columns .....................................................................32

Classifieds ..................................................................36

Service directory ........................................................37

Real estate ..................................................................38

MOU NTA I N TI M E S

is a community newspaper covering Central

Vermont that aims to engage and inform as well as

empower community members to have a voice.

Polly Lynn-Mikula ............................. Editor & Co-Publisher

Jason Mikula ......................... Sales Manager & Co-Publisher

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By Glenn Russell/VTDigger

One of WRJ's two mail processors was recently removed, causing slowdowns. The facility is one of only two in the state.

Vt. delegation decries removal of mail

processor at White River Junction facility

By Anne Galloway/VTDigger

A mail processor was recently

removed from the White River

Junction U.S. Postal Service plant,

one of two facilities that sort mail

in Vermont.

Only one processing machine is

now left at the Upper Valley location,

and last weekend that device broke

down. Postal workers were forced

to sort and process pieces of mail by

hand, significantly delaying delivery

of mail, according to a statement

issued by the Vermont congressional

delegation Tuesday evening.

Rep. Peter Welch and Sens. Bernie

Sanders and Patrick Leahy have demanded

that the Postmaster General

Louis DeJoy install a new AFCS

200 cancellation machine at the

Vermont facility immediately. The

Vermont delegation sent a letter to

DeJoy Tuesday condemning the way

the Trump administration is playing

politics with the electoral system

during Covid and demanding a

response by Oct. 16. The mail-in

ballot system is a critical option for

voters who do not want to contract

the virus or spread the contagious

disease to poll workers.

“While we have been promised

for months that a new AFCS

200 cancellation machine will be

installed, we have just learned that

this will not occur until January of

2021 at the earliest,” they wrote in

a joint press release. “This timing

is both unacceptable and another

example of this administration’s attempt

to sabotage the Postal Service

and the 2020 election.”

The Vermont Secretary of State’s

Office has mailed ballots to every

registered Vermont voter. Ballot

returns have already broken records

and are expected to continue to be

heavy as the unofficial deadline for

mail-in ballots, Oct. 24, nears. Ballots

can also be brought to polling

stations on Nov. 3.

“Waiting until 2021 to get this

new machine to Vermont will

present undue harm to the hundreds

of thousands of Vermonters

who have been given the ability

to vote by mail by Nov. 3 as well

as Vermont’s seniors, veterans,

and people with disabilities who

rely on the Postal Service for the

delivery of their prescriptions,” the

Vermont delegation wrote.

Maureen Marion, the communications

director for the Northeast

region, said her office is trying to

confirm the information from the

Vermont delegation and could not

comment at this time.

Secretary of State Jim Condos

said he had not been made aware of

the equipment removal or sorting

issues at the White River Junction

facility.

“I really can’t comment without

more information other than to say

that it would be disappointing if

true,” Condos said in a statement.

“We have been assured by the

USPS that Vermont election mail

would be handled as a high priority,

and we expect that to happen. The

USPS has a responsibility to ensure

mail is delivered in a timely fashion,

especially for an election being conducted

during a pandemic.”

Condos said he joined the call

of the congressional delegation “to

properly resource our hardworking

VT USPS staff so that they can accomplish

their jobs effectively and

efficiently.”

Independent School in raises over $12,000 at wine event

Ludlow's Independent

School raised over $12,000

at the autumn wine tasting

event held Oct. 11 at

the Echo Lake Inn. The

board of trustees continues

to drive fundraising efforts

to further support the

endeavors of the school.

The event featured wine

from Casarena Winery

in Argentina as well as a

silent auction featuring a

week long stay in a private

villa in St. Barts.

The event took place

in a heated tent with

social distancing guidelines

in place.

Many generous donors

from the community made

the event possible. The

event would not have been

possible without the support

of Tom Gianola and his

staff at the Echo Lake Inn.

For more information

visit blackriveris.org.


The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020 STATE NEWS • 7

Employment 4.79x11.91 Mtn Times Sept 2020.qxp_Layout 1 10/5/20 3:30 PM Page 1

Vermont reports record

number of returned early

ballots for general election

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos announced on Oct. 14 that a record number

of ballots have been cast early in the Nov. 3, 2020 General Election as compared to ballots

cast early in prior elections.

As of the end of the day on Oct. 13, 110,016 Vermonters have voted early in the 2020

General Election, with three weeks of early voting remaining. The previous record of

total ballots returned early/absentee in a single election was 95,203 in the 2016 General

Election.

“Our hard work preparing for the 2020 General Election during the Covid-19 health

crisis has paid off already, as Vermonters have overwhelmingly embraced safe and secure

voting options to cast their ballots,” said Condos. “I would encourage every voter

who has not yet voted to make their voting plan, whether that includes returning their

ballot by mail, dropping it off early at the Town or City Clerk’s office, or by bringing it to

the polls on Election Day.”

“I want to extend my sincere thanks to Vermont’s town and city clerks for all of their

efforts to ensure an election that is free, fair, and accurate,” continued Condos.

To be counted a voter’s voted ballot must be received by the town or city clerk by

7 p.m. on Nov. 3, Election Day. The certificate on the front of the "voted ballot" envelope

needs to be filled out completely, dated, and signed by the voter for the vote to be

counted. Any eligible voter who has not received a ballot should contact their Town or

City Clerk immediately to obtain one.

Vermont becomes first state to provide

condoms at public schools

Author of the bill cites lowering abortion rates among its goals

Vermont will become the first state in

the nation to make free condoms available

in public middle and high schools next

year. Gov. Scott signed a bill on Oct. 5 that

expands access to contraceptives.

Some of the country’s largest school districts

have free condoms available, but no

other state requires its secondary schools to

have them according to the National Coalition

of STD Directors.

Barre Republican Rep. Topper McFaun

introduced the bill, and said if teenagers

have more access to contraceptives and

health education, it might lead to a reduction

in the number of abortions that are

performed.

Vermont’s abortion rate for teens ages

15-19 is about seven per 1,000, lower than

the national average.

“I’m talking about allowing people to

be in the position where they don’t have to

make the decision, that crucial decision, to

have an abortion or not — that’s what I’m

trying to prevent,” McFaun said. “And the

way to do that is to provide ways to allow

people to protect themselves.”

Ice rinks directed to freeze

schedules for two weeks

Governor aims to prevent influx from high risk areas

Following the decision by the State of

New Hampshire to close indoor skating

facilities for two weeks, Governor Phil

Scott Oct. 16 issued an executive order

prohibiting Vermont’s

skating rinks from accepting

new reservations

for use beginning that

Oct. 16, at 5 p.m., through

midnight on Oct. 30.

Scott said the directive is

intended to prevent an influx

of new users from high

risk areas into ice rinks.

“As of today, New Hampshire’s skating

facilities were closed by their governor for

two weeks in response to outbreaks that

have resulted in 158 cases of Covid-19

among 23 different ice hockey teams,”

Governor Scott said. “In addition, there is

an outbreak in central Vermont that may

be connected to the outbreaks in New

Hampshire. To reduce the risk to Vermonters,

and to help sustain the progress we

have made, rinks in Vermont may not take

any additional reservations for the next

two weeks.”

"New Hampshire’s skating facilities

were closed ... in response to

outbreaks that have resulted in 158

cases of Covid-19 among 23 different

ice hockey teams,” Gov. Scott said.

Rinks may allow their currently scheduled

operations over this two-week period.

Gov. Scott’s executive order also directs

state agencies to review current recreation

guidance to determine if a more aggressive

response is needed to prevent further

spread of Covid-19 related to activities in

indoor skating, hockey and other recreational

facilities.

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8 • STATE NEWS

The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020

Over $299K in grants will

benefit Vermont specialty crops

Agency dollars assist Vermont fruit, vegetable, and value-added

producers and increase consumer access to locally produced food

The Vermont

Agency of Agriculture,

Food & Markets

(VAAFM) last

week announced

grants totaling

$299,350 for seven

projects to benefit

Vermont fruit, vegetable, and value-added

producers and increase consumer access

to locally produced food. These grants,

funded through the USDA Agricultural

Marketing Service’s Specialty Crop Block

Grant Program (SCBGP), were awarded to

six agricultural organizations to undertake

a range of research, development, education,

business planning, and marketing

projects. The grants will leverage an additional

$190,026 in matching funds.

“These important investments will grow

the Vermont economy,” said Agriculture

Secretary Anson Tebbetts. “This year’s

>

and June Buttner became

the proud parents of Allison

and Timothy, and the family

thrived within the mountain

community.

In 1991, Bob Buttner

suffered his first episode

of epilepsy. Although his

severe case of epilepsy was

an extreme ailment that

would rapidly deteriorate

his abilities in speech —

nonetheless to mention

his health — he continued

to be an avid and excellent

golfer who loved people

and never lost his smile.

After many happy years

“These important

investments will grow

the Vermont economy,”

said Tebbetts.

Specialty Crop Block

Grant funding will

promote local food

markets, increase

marketing opportunities

for Vermont

specialty crops within

and beyond Vermont,

support the emerging Vermont saffron

industry, and invest in research to improve

fruit and vegetable production methods

and control pests.”

Since the program’s establishment in

2006, the Vermont SCBGP has invested

over $3.2 million in projects to benefit

Vermont specialty crop producers. The

program supports projects led by producers,

researchers, and agricultural service

providers, including a recently completed

project, Increasing the Competitiveness of

Vermont Wine through Vermont Restaurant

and Agritourism Opportunities.

Buttner: Long-time Killington resident never lost his smile

from page 2

in Killington, June and Bob

moved down to Venice,

Florida in 2016; there they

were able to make wonderful

relationships through

their passion for golf. To

be fair, the Florida heat is

brutal; so they continued to

summer in Killington.

Buttner unexpectedly

passed away in Venice,

Florida on Feb. 26, 2020,

and is survived by his wife

June of 38 years, and their

children: Allison and Robert

(Kozar), Timothy; plus two

sisters: Jeanette Boyle, and

Maryann Bernard, not to

mention many nieces and

nephews. He was predeceased

by his father Arnold,

his mother Emilia, and his

sister Barbara Sandstedt.

While a funeral and

celebration of life are indiscernible

at this time (due to

current pandemic circumstances)

those who knew

and loved Bob Buttner are

asked to lift a glass to his

honor on Oct. 22, at 7 p.m.

It would give his family

great comfort to know that

as a community we can

celebrate his life, in any way

simultaneously.

Economic Recovery

Grants expand

Qualifying businesses can now receive up to $300,000

Governor Phil Scott announced Tuesday,

Oct. 20, an expansion of the state’s

Economic Recovery Grants, utilizing an additional

$76 million in funds from the $1.25

billion the state received from the Federal

CARES Act. These funds are in addition to

the $152 million in economic relief already

delivered to Vermont businesses.

Per Act 154, passed by the Legislature and

signed by Scott, these new grants will be administered

by the Agency of Commerce and

Community Development (ACCD), with

assistance from the Dept. of Taxes.

Vermont businesses and nonprofits,

including sole proprietors, that have seen

a decline in total sales between March and

September of 2020, compared to the same

period in 2019, and who can demonstrate

unmet need, may be eligible to receive an

Expanded Economic Recovery Grant.

Qualifying businesses may now

receive up to $300,000 in total economic

recovery grants.

“With these grants, we are working to

support those sectors most impacted by this

pandemic and help them survive into the

winter months," Scott said.

Businesses and nonprofits that collect

and remit meals and rooms tax or sales

and use tax may apply through the Dept. of

Taxes. All others, including those who have

previously received a grant from ACCD,

may apply to ACCD.

Unlike previous grant programs, the

expanded grant program will not be firstcome,

first-served. Instead, grants will be

distributed in late November after the total

unmet need of all qualifying businesses has

been ascertained.

The Dept. of Taxes application is open

now through the myVTax portal until midnight,

Oct. 30.

ACCD will open its application in the

next week and the window to submit applications

will also be two weeks.

ACCD and the Department of Taxes will

host informational webinars on Wednesday,

Oct. 21 and Friday, Oct. 23 to review

program eligibility, process, and answer

questions from business owners.

SBA and Treasury announce simpler PPP

forgiveness for loans of $50,000 or less

The U.S. Small Business Administration, in consultation with the Treasury Department,

released a simpler loan forgiveness application for Paycheck Protection Program (PPP)

loans of $50,000 or less on Oct. 8. This action streamlines the PPP forgiveness process to

provide financial and administrative relief to America’s smallest businesses while also

ensuring sound stewardship of taxpayer dollars.

“The PPP has provided 5.2 million loans worth $525 billion to American small businesses,

providing critical economic relief and supporting more than 51 million jobs,” said

Secretary Steven T. Mnuchin. “We are committed to making the PPP forgiveness process as

simple as possible while also protecting against fraud and misuse of funds. We continue to

favor additional legislation to further simplify the forgiveness process.”

SBA and Treasury have also eased the burden on PPP lenders, allowing lenders to process

forgiveness applications more swiftly. SBA began approving PPP forgiveness applications

and remitting forgiveness payments to PPP lenders for PPP borrowers on Oct. 2.

Solid Waste Transfer Station

Location: 2981 River Road (Behind Town Garage)

Phone Number: (802) 422-4499

SAT.& MON. (8 A.M.- 4 P.M.)

Collection & transfer of solid waste deposited by residents and property owners of

the Town. (Windshield sticker & punch card needed) Recycling Center for residents

and property owners of the Town. (Free with windshield sticker) If you need to

dispose of solid waste outside the normal operating hours of the Transfer Station

or have construction & demolition debris or other non-acceptable waste, residents

and property owners of Killington can go to the Rutland County Solid Waste District

Transfer Station & Drop-off Center located on Gleason Road in Rutland.

Summer hours began Sat., April 4, 2020.

VOTE

.

Jim

Harrison

State Representative

Bridgewater • Chittenden • Killington • Mendon

Paid for by Jim Harrison for Vermont, 75 Lazy Acres Rd, N.Chittenden, VT


The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020 STATE NEWS • 9

By Robin Alberti

Peak foliage is short-lived in Vermont. A scene from September reminds us of the beauty.

More relief money available for farm food

The state has announced $240,000 in additional

relief funding was made available

through two new Coronavirus Agriculture

Assistance Programs that launched this

past Friday, Oct. 16.

Farmers Market Relief

The Farmers Market Relief program

will provide up to $2,000 to markets that

suffered economic harm as a result of

the global pandemic. Markets must have

earned less than $10,000 in gross revenue in

2019. Markets that earned more can apply

for relief through the Agriculture & Working

Lands Relief program.

Farm to School Relief

The Farm to School Relief program

will reimburse schools and licensed

early childcare providers for equipment

or supply purchases that were necessitated

by the pandemic and that support

the goals of farm to school. Those goals

include local food procurement, school

gardens and agriculture and nutrition

education. Eligible applicants can

receive up to $10,000.

The joint application will allow organizations

to apply for funding from the Agency

of Education’s Covid Relief program as well,

which covers equipment and/or supplies

for school meal programs.

In addition to these two new programs,

both the Agriculture & Working Lands and

the Dairy Relief programs are reopening

this week. The deadline for these programs

has been extended to Nov. 15 and eligibility

has been expanded for Agriculture &Working

Lands. Eligibility changes include: Sole

proprietors are now eligible to apply and

businesses with a net profit between March

2020 and August 2020 can now apply.

Hartford Dollars support

40 local businesses

A new Covid recovery

program aims to boost

Hartford's local economy

with “Hartford Dollars,” an

incentive-based stimulus

program that sells a discounted

special “currency”

to be spent at locally.

Many small Upper Valley

businesses have been

devastated by the economic

disruption caused

by the pandemic. Vital

Communities, the Hartford

Area Chamber of Commerce,

and other Hartford

partners created the program

to increase foot traffic

and sales for struggling

businesses, using a Restart

Vermont Regional Marketing

and Stimulus Grant

from the Vermont Agency

of Commerce and Community

Development.

Economists have long

known that dollars spent

on local businesses add the

most to the local economy.

A recent study commissioned

by Vital Communities

found that, for every

dollar they earn, locally

owned retailers and restaurants

return a share to the

local community that’s up

to four times as big as that of

chain or online businesses.

Hartford Dollars can be

purchased in $30 and $50

values for $15 and $25, respectively

(a 50% discount).

Hartford Dollars are

available for purchase

online on the Hartford Area

Chamber of Commerce

website and at the Quechee

Gorge Visitors Center. You

can print out the currency

or use unique codes.

Hartford Dollars can be

spent at the following participating

businesses:

BE Fit Physical Therapy,

Cloverleaf Jewelers, Deirdre

Donnelly Jewelry Art,

Dynamic Natural Athletes,

Elixir Restaurant, Fat Hat

Clothing Co, Flourish,

Beauty Lab, Jake’s Market &

Deli, JUEL Modern Apothecary,

Little Istanbul, Living

the Dream Alpaca Farm,

Long River Gallery, Massage

Eminence, Northern Stage,

Open Door Integrative Wellness,

Piecemeal Pies, Pizza

Chef, POST, Public House

at Quechee Gorge, Public

House Diner Quechee,

Raq-On Dance, Revolution,

Scavenger gallery, Scout

Hair Design, Small Batch

Design Company, Stern’s

Quality Produce, Steven

Thomas, Inc., Strafford

Saddlery, Sugarbush Farm,

Sunrise Farm, The Collection,

The Skinny Pancake-

Quechee, The Uncommon

Home, Thyme, Trail Break

taps + tacos, Tuckerbox,

Upper Valley Aquatic

Center, Upper Valley Yoga,

Valley Flower Company,

Vermont Institute of Natural

Science, Wicked Awesome

BBQ, and Wolf Tree.

Hartford Dollars need

to be spent by Nov. 30, 2020

and may not be used to

pay for tobacco, cannabis,

alcohol, lottery tickets, fire

arms, tax or tips. No change

will be given for Hartford

Dollars.

Hartford Dollars is a

locally coordinated Covid

recovery project between

the Hartford Area Chamber

of Commerce, Vital

Communities, the town of

Hartford and Hartford Dev.

Corp. and partially funded

with federal funds.

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10 • The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020

Board terminates Windsor High School principal over Facebook post

By Katy Savage/VTDigger

The Mount Ascutney School Board

fired Principal Tiffany Riley after she

posted a controversial Black Lives Matter

comment on her personal Facebook

page.

In the school board’s 50-page decision,

released Friday, Oct. 16, board

members said Riley’s post was seen by

more than 250 people and created “serious

disruption” to the school district.

Many saw the post as “denigrating, derogatory,

or contrary to the movement

for social equity for African Americans,

including the Black Lives Matter movement,”

according to the decision.

The post in question was made June

10 at 10 p.m. In it Riley wrote, “I firmly

believe that Black Lives Matter, but I DO

NOT agree with the coercive measures

taken to get this point across; some of which are falsified

in an attempt to prove a point. While I want to get behind

BLM, I do not think people should be made to feel they have

to choose Black race over human race.”

Riley asked about equity for law enforcement in her post

and added, “Just because I don’t walk around with a BLM

sign should not mean I am a racist.”

The post was widely circulated with hundreds of comments,

including one from Heather Pogue, an educator

and parent in Hartland, who took offense to the post. She

emailed Riley and Superintendent David Baker shortly after

seeing it.

“You began by saying that you ‘firmly believe Black Lives

Matter,’” Pogue wrote in June. “Then literally every single

thing you say after that contradicts that statement — thus

Tiffany Riley

demonstrating that you do not actually

value Black lives … BLACK LIVES ARE

HUMAN LIVES. If you really do ‘firmly

believe that Black Lives Matter,’ you

would understand that ‘choosing the

Black race’ IS ‘choosing the human

race.’”

The next day, Riley deleted the post

and made a follow-up comment on

June 11, where she said: “While selfreflecting,

researching, learning, and

trying to make myself more aware of

the struggles of the BLM movement,

I recently made a public post that

unintentionally offended many people.

I understand the struggles of the Black

lives community and stand with them

in the fight against racism.”

Riley was placed on paid administrative

leave the next day. The school board issued a public

statement, saying Riley’s first post showed “ignorance,

prejudice and lack of judgment” and her second post

showed “no culpability, expressed no specific contrition or

empathy, and showed no humility.” The board stated it was

“resolved that [Riley] would no longer lead the school.”

The board voted unanimously to fire Riley on July 27,

pending a termination hearing, as required by law. The

hearing on Sept. 10 was held in executive session, despite

Riley’s attempts to have the hearing open to the public.

Bill Meub, Riley’s attorney, said the board’s decision will

be appealed in federal court.

“It was not unexpected,” Meub said. “We see it

merely as an attempt to justify improper conduct that

was done in June.”

Cox: Sees agriculture as growth opportunity for population, economy

from page 2

wife, Gay, said that the We share this small piece

divided social-political of earth. We have to let

landscape of the nation is people know they have

being mirrored on a local value, have a conversation

level.

where you look for

“Where I stand, I commonality. Get to

reject the national party the person behind the

problems because both Trump sign.”

parties use inflammatory

language to intentionally

“I was one of those back to

divide us and that

has happened on a local

the land food growing hippies

level,” he said. “I stay

back in 1968,” he said.

away from that.”

But the farmer and

“We were 100,000 strong.

innovator does not

We changed Vermont and

anticipate any problems

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should he be elected. I

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cross people off my list.” visionary and a change

ALL SALES STARTING FINAL! ABSOLUTELY ON MONDAY, NO RETURNS/NO OCTOBEER EXCEPTIONS. 12, Cox 9 lamented AM - the 5 PM agent,” he said. “I never

inability of the nation to say, ‘no,’ I smile until it

Come in, say Masks “hi” and hand “goodbye” sanitizing and required. get a bargain. Temperature will be taken.

see people beyond their happens and if someone

All WE children LOVE must YOU be ALL! accompanied by an adult at all party times. affiliation, and to wants to take the credit, it

NO STORE CHARGES. Cash, local check, Mastercard, Visa ($10 just minimum see a person. with cards). doesn’t matter as long as

ALL WOODSTOCK SALES FINAL! ABSOLUTELY PHARMACY

“They see a Trump it happens. To be seeking

credit is to be filling a

NO RETURNS/NO sign and EXCEPTIONS.

they just dismiss,”

he said. “That’s hole somewhere. You do

19 Central Street, Woodstock, VT

insanity. We’re neighbors. not give to get, you just

Come in, say “hi” and “goodbye” and get a bargain.

WE LOVE YOU ALL!

>

The board found five grounds for terminating Riley, saying

her Facebook post was “diametrically contrary” to her

job of promoting racial equity in the school.

“It is unacceptable conduct for a principal to promote

equality by day and then, on her own time, make a social

media post on Facebook, which undermines that work in

a way that adversely affects the district, and that is exactly

what happened here,” the board said in the decision.

Board members said messages from concerned community

members were “pouring in” to them following

Riley’s post, according to the decision.

Riley initially “refused” to remove her June 10 post

at the suggestion of Baker, the decision said. The board

said the superintendent offered Riley a “lifeline” on

June 11 to work together on a replacement Facebook

post that would mitigate the impact of her first Facebook

post, but she didn’t comply.

“She reverted again to wanting to make a statement

which contained no actual apology,” the board wrote. “The

June 11 post thus played a role in, and likely exacerbated,

the impacts caused by the June 10 post.”

The board further said Riley behaved inappropriately

with community members and made the post “to

air her personal grievances” and “vent frustration over

perceived slights directed at her by a school employee

and former student.”

Graduation controversy

The controversy started when Baker and Riley received

an email from former student Iyanna Williams on June 2.

Williams, one of the few African Americans in the community,

asked them to remove an American flag that was

painted on a hillside for Windsor High School’s graduation

ceremony on June 5, suggesting that the flag had become

an anti-minority symbol.

Riley > 14

give because it’s the right

thing to do.”

Cox has no illusions

about his chances of

winning a Rutland

County Senate seat, given

the more conservative

nature of the county with

Democratic incumbent

Cheryl Hooker running

for reelection. But that’s

not stopping him from

wanting to be an agent of

change at the state level.

If he loses, Cox said he

will just keep doing what

he’s doing, with good

reason.

“I was born white,

male, middle class, three

generations, educated,”

Cox said. “I got five aces,

so if I fail, I really suck.”


Achieving Our Best for YOU

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

Healthgrades® evaluates hospital quality for conditions

and procedures based solely on clinical outcomes. Hospital

and procedures based solely on clinical outcomes. Hospital

and procedures based solely on clinical outcomes. Hospital

and procedures based solely on clinical outcomes. Hospital

and procedures based solely on clinical outcomes. Hospital

and procedures based solely on clinical outcomes. Hospital

and procedures based solely on clinical outcomes. Hospital

and procedures based solely on clinical outcomes. Hospital

and procedures based solely on clinical outcomes. Hospital

and procedures based solely on clinical outcomes. Hospital

and procedures based solely on clinical outcomes. Hospital

and procedures based solely on clinical outcomes. Hospital

and procedures based solely on clinical outcomes. Hospital

and procedures based solely on clinical outcomes. Hospital

and procedures based solely on clinical outcomes. Hospital

and procedures based solely on clinical outcomes. Hospital

and procedures based solely on clinical outcomes. Hospital

and procedures based solely on clinical outcomes. Hospital

and procedures based solely on clinical outcomes. Hospital

and procedures based solely on clinical outcomes. Hospital

and procedures based solely on clinical outcomes. Hospital

and procedures based solely on clinical outcomes. Hospital

and procedures based solely on clinical outcomes. Hospital

and procedures based solely on clinical outcomes. Hospital

and procedures based solely on clinical outcomes. Hospital

and procedures based solely on clinical outcomes. Hospital

and procedures based solely on clinical outcomes. Hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

performance is measured for the most common in-hospital

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

procedures and conditions and adjusted for each patient’s

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

risk factors, such as age, gender and medical condition.

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

Healthgrades analyzes more than 45 million Medicare

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

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medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

medical claims from nearly 4,500 hospitals nationwide.

The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020 • 11


Opinion

12 • The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020

OP-ED

Voters should not

be intimidated

There are strict limits on what

“poll watchers” can do

As Election Day nears, President Trump has increasingly

threatened to instigate voter intimidation. First,

he has insinuated that he will deploy law enforcement

officers to root out election-related crimes at the polls or

call up the National Guard. (Spoiler alert: voter fraud is

vanishingly rare).

The president has abused his authority over law enforcement

before, most notably when he deployed federal

agents — and threatened to deploy the military — in

response to domestic protests earlier this summer.

Now he's calling for his supporters to “go into the polls

and watch very carefully.”

Additionally, the Republican National Committee

(RNC) claims to be gearing up for an aggressive “ballot

security” operation involving 50,000 poll watchers, which

many worry could include plans to intimidate voters. In

2017 a court freed the RNC from a 35-year-old consent

decree that required the committee to obtain judicial approval

of any such operations to ensure that they would not

illegally intimidate, discriminate or interfere with voting.

There is a shameful history in parts of the country of

armed officers, on duty or off, intimidating Black voters

and other voters of color. Their mere presence in polling

places could raise reasonable fears among groups that are

frequently the target of racial profiling and misconduct.

But the law is crystal clear: it is illegal to deploy federal

troops or armed federal law enforcement officers

to any polling place. Federal, state and local laws limit

the role of law enforcement and poll watchers, many of

which also carry severe criminal penalties, prevent anyone

— whether a law enforcement officer or a vigilante

— from harassing or intimidating voters.

“The American people must be prepared for an election

that is unprecedented in our history due to the enormous

increase in mail-in ballots that have been, and will be, cast

as a result of the pandemic,” said Vermont's U.S. Senator

Bernie Sanders. "No one should have to risk their health or

their lives in order to vote, and that is why many millions

are voting through mail-in ballots. One of the worst lies

that Donald Trump is spreading is that there is a massive

amount of voter fraud in this country. That is a total lie

which no election official, Republican or Democrat, can

support. What we are doing with this effort is ensuring that

the American people understand that if American democracy

means anything, it means that every vote must be

counted—no matter how long it takes.”

“President Trump has for months now been laying

the foundation to undermine the election and he has

repeatedly refused to commit to a peaceful transfer of

power if he loses... The most powerful defense against

this type of autocratic behavior in our country is the will

of the American people and that is why we are encouraging

every American to vote and vote early,” said Senate

Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer.

“The election is well underway, and Americans are

voting in droves because they know what is at stake. We

must do everything we can to protect the right to vote,

and uphold the integrity of the election process. That

means pushing back on President Trump’s lies about

mail-in ballots and his efforts to sow chaos,” said Senate

Rules Committee Ranking Member Amy Klobuchar.

"Every American must vote... so we can make it clear

to Trump and the world that America remains a democracy,

the will of the people will always win out, and that

any form of voter intimidation is illegal and will not be

tolerated," said Senator Chris Murphy.

This commentary is courtesy of The Brennan Center for

Justice at NYU Law and an Oct. 18 report summarizing

what to expect on Election Day.

LETTERS

An invasion of

privacy

Jerome is a

well-functioning

Representative

Trump and Biden polling by John Cole, The Scranton Times-Tribune, PA

An endorsement

for Cheryl Hooker

Sad day for

SCOTUS

Dear Editor,

Dear Editor,

Dear Editor,

Think your vote for

Senator Cheryl Hooker Donald Trump and the

the Legislature doesn’t Dear Editor,

of Rutland County has Republican Senate majority

matter? You might want to While serving as a our vote and support. As

have long conspired to

consider the new “red tag” member of the Otter our State Senator, Cheryl tilt the balance of power

rule that prevents hundreds

Valley Unified Union Hooker has championed toward the pockets of

of Vermonters from School Board, I attended the needs of all citizens of billionaires. Now they’re

filling up their heating oil a workshop about how to Rutland County. Should stacking the Supreme

tanks AND shames them strengthen and sustain you contact Senator Court with another hardright,

in front of anyone with public engagement. I Hooker with a need or

corporate-friendly

an internet connection. chuckled when I heard

ringer who will inflict even

Read on if you value your the phrase “crickets and

Our public

more damage on ordinary

dignity and privacy. pitchforks,” referring to

Americans.

H571/Act 76, the above the two typical reactions educational

Throughout her confirmation

hearings, Amy

ground storage tank rule, elected officials receive

was passed in 2016 by a from the public: silence system

Coney Barrett claimed

legislature controlled by and outrage. I was excited (pre-K-16) she was not “on a mission

Democrats and Progressives.

We have come to is not simply possible, but is one of

able Care Act.” That’s a

to learn that engagement

to destroy the Afford-

know it as the fuel tank is the linchpin of democracy.

Working in a true

shamelessly disingenuous

“red tag” rule. Essentially,

Vermont’s

dodge. She has publicly

the “red tag” rule directs unified fashion, the OVUU shining

criticized previous rulings

fuel dealers to inspect school board sought out

upholding the ACA and

your fuel tank prior to every way to connect with attributes. was explicitly selected

delivering heating oil. If the community, to hear

by Trump and a powerful

your tank does not meet the diversity of all voices. issue, she promptly

cabal of big-money

the standards, as set by the Now that my term has responds with accurate lobbyists as a reliable vote

Vermont Agency of Natural

ended I am still ener-

information and assis-

to kill the health care law

Resources, a red tag is gized about community tance.

when it’s challenged in the

affixed, and you cannot engagement, and I want As educators in Rutland

Supreme Court on Nov. 10.

receive heating oil until to share my view of how

County for two de-

If the ACA dies, millions

the tank is brought up to our State Representative, cades, we have seen the of Americans immediately

said standards.

Stephanie Jerome, has financial pressure placed

lose health insurance

The bill, introduced by absolutely nailed this key on Vermont’s public education

amid a deadly pandemic

then Representative Daniel

element of her job.

system from pre-K now spiking in 44 states.

Connor (D), included Representative Jerome through post-secondary The insurance industry

a section on creating a list shares her current work higher ed and technical would again be free to

of those not in compli- efforts on Front Porch training.

punish the 54 million-

Red tags > 13 Jerome > 13 Hooker > 13

SCOTUS > 18


The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020 OPINION• 13

CAPITOL QUOTES

From Republicans denouncing Trump

and the Republic Party...

“Today’s Republican Party has lost its

ideas. What’s the plan on the national

debt, health care, climate change and

many other issues? America needs

parties that are full of ideas, not insults,

division and rhetoric,”

said former Ohio governor John Kasich

“We have a Constitution. And we have to follow

that Constitution. And the President has drifted

away from it... What we have to do now is reach out

to the whole people, watch these demonstrations,

watch these protests, and rather than curse them,

embrace them to see what it is we have to do to get

out of the situation that we find ourselves in now.

We’re America, we’re Americans, we can do this. We

have the ability to do it, and we ought to do it. Make

America not just great, but strong and great for all

Americans, not just a couple,”

said former secretary of state Colin Powell

“I know with certainty from my own

conversations that we have elected

Republicans and elected officials within

the party structure who feel almost the

same way about Donald Trump as I do.

The fact they recognize the things about

him that I recognize but are unwilling

to speak up, unwilling to take a stand,

unwilling to risk losing their next

election, is a reflection unfortunately

of their own character, of their own

integrity. And they deserve to have

voters hold them accountable for that.

I think that there is no question that

the Republican party is going to be held

accountable for voters for many cycles to

come,”

said Former New Hampshire GOP chair

Jennifer Horn

“I think the Republican party is dead as it currently

exists, and it’s going to have to reinvent itself, or be

reinvented by some new and or seasoned voices,”

said former Union Leader publisher Joe McQuaid

LETTERS

Red tags: Voters must demand accountability

>

from page 12

ance for the fuel dealers.

The bill made its way

through the philosophically

lopsided statehouse

and was signed into law

by then Governor Peter

Shumlin (D). Without any

public fanfare, this list was

started and made publicly

available on the VtANR

website!

To make matters worse,

the list continues to

grow as new “red tagged”

tanks are discovered and

reported. Is this the state

government that you

want?

For those of you who

have yet to vote, please,

>

take a little time and reach

out to your current Representatives

and Senators

and find out if they voted

in favor of this invasion

of your privacy. Unfortunately,

you will have to

take them at their word as

they only held a voice vote

every step of the way. That

means there is no actual

record of how they voted.

There is NO accountability.

For the Representatives

and Senators who were

not serving then, ask them

if they are even aware of

“the list.” Again, is this the

state government that you

want?

Jerome: Is ready, willing and able to serve

from page 12

Forum, Facebook and in have to say. When we

The Reporter so that we share our perspectives,

have the timely opportunity

we create the opportunity

to contribute. When to connect with her. This

we are informed about is how we achieve real

upcoming legislation representation.

we can then share our Stephanie Jerome has

perspective with her. also built relationships

Equity is the opportunity

with our town select

for everyone to be treat-

boards and school board.

ed the same way. Whether She collaborates with

you like a good old fashion leaders by showing up

phone call, email or in for meetings with helpful

person meetings, Stephanie

information and an open

has invested in fair ear.

accessibility. She shows With these combined

up in Sudbury, Pittsford efforts she has created a

and Brandon each month. communication system

Her physical presence is that functions for our

a unique action, proving future. She has been

that she wants to hear vigilant and consistent in

what her constituents this responsibility.

Hooker: A candidate with a plan

>

from page 12

We expressed our

serious concern to Senator

Hooker regarding

reduced educational

funding at all levels. As

a former educator, she

recognizes the impact

inadequate educational

funding causes. Most recently

the Vermont State

Colleges were threatened

with the closure of three

of its five full-service

campuses. Fortunately,

due to citizen outrage

and the support from

legislators like Senator

Hooker the closures did

not happen. Our public

educational system (pre-

K-16) is one of Vermont’s

shinning attributes.

To overcome Vermont’s

aging demographics,

we must encourage our

most valuable resource,

our children and young

adults, to make Vermont

their home. Vermont’s

youth are our future

and Senator Hooker has

assured us that she will remain

a champion for education,

including financial

support for our post-secondary

public colleges;

technical schools so that

in-state tuition becomes

affordable for all.

As State Senator, Cheryl

has served on Justice

Oversight, Economic

Development, Housing-

General Affairs, Institutions

and Sexual Harassment

committees. Her

engagement in these

many assignments reflect

As candidate for Representative

of Rutland-6

(Brandon, Pittsford and

Sudbury), I call upon the

Vermont Agency of Natural

Resources to IMMEDI-

ATELY password protect

this list you have created.

Our state government

must respect and protect

the privacy and dignity of

the citizens of Vermont!

Please vote for the

change Vermont desperately

needs!

Dave Soulia

Candidate for Representative

Rutland-6

(Brandon, Pittsford,

Sudbury)

Stephanie works for

the quality of life that

Vermonters deserve.

From childcare to broadband,

small businesses

to outdoor recreation, I

appreciate her advocacy

and her vote. She has

shown the ability to utilize

a self built network

of community engagement

to fuel progress for

Vermonters.

Join me in voting

for Stephanie Jerome,

because the result of

her work is not “crickets

and pitchforks,” but the

dialog of functioning

representation.

Emily Nelson

Brandon

the broad and dedicated

spectrum of her work in

Montpelier on behalf of all

Rutland County citizens.

Senator Hooker sponsored

bills to increase the

minimum wage, provide

paid family leave, protect

victims of domestic

violence from housing

discrimination, limiting

out-of-pocket expenses

for insulin prescriptions

and tuition free scholarships

for Vermonters

to CCV. For the reasons

expressed in this endorsement,

we ask that you

cast your vote for Senator

Cheryl Hooker.

Sincerely,

C. William Petrics

Catherine L. Petrics

Killington


14 • OPINION

The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020

>

Riley: Teacher fired after controversial Facebook post causes disturbance

from page 10

Baker and Riley both told

Williams the American flag

could not be removed. The

former student then asked

to display another symbol

of equity at graduation.

Riley emailed Williams

separately and suggested

statements like “United

We Stand,” “All Means All,”

“Stop the Violence” or “Equity

for All” could appear at

graduation.

Williams replied on June

3, saying, “Phrases like ‘all

means all’ and ‘united we

stand’ are politically correct

ways of saying ‘all lives

matter.’ This statement ‘all

lives matter’ has been used

to take away from pointed

efforts to save Black lives.”

Riley then had an

email exchange with Erin

Rockwood, a behavioral

analyst at the school and

parent who hosted Williams

in her home. Riley asked

Rockwood if she had a Black

Lives Matter flag to hoist

at graduation at Williams’

request.

When no Black Lives

Matter flag appeared at

the graduation ceremony,

Rockwood and Williams

sent lengthy emails to Baker

and Riley on June 8 and 9,

saying they were disappointed.

Williams said she

was reaching out to a

Select Board member

to hold Riley to higher

standards.

Riley posted her

Facebook comment the

next day.

Kabray Rockwood,

Erin’s husband and a

coach at the school, also

shared the post on his

Facebook page, saying

he was disappointed in the

post and couldn’t support

Riley as an administrator.

Rockwood is African

American.

Revealing text exchange

Riley had phone conversations

with David Baker

the next morning. Riley

texted Assistant Principal

Kate Ryan the morning

of June 11, explaining

her frustration with the

Rockwood family, saying:

“Is it OK to say I’m over the

Rockwoods?”

That text message

among others were revealed

with the testimony.

“Kabray completely twisted

a FB post I made on my personal

FB page," she continued.

"My post was related

to my frustration with being

harassed by Iyanna and

Erin about the American

flag painted at graduation

and the school not hoisting

a BLM flag.”

Riley told Ryan she was

refusing to take her Facebook

post down, despite

Baker’s requests.

In the decision school

board members said the

text exchange showed Riley

lacked professionalism in

interacting with the community.

“A school principal

who is unable to check her

frustration with a school

community family, such

that she uses social media

as an outlet to vent that

frustration, is not conducting

herself in a professional

manner,” the decision

states. “Even if a principal

is offended by constructive

criticism, she fails to effectively

lead the school if she

chooses to deal with that

criticism by making reactive

posts on social media.”

However, Meub said

Riley’s Facebook post had

nothing to do with the

Rockwoods or anybody else

in Windsor.

“She was watching the

TV and seeing these violent

demonstrations,” Meub

said. “She was opposed to

the violent demonstrations

“Your statement was

inflammatory; it was

incendiary and quite

frankly it was racist,”

Baker told Riley in

the recorded call.

and it was distracting to the

Black Lives Matter message.”

Meub said Riley has always

fought for equity and

was misunderstood.

Riley became combative

School board chair

Elizabeth Burrows said

one of the most convincing

pieces of evidence the

board used in its decision

was a 26-minute telephone

call Riley recorded between

herself and Baker, which

was part of the testimony.

Burrows said Baker “was

insistent the post be taken

down” in the phone call but

rather than comply, Riley

became combative.

In the call on June 11,

Baker called Riley’s post a

“huge mistake” that hurt

her credibility.

“Your statement was

inflammatory; it was incendiary

and quite frankly it

was racist,” Baker told Riley

in the recorded call.

Baker further told Riley

her post hurt a number of

people in Windsor and she

was being defensive instead

of embracing her mistake.

Riley shot back at Baker.

“I am actually a little

appalled that you are not

standing up for me,” Riley

told Baker. “I am a little offended

that you, my leader

who has known me for

seven years, would even sit

here and suggest that there

is some racist in me. I am a

little offended by that.”

Baker offered to help

Riley craft an apology.

Riley told Baker in a June

11 text message that she

had spoken to a Black U.S.

Marshal friend of hers in

Florida about her Facebook

post. “It’s important to note

he said my post is not racist

at all. His wife is an equity

professor at the University

of Florida and will help me

with my response,” Riley

texted to Baker. “I trust his

judgment on this issue

more than anyone."

“I think that’s fine,” Baker

responded. “Just remember

that you don’t work for that

Marshall [sic] and you

don’t work in Florida.

You need to be responsive

to your school

board and to me. So far

it’s not going well.”

Riley released a

statement Friday night,

Oct. 15, in which she

said: “I did not know

that talking about ‘all

lives’ was ‘code’ for

opposing the nonviolent

messages of the Black Lives

Matter movement. Black

lives have always mattered

to me, which is why I had

been leading equity training

in the school."

Riley, who lives in Reading,

was assistant principal

at Windsor High School for

two years before becoming

principal five years ago with

a salary of $113,000 a year.

Just before the controversy,

Riley was given a two-year

contract extension with a

pay raise.

Riley sued the board on

June 26, claiming she was

wrongfully terminated. The

case was put on hold until

the board’s decision was released.

It will now be picked

back up again.

By Brent Doscher/Spartan

Wrestling was among the sports challenging the athletes to determine who is the "fittest."

Spartan: Pittsfield competition one of two held during pandemic

>

from page 11

others..They competed in Spartan obstacle

course racing, long-distance trail running,

mountain biking, swimming, and more for

the chance to win $100,000.

The four-part series, called the Spartan

Games: Battle of the Fittest,

presented by Harley-Davidson, will

air on Spartan’s YouTube channel in

December. The show will capture

the competition, the rivalries and

the challenges the athletes face as they eat,

sleep and compete together. It’s one way of

keeping the Spartan spirit alive in the age of

social distancing.

“It’s showing the community there’s

going to be a light at the end of the tunnel,”

said Jonathan Fine, Spartan’s head of global

brand communications.

Like other event companies, Spartan has

been hit hard by the Covid-19 pandemic.

About 75% of the company’s 500 employees

have been furloughed and Spartan has lost

more than $100 million.

De Sena said, “We’re in the business of

social un-distancing … we’re in a bit of a

grind and a mess right now.”

The Pittsfield competition was one

of just two events Spartan has held in

the United States since the pandemic. A

Spartan sprint was held in Jacksonville,

Florida in June. This year is a big change for

Spartan, which typically brings together a

total of 1.2 million athletes a year.

“[The athletes] have dedicated their

lives to the sport and the sport just doesn’t

exist right now,” De Sena said.

Spartan has expanded its digital offerings.

Virtual races, online nutrition programs

and workouts have become part of

Spartan’s focus, with 100,000 participating

online events this year, but it’s not the same

as racing together in person.

Fine said the television series is one way

of keeping the community together. “It’s

a community in every sense of the word,”

Fine said. “Everyone lifts each other up

and they stay very connected. The community

is anxious to get back out on the

race course. It’s definitely had a negative

impact.”

The series highlights 12 female and 12

male athletes. All of them stayed in Pittsfield

under strict rules for the series. They

had to quarantine prior to coming, had

to test negative for Covid-19 and couldn’t

leave the farm.

The rules applied to athletes and staff,

“We’re in the business of social

un-distancing," De Sena said.

including De Sena, who was stuck at his

home in Boston because he didn’t get a

negative Covid-19 test in time to be at the

farm.

As Spartan shifts toward a digital focus,

De Sena, who is also a founder of the Endurance

Sports Coalition, is lobbying congress

for funding.

“Without specifically targeted help from

the federal government, Endurance Sports

may not survive the Covid-19 pandemic,”

the coalition’s website states. “Many events

with long and proud histories do not have

the resources to weather this storm and will

not be able to ramp up again next year.”

“Right now there’s just a standstill,” De

Sena said.

By Brent Doscher/Spartan

Riverside Farm became home to 24 athletes.


The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020 OPINION • 15

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802-422-BOOT • 937 Killington Road


Calendar

16 • The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020

DRIVE-IN MOVIE: ‘HOCUS POCUS’

IN RUTLAND & BRANDON

OCT. 23 & 24 AT 7 P.M.

Courtesy ofParamountTheatre

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 21

StoryWalk at Roger Clark Memorial Library

all day

Come to Pittsfield’s Roger Clark Memorial Library and jump, run,

and play your way through our latest (and maybe last for the year!)

StoryWalk! This time, it’s “Mole Music” by David McPhail, a beautiful,

touching picture book about how music unites us all. The fun starts

right outside the door! Story available for viewing 10/16-27, weather

permitting.

Fit and Fun

9:30 a.m.

Marilyn Sheldon holds exercise classes at the Godnick Adult Center.

Low impact, aerobic, and stretching routines; move to lively, sing-along

music. 1 Deer St. in Rutland. Advance registration required, call

802-773-1853.

It Takes a Village: A Community of Parents

10 a.m.

Meet on the patio outside Taso on Center St. (Wonderfeet is rain location)

for a stroller/backpack/baby wearing walk around downtown.

Mighty Micro-Purchase: The Sole Source Super

Power

10 a.m.

Entrepreneurs and small business owners seeking their first contract

– or their next one – with the federal government. In this webinar, you

will learn how a federal buyer can purchase up to $10,000 from you

immediately. More info or to register visit vtptac.ecenterdirect.com/

events/745.

Poultney Trailblazers Teen Bike Club

12:30 p.m.

The Poultney Trailblazers is a new mountain bike club for teens ages

13-18. Join Slate Valley Trails and Coach Caitrin every Wednesday

through Oct. 28 for coaching, riding and camaraderie.

Vermont Farmers’ Market (Rutland)

3 p.m.

The Vermont Farmers Market and The Rutland County Farmer’s Market

combine forces at Depot Park, in the heart of downtown Rutland.

Everyone Eats

4 p.m.

Free meals served up at the Vermont Farmer’s Food Center from 4-6

p.m. More info at vermontfarmersfoodcenter.org/everyone_eats

Kim Wilcox and Guest

5 p.m.

Performing live at The Public House, 5813 Woodstock Rd in Quechee.

Card Making Workshop

5:30 p.m.

Hartford Town Hall. Send your sentiments from the heart with a

handcrafted card! Each month focuses on a different theme with

exciting new creations. No experience necessary. Supplies are

included. Ages 13+. Class size is limited to 10, with a minimum of

3. Register at hartfordvt.myrec.com/info/activities/program_details.

aspx?ProgramID=30073

Open Mic Night

5:30 p.m.

At the Skunk Hollow tavern with host Pete Meijer every Wednesday on

the outdoor stage (weather permitting) from 5:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Ryan Fuller

5:30 p.m.

Performing live at Roots the Restaurant.

Comfort Food Pairing Dinner

6 p.m.

A 4 course pairing dinner of rib-sticking favorites and some fantastic

wines from Mary Taylor Selections at Brix Bistro in Rutland.

Rutland Roundtables

6 p.m.

Share your story and vision for the future of Rutland. Rutland

Roundtables take place virtually over Zoom/phone. Register at

rutlandroundtables.org

Rigged: A Voter Suppression Panel

7 p.m.

Next Stage Arts Project produces a panel discussion about voter

rights and voter suppression. Virtual, register at flipcause.com/

secure/cause_pdetails/OTg2NDM=

THURSDAY, OCT. 22

ARC Rutland Area eBay Charity Auction

All day

Help ARC with its mission To advocate for the right of individuals with

developmental disabilities. It’s easy. Log on to: charity.eBay.com. Type

in: ARC Rutland Area. Make a bid! Auction runs through Oct. 31

Groovy Grannies line dance

9:30 a.m.

Intermediate line dance, mostly country with a little variety. No partner

is needed. Marilyn Sheldon leads at the Godnick Adult Center. 1 Deer

St. in Rutland. Advance registration required, call 802-773-1853.

Circle of Parents

10 a.m.

Virtual. contact Cindy Atkins, Family Support Programs Coordinator, at

802-498-0608 or catkins@pcavt.org.

Clean Water Budget Public Hearing

12 p.m.

Please RSVP by completing this online form (found at dec.vermont.

gov/water-investment) by Wednesday, Oct. 21, 2020 at 4 p.m. Public

attendees may sign-up to comment during the hearing.

Everyone Eats

4 p.m.

Free meals served up at the Vermont Farmer’s Food Center from 4-6

p.m. More info at vermontfarmersfoodcenter.org/everyone_eats

King Arthur Junior

5 p.m.

Performing live at Neal’s Restaurant in Proctorsville.

Circle for Foster & Adoptive Families

5 p.m.

Virtual. Contact Heather Niquette, Family Support Programs Coordinator,

at 802-498-0607 or hniquette@pcavt.org

Nurturing Skills For Families

5:30 p.m.

Virtual. Contact Cindy Atkins, Family Support Programs Coordinator, at

802-498-0608 or catkins@pcavt.org

Winter League kick off

6 p.m.

Play cornhole with Exit 4 Cornhole in Randolph. Located in the warehouse

at Rain or Shine, 14 Hull St. Bags fly at 6 p.m. $5 cover, $10

league fee.

BYO(D)Mic

6 p.m.

It’s open mic night on Thursdays now at Du Jour VT, but you gotta’

bring your own mic to spit on.

Team Trivia with Casey Murray

6 p.m.

Test your knowledge at The Public House, 5813 Woodstock Rd in

Quechee.

Jim Yeager

6 p.m.

Summer Music Series presents local musician Jim Yeager every Thursday

rain or shine at the Barnard Inn and Tavern. No Cover - Donations

appreciated.

Stained Glass Branches

6 p.m.

In this introductory stained glass class, students will spend their

evening moving through the techniques of selecting colors and cutting

glass leaves, building with copper foil and soldering onto wire. Each

student will make one lovely wire branch of glass leaves to bring home

and will leave with the basic knowledge of the stained glass process.

No experience necessary/ All levels welcome. Teaching Artist, Dayna

Sabatino $65 +$10 materials. Register: info@whiterivercraftcenter.org

Implicit Bias Training Workshop

6:30 p.m.

Sponsored by the Chittenden Select Board on via zoom from 6:30-8:30

p.m. For more information head to chittendenvt.org or call (802) 483-

6647.

Coping Through the Covid-19 Crisis

7 p.m.

A talk for parents and caregivers about normal and excessive reactions

to pandemic-related stress and isolation featuring Dr. Michael Friedman,

hosted by Windsor County Mentors. $10 registration fee for each

session. To register, visit wcmentors.org/event.html.

Virtual Knit Knite

7 p.m.

Six Loose Ladies and Friends host a knitting circle from Chester via

Zoom. More info available at facebook.com/events/973117296469197.

Circle for Kinship & Guardianship Families

8 p.m.

Virtual. Contact Heather Niquette, Family Support Programs Coordinator,

at 802-498-0607 or hniquette@pcavt.org

FRIDAY, OCT. 23

• Harvest at the Farm

10 a.m.

Learn about 19th century harvest activities at Billings Farm

& Museum! Harvest-themed activities, demonstrations, and

crafts offered each weekend.

Prana Yoga

10:30 a.m.

Tammy Brown instructs at the Godnick Adult Center. Advance registration

required by calling 802-773-1853.1 Deer St. in Rutland. Stay for

free meditation at 11:30 a.m.

Meditation

11 a.m.

Led by Brian Salmanson at the Godnick Adult Center. 1 Deer St. in

Rutland. Free.

Valley Quest

1 p.m.

Meet at Datamann in Wilder. Join Vital Communities’ Valley Quest,

Coordinator, Sandy Gmur, along with Roy Black, lifelong resident of

Wilder and a member of the Hartford Historical Society, on a guided

exploration of the historical village of Wilder. Learn about many of the

old buildings from the 1890s and early 1900s that were built to house

people who worked at the paper mill that used to exist on the Connecticut

River here. This guided Quest is appropriate for families and

adults, all are welcome. register at hartfordvt.myrec.com/info/activities/

program_details.aspx?ProgramID=29865

Chris Pallutto

5 p.m.

Performing live at Moguls Sports Pub.

Ryan Fuller

5 p.m.

Performing live at the Foundry at Summit Pond.

Aaron Audet

5:30 p.m.

Performing live at Roots Restaurants in Rutland.

Jack Snyder

6 p.m.

Summer Music Series with Barnard’s own local musician Jack Snyder

at Barnard Inn. No cover, donations appreciated.

King Arthur Jr

6 p.m.

Friday Nights at Flannels Bar & Grill, $3 Draft Beer and live music by

King Arthur Junior!

Trivia in the Tap Room: Vermont

6:30 p.m.

Pub trivia with Rick Davis at the Harpoon Riverbend Taps & Beer

Garden in Windsor.

Live Music

6:30 p.m.

Catch a live performance at Taso on Center in Rutland.

Jenny Porter

6:30 p.m.

Performing live at Du Jour VT in Ludlow.

• Drive-in Movie: “Hocus Pocus”

7:00 p.m.

Showing at the Rutland Fairground Drive-in. $25/vehicle.

Tickets at Paramountvt.org.

Calendar > 17


The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020 CALENDAR • 17

Calendar:

from page 16

>

DJ Dirty D

9 p.m.

Spinning live in Rutland’s Center Street Alley.

SATURDAY, OCT. 24

Cars and Coffee

7 a.m.

Enjoy a cup up of coffee, look at cars and show off your own at Forest

Dale Grocery in Brandon.

Winter Clothing give-away

8 a.m.

For those in need of free, warm winter clothes. The event will take place

under the Equinox tent on the Burr and Burton Academy field out front.

Rain or shine. Set up is the evening before 4-6 p.m. for those that want

to drop off clothes in good condition or help with set up and organizing.

Women’s Mountain Biking Fundamentals

9 a.m.

Hartford Town Forest. To get the most out of this clinic you should feel

comfortable riding off-road on wide dirt or gravel roads or double track

trails, and be willing to develop the skills and confidence to ride novice

terrain with roots, rocks, tight corners, trees and steep sections. We will

work on improving your riding technique and learn new tips for getting

over obstacles, crossing bridges, improving your speed and safety in

corners and overall being able to manage your bike more confidently

on the trails. Perhaps you would just like to refine the riding skills you

already have? If so - this 1-day clinic is for you. Register at hartfordvt.

myrec.com/info/activities/program_details.aspx?ProgramID=30108

NEACA Rutland Gun Show

9 a.m.

This Rutland gun show is held at Holiday Inn and hosted by NEACA

Inc. All federal, state and local firearm ordinances and laws must be

obeyed. $9 adults, $8 seniors, kids free with adult.

Mental Illness and Recovery workshop

9 a.m.

For peers, family members, professionals, and community members

who want to learn more about mental health and recovery via Zoom.

For more information or to register, visit namivt.org.

Norwich Farmers’ Market

9 a.m.

Revamped for social distancing. Pre-ordering is encouraged but not

required. More info is available on the web site explaining new procedures

- norwichfarmersmarket.org

Village Green Market

9 a.m.

The Vermont Farmers Market and The Rutland County Farmer’s Market

combine forces at Depot Park, in the heart of downtown Rutland

Summit Fall Saturday Morning Soccer

9 a.m.

Morning soccer program for kids in Pre-K, Kindergarten, 1st and 2rd

Grade at the Rutland Polo Fields on E. Pittsford Rd in Rutland.

2020 Fall Work Days (distanced and outside)!

9 a.m.

HALLOWEEN FUN RUN

IN RUTLAND

SUNDAY, OCT. 25 AT 9 A.M.

Courtesy ofRutlandRec.Dept.

Bethany Birches Camp needs your help to prep camp for the coming

winter and summer. Come out to enjoy the beautiful fall weather and

do a little outdoor work. Camp will also provide individually wrapped

desserts

RACS Craft Festival at the Vermont State Fairgrounds

10 a.m.

Shop handmade toys, Pink Zebra Candles, Lilla Rose, Tupperware,

Color Street Nails, LulaRoe, Scentsy, Usborne Books, Masks, Goat

Milk Products, Lotions & Soaps, Canned Goods, Jewelry, Wrought

Iron, Wreaths, Knit, Fabric, Wire & Resin Crafts and more at the Vermont

State Fairgrounds from 10-3 p.m. For more info Contact Lindsay

at lcote@racsonline.org.

• Halloweeny activities

10 a.m.

All day long, get in the Halloween spirit at VINS Nature center.

Scales and serpents, a bird costume contest and more. Visit

vinsweb.org/events for a complete list.

Sammy B

4 p.m.

Performing live at Outer Limits Brewing in Proctorsville.

Hartland Turkey supper

4:30 p.m.

Drive-thru at the UU Church, Hartland 4 Corners from 4:30 - 6:30

p.m. for a complete turkey dinner with all the fixins’ $12 per person

Cash (exact change appreciated); Checks made out to FUSH (First

Universalist Society of Hartland); no credit cards please, no pre-orders.

8 Brownsville Rd in Hartland.

Super Stash Bros

5 p.m.

On the deck at Moguls Sports Pub. 2360 Killington Rd. in Killington.

• Hoots & Howls

5:30 p.m.

Family-friendly, non-scary guided tours at VINS Nature Center.

Tour groups will be limited to 12 participants. Be sure to

register for a tour that can accommodate your entire group at

eventbrite.com/e/hoots-howls-tickets-119944123101

Ryan Fuller

5:30 p.m.

Performing live at the Foundry at Summit Pond.

Rick Redington and The Luv

6 p.m.

A Drive-in concert at the Wild Fern in Stockbridge.

Jenny Porter

6 p.m.

Performing live at Flannels Bar and Grill in Mendon.

Aaron Audet

6 p.m.

Performing live at the Bomoseen Lodge.

Chris Pallutto

6:30 p.m.

Catch a live performance at Du Jour VT in Ludlow.

• “Abbott & Costello Meets Frankenstein”

7 p.m.

Showing at the Heald Auditorium in the Ludlow Town Hall.

Free, donations gladly accepted.

• Drive-in Movie: “Hocus Pocus”

7:00 p.m.

Showing at the Rutland Fairground Drive-in. $25/vehicle.

Tickets at Paramountvt.org. This event is sold out.

• Drive-in Movie: “Hocus Pocus”

7:00 p.m.

Showing at Brandon’s Estabrook Park. $25/vehicle.

Tickets at Paramountvt.org.

Sat night with Dj Mega

10 p.m.

Spinning live in Rutland’s Center Street Alley.

SUNDAY, OCT. 25

NEACA Rutland Gun Show

9 a.m.

This Rutland gun show is held at Holiday Inn and hosted by

NEACA Inc. All federal, state and local firearm ordinances and laws

must be obeyed. $9 adults, $8 seniors, kids free with adult.

• Halloween Fun Run

9 a.m.

Two sessions, beginning at 9 and 9:30 a.m. Prizes for the best

costume. Hosted by the Rutland Rec Dept. Sign up at signupgenius.com/go/9040548a9aa2aa5fb6-halloween1.

• Family Halloween

10 a.m.

Costume parade, trick-or-treating, hay rides and more activities

at Billings Farm & Museum. Children in costume receive

free admission when accompanied by a ticketed adult.

Worship Service

11 a.m.

Live worship, moving testimonies, and a brief message at Vermont

Marble Museum in Proctor. The service will be recorded, but not live

streamed. Everyone is encouraged to wear a mask and practice social

distancing. A public restroom is available. Some chairs will be provided,

but you may want to bring your own. Register to participate at reopen.

church/r/H16lucFd

Jim Yeager

12 p.m.

Performing live at Mont Vert Cafe in Woodstock.

45 tournament fundraiser for Dale

12:30 p.m.

Women of the Moose chapter 241 is holding a fundraiser for Dale

Plankster who as been diagnosed with Cancer. Basket raffle and lottery

raffle at Moose Lodge 1122, 78 Center St. in Rutland.

• The Devil’s Cabinet: The Eddy Family of

Spirit Mediums

2 p.m.

Author Jason Smiley will lead a program on the Eddy family of

Chittenden at the Woodstock History Center.

Jazz Night

5 p.m.

The Summit Pond Quartet performs live Jazz, Sundays at the Foundry

at Summit Pond.

Live music sip n stretch

6 p.m.

Sammy B headlines at DG Bodyworks in Proctorsville. $25 for 90 minutes

of live music while working thru the stress in our bodies. Denise

Gebroe will lead you thru a mobility class filled with freedom of movement,

increasing range of motion in the body’s joints, and flowing the

struck junk out of the body. Bring your own bevvie and light snacks will

be provided. Open to the first 8 people to contact Denise @ denisegebroe@gmail.com.

MONDAY, OCT. 26

Village Walk West Hartford

9 a.m.

Registration is required. Meet at the West Hartford Library by 9 a.m.

The group will enjoy a 60 minute walk through the West Hartford Village.

This is a great way to get outside, exercise, and socialize with

others. Register at hartfordvt.myrec.com/info/activities.

Fit and Fun

9:30 a.m.

Marilyn Sheldon holds exercise classes at the Godnick Adult Center.

Low impact, aerobic, and stretching routines; move to lively, sing-along

music. 1 Deer St. in Rutland. Advance registration required, call

802-773-1853.

Nurturing Skills For Families

10 a.m.

Virtual. Contact Heather Niquette, Family Support Programs Coordinator,

at 802-498-0607 or hniquette@pcavt.org

Nurturing Program for Families in Substance

Abuse Recovery

4 p.m.

Virtual. Contact Cindy Wells, Family Support Programs Coordinator, at

802-498-0611 or cwells@pcavt.org

Everyone Eats

4 p.m.

Free meals served up at the Vermont Farmer’s Food Center from 4-6

p.m. More info at vermontfarmersfoodcenter.org/everyone_eats

Nurturing Fathers Program

5 p.m.

Virtual. Contact Amber Menard, Family Support Programs Coordinator

at 802-552-4274 or amenard@pcavt.org

King Arthur Junior

5:30 p.m.

Performing live at Flannels Bar and Grill in Mendon.

TUESDAY, OCT. 27

Intro to VT PTAC

10 a.m.

VT PTAC is a government-funded program assisting Vermont small

businesses who want to sell their goods or services to the government,

whether it is federal, state or local. Visit accd.vermont.gov/economicdevelopment/programs/ptac

for more info.

Calendar > 18


18 • CALENDAR

The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020

>

Calendar:

from page 17

Line Dance: Country

9:30 a.m.

Marilyn Sheldon holds dance classes at the Godnick Adult Center.

Advance registration required, call 802-773-1853. Come for a fun cardiovascular

workout with both new and old-line dances. No experience

necessary. No partner needed. 1 Deer St. in Rutland. $5

Jim Yeager and Friends

5 p.m.

Performing live at The Public House, 5813 Woodstock Rd in Quechee.

Sammy B

5:30 p.m.

Performing live at Flannels Bar & Grill in Mendon.

Circle of Parents in Recovery

5:30 p.m.

Virtual. Contact Cindy Atkins, Family Support Programs Coordinator, at

802-498-0608 or catkins@pcavt.org

Pickleball Fall Season

6 p.m.

Located at the Maxfield Outdoor Sports Complex in Hartford. They

have equipment on-site that can be loaned out if you need it. Ages

16+. Purchase a pass for the entire season or drop-in anytime for

a $2/visit. hartfordvt.myrec.com/info/activities/program_details.

aspx?ProgramID=30089

Did we miss a local event?

Email djdavehoff@gmail.com and we’ll be sure to

include your next musical event on this page!

If you have another event coming up, email

events@mountaintimes.info.

Road construction report for the week of Oct. 19

Here is a list of road construction projects happening

throughout central Vermont. Please remember to drive

safely in all work zones. Lives depend on it.

I-91 Hartland – Motorists will see lane reductions

Northbound and Southbound, with reduced speeds enforced

in the work zone for bridge replacement operations.

Bethel – The bridge along VT 12 is open to traffic. Travelers

should expect one-way alternating traffic for guardrail

installation. Minor delays

Bristol – Paving operations will finish this week along

VT 116, and project clean-up activities will begin. Expect

minor delays in the vicinity of paving operations.

Cavendish – Weathersfield – A roadway project along

VT 131 continues. Motorists will encounter multiple areas

of one-way alternating traffic. Minor delays should be

expected.

Fair Haven – Rutland – Guardrail work this week on US

4 from the NY State line to Exit 5 at US 7 south of Rutland.

One-lane traffic will be maintained in each direction.

Hartford – Crews continue drainage and box cutting

work along US 5 and Sykes Mountain Ave as part of the

Hartford Roundabout and Sidewalk project. Minor traffic

interruptions are expected on Beswick Dr. and Ralph

Lehman Dr.

Pittsford – Multiple activities for roadway reconstruction

along US 7 this week. Lane shifts and new traffic

patterns are now in effect. Motorists should proceed with

caution as they navigate new traffic patterns and lane shifts

throughout the project. Expect intermittent stoppages of

traffic throughout the week, with minor delays. A speed

reduction to 35 mph remains in effect.

Windsor – Hartland – A paving project continues along

US 5. Travelers should anticipate areas of alternating oneway

traffic with some delays.

>

SCOTUS: GOP Nominee will unbalance court

from page 12

plus Americans with

preexisting conditions

by drastically increasing

their premiums or denying

coverage altogether.

And the number of

Americans with preexisting

conditions will only

grow as many Covid-19

survivors suffer serious

ongoing health issues.

Don’t count on Trump

or the GOP to replace the

ACA with a better health

care bill. No new set of

protections will magically

appear if he manages to

win.

Nor would the loss

of the ACA be the only

bad news flowing from

her appointment to the

court. The ideological

bias of Barrett, who

worked for the GOP in

the Bush v. Gore debacle

and whose father was an

attorney for Shell Oil, far

outweighs her judicial

credentials. Her extremist

views and corporate

ties are a danger to American

democracy and the

civil liberties of everyone.

Her writings and associations

foretell any number

of catastrophic court

decisions.

She even declined to

acknowledge climate

change as scientific fact.

Barrett’s immediate

value to Trump also

goes beyond the ACA.

She would not commit

to recusing herself from

an election challenge by

Trump, nor so much as

confirm that a president

who decisively loses

The ideological bias of Barrett... far

outweighs her judicial credentials.

reelection must leave the

White House peacefully,

as required by law.

With an entrenched

majority of hard line

conservatives stacking

the court, Barrett’s appointment

represents the

tragic corruption of our

most trusted institution,

in service to special interests.

Our future depends

on electing a Democratic

president and

Congressional majority

to counterbalance such

a dangerous bias and

restore representation for

the people.

Robin Vaughan

Kolderie

Hoosick, New York

Sick days: Children sent home with minor ailments causes challenges

>

from page 1

she’s supposed to stay clear of inperson

work if she has even mild

symptoms.

“I mean — I get it, I completely

get it. But it just makes it hard, especially

with 3-year-olds who have

allergies, and colds, and teething

and meltdowns,” she said.

In Essex, Growing With Wonder

child care center director Dawn Irwin

said she and her staff decided a strict

ban on runny noses was untenable.

So, in consultation with staff from the

Department of Health, Irwin said her

center came up with a way to triage

mucus. A clear runny nose that needs

to be wiped only five times or fewer in

half an hour can stay. The rest go.

“If it’s discolored, or like really

goopy, that’s the kind of runny nose

that we just say, ‘Nope, you can’t be

here today’,” Irwin said.

Sierra Metcalf, a teacher at the Seed

Sprout Bloom center in Berlin, said

child care workers dread making the

call to parents, who are more often

frustrated than understanding.

‘Some parents cry … some are rude’

“Some parents cry because they

get so stressed out because they just

got back to work,” Metcalf said. “Some

of them are really rude about it. Like,

‘this is ridiculous, these are runny

noses.’ It puts a strain on us, because

we feel horrible about it.”

The center also lets snot-nosed

children stay so long as the mucus is

clear and does not run freely. But too

many still get sent home, Metcalf said,

and state officials have been thus far

unwilling to offer further leniency.

Employees tell parents they have little

say in the matter, she said, and encourage

them to call the state directly

to register their complaints.

Jay Nichols, executive director of

the Vermont Principals’ Association,

said he’s increasingly hearing about

this from schools and parents.

“If you’re only going to school a

couple of days a week, for example,

and you miss one of those days

because you have a little bit runny

nose, you’ll find that it’s really very

unfortunate. The problem is with

this disease — it’s really hard to tell.

So we’re gonna err on the side of

safety,” he said.

Vermont is not alone in wrestling

with this problem. In Canada,

British Columbia has gone so far as

to remove cold symptoms entirely

from its student health checklist,

and Ontario just relaxed its own

screening protocols.

Vermont needs to watch the real-world

impacts of its guidelines,

said Ben Lee, an associate professor

of pediatrics at the University of

Vermont and pediatric infectious

disease specialist at UVM’s Children’s

Hospital.

But for now, Lee said he favors a

more cautious approach, and said

the current guidelines have the added

benefit of lessening the transmission

of other illnesses that usually spread

rampantly in school and child care

settings.

“Having a flu outbreak in a school

or having an outbreak of another

respiratory virus could, in the era of

Covid … place enormous burdens on

schools and families and providers as

well,” he said.

Vigilance is crucial now

The Vermont Health Department

does not anticipate removing runny

noses from its symptom list, according

to agency spokesperson Ben Truman.

But it is working on providing

“additional guidance on when runny

noses should/should not be excluded

from school,” he said, which should

be released around mid-October.

Truman said the current guidance

allows for students with no fever and

allergy symptoms that cause coughing

and clear runny nose to attend

in-person, if they have medically

diagnosed allergies and follow treatment

plans.

Sophia Hall, president of the Vermont

State School Nurses Association,

said she’d rather not see screening

protocols relaxed. If the state has

escaped the worst of the pandemic,

she said, it’s because it’s been vigilant

about mitigation measures.

She agrees a clear runny nose is

less concerning than one that’s discolored

and congested, and particularly

one that’s accompanied by other

symptoms. But she said she’d still

send a kid home and then do some

fact-finding to assess how quickly

they could come back to class.

“I have had parents tell me, ‘It’s

just a cold, it’s just allergies.’ You

know, all you can do is try to try to

help them understand that this is a

pandemic, and we have to do things

differently,” she said.


The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020 PUZZLES • 19

WORDPLAY

‘Popcorn’ Word Search: Find the words hidden vertically, horizontally, diagonally and backwards.

SUDOKU

Solutions > 36

How to Play

Each block is divided by its own matrix of nine cells. The rule for solving Sudoku

puzzles are very simple. Each row, column and block, must contain one

of the numbers from “1” to “9”. No number may appear more than once in any

row, column, or block. When you’ve filled the entire grid the puzzle is solved.

BAG

BALL

BUTTERY

CARAMEL

COB

CONCESSION

EXPLODE

FAIR

FLUFFY

KERNELS

KETTLE

MICROWAVE

MOVIE

OIL

PAN

POPCORN

POPPER

POT

SALT

SNACKS

SPICES

STEAM

STORAGE

STRINGS

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

Solutions > 36

CLUES ACROSS

1. Battered corners:

dog-__

6. __ Mater: one’s

school

10. National capital

14. Frogs and toads

order

15. Bathrooms

(French)

17. Praise

19. Witch

20. Consume

21. Pork and lamb are

two types

22. Rocky peak

23. Women’s

undergarments

24. From end to end

26. Bed sheets

29. South Sudanese

king

31. Dislike immensely

32. Diving seabird

34. Breathe noisily

35. Full of roots

37. Inside

38. Small island in

a river

39. Tear into pieces

40. “CSI” actor George

41. Make less dense

43. Derogatory term

for a country native

45. Pike and pickerel

genus

46. Important in

respiration and other

biochemical reactions

(abbr.)

47. Belgian city

49. “The Joy Luck

Club” author

50. Essence of “Aloha”

53. Suggestions

57. One who

overindulges

58. Expression

59. Maize dough

60. Make into leather

61. British noblemen

CLUES DOWN

1. One of two or more

people or things

2. Small, deerlike

water buffalo

3. Part of a ladder

4. Unit of work

5. Patriotic women

6. Fragrant essential

oil

7. Aggressive,

uncouth man

8. One thousandth of

an inch

9. Brisk and cheerful

readiness

10. Serving no

practical purpose

11. Prevent from going

forward

12. Camera part

13. Former CIA

16. Colorless, odorless

gas

18. Long division of

time

22. Atomic #73

23. Make a bleating

sound

24. The kids love him

25. Female condition prior to

menstrual period

27. Founder of Sikhism

28. Sudanese swamp

29. He/she can help with your

finances

30. Part of the human body

31. Mortar trough

33. Greek island

35. Change pagination

36. Queens hip hop group

37. Precursor to the EU

39. A way to go on

42. Slender marine fish

43. Georgetown’s mascot

44. Farm state

46. Military leader (abbr.)

47. Russian river

48. Teams’ best pitchers

49. In a more positive way

50. Long French river

51. Reactive structures in

organic chemistry

52. Distinctive practices

53. Male gypsy

54. When you hope to get there

55. Men’s fashion accessory

56. Journalist Tarbell

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LivingADE

20 • The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020

This week’s living Arts, Dining and Entertainment!

“The Whales” by Brian Sylvester and Ailsa Diancia has been a fixture on Center Street in Rutland since 2014.

By Vermont Arts Council

RUTLAND COUNTY—There’s still plenty of art and

culture to discover across Vermont this fall with room for

spatial distancing, indoors and out. Vermont autumns

are a magical time to discover something new, as “nothing

gold can stay.” Get out there and fortify your soul

for the months ahead with art with our recommended

Covid-safe excursions around Vermont. What makes

them Covid-safe? Clear Covid-precautions are posted

for all visitors — you know the drill: masks, sanitizer, and

social distancing. We’ve also got “Picnic Pairings” for

premium picnic spots.

The largest town in the Addison/Rutland Creative

Zone is Rutland, with a population of 16,495, making

it the third largest city in Vermont. Rutland’s art and

culture scene is doing its best to keep folks active during

Covid, in a safe and socially distanced way of course.

There’s still plenty of art and culture to discover.

A stroll through the historic district of downtown

Rutland brings you to several works of art from local,

national and international artists. There are murals,

sculptures and galleries are a-plenty. Take a mural

scavenger hunt downtown to spot a peregrine falcon,

a whale, a giraffe, elephants and more on several of the

more 100 buildings in downtown that are listed in the

National Register of Historic Places.

What’s with all the marble? Rutland County was

once the center of the world’s largest marble manufacturers.

You’ll find plenty of notable marble sculptures

on the downtown streets on the Rutland Sculpture

Trail. New pieces are added periodically. The most

recent is a bust of Rotary International founder, Paul

Harris. Next up is a tribute to Martin Henry Freeman,

a Rutland native who was the first African American

college president in the country. A variety of outdoor

sculpture is also available for viewing in the Sculpture

Enjoy an art excursion in the time of Covid

Courtesy of Vermont Arts Council

Garden at the Carving Studio and Sculpture Center at

636 Marble St., in West Rutland.

The work of jurried artist members and featured

member artist Alexis Kyriak are showcased in the

upstairs galleries of the 1890s historic mansion that is

Chaffee Art Center, through Oct. 30, at 16 S. Main St.,

Rutland. Hours: 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday and Friday,

and by appointment.

Have you worked up an appetite? Head over to Roots,

55 Washington St. in Rutland, where during prime

dinner hours, from 5:30-8:30 p.m., Thursdays through

Sundays, one or two artists paint mural-sized art on the

walls of this industrial space. Each artist paints for a total

of twelve hours over the course of four nights. With 3,000

square-feet, there’s also enough room to listen to live

music from soloist musicians. It’s Covid time, so be sure

to make reservations at rootsrutland.com or by calling

802-747-7414.

A little farther south from Rutland, head to River Road

in Pawlet to view the “drive-by, quarantine-friendly,

art-in-a-Vermont-hayfield” series from EveNSteve. The

exhibit includes several large standing screens featuring

photography and artwork of best-selling author Eve O’

Schaub and art photographer Stephen Schaub. The exhibit’s

intent is to provide visitors with hope in a time of

uncertainty. You can drive by or park and walk the mown

pathways in the field, for free. Visit evensteve.com/ for

more information and directions.

In Middlebury at Henry Sheldon Museum,1 Park St. is

“A Sculpture Haven,” works of three Vermont sculptors

in the museum’s garden, which is open from sunrise to

sunset. The museum is temporarily closed in accordance

with Covid-19 restrictions.

Picnic Pairing: Happy Valley Orchard, 217 Quarry

Road, Middlebury. Pick your own apples through October.

Fresh made cider donuts everyday, and apple cider

pressed at the orchard. Open everyday from 10 a.m.- 5:30

p.m. until Oct. 31.

A short drive east from Middlebury, you’ll find the Robert

Frost Interpretive Trail where you can enjoy the woods,

fields and poetry. Frost’s poems are mounted along this

easy 1.2 mile loop. The first 0.3 mile is along a wheelchairaccessible

boardwalk. Directions from Middlebury: travel

south on Route 7 to where it intersects with Route 125.

Travel east on winding Route 125 for 5.8 miles. The parking

area is on the right.

If it’s Sunday, head to Poultney for Stone Valley Arts at

Fox Hill, 145 E. Main St., and its exhibit of contemporary

painters, Painters Choose Painters, through Nov. 22. Also

featured is artist Sarah Elworthy and author Kara Beste in

an exhibit of original batiks created by Elworthy with text

by Beste from their book, “What Leads Her,” highlighting

23 women who lead in a multitude of ways. The book aims

to inspire and empower girls ages 8 and up. The number

of visitors are limited inside the building to 10, and face

masks and social distancing are required. Gallery hours on

Sundays are 1-4 p.m. or by appointment.

In Brandon, the Brandon Artists Guild gallery exhibits

A Space Within, a solo show of ceramics by artistmember

Dasha Kalisz. Dasha’s newest work features

wheel-thrown and altered organic forms based on the

human body. The show continues through Nov. 1. The

galley also showcases a selection of fine art and crafts

from more than 30 member artists. Media include

painting, sculpture, printmaking, ceramics, glass,

jewelry, metalwork and more. Brandon Artists Guild is

located at 7 Center St. Hours: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday

through Saturday; 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. Covidsafety

protocols must be followed here as well.


The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020 LIVING ADE • 21

Abbott & Costello meet a host of monsters on the big screen in Ludlow.

Saturday, Oct. 24 at 7

p.m.—LUDLOW— In order

to prepare for the Halloween

season, FOLA will

screen the classic comedy,

“Abbott and Costello

Meet Frankenstein” in

the Heald Auditorium of

Ludlow Town Hall on Saturday,

Oct. 24 at 7 p.m.

In keeping with the tradition

of their comedy routines,

the film will feature

virtually every major horror

movie monster, including

Dracula, Wolfman, and the

Invisible Man in addition

to Frankenstein’s monster

– all in a hilarious romp of

comedic fun as only Abbott

and Costello can create.

Portraying freight handlers,

Abbott and Costello

must deliver a box, oddly

shaped like a coffin, to a

museum. From that point

on, the story introduces

Dracula and friends as

they attempt to restore a

brain into Frankenstein –

intending to use Costello’s.

The usual haunts for

this procedure follow

with Abbott and Costello

visiting a castle where the

monster awaits his new

brain, the Wolfman seeks to

destroy Dracula, a beautiful

woman scientist working

with Dracula, and finally a

masquerade party where

Dracula is able to entrance

Abbott and Costello.

The finale is one that

will draw laughs even from

those not particularly

pleased to view a monster

film. Vincent Price makes

an uncredited “appearance”

to culminate the

misadventures that Abbott

and Costello endure.

For all the odd-ball

adventures in this comedy,

Courtesy of FOLA

FOLA features ‘Abbott & Costello Meets

Frankenstein’ to usher in Halloween

the film has been ranked

very highly. In 2001, the

United States Library of

Congress deemed this film

“culturally, historically, or

aesthetically significant”

and selected it for preservation

in the National Film

Registry, and in September

2007, Reader’s Digest selected

the movie as one of

the top 100 funniest films

of all time. The film is 56th

on the list of the American

Film Institute’s 100 Funniest

American Movies.

The movie is open

to everyone and is free;

donations are appreciated.

Water is provided

by the United Church of

Ludlow. All guests are

asked to wear masks and

maintain appropriate

social distances. Call

802-228-3238 for

information.

Rutland Art Ramble returns for Part II

Residents and visitors to Rutland may have noticed “Rutland Art Ramble” signs on

windows along the downtown streets of our familiar city beginning in August. These

signs point to art exhibits designed to enliven, challenge and entertain. Those exhibitions

ran through September. October launches a new arrangement of exhibits.

Rutland Art Ramble is a collaboration between organizations dedicated to fostering

the arts and artists throughout the Rutland region. Many downtown business

owners have lent store windows, so anyone walking in the city will be able to enjoy a

wide variety of works including sculpture, painting, video and installation.

Rutland Art Ramble is confirmation of the fact that, although we may be facing

hardship, our city is as vital as ever. During this period of social distancing, anxiety

and upheaval is when we need art most. Rutland Art Ramble brings art to the

streets, where we can all enjoy it.

Rutland Art Ramble organizers think of it as an outdoor museum, offering a new

venue for art and design that highlights the extraordinary talent and tenacity of the

organizations and artists who are our community partners, neighbors and friends:

the Carving Studio, Castleton U. Bank Gallery, the Chaffee Art Center, The MINT,

Stone Valley Arts, Vermont Creative Network and 77ART. The exhibitions will remain

in place through Nov. 21.

Windsor County Mentors to host virtual

seminars on Covid-related stress

Thursday, Oct. 22 at 7 p.m. – WINDSOR

– Families, caregivers, and health professionals

are seeing the devastating mental

health impact that the Covid-19 pandemic

is having on youth. The isolation, worry,

and uncertainty of the past six months,

coupled with anxiety over the challenges

of a new school year, are causing changes

in behavior among children that raise concerns

about their wellbeing.

Windsor County Mentors, the youth

mentoring organization that serves all of

Windsor County, will host two virtual seminars

with renowned guest speaker Matthew

Friedman, M.D., Ph.D., a leader in the fields

of psychiatry and PTSD research. These

seminars – Coping Through the Covid-19

Crisis – will be geared to two audiences,

one for parents and caregivers and one for

health and human services professionals,

as described below:

Thursday, Oct. 22, 7-8:30 p.m.

A talk for parents and caregivers about

normal and excessive reactions to pandemic-related

stress and isolation.

Thursday, Oct. 29, 7-8:30 p.m.

A discussion for professionals about normal

and excessive reactions to pandemicrelated

stress and isolation.

For both audiences, Dr. Friedman will

discuss how we react to prolonged isolation

and will frame what are considered normal

reactions to stress as compared to excessive

reactions, up to and including PTSD.

He will also discuss helpful supports and

interventions. In each seminar there will be

time for audience participation and general

discussion.

Matthew Friedman, M.D., Pd.D., is

Professor and Vice-Chair for Research in

the Department of Psychiatry at the Geisel

School of Medicine at Dartmouth. He

served for 24 years as executive director

of the US Department of Veterans Affairs’

National Center for PTSD. There is a $10

registration fee for each session. To register,

visit Windsor County Mentors’ event page

at wcmentors.org/event.html. For further

information, contact Windsor County Mentors

at 802-674-5101.

Green Mountain National

YOUR NEXT GOLF ADVENTURE IS HERE

Visit gmngc.com for the current

playing and clubhouse guidelines.

call the pro shop today to book

a tee time 802-422-4653

Gracie’s Grill is open for inside & patio serVice

Barrows-Towne Rd, Killington, VT 05751 | (802) 422-4653 | www.gmngc.com


22 • LIVING ADE

The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020

Charles Platt: a commemorative retrospective currently

showing at the AVA Gallery and Art Center in Lebanon, NH

Inn at

L ng Trail

LEBANON, NEW HAMPSHIRE—AVA Gallery and Art

Center, located at 11 Bank Street in Lebanon, New Hampshire,

is pleased to present the exhibit Charles Platt: A Commemorative

Retrospective, on display from Oct. 23 through

Nov. 27 in their named gallery spaces, Rebecca Lawrence

Gallery, the Clifford B. West Gallery, the E.N. Wennberg Gallery

and the Elizabeth Rowland Mayor Gallery.

A graduate of Harvard College and the Graduate School

of Design at Harvard, Charles Platt (1932 –2020) was an

award-winning architect in New York City, founding the

firm Platt Byard Dovell White.

Platt’s career as an artist was closely aligned with his

career as an architect. He approached both with the same

highly tuned visual ability, seeking to bring the balance and

beauty of the world into focus for those around him.

Platt began his work in collage in 1959, when he

discovered a pair of workman’s overalls hanging over

a blank piece of canvas. He was immediately struck by

the image, and it later became his first piece, “The Hired

Man.” Since then, he has furthered this study of the

relationship and meaning of objects, working them into

compositions with a focus on the nature of the objects

themselves, saying that he formalized and arranged

“memories and thoughts through the discarded clothes

and objects of places and people’s lives.”

Though his palette was an accidental array of discarded

clothing, blankets, and household items, there was nothing

random about his arrangements–they were meticulously

composed descriptions of a space he had sketched

or imagined. In describing his process, he stated that after

the initial conception of an idea “there follows an extended

period of development, sketching, refining the whole and

describing individual parts of the work, tracing, retracing,

and adjusting, pretty much the way [he worked] as an

architect.” He has been quoted as saying that he was an

architect by profession but an artist by choice.

Upon viewing his work, one delights in the pure abstract

composition and, upon entering more closely, one discovers

fun and humor, with objects splayed and spliced,

then layered and juxtaposed together. The objects are

restructured, cut open to reveal their inner mechanics, and

transformed to new shapes with new associations. It is in

these small details that Platt evoked powerful responses in

the viewer, sometimes using them to narrate the piece. The

relationship of the patterns is as important as this evocativeness:

the viewer’s eye is intentionally drawn to certain areas,

exposing things that may have been missed at first glance.

The Platt family has had a long association with the Upper

Valley that began when the artist’s grandfather, Charles

A. Platt, moved to Cornish, New Hampshire, with other

creatives who gravitated to the area following the arrival of

sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens in the late 19th Century.

This loose group of artists, writers, performers, architects

and landscape designers became known as the Cornish

Art Colony. Charles A. Platt designed homes in Cornish and

Plainfield for other members of the colony and was famous

for integrating the interior with the exterior through

architectural elements in the gardens he also designed.

The family has maintained a presence in Cornish for four

generations. Platt was also a member of the board of trustees

and former president of the board for the Augustus

Saint-Gaudens Memorial at the National Historic Site.

Please join AVA Gallery from Oct. 23 - Nov. 27 and

celebrate the work and life of Charles Platt. For further

information, contact Heidi Reynolds, heidi@avagallery.

org, or 603-448-3117.

McGrath’s

Irish Pub

Inn at

L ng Trail

Courtesy of AVA Gallery and Art Center

Courtesy of AVA Gallery and Art Center

Deer Leap

2.2 mi. from

start to

Pub Open Daily

Noon - 8 p.m.

Serving Lunch & Dinner

Take-Out

Starting 10/25

Mon.–Fri. 3-9 p.m.

Sat. & Sun. 12-9 p.m.

cGrath’s

cGrath’s

Rte. 4 between Killington & Pico

802-775-7181

innatlongtrail.com

Rooms & Suites available

McGraths

McGrath’s

McGrath’s

Irish

Irish

Pub Pub


The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020 LIVING ADE • 23

Vermont Fish & Wildlife participates in eastern woodcock

migration research cooperative

The Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department

has joined the Eastern Woodcock

Migration Research Cooperative, an

international research collaboration

developed to better understand the

migratory ecology of the American

woodcock along the Eastern seaboard

through the use of Global Positioning

Systems (GPS) technology.

A total of 18 woodcock were captured

and outfitted with GPS units in three locations

across Vermont in September with

field work led by PhD students from the

University of Maine with support from

members of Vermont Fish & Wildlife, U.S.

Fish & Wildlife Service, U.S. Forest Service,

the Vermont chapter of the Nature Conservancy,

and Audubon Vermont.

Directed by the University of Maine, this

The goals of the program include identifying

when woodcock initiate migration, migrational

stopover sites, duration of migration for

individuals, and survival during migration.

study is designed to provide precise and

timely GPS data to track the seasonal movement

and habitat selection of American

woodcock during pre-migration periods

in the Northeast and southern Canadian

provinces, southerly migration paths and

stopovers, wintering periods in southeastern

states, and reverse migration routes

to northern breeding grounds. The goals

of the program include identifying when

woodcock initiate migration, migrational

stopover sites, duration of migration for

individuals, and survival during migration.

“This is a very important step to better

understand woodcock in Vermont,” said

Migratory Game Bird Biologist David Sausville.

“Our involvement is a critical piece in

understanding their behavior and population

distribution across the entire eastern

management region. Wildlife biologists

have observed a slow decline in woodcock

numbers during the past four decades in

the Northeast. We know very little about

their migration patterns and habitat

utilization relative to spring breeding and

pre-migration periods in the fall.”

“The information obtained from this

study will answer questions about habitat

use during various seasons and life

stages, as well as migration mortality that

will help us to fine tune our hunting season

dates and work with habitat management

partners to provide critical habitat

needs during all stages of the woodcock

lifespan here in Vermont.”

Vermont Fish & Wildlife purchased five

GPS units, with funding from state and federally

matched funds. Vermont cooperative

partners providing

additional

financial contributions

for

the remaining

units came from

the U.S. Fish &

Wildlife Service,

U.S Forest Service, Wildlife Management

Institute, and the Vermont chapter of the

Nature Conservancy.

“We look forward to learning valuable

information obtained from these 18 individuals

and we plan to return with another

round of deployments next year as we

continue to refine and improve our woodcock

management and habitat programs,”

added Sausville.

For information on becoming a Vermont

cooperative partner, email David Sausville

at david.sausville@vermont.gov

To learn more about the Eastern Woodcock

Migration Research Cooperative, visit

woodcockmigration.org and click on the

“Migration” tab to follow Vermont’s study

of the birds as they migrate to southern

wintering grounds.

Courtesy of VTF&W, by Chris Ingram

Vermont Fish & Wildlife, along with state and federal conservation partners captured

and outfitted 18 American woodcock with GPS tracking units as part of the Eastern

Woodcock Migration Research Cooperative study to better understand woodcock habitat

selection and migration patterns across the eastern seaboard.

NAMI Vermont offers mental illness

and recovery workshop online

Saturday, Oct. 24 at 9 a.m.—The National

Alliance on Mental Illness of Vermont

(NAMI Vermont) will offer the Mental

Illness and Recovery workshop for peers,

family members, professionals, and community

members who want to learn

more about mental health and

recovery. This workshop will be

offered on Saturday, Oct. 24, 9

a.m. –3 p.m. via Zoom.

This workshop will provide

basic information about

major mental illnesses including

schizophrenia, bipolar disorder,

major depression, panic disorder,

post-traumatic stress disorder and borderline

personality disorder.

The workshop will also provide an

overview of effective treatments for mental

health conditions, accessing services

throughout the state, evidence-based

Oct.

practices available in Vermont, coping

strategies and crisis prevention, recovery

and helpful community resources.

The NAMI Vermont Mental Illness

and Recovery workshop is free and is

made possible by a grant from the

Dept. of Mental Health. For

more information or to register,

visit namivt.org.

The National Alliance on

Mental Illness of Vermont

(NAMI Vermont) is the state

chapter of the National Alliance

on Mental Illness, the nation’s largest

grassroots mental health organization

dedicated to improving the lives of

individuals and families affected by mental

illness. Through the dedicated efforts of

grassroots leaders, NAMI focuses on three

cornerstones of activity: support, education

and advocacy.

24

FULL BAR

Craft Cocktails

Expansive VT Beer & Cider Menu

NOW OPEN

KILLINGTON DISTILLERY &

STILL ON THE MOUNTAIN CoCktail Bar

47 Old Mill Rd, Killington, VT | 802-422-8200

Serving Full Dinner & Drinks – 3p-9p (Wed. - Sun.)

Outdoor Patio & Indoor Dining Available by Reservation

Medical Grade HEPA filters installed indoors for your added safety.


24 • HALLOWEEN

The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020

Boo-m! A Halloween

fireworks spooktacular at

the Fairgrounds on Oct. 31

Saturday, Oct. 31 at 7:15

p.m.—RUTLAND—The

Paramount Theatre and

the Vermont State Fair,

two long-standing Rutland

not-for-profit organizations,

have announced

that they are partnering

on a fireworks show

that will be free

for the community

on Saturday,

Oct. 31 at

7:15 p.m. at the

historic fairgrounds

located

on South Main

Street in Rutland.

Boo-m! A Halloween

Fireworks Spooktacular

was created in response to

the news that the longstanding

Rutland Halloween

Parade was grounded

due to the ongoing pandemic.

Free parking on the

infield of the fairgrounds

Oct.

31

Courtesy of Paramount Theatre

will be available. Gates

open at 6 p.m. Attendees

must adhere to all social

distancing standards

including the wearing of

masks if they are to travel

further than an arm’s length

of their vehicle.

This event is

“Drive In” style –

attendees will

be asked to

stay at their vehicle.

Those in

attendance at

the fairgrounds

will be able to tune

their radio to 89.3FM

to enjoy a soundtrack

specifically created for

this event including a

pre-recorded kick-off featuring

Rutland’s famous

Drum Journeys of Earth

who traditionally lead

the Rutland Halloween

Parade with their Drumming

Halloween Skellies.

The first 300 children to

arrive at the fairgrounds

will be provided an

individually bagged, safe

goodie-bag.

For those looking to

extend their Halloween

night out, rounding out

the evening will be a

screening of the Disney

classic “Halloweentown”

(rated G – 84 minutes)

at the Drive-In located

at The Vermont State

Fairgrounds. Tickets are

$25 per vehicle and are

available at ParamountVT.

org. Availability is limited.

Entrance for the Drive-In

is gained at the fair’s Park

Street entrance located,

just east of the railroad

crossing. Gates open for

movie parking at 6:45 p.m.

and the movie starts at

7:30 p.m.

Submitted

Pittsfield puts pumpkins on the Green

Help spread some spooky Halloween cheer! Bring your decorated pumpkins (no

candles, please) to Roger Clark Library in Pittsfield during the week of Oct. 26, and

library ghouls will place them on the Village Green for all to enjoy! Call or email for

details, 746-4067 or pittsfieldvtlibrary@gmail.com.

Courtesy of Wilson Castle

Eerie, twilight view of Wilson Castle in Proctor. Tours are available weekends thru Oct.

Wilson Castle offers tours and

more in time for Halloween

By Brooke Geery

Wilson Castle,a 19th Century baronial

estate, 2970 West Proctor Road in Proctor,

is a historic home-turned-museum. The

haunted property is ideal for this time

of year, and accordingly, offers several

opportunities to get in the spirit. In

downtown Rutland, witness the Castle’s

impressive jack-o-lantern display, illuminated

nightly from 6-11 p.m. at the corner

of Center Street and Merchants Row. Over

150 pumpkins are on display, using very

realistic artificial pumpkins so they can

be enjoyed Halloween after Halloween.

If you dare, venture to Proctor to

tour the museum yourself. The castle is

open for tours until Nov. 1, Friday-Sunday

10 a.m.-5 p.m. Or, if you’re looking

for a more intensive experience,

don’t miss the Wilson

Castle Restoration Extravaganza

on Saturday, Oct. 24.

Warner Paranormal and

Jason Baker Photography are

proud to present you with an

incredible opportunity to explore

and photograph Wilson

Castle. Two options for photo

workshops with Jason, 1-3

p.m. or 3-5 p.m. Only 10 spots

per session will be available.

Then, join Warner Paranormal

and an amazing group of

guest investigators to investigate

the four full floors of this

massive castle. Learn from

some of the best in the field, as

you get to experience various

tools and techniques used

in ghost hunting. Feel free to

bring any of your own equipment

as well.

There will be 20 general

admission tickets, which grant

you 7 p.m.-midnight at the

Castle. Ten “VIP” tickets will

also be available for hardy

types who want to spend an

overnight at Wilson Castle! Bring a sleeping

bag/air mattress and spend the night

chasing ghosts.

Anyone that purchases both a photo

workshop and investigation ticket will get

their choice of tee shirt or $20 kickback

discount! All money raised will go toward

the restoration and preservation of this

amazing property. Light refreshments

and pizza will be served, no alcohol is

permitted on site. No refunds unless the

city cancels due to Covid restrictions, if

that is the case all tickets will be refunded

via Eventbrite.

Reserve your ticket at eventbrite.

com/e/wilson-castle-restoration-extravaganza-tickets-119830541375.

Courtesy of Rutland Downtown Partnership

Jack-o-lantern display on the corner of Center and

Merchants Row, downtown Rutland


The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020 HALLOWEEN • 25

Courtesy of Billings Farm & Museum

Celebrate a family Halloween

at Billings Farm & Museum

A spooktacular, physically distanced event!

Sunday, Oct. 25 at 10 a.m.—WOODSTOCK—Billings Farm & Museum will host

a family Halloween on Sunday, Oct. 25, from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. Children in costume

receive free admission when accompanied by a ticketed adult.

Children are invited to march in a costume parade. Parades will be held at 11:30

a.m. and 1:30 p.m., and all children will receive a ribbon. Costumed children can enter

to win a drawing for a $10 gift certificate to the museum shop. Drawings will be held

following each costume parade. Families can also enjoy a hayride around the farm,

offered from 11 a.m.–3 p.m.

Activities for all ages include pumpkin bowling, making spider web necklaces, plus

family-friendly Halloween story readings. Families can venture through the “not too

spooky” Farm Life exhibits while searching for the hidden pumpkins. Children are invited

to trick-or-treat safely from 12–3 p.m. at candy stations located around the farm.

Don’t fear the annual pumpkin carving contest! Guests vote for their favorite in

the ‘spooktastic” display of decorated pumpkins created by our staff! See the roasted

pumpkin seed display and take home the Billings Farm recipe.

Visit the dairy bar for a special fall treat – cider and doughnuts! Also available:

pumpkin ice cream and Billings Farm cheese.

Note that as of July 1 this year, the Billings Farm & Museum site is limited to a

maximum capacity of 225 people at one time, per state of Vermont guidance, and face

coverings must be worn by all guests over the age of 2 everywhere on the site, including

the outdoors. For more about visiting Billings Farm safely, updates on site capacity,

and to learn which spaces are open, visit billingsfarm.org/safety.

The Farm & Museum is open Thursdays-Tuesdays, from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. through

Oct. 31, November – February weekends and vacation weeks or online anytime at

billingsfarm.org/billings-farm-at-home.

Halloween windows on parade

in Rutland beginning Oct. 24

Explore the rich history

of the Rutland Halloween

Parade in windows

throughout Downtown

Rutland!

Over 25 windows in the

business district will display

photos from past Halloween

parades beginning

Saturday, Oct. 24 through

Halloween.

Past parade participants

Casella Construction

and Killington Resort

sponsored creative stationary

float displays that

can be found at 72 Merchants

Row and the Boys

and Girls Club, located at

Halloween may look a little different

this year, but you can still find ways to celebrate

safely. Please be sure to stay home

if you or anyone in your family is sick.

Making these three things a part of your

Halloween plans will make everyone safer:

6-foot spaces

Keep a safe 6-foot distance between

your family and other people who don’t

live in your household. Bring a flashlight

so you’re visible in the dark. You can get

71 - 75 Merchants Row.

Visitors will be able

to view a map of all the

photo locations as well

as a spooktacular display

of jack o’lanterns, parade

costume parts, and more

at the Mead Building on

the corner of Center Street

and Merchants Row.

Special thanks to

Awesome Graphics, Zip

and Royal Barnard, and

friends of Norma Montaigne

for organizing this

event. It is presented in

honor of the memory of

Norma Montaigne. Norma

Montaigne, aka “Anything

Graphic,” was one of

the artists and designers

who contributed greatly

to the annual Halloween

Parade, including her

creation of the costumes

and props for the Drum

Journey “Skelly Dancers”

and other displays.

More than that, Norma

Montaigne was known

and loved for her overall

creative genius, generosity

and her love of life, fun

and all the creatures in

the universe. She was a

beautiful person and we

are honored to remember

her at this special event.

State provides guidance on

celebrating Halloween safely

creative if you’re giving out candy. Need

ideas? Have bags ready to grab on your

front steps or slide the treats down a

“candy slide!”

Masks on Faces

Make sure you and your family are

wearing a face mask or covering when

you go out. Find a fun

way to make it part of

your costume. But don’t

wear a costume

mask over your

face mask, which

could make it harder to

breathe.

Uncrowded Places

Keep your group small and skip

crowded indoor parties. If you’re trickor-treating,

and one street or neighborhood

seems too busy, move on to the

next one.

VINS invites family for hoots and howls

Satruday, Oct. 24 at 5:30 p.m.—

QUECHEE—Join in on a family-friendly

guided tour thats visits different fun,

non-scary stations around the

VINS Nature Center. You’ll

be delighted by Lindsay

and her Puppet Pals

and treated to a tale or

two by the storyteller

Simon Brooks. Explore

the power of

wind at the science

station and solve

a mystery during

the nature skit. The

Forest Canopy Walk

will intrigue both big

and small as tour guides

lead you through the trees

illuminated by jack-o-lanterns.

Get ready for a night of costumed fun and

spooky intrigue!

Tour groups will be limited to 12 participants.

Be sure to register for a tour that

can accommodate your entire group.

Evening tours begin at 5:30 p.m., depart

every 10-minutes, and are 40-minutes

in duration. Please

note that your selected

tour begins promptly

at the specified start

time. Plan to arrive

10-minutes early to

check-in and prepare

for your tour.

If you are late, they

cannot guarantee

access to another

tour due to health

and safety concerns.

Cost is $12.50 for

adults and $10 for kids

and seniors. Reservations are

required; walk-ins are not permitted. Get

tickets now at eventbrite.com/e/hootshowls-tickets-119944123101

Courtesy ofVINS


Food Matters

26 • The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020

Mid-way up Killington Access Rd.

Tuesday - Sunday, 11:30 a.m. - 9 p.m.

vermontsushi.com • 802.422.4241

HIBACHI | SUSHI | ASIAN

GET IN A DECK

DAZE!

INDOOR & OUTDOOR

SEATING

OPEN DAILY AT NOON

GREAT FALL MENU!

CALL FOR TAKE OUT

802-422-5665

COME TRY OUR

“GREATEST HITS” MENU!

CELEBRATING 20 YEARS

MISO

HUNGRY

CHECK IT OUT

ONLINE AT

LOOKOUTVT.COM

IN KILLINGTON

Back Country Café

The Back Country Café is a hot spot

for delicious breakfast foods. Choose

from farm fresh eggs, multiple kinds of

pancakes and waffles, omelets or daily

specials to make your breakfast one of a kind. Just the right heat Bloody

Marys, Mimosas, Bellini, VT Craft Brews, Coffee and hot chocolate drinks.

Maple Syrup and VT products for sale. Check Facebook for daily specials.

(802) 422-4411.

Birch Ridge

Serving locals and visitors alike since 1998, dinner

at the Birch Ridge Inn is a delicious way to

complete your day in Killington. Featuring Vermont

inspired New American cuisine in the Inn’s dining

room and Great Room Lounge, you will also find

a nicely stocked bar, hand crafted cocktails, fine

wines, seafood and vegetarian options, and wonderful house made desserts.

birchridge.com, (802) 422-4293.

Casey’s Caboose

Come for fun, amazing food, great drinks, and

wonderful people. A full bar fantastic wines and

the largest selection of craft beers with 21 on tap.

Our chefs create fresh, healthy and interesting

cuisine. Try our steaks or our gourmet burgers

made with 100% Vermont ground beef, U.S. lamb or home-grown pork— we

have 17 burgers on our menu! Try our famous mac n’ cheese with or without

lobster. Yes! the train is still running... caseyscaboose.com,(802) 422-3795.

McGrath’s

Irish Pub

Dream Maker Bakers

Dream Maker Bakers is an all-butter, from-scratch

bakery making breads, bagels, croissants, cakes

and more daily. It serves soups, salads and sandwiches

and offers seating with free Wifi. At 5501

US Route 4, Killington, VT. No time to wait?

Call ahead. dreammakerbakers.com, (802) 422-5950.

Inn at Long Trail

Looking for something a little different? Hit up

McGrath’s Irish Pub for a perfectly poured pint of

Guinness, Inn live music at on the weekends and delicious

food. Guinness not your favorite? They also

L ng Trail

have Vermont’s largest Irish Whiskey selection.

Visit innatlongtrail.com, (802) 775-7181.

Jones’ Donuts

Offering donuts and a bakery, with a

community reputation as being the best!

Closed Monday and Tuesday. 23 West

Street, Rutland. See what’s on special

at Facebook.com/JonesDonuts/.

Call (802) 773-7810.

Killington Market

Take breakfast, lunch or dinner on the go

at Killington Market, Killington’s on-mountain

grocery store for the last 30 years.

Choose from breakfast sandwiches, hand

carved dinners, pizza, daily fresh hot panini, roast chicken, salad and specialty

sandwiches. Vermont products, maple syrup, fresh meat and produce along

with wine and beer are also for sale. killingtonmarket.com (802) 422-7736

or (802) 422-7594.

Lookout Tavern

Celebrating 20 years of fun, friends and good

times here in Killington! Everything from soup

to nuts for lunch and dinner; juicy burgers, fresh

salads, delicious sandwiches and K-Town’s best

wings. Your first stop after a full day on the Mountain

for a cold beer or specialty drink and a great

meal! lookoutvt.com, (802) 422-5665.

Moguls

Voted the best ribs and burger in Killington,

Moguls is a great place for the whole

family. Soups, onion rings, mozzarella

sticks, chicken fingers, buckets of chicken

wings, salads, subs and pasta are just

some of the food that’s on the menu. Free shuttle and take away and delivery

options are available. mogulssportspub.com (802) 422-4777.

Peppino’s

Chef-owned since 1992, Peppino’s offers

Neapolitan cuisine at its finest:

pasta, veal, chicken, seafood, steak,

and flatbreads. If you want it, Peppino’s

has it! Aprés-hour daily features half price appetizers and flatbreads.

Reservations accpeted. peppinosvt.com, (802) 422-3293.

Seward’s Dairy

If you’re looking for something truly

unique and Vermont, check out Seward

Dairy Bar. Serving classic homemade

food including hamburgers, steaks, chicken, sandwiches and seafood. Craving

something a little sweeter? Check out their own homemade 39 flavors of

ice cream. Vermont products also sold. (802) 773-2738.

Still On the Mountain

Killington Distillery & Still on the Mountain

Cocktail Bar invite you to enjoy our handcrafted

small batch spirits inspired from the blissful Killington

region. Pair your cocktail with one of

our delectable food offerings made from sustainably

sourced, local ingredients. Sit back,

sip on your cocktail, and dig into a delicious meal in the lap of nature.

killingtondistillery.com, (802) 422-8200.

OUR DECK IS STILL OPEN!

2910 KILLINGTON ROAD, KILLINGTON VT

802-422-LOOK LOOKOUTVT.COM


The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020 FOOD MATTERS • 27

Sugar and Spice

Stop on by to Sugar and Spice for a home style

breakfast or lunch served up right. Try six different

kinds of pancakes and/or waffles or order up

some eggs and home fries. For lunch they offer

a Filmore salad, grilled roast beef, burgers and

sandwiches. Take away available.

www.vtsugarandspice.com (802) 773-7832.

Taso on Center

Taso On Center serves up a menu that is always

changing and evolving, with options like

traditional American, Mexican, and Asian cuisine.

Enjoy eclectic food, craft beers or cocktails

at Taso on Center in historic downtown Rutland!

(802) 775-8270.

Sushi Yoshi

Sushi Yoshi is Killington’s true culinary adventure.

With Hibachi, Sushi, Chinese and

Japanese, we have something for every age

and palate. Private Tatame rooms and large

party seating available. We boast a full bar with

20 craft beers on draft. We are chef-owned and operated. Serving lunch

and dinner. Delivery or take away option available. Now open year round.

www.vermontsushi.com (802) 422-4241.

Get ready for the wood

burning season now

October is ideal for stove maintenance,

wood stockpiling

The Northeast Hearth, Patio and Barbecue Association issued a prewinter

alert urging households in the New England and New York region to

prepare now for the wood-burning season.

Long-range forecasts call for a severe winter in the Northeast, with

lower than average temperatures predicted as well as a potentially major

blizzard in February. Over 300,000 homeowners in the Northeast use wood

as their primary heating source, with countless others using it as a secondary

heating source.

Pre-winter equipment maintenance and cleaning, equipment testing

and safety inspections, and stockpiling adequate firewood and wood

pellet fuel are critical steps in being prepared for a winter of heavy woodburning

stove or hearth use. Only licensed professionals should perform

this work. A comprehensive directory of licensed and verified professionals

for wood-burning appliance maintenance is available from NEHPBA.

“Our member retailers and service providers are the most experienced

industry professionals in the U.S., and every one of them will say a comprehensive

pre-winter routine is critical to safely and efficiently burning

wood fuel,” said Joel Etter, president of NEHPBA and senior wholesale

account manager for Hearth & Home Technologies. “October is an ideal

time to conduct this routine, and we are advising families and households

all over the Northeast how to do this effectively.”

A good checklist for pre-winter inspection and maintenance on woodburning

stoves includes steps such as:

• Disassemble and closely inspect all stove pipe sections.

• Empty all soot and debris from interior of pipe sections.

• Inspect for creosote build-up and use wire brush tool to remove.

• Clean out firebox completely.

• Clean glass window on door and inspect closely for cracks.

• Clean out ash drawer.

Open

7:30 am- 3 pm – Sun. Mon. & Thurs.

7:30 am- 4:30 pm – Fri. & Sat.

Check out our NEW patio & outdoor seating!

All butter from scratch bakery making

breads, bagels, croissants, cakes and more.

Now serving soup, salad and sandwiches....

outdoor seating with Wifi and games area.

Pre-order now for

Grace Church’s

take-out

harvest dinner

Grace Congregational Church in

Rutland will offer a take-out turkey dinner

with all the trimmings on Saturday, Nov.

14 from 4:30-6 p.m. in their West St. parking

lot. During your scheduled pickup,

servers will bring your order to your car to

enjoy at home. Tickets will be required at

pickup.

For $15, enjoy turkey, stuffing, mashed

potatoes, gravy, coleslaw, cranberry sauce,

and either apple or pumpkin pie.

Order by calling the church office at

802-775-4301. Please prepay (cash or

check)and collect tickets from the church

office by Oct. 25. Pick up times scheduled

during ticket purchase.

5501 US Route 4 • Killington, VT 05751

802.422.5950

Breakfast • Pastries • Coffee • Lunch • Cakes • Special Occasions

POOL • DARTS • HORSESHOES • FREE MINI GOLF

BURGERS • BBQ RIBS • SALADS • GYROS

• THURSDAY:

FOOTBALL

• FRIDAY: 5-8PM

CHRIS PALLUTTO

GROCERY

MEATS AND SEAFOOD

beer and wine

DELICATESSEN

BAKERY PIZZA CATERING

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

Sun. - Thurs. 7 a.m. - 8 p.m.

Fri. & Sat. 7 a.m. - 9 p.m.

2023 KILLINGTON ROAD

802-422-7736

• SATURDAY: 5-8PM

SUPER STASH BROS.

• SUNDAY: NFL SUNDAY

3 NFL TICKETS

Deck Dining • A/C • Shuffleboard

BEST BBQ RIBS IN KILLINGTON

OPEN MON/THURS/FRI/SAT 3-11 p.m.

& SUN NOON-11 p.m.

GREAT

VT

CRAFT

BREWS

Daily Specials posted on

@KillingtonMarket

& our website. Order by 2 p.m.

Call Deli 802-422-7594

Any special requests are always welcome.

www.killingtonmarket.com

TAKE-OUT

&

RESERVATIONS

ATM

Take-Out Convenience:

Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner


Food Matters

28 • The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020

RUTLAND

CO-OP

grocery

I

household goods

77 Wales St

produce

health and beauty

Classic Italian Cuisine

Old World Tradition

~

Since

1992

fresh. simple.

delicious!

1/2 price appetizers

& flaTbreads

from 4-5 p.m.

NEW!

Sunday Lunch

pasta | veal

Chicken | seafood

steak | flatbreads

For reservations

802-422-3293

First on the Killington Road

~

starting at 1 p.m.

Closed Wednesdays

By Melissa Wyman

The new pizza oven in Hartland is reminiscent of town ovens in Europe, providing a gathering place for residents.

Hartland enjoys new community pizza oven

By Curt Peterson

On Friday, Oct.16, Hartland residents celebrated the

unveiling of the town’s new community pizza oven during

the drive-through Farmers’ Market amid a significant

downpour. Everyone who asked was served a free

slice of pizza baked in the brand new wood-fired oven.

“We made twenty pizzas with eight slices each,” Farmers’

Market manager Brian Stroffolino told the Mountain

Times. “That’s one-hundred

sixty slices – all gone!”

Community – 1, Pandemic/rainstorm

– 0. A big

win for the Home Team.

And the pizza got quite a

few listserv compliments.

“My pizza this evening

had a crust to die for, and

a sauce … oh, so good,”

wrote Selectman Phil Hobbie

on the Hartland listserv,

citing the long history of

“town ovens” in Egypt,

Rome and Naples, home of

the first pizza oven.

The Community Pizza

Oven Steering Committee,

including Stroffolino, his

wife Melissa Wyman, Jeffrey

Hamelman, Jesse Hills,

Tina Barney, Tom Graham

and Sarah White, got

Select Board and Hartland

Library blessing for the

project in the fall of 2018,

@back_country_cafe

Open

Thurs.-Mon.

at 7 A.M.

EGGS • OMELETTES • PANCAKES • WAFFLES

Great Breakfast Menu

Outdoor seating & dining now open! TAKE-OUT AVAILABLE

923 KILLINGTON RD. 802-422-4411

By Melissa Wyman

Committee photo: (L to R) Jeff Hamelman, Jesse Hills,

Sarah White (Apron), Brian Stroffolino (in back), Tom

Graham (seated on edge of oven), Tina Barney.

Celebrating the end of Free Pizza Oven Day Pizza at the

Hartland Farmers’ Market.

and Hartland voters approved $2,000 funding at 2019

Town Meeting.

Final cost of the oven on town property was $3,000,

the difference made up by private donors.

“Local contractors Garcia Excavation, D&D Excavating

and Brockway Enterprises contributed materials

and labor to complete the project,” Stroffolino said.

So far wood fuel has

been donated.

The committee fired

up the oven on Sept. 30 to

make sure it was ready for

prime-time pizza-making.

The purpose for the oven

project is threefold. “Of

course, providing pizza for

the Farmers’ Market is one

purpose,” Stroffolino said.

“We will also use it to teach

Hartland students about

wood-fired food, and to

make it available for private

and community events.”

If someone wants to rent

the facility, volunteers will

either operate the oven or

BC

BACKCOUNTRY CAFE

KILLINGTON VERMONT

Vermont

Gift Shop

BC

BACKCOUNTRY CAFE

KILLINGTON VERMONT

(802) 773-2738

train users how to cook in it

safely and efficiently.

“I look forward to future

events when we can all

safely gather around fire

and food,” Stroffolino

wrote on the listserv.

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner

LARGEST SELECTION OF ICE CREAM TREATS!

GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE!

Celebrating our 74th year!

Open Daily 6:30 a.m.

Specials

Daily


The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020 FOOD MATTERS • 29

EARLY BIRD

SPECIALS

MON./ THURS./FRI.

4:30 PM -6 PM

PLUS T/T

» BAKED HADDOCK

w i t h RICE

» DELMONICO SUPPER

STEAK MASHED

POTATOES

» CHICKEN BROCCOLI

ALFREDO

» BAKED RAVIOLI

w i t h MEATBALL

» FREE COFFEE

(Soup o r Salad w i t h a b ov e)

Courtesy of VTF&W

The removal of abandoned and derelict dams ensures free flowing rivers for fish and other aquatic organisms to freely

migrate to important upstream spawning habitats and other seasonal refuge locations.

Vermont Fish & Wildlife invites Vermonters to

celebrate world fish migration day

Saturday, Oct. 24 and Wednesday

Oct. 28—The Vermont Fish &

Wildlife Department, along with

several local, state and federal

conservation partners, will be

celebrating World Fish Migration

Day on Saturday, Oct. 24 and

Wednesday, Oct. 28 with in-person

and online activities.

World Fish Migration Day is a

global day of recognition to raise

awareness about fish migration

and commemorate free flowing

rivers. Vermont Fish & Wildlife,

the Vermont Natural Resources

Council, Friends of the Winooski

River, Vermont Rivers Program,

Connecticut River Conservancy,

the Vermont chapter of the Nature

Conservancy, and the U.S. Fish &

Wildlife Service are offering opportunities

to learn more about

Vermont’s fish migration efforts.

“During this international

event, we’re featuring the restoration

work that we and our local

partners do every day to remove

abandoned dams, improve passage

at hydropower dams and

fix perched culverts to improve

aquatic organism passage for

migratory fish,” said Aquatic

Habitat Biologist Will Eldridge with

Vermont Fish & Wildlife.

Saturday, Oct. 24, guests can

tour the Camp Wihakowi Dam removal

site on Bull Run, a tributary

to the Dog River in Northfield, and

see a stream restoration project

happening. Tours start at 12 p.m.

and end at 3 p.m. Please email the

Friends of the Winooski River to

register: info@winooskiriver.org.

Wednesday, Oct. 28, the Connecticut

River Conservancy will

host a virtual town hall meeting

to learn about native sea lamprey

and American shad, two species

that migrate from the Atlantic

Ocean to the Connecticut River

and its tributaries to spawn. Register

for the event at tinyurl.com/

ctriverevent.

An Agents of Discovery digital

scavenger hunt and three educational

videos will showcase the

migrating fish at the Winooski

One Dam, native sea lamprey and

American shad in the Connecticut

River, and brook, brown and rainbow

trout in Bull Run in Northfield.

All local World Fish Migration

activities including the scavenger

hunt, video premieres, and event

information can be found at vnrc.

org/world-fish-migration-day.

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30 • PETS

The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020

Rutland County Humane Society

RUSTY & BUDDAH

Why be loved by just one cat when you can be loved by

two?! Rusty and Buddah are 7-month-old brothers looking

for an indoor home together. They are both sweet kitties

and are excited to begin their life with you! They do great

with other cats and did fine with the dog they met. For more

information on this pair call 802-885-3997 or to apply to

adopt them fill out an application on our website.

DOWNY - 2-year-old.

Neutered male. Domestic

Shorthair. Grey and white.

If I am not out and about,

you can typically find me

under a blanket.

LUNA - 2-year-old. Spayed

female. Boxer mix. Brindle.

I might be a little shy but I

have so much love to give.

RAY - 3-year-old. Neutered

male. Domestic Shorthair.

Grey tiger. You will find that

I am a confident and observant

kitty.

VIRGINIA - 3-year-old.

Spayed female. Domestic

Shorthair. Grey and white

tiger. I am a very affectionate

and curious lady.

This pet is available for adoption at

Springfield Humane Society

401 Skitchewaug Trail, Springfield, VT• (802) 885-3997

*Adoptions will be handled online until further notice.

spfldhumane.org

WINTER - 1-year-old.

Spayed female. Domestic

Shorthair. Grey and white.

I am one beautiful loving

cat.

STEVE - 5-year-old. Neutered

male. Domestic

Shorthair. Black. Don’t let

my big belly fool you, I’m

an agile guy who can really

get around and play

with the best of them.

KAYA

I’m a 12-year-old Hound mix. After nearly 10 years at

my previous residency, life underwent some changes.

I can get up and go – enjoying long walks and all that

nature has to offer! I love attention and affection, and I

have a very sweet demeanor. My biggest wish is to find

my forever home to spend my golden years, because I

suspect they’re going to be some of the best years of my

life. So, if you are looking for a kind old gal, please call.

This pet is available for adoption at

Lucy Mackenzie Humane Society

4832 VT-44, Windsor, VT • (802) 484-5829

*(By appointment only at this time.) Tues. - Sat. 12-4p.m.

& Thurs. 12-7p.m. • lucymac.org

MO - 13-year-old. Neutered

male. Domestic

Shorthair. Black. We are

looking for a retirement

home that will feed us,

keep us warm and give us

all the love we deserve.

DELTA

1-year-old. Spayed female. Domestic Shorthair.

Brown Tiger. 8 lbs.

I am “full of it” and get the zoomies, so you might

find me running back and forth when you come

in for your appointment to meet me.

All of these pets are available for adoption at

Rutland County Humane Society

765 Stevens Road, Pittsford, VT • (802) 483-6700

Tues. - Sat. 12-5p.m. Closed Sun. & Mon. • www.rchsvt.org

JAZZIE - 2-year-old. Neutered

male. Domestic

Shorthair. Black and white.

It may take me a while to

warm up in my new home

so please be patient with

me.

CHARITY - 7-year-old.

Spayed female. Domestic

Shorthair. Brown tiger. I am

a sophisticated adult lady

that wants to be the one

and only pet in the home.

GUMBY - 11-year-old.

Neutered male. Domestic

Shorthair. Orange and

white. I am a unique senior

looking for a retirement

home!

GEORGIA - 3-year-old.

Spayed female. Domestic

Shorthair. Calico. I am very

sweet and social. Look at

this face, who wouldn’t fall

in love?


The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020 HOROSCOPES • 31

Cosmic

Catalogue

Aries

March 21 - April 20

How hard are you willing to work

for something you want? This

may be a question that you’ll continue

to negotiate this week. New opportunities

that can lead to a breakthrough

may arise, but you’ll need to be willing

to see them. It’s likely you’re

tired, run down or simply fed up. If

that’s the case, you’ll need to adopt a

new perspective in order to attract the

changes you desire. Rather than run

head first into something shiny and

new, consider negotiating the terms

first.

Taurus

April 21 - May 20

There are times where your solid

approach serves you well. There

are other times where learning where

to bend can save you from breaking.

As new opportunities come your way

this week, don’t reject them just because

they don’t look like how you

imagined. There is scope to negotiate

the terms, provided you’re willing

to compromise in a key relationship.

Your challenge is to get involved with

the process, especially if you have a

vested interest in the outcome.

Leo

July 21 - August 20

Your guiding star, the Sun, spends

the next four weeks illuminating

your sphere of home, family and

your domestic life. By radiating your

light into this part of your life, you’ll

be given the opportunity to explore

your family relationships. By taking

the extra time to engage in deep

and meaningful conversations, you’ll

learn more about those you love and/

or share you living space with. New

insights may reveal deeper connections,

helping you establish more authentic

relationships with those you

call family.

Virgo

August 21 - September 20

Despite your best attempts, your

helpful approach may not always

be well-received. You can only do the

best you can. This week, you’ll likely

discover that it’s not about you helping

others, but giving them the chance

to help themselves. While it may

seem counter-intuitive to your penchant

for problem solving, it will actually

be of benefit to all of your relationships.

Sometimes, saying ‘No’ is

the most healing and liberating thing

you can do.

Copyright ©2020 - Cassandra Tyndall

Sagittarius

November 21 - December 20

The extra effort you’ve been making

in the workplace may get

noticed this week. Whether you’ve

extended yourself to support your

peers or doing your best to be seen in

your best light, it’s likely to pay off.

As helpful Venus connects to Jupiter,

your special star, you might be the

lucky recipient of a pay raise or bonus.

If you’re looking for a new role,

having friends in the right places may

help you to where you want to go professionally.

Capricorn

December 21 - January 20

Making agreements that support

everyone is now highlighted.

Before you’re able to get to that point,

you may need to get honest about

what you want first. While there are

times to be agreeable, there are also

times where you need to put your

cards on the table. The strange paradox

here, is that the more vulnerable

you’re willing to be, the more joy

you’re likely to receive out of whatever

deals, contracts or arrangements

that are currently in the pipeline.

Go deeper

What’s fair in love and war is likely to be highlighted

this week. As the planet of love, Venus, makes a series of

alignments to other planets, you might begin to question

just how far you’re willing to go in order to find

equilibrium.

A sense of helplessness, powerlessness or lack of

hope can feel overwhelming and confusing. If you think

about it deeply enough, there are gifts to be had, even in

the most barren of landscapes. When you can get fed up

enough, is when you’re willing to explore another perspective

or point of view. It’s from the position of being

between a rock and hard place that you can make rightfor-you-choices

and are more willing to invite change.

There is some joy, elevation and support that can be

gleaned from the willingness to change your mind. It

may come in the form of a breakthrough, a surprising or

sudden piece of news, or simply that you’ve got no other

choice. If you feel like you’re going over old territory, it’s

probably because you are. If in doubt, go deeper. Explore

the hidden depths, what lies beneath. The solution can

be found in the exact place you’re reluctant to look, and

that’s within you.

Camille’s

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Gemini

May 21 - June 20

You might be revisiting territory

that you first discovered earlier

this month. Now that the dust has likely

settled regarding a shock, surprise

or a sudden piece of news, you can

now see things from a fresh perspective.

New insights are available to you

in regards to your health, how you

spend your time and your day-to-day

routines. A large-scale project may be

laborious now, but will work to your

advantage down the track.

Cancer

June 21 - July 20

Fresh from last week’s New Moon,

you may have new ideas, insights

or intentions about your home, family

and general domestic life. If you’re

feeling challenged or overwhelmed

by a certain situation in your life, you

don’t have to take things as face value.

As the Moon grows in light, you’re

encouraged to take action about what’s

not working, or what you’re not happy

about. The change you’re looking for

is available to you if you’re willing

to take steps in a new direction rather

than ruminating on the past.

Libra

September 21 - October 20

If you play your cards right, you

might be in a position to negotiate

the terms-of-contract this week. It may

be about your money, a significant purchase

or some kind of agreement with

somebody else. Regardless of what the

situation is, the key to your success is

by getting honest about what it is you

deeply want first. Deciphering what’s

worthy of a consensus approach and

simply going for your heart’s desire

will be worth your time meditating on.

Scorpio

October 21 - November 20

Happy Birthday Scorpio! As the

Sun enters your sign this week,

light may be shed around a perplexing

problem. You’re undergoing a process

of getting to know yourself better,

thanks to Mercury retrograde. You

may get closer to knowing what you

really want, or at least, feel like you’re

coming to the place where you can

make an important decision. As usual,

keeping your cards close to your chest

is your best bet for now, as there is

more contemplation or research to be

done.

Empowering you to lead a divinely inspired life.

Aquarius

January 21 - February 20

You may gain some fresh clarity

or perspective around a work

issue this week. While Mercury is

currently back-tracking in your professional

sector, researching your options

regarding a new role, contract

or arrangement is possible. By being

able to see the situation from all angles,

you may be able to experience a

breakthrough or new opportunity you

never thought possible. With Venus in

play, it may be helpful to remember

you have more power in negotiating

the terms or agreements than you

might think.

Pisces

February 21 - March 20

There is plenty of cosmic support

on offer this week in the form of

friendships as well as your intimate

relationships. With some of this year’s

more challenging alignments forming

in your sector of friendship, hopes and

dreams, it may be helpful to connect

with those who have always been in

your corner. Conversations with those

who lift your spirits may help you see

the meaning and purpose behind any

challenges or difficulties you’re currently

facing.

Cassandra has studied astrology for about 20 years. She is an international teacher of astrology who has been published all over the globe.

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Thursday 5 - 6 p.m. Vinyasa

Friday 10 - 11a.m. Basics


Columns

32 • The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020

The defenses of hairy

caterpillars

Last October, a young student in one of

my nature journaling workshops pointed

out a fuzzy yellow caterpillar with long

black tufts. “Those kind sting!” he declared.

He was the third student that month to

point out the same kind of caterpillar as

stinging. I remembered being warned away

from hairy caterpillars as a kid, but I’ve

since picked up many – of various types

– with no ill effect. I wondered, could the

hairy-caterpillars-sting story be a myth?

To learn more, I contacted Rachel Maccini,

urban entomologist for the University

of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension.

She explained that many fuzzy-looking

caterpillars, especially in the tussock moth

subfamily (Lymantriidae), have “urticating

hairs” that they use for self-defense. At

the tip of each defensive hair is a microscopic

barb with a weakened ring at the

base, allowing the barb to easily break off

in the skin of any animal that grabs onto

the caterpillar. These barbs are physically

irritating, often causing an itchy-burning

sensation, similar to what happens

if you touch fiberglass

insulation.

Some caterpillars take their

urticating hairs a step further

by connecting them to poison

sacs. When the barb breaks

off, it also delivers a venom,

like the stings of other insects.

Seen with a microscope,

urticating hair barbs look

like miniature hypodermic

needles. No wonder picking

up a hairy caterpillar can be an uncomfortable

experience!

When someone picks up a caterpillar

with urticating hairs, the degree of unpleasantness

depends on the number of barbs

that stick in their skin and their susceptibility

to any venom that may be present. Most

reactions range from itchy skin to blisters

and swelling. Kids are often more sensitive

to urticating hairs, so it makes sense to warn

young nature lovers to be cautious with

fuzzy caterpillars, even if they do look like

tiny, crawling teddy bears.

Some caterpillars with urticating hairs

advertise that their defense system is up

and armed with high contrast warning

colors and complicated “hairdos” that

include short or long tufts in different

colors on different parts of their bodies. In

the Northeast, the hickory tussock moth

caterpillar (Lophocampa caryae) has white

hair with both short and long black tufts,

while the definite marked tussock moth

caterpillar (Orgyia definita) has white

The Outside

Story

By Rachel Mirus

hair, short gold tufts, and long black tufts.

On the other hand, Maccini pointed out

that the streaked tussock moth caterpillar

(Dasychira obliquata) has urticating

hairs and is a mundane brown with only

a couple of long dark tufts. Other hairy

caterpillars, like those of the tiger moth

subfamily (Arctiidae), which includes the

familiar woolly bear (Pyrrharctia Isabella),

have no urticating hairs at all. Moths

may use urticating hairs as defense

beyond the larval state, Maccini

said. Some species, including the

definite marked tussock moth

caterpillar, will weave their shed

urticating hairs into a cocoon

around themselves as they

pupate. The adult moths of two

species considered invasive to

the Northeast, the brown-tailed

moth (Euproctis chrysorrhoea)

and the gypsy moth (Lymantria

dispar), have urticating hairs

on their bodies. Female tailed moths will even

browncover

their eggs with

these hairs from their bodies.

I didn’t keep any of last

year’s yellow-and-black fuzzy

caterpillars for identification,

but I suspect they were American

dagger moth caterpillars

(Acronicta americana). People

have reported experiencing

skin irritation after handling

this species, although there

is no sign that it possesses a

venom. I wonder now if I’ve been able to

safely handle these and other tufted caterpillars

because I don’t scoop them up, but

instead coax them to crawl onto a finger,

exposing less of my skin to the barbed tips

of their urticating hairs.

While getting an itchy rash from a caterpillar

is unpleasant, Maccini emphasized

that there’s no need to fear fuzzy caterpillars.

Caterpillars with urticating hairs,

whether they have a venom or not, are

simply trying to make themselves an unpleasant

mouthful for potential predators.

Many of these caterpillars boast interesting

colors and shapes and can be watched

without touching, or carefully moved and

closely observed while wearing gloves.

Rachel Mirus lives and writes in Duxbury,

Vermont. The illustration for this column

is by Adelaide Murphy Tyrol. The Outside

Story is assigned and edited by Northern

Woodlands magazine and sponsored by the

Wellborn Ecology Fund of the New Hampshire

Charitable Foundation: nhcf.org.

2020 elections and your

investment portfolio

As the U.S. presidential election draws

near, expect to see more and more headlines

that propose, “What will happen next

if this person is elected?” or, “What policy

changes to prepare for in the next four

years?”

In reality, however, it isn’t

easy to anticipate what may

happen with the financial

markets after the November

elections. An ambitious investor

would have to forecast

the election results, evaluate

which policies may become

law, estimate a potential economic

impact, and assess how

the financial markets might

react.

That’s a tall order.

Remember, in addition to

the presidency, a total of 35 Senate seats

and 435 Congressional seats will be on the

ballot. The makeup of the country’s executive

and legislative branches may look

much different—or very similar—in 2021.

A financial professional’s role is to help

guide and equip clients with the tools they

Money

Matters

By Kevin Theissen

need regardless of who controls the White

House or Congress. We’ve been through

several elections, and we’re not going to be

influenced by a headline that speculates

about a policy or projects a new approach.

It should come as no surprise to hear

the economy is the top issue

for voters in the 2020 election.

It seems the majority of voters

say that the economy will be

very important to them when

they cast their votes.

But when voters say “economy,”

what do they really mean?

Is it a catch-all phrase for

personal finances? Not exactly.

Here’s a breakdown of voters’

top three economic concerns

and what each candidate has

said about the issues.

Questions about trade. Questions

remain about what will develop between

the U.S. and China following the election.

President Trump has worked to revise

the U.S.-China trade agreements, while

former Vice President Joe Biden has indicated

he may move towards a more open

Money matters > 34

Pastor Alberta Wallace guides

churches through transition

Vibrant, energetic and uplifting: Words used to describe Grace Church’s new

intentional interim pastor, Rev. Dr. Alberta Wallace. Blessed is the word to describe

what the congregation should be feeling now that she’s here. The church is in the

process of searching for a new settled minister. Until that happens,

they needed an interim and after a year, found one in

Wallace in August.

“Transitional ministry is my call to ministry. Like most

people in ministry, you’re wondering what God has for me to

do?” she said.

For Grace, she’s here to help transition from the ministers

they had to the one they’ll be getting.

Wallace was a settled pastor in Yuma, Arizona for five years.

By DJ Dave

Hoffenberg

“After that I knew there was something else for me here but

this was not it,” she said.

She resigned and went back to school to work on her

doctorate. “School is a time for me for discernment. Study

is that discernment period where I hear again what God has

for me to do so that’s when I reheard that transitional ministry is my real passion,”

she added. That’s the ability to help churches move ahead especially after the long

term pastor has left.

Some leave on good terms like retirement and some by unpleasant ways. “I am

committed to churches and helping them to be healthy and realizing the gifts that

are in the church,” Wallace said.

She was an interim for two churches in Arizona and then moved across country

to First Congregational Church of Wakefield, New Hampshire. She was the interim

there for 18 months.

“When you take a transitional ministry position, you’re encouraging that church

to live into the life of the future,” Wallace said. “What’s life going to be like for you

when you call your settled pastor? For that church, they realized they could not afford

a full-time pastor which they had for the past 12 years.”

In order for them to be sustainable and truly be there for another 235 years, there

would have to be a hiatus time.

“It was a hard task for me as the temporary shepherd to leave them in a temporary

space while they continue to be in the search and call process and we had to agree

with that,” she added.

Once that agreement was made, Wallace reactivated her profile and started

Wallace > 34


The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020 COLUMNS • 33

My son started his first job about six weeks ago. He

works at a local grocery store collecting carts from the

parking lot, bagging groceries, and emptying trash barrels.

He makes just under $10 an

hour and couldn’t be happier.

He generally works on Fridays,

Saturdays, and Sundays so for

the first time in my life, I feel

bored on the weekends. My wife

and I loved the idea of our son

getting a job to earn money, but

now that he’s gone so much,

The Movie

Diary

By Dom Cioffi

we’re admittedly missing him

being around the house.

I usually drop him off at the start

of his shift and return hours later

to pick him up. If he has to be at

work early in the morning, he will likely sleep on the way to

the store and then roll out of my truck looking every bit the

sleep-deprived teenager. However, when I return to pick

him up hours later, he’s generally in the highest of spirits.

Being an only child, my son thrives on his relationships

with others. He loves being around his friends

no matter what the scenario. I’ve never seen a kid who

wanted to go to school so badly and yet wasn’t that interested

in education.

At work, he’s found a host of new people to chum

around with, but he also loves the interaction with the

shoppers. It didn’t take him long to figure out that the

nicer you are to the customers, the better chance they’ll

mention something to the manager.

At the grocery store he works at, if someone tells the

staff that you did something special for them, they’ll

give you a service excellence award. Sounds great,

but when my son found out you could trade in the certificate

for a free pizza and soda, he got really excited.

He’s now collected three service excellence awards

in the last month and I’m confident it has more to do

with the food than the honor.

He’s also realized that going the extra step for a customer

could be a financial windfall. Periodically, he carries

groceries out to shopper’s cars, at which point they’ll

Halloween will certainly not be the

same this year. The much anticipated

parade will not wind its way through

downtown Rutland. The crowd that the

parade draws is not safe with

social distancing guidelines.

Sometimes we just have

to accept that people who

know more than we do have

made the best decision for

all of us.

Rutland’s Halloween

parade has been around for

60 years. I was in high school

when the first parade was

held. Since my trick or treating

days were over the parade

was a new and different

way to celebrate that holiday. So what

did we do for fun at this spooky time of

year before the parade came into being?

Let’s take a look back and see!

During most of my grade school

years the big event was painting store

windows in downtown Rutland. Just

about every store was willing to let

school children paint their windows

Working for the weekend

reward him with a few bucks.

One elderly woman left him a

$10 bill in her trunk, complete

with an antiseptic cloth so he

could “wipe off the covid.”

I asked him recently if he was

interested in being a cashier. He

scoffed at the idea. Even though

they make a bit more money, he

claims it’s not worth the hassle.

Apparently, cashiers have to recite

pre-written, interactive dialogue,

which he finds contrived. Plus,

they aren’t allowed to listen to

music, which he can do while collecting

carts.

Sometimes when I show up a bit

early to pick him up, I’ll catch him

working the parking lot collecting

carts. I’ll pull my truck into a spot

and then watch how he approaches

his job. I feel a sense of pride when I

see him muscle a huge line of carts

into the building, unlike some of the

other kids who take in two at a time

in order to drag out the process.

Halloween memories

Looking

Back

By Mary Ellen Shaw

with festive Halloween scenes. After

school was out for the day those of us

who wanted to paint worked together,

supervised of course, to create witches,

cemeteries, pumpkins and “all

things Halloween.” The first

thing we wanted to do after

the windows were completed

was to show our parents.

I remember walking around

downtown in the evening

with my mom and dad to

check out everyone’s creativity.

Any time a child could go

out at night back in the 50s

seemed like a big deal!

There really wasn’t any

worry about children trick

or treating with their friends back then.

Parents sent you out with a bag to hold

the candy, told you to have a good time

and when to be home! I remember

one of our teachers told the class that

we were welcome to go to her house

for candy. Two of us did just that and I

doubt we told our parents that we were

going about a mile and a half from our

...the nicer you are to the

customers, the better chance they’ll

mention something to the manager.

The other night I showed up early and caught him

dancing through the parking lot while singing to himself.

I rolled my window down to listen and then when he

wasn’t suspecting it, I honked my horn, scaring him to

such a degree that he came over to the truck shaking.

While I thought it was the funniest thing I had seen all

weekend, he was highly agitated and refused to talk to

me on the way home. (It was still worth it!)

But the single greatest moment came on the afternoon

I showed up a few minutes

early and found him collecting

trash. He saw me parked and

wandered over with a large bag of

garbage. I rolled down my window

to talk, at which point he stated

very matter-of-factly, “I’m the only

teenager in this store that knows

how to tie a damn garbage bag.”

I beamed with pride at this

statement since, many years ago,

I taught my son the correct way to

tie a garbage bag, telling him that

someday the knowledge would

come in handy. (It seems so

innocuous, but like everything

else in the world, there’s a right

and a wrong way to do things.)

The fact that he remembered

my lesson and was prideful of

his abilities gave me hope that

he’s realized I may know a thing

or two.

This week’s film, “The King

of Staten Island,” is about another young man venturing

out into the world, except in this case, his lack of a fatherfigure

has stunted his abilities and self-esteem.

Starring SNL comedic standout Pete Davidson, this

surprising little film (which is rooted in Davidson’s own

life story), does a wonderful job capturing the unique

flavor and sentiment of a 20-something man struggling to

find his way in the world.

I have to admit, this film caught me off guard. I had no

idea how much I would enjoy it. It’s well-made (directed

by Judd Apatow) and well-acted (co-starring Marisa

Tomei and Bill Burr). And kudos to Davidson for a shockingly

rich and emotional performance (even if he was

basically playing himself).

A blue-collar “B+” for “The King of Staten Island”

(available for rental on multiple online platforms).

Got a question or comment for Dom? You can email him

at moviediary@att.net.

Snowliage delights

It starts the night before, as people start noticing the slight changes in the weather.

Perhaps someone close to them has mentioned the forecast they have been following.

You watch as your neighbor reaches for an old canvas to cover their most precious

plants. Arriving restaurant guests remark on the bitter cold as

they remove their jackets for the first time this season. It’s coming.

Leaving the restaurant in the darkness, my nose hairs tingle

with the first inhalation, and I can feel them freeze even as the

cold air passes through my body. A little touch of moisture coats

my car and the canoe atop it in a wave of frost which glitters in

the lamplight. Looking up the Killington Road, I can’t see it in the

darkness but I know it is there.

Livin’ the

Dream

By Merisa

Sherman

Sleep that night is elusive. The sense of anticipatory greatness

provides no reason to find winter in dreams. Memories of

magical days come flying through our minds, uncontrolled and

unrequested. Yet they flow constantly, reminding us of every

wonderful moment to come.

The first snowfall.

That magical snow that turns everyone from a serious, responsible adult into a giddy

elementary school student anxious to make snow angels and snowmen. Or in the case

of our community: skiers and snowboarders stoked with anticipation for that first glissé

down the mountain.

Traditionally, the first snow at elevation comes with meteorological discussions as to

when the wet bulb would be sustainable enough to have the resort turn on the guns. Discussion

quickly turns to thoughts of Opening Day and when that might be. Anticipation

flies through town as quickly as the snowliage photographs get shared on social media.

This time, there were no stolen turns, no mad dashes up the mountain by skiers anxious

Looking back > 34 Livin’ the dream > 35


34 • COLUMNS

The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020

>

Looking back: Pandemic has changed Halloween, but past memories of parades and costumes remain

from page 33

homes just to get candy! They might have trusted us

to go out by ourselves but I don’t think it even entered

their minds that we would travel that far.

As I look back my friend Elaine and I were quite adventuresome

on Halloween. She was my “partner in

crime” when we visited the teacher and the two of us

also traveled about two miles in another direction the

next year to a friend’s house. That led to the three of us

trick or treating in her neighborhood. Those carefree

days are gone when parents didn’t worry about an

inappropriate person coming in contact with their

child as they walked the streets.

There was a gap of many years without my being

in a Halloween costume. But when I went to work at

city hall that holiday took on a whole new meaning.

We all dressed up and chipped in on candy for the

counter. I am not one bit handy when it comes to

sewing but my former coworker, Cathy Cioffi Taggart,

is very talented in that respect. One year she

created costumes for everyone in our office. It was

our “money bags” costume. That was totally in sync

with our employment in the treasurer’s office. For a

number of years I did the banking for the city and I

remember all the banks had a sign posted to remove

masks before entering. When our work costumes

included a painted face I just opened the door to the

bank, called out a teller’s name and told them who I

was. No problem!

I find it amusing that today we are required to wear

a mask in banks and we are willingly given the cash

that we want. What a difference a pandemic makes!

As I am writing it appears that trick or treating will

go on but some parents will probably have concerns

about letting their children do that. I expect that

masked adults will be answering the doorbell. But

it won’t be because it’s Halloween. It will be a safety

precaution for themselves and the children.

Let’s be optimistic and hope that there will be a

Halloween parade in 2021 and children can go from

door to door without a worry and get all the candy

their bags can hold. After all, that’s what Halloween is

all about!

Courtesy of Mountain Times Archives/Billings Farm & Museum

Looking back to the 90s at Billings Farm & Museum’s 11th

annual family Halloween costume parade.

TOWN OF KILLINGTON

DEVELOPMENT REVIEW BOARD

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE

The Development Review Board will hold a

public hearing on Thursday, October 29, 2020

at 6:30 p.m. at the Sherburne Library Meeting

Room at 2998 River Road with attendance

available via videoconference (Zoom) to review

the following applications:

Application #20-052 by Elinko, LLC (Mountain

Meadows Lodge) at 285 Thundering Brook

Road for site plan review of physical changes

to the Lodge building (addition to the back,

hot tub deck off the back, expansions to terrace

on the Kent Pond side, and realignment of the

porte chochere on the front) and use changes

including opening the restaurant to the public

and offering an outside wedding and event

venue.

The public hearing will be preceded by a Site

Visit to convene at 285 Thundering Brook at

5:30 p.m. on Thursday, October 29, 2020. The

Site Visit is open to the public but no testimony

will be heard or minutes taken at the Site Visit.

The application may be viewed at the Town

Offices at 2706 River Road between 9:00

a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday

by appointment by calling 802-422-3243.

Digital copies of the applications may also be

requested in portable document format (PDF).

Participation in this local proceeding in

person, via videoconference (Zoom), or

through written statement is a prerequisite to

the right to make any subsequent appeal. It is

requested that written statements be submitted

at least two (2) days prior to the hearing for

review by all.

For participation via videoconference (Zoom),

a meeting link will be posted 1-2 hours prior

to the hearing on the Town Website Calendar

(www.killingtontown.com).

Dated at Killington, Vermont this 19th day of

September 2020.

Preston Bristow, Town Planner, Town of

Killington, Vermont

>

Wallace: Interim pastor aids Grace Church in transition while seeking replacement

from page 32

the interviewing process for her in Missouri. Church was always a

next church. She wants to find part of her life. She was raised in a

churches that are committed to traditional Black Baptist church.

the process. She’s not just there to Church was the place where she felt

fill the pulpit, Grace had Reverend warmth, comfort and serenity.

Holly Noble for that.

Before going into ministry, she

Wallace said, “I come in to guide earned her bachelor’s in psychology

the church to look at everything

they do, how they do it and ask the

questions why they do it or don’t do

it? Through that process of interviews,

I decide if we should continue

on to see if this is a match.”

Keep in mind that since this was

during a pandemic, those interviews

were done through Zoom and

phone calls.

“From that I’m always prayerful

and listening, OK God, what

does this church need? Do I have

the gifting that can help them be

prepared to call their next settled

pastor? This was the church that

God kept saying yes, you’re supposed

to be there,” she added.

Wallace was the seventh person

Grace had contacted for the interim

position.

Arizona to New Hampshire was

Submitted

a major stretch but she loved it. “I Rev. Dr. Alberta Wallace

love being outdoors and exploring

new areas. I’ve done two winters and sociology at Grinell

in New England, I could probably College in Iowa. She got

do a third. No, I don’t like the cold her first master’s in social

but I learned the art of layering. I work administration at

was raised in the Midwest, it gets University of Kansas and

cold there and I didn’t like it then,” her second master’s in

she said.

divinity at Central Theological

Seminary. This

She was happy to be coming to

Vermont. She likes that Rutland is will be her 20th year as an

in a valley surrounded by mountains

and can’t wait to experience it I met Rev. Wallace and

ordained minister.

when snow falls.

her partner, Wendy, at

She was raised in Kansas City. the Chad Hollister Band

Her parents were divorced so mom concert in August at the

lived on one side of the river in Killington Library.

Kansas and her dad on the other They both love music

and the arts and have been able to

take in various events in the Rutland

area. “We love the diversity and if

we can safely gather, then we can

do that,” she said. “We’re the type of

couple that likes to live life and experience

what the area has for us.”

Wallace has only been here

a couple months but said, “I’m

already rejoicing for Grace in the

process they’re going through to be

able to call their next settled pastor.

I’m already rejoicing for Grace and

how they’re going to continue to

be the community church in this

area but even have a brighter star.

I already see and feel what God is

doing here.”

Courtesy of Grace Congregational UCC

Rev. Wallace leading worship in Grace Congregational

UCC’s chapel via Facebook live.


The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020 COLUMNS • 35

TOWN OF KILLINGTON

SOLID WASTE TRANSFER STATION

Hours of Operation:

Winter (November thru March )

Saturday and Monday (8 a.m. - 4 p.m.)

Sunday (8 a.m. - noon)

Summer (April thru October)

Saturday and Monday (8 a.m. - 4 p.m.)

RATE SCHEDULE (EFFECTIVE OCTOBER 6, 2020)

>

Livin’ the dream: Mother Nature combines the seasons over the golf course, but it’s not winter yet!

Money matters: Will the election results affect your portfolio?

>

from page 42

trade policy.

Corporate taxes. President

Trump passed the Tax Cuts and Jobs

Act (TCJA) of 2017, a far-reaching

piece of legislation that included

lowered corporate taxes. Former

Vice President Biden has said that

he wants to repeal parts of the TCJA

and has indicated he would be in

favor of raising corporate taxes

back up to 28% from 21%.

Climate change. Former Vice

President Biden has put forward his

“Clean Energy Revolution,” which

is designed to transition the country

to 100% clean energy and netzero

emissions. President Trump is

likely to continue to pursue adjusting

environmental regulations and

supporting fossil fuel.

Here is a startling statistic. Some

polls suggest that as many as 45% of

consumers with $100,000 or more

investable assets expect to make

changes to their

investments due

to the upcoming

2020 presidential

election.

Second-guessing

your investment strategy is natural,

especially with an election on the

horizon. Emotions are running high

as many are divided about what may

happen to the financial markets with

the election just weeks away.

It’s a good time to remind everyone

that investing involves risks,

from page 33

to catch the snow before it melts. No thought to the dangers

of skiing on fast grass nor the big grins that happen as you

finally reach the snow line. Not even a hint of a snow angel

anywhere.

Killington Resort will open on Nov. 14. Period. For the

first time, our community is like any other ski community.

We know the day our resort will open to the public and can

plan accordingly. In a year filled with chaos and uncertainty,

there’s a weird stability in knowing a date that we never

knew before. I don’t need my pass urgently, or to have my

skis ready at a moment’s notice.

For the first time in a very long time, I can actually relax

and simply enjoy this time of year. And, honestly, I am not

sure what that means exactly. Cold October mornings are

usually spent hiking up the mountain in the darkness wearing

ski boots to steal a couple of turns before the sun comes

out and melts the snow. That’s me.

But this year, I slept in. I took the time to look at the snow

through other people’s eyes, scrolling through absolutely

stunning photographs of the snowliage. The snowy mountains

create a gorgeous backdrop to the fading red and

yellows of the fall season, combined with pops of evergreen

and even some still-bright green grass. I always miss this, always

seeing the view from the snow looking outward across

the valley. Not caring about anything but skiing.

It was glorious. Driving up the Killington Road and seeing

the white trails popping out in the distance was simply

stunning. I drove around town, looking at the snow from

different angles, focused more on discovering the best ratio

of foliage to snow than whether or not there was enough

snow to ski. A strange, new feeling to simply observe the

peaceful beauty of Mother Nature rather than pressing

onward to the top and hoping that my knee wouldn’t get

shredded on the descent.

Instead, we walked around the newly “opened” golf

course, under the shadow of snowliage and just studied

it all. How the tall grasses grew above the snow, with the

mowing lines still visible at lower elevations. You could see

the differences between the left and right sides of middle

Ovation, as the pine trees have been growing taller over the

past few years. The vibrancy of certain yellows and reds, still

holding strong this late in the season, contrasts with the

bright white and frosted greens of the mountain.

How does Mother Nature have so many seasons going

on at one time? Mums are blooming down below in the

valley while winter has made its first arrival up high. It’s

almost as if a cloud of winter is rolling down the mountain,

and soon it will encompass the entire valley in its blanket

of white. I cannot wait to experience this wave from down

below, waiting for winter instead of rushing forth to meet it

head on.

Yes, winter is coming. But it’s not here yet.

and investment decisions should

be based on your own goals, time

horizon, and tolerance for risk. If

you’re concerned that the upcoming

election may change one of these key

Second-guessing your investment

strategy is natural, especially with

an election on the horizon.

By Marisa Sherman

factors, perhaps it’s time to review

your portfolio.

Making a change to your portfolio

should be driven by sound analysis,

not an emotional response to a current

event.

Kevin Theissen is the owner of

HWC Financial in Ludlow.

• Permit Card - $25.00 (expires annually Nov. 1)

• Bagged Solid Waste -

• $ 3.00/bag - Largest bag permissible

– 33 gallons

• $ 15.00 - Coupon Card – 5 bags

• $ 30.00 - Coupon Card – 10 bags

• $ 72.00 - Coupon Card – 24 bags

• $367.00 - Commercial Hauler Coupon Card

– 20 cu.yd.

• Non-metal bulky items

(to be placed in compactor)

• $ 9.00 each (3 card punches) - bike tires

and car tires under 17”

• $15.00 each (5 card punches) - small nonmetal

items (twin or smaller mattresses,

TV, wooden chairs, small

• tables, small rugs, medium or smaller

stuffed chairs); other items under ¾ cu.yd.

(20 cu.ft.) and not

• delivered in bags.

• $30.00 each (10 card punches) - large nonmetal

items (sofas, full or larger mattresses,

recliner or large stuffed

• chairs, tires 17” & over, dressers, kitchen

tables, large rugs); other items over

¾ cu.yd. (20 cu.ft.).

• Metal Bulky Items

(to be placed in open container)

• $ 9.00 each (3card punches)

- bike, metal chairs, lawnmower, muffler,

small appliances; other items under

• ¾ cu. yd. (20 cu.ft.).

• $15.00 each (5 card punches)

- washer, dryer, stove, bare metal springs

or frame, dishwasher, water tank;

• other items over ¾ cu.yd. (20 cu.ft.).

• $30.00 each (10 card punches)

– refrigerator/freezer.

Coupons for non-bagged and metal items

are available on a per item basis.

All stickers, coupon cards and coupons

may be purchased at the Town Office

Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

or at the transfer station during open hours.

THE ABOVE RATES APPLY

TO RESIDENTIAL SOLID WASTE ONLY.

COMMERCIAL SOLID WASTE IS PROHIBITED

AT THE TRANSFER STATION.


Classifieds

36 • The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020

RENTALS

THE CASCADES LODGE,

Killington Resort. Rent the

entire hotel for the 2020-

2021 winter season. 30,000

sq feet. 42 rooms & baths.

Heated indoor pool, hot tub,

sauna, gym. Email: info@

cascadeslodge.com

2 BDR plus loft, Killington/

Pico condo. Woodstove,

washer/dryer, Cathedral

ceilings, eat-at bar/ kitchen.

For year round rental or sale.

$1175. 781-488-8746

KILLINGTON CONDO- 2

Bed, 2 bath seasonal rental.

$13,000+heat. 401-258-

1986

REAL ESTATE

FOR SALE -Killington

building lot. Robinwood.

Walk to Pico. 603-340-3835

UNIQUE VICTORIAN

10 rooms with open floor

plan.10 private acres mostly

wooded with mountain

bike trails. Dead end road.

Minutes to school, Pico and

downtown. North Rutland

Town (802) 775-6961

ERA MOUNTAIN

Real Estate, 1913

US Rt. 4, Killington

killingtonvermontrealestate.

com or call one of our real

estate experts for all of your

real estate needs including

Short Term & Long Term

Rentals & Sales. 802-775-

0340.

KILLINGTON PICO

REALTY Our Realtors have

special training in buyer

representation to ensure a

positive buying experience.

Looking to sell? Our unique

marketing plan features your

very own website. 802-422-

3600, KillingtonPicoRealty.

com 2814 Killington Rd.,

Killington. (next to Choices

Restaurant).

KILLINGTON VALLEY

REAL ESTATE Specializing

in the Killington region

for Sales and Listings for

Homes, Condos & Land

as well as Winter seasonal

rentals. Call, email or stop in.

We are the red farm house

located next to the Wobbly

Barn. PO Box 236, 2281

Killington Rd., Killington.

802-422-3610, bret@

killingtonvalleyrealestate.

com.

PEAK PROPERTY

GROUP at KW Vermont.

VTproperties.net. 802-

353-1604. Marni@

peakpropertyrealestate.

com. Specializing in homes/

condos/land/commercial/

investments. Representing

sellers & buyers all over

Central Vt.

THE PERFORMANCE

GROUP real estate 1810

Killington Rd., Killington.

802-422-3244 or 800-338-

3735, vthomes.com, email

info@vthomes.com. As the

name implies, We perform

for you!

PRESTIGE REAL ESTATE

of Killington, 2922 Killington

Rd., Killington. Specializing

in the listing & sales of

Killington Condos, Homes,

& Land. Call 802-422-3923.

prestigekillington.com.

SKI COUNTRY REAL

ESTATE, 335 Killington Rd.,

Killington. 802-775-5111.

SkiCountryRealEstate.

com ‚ 8 agents servicing:

Killington, Bridgewater,

Mendon, Pittsfield,

Plymouth, Stockbridge,

Woodstock areas.Sales &

Winter Seasonal Rentals.

Open Monday-Saturday:

10 am‚ 4 pm. Sunday by

appointment.

FOR SALE

FIREWOOD FOR SALE-

We stack. Rudi, 802-672-

3719

SNOW TIRES- Four 2019

Nokian Hakkepelitta R-3

snow tires and rims. 265-

70-r16. About 3000 miles.

Asking $500. 631-766-4981

FREE

FREE REMOVAL of scrap

metal & car batteries. Matty,

802-353-5617.

SERVICES

ACCORD MEDIATION

Work through divorce

or disagreements

peacefully with mediation.

802-391-4121 www.

accordmediationvt.com

BEAUREGARD PAINTING,

30 years experience, 802-

436-1337.

CHIMNEYS CLEANEDlined,

built, repaired. 802-

349-0339

TREE WORK at fair prices.

We also do all kinds of house

maintenance and check

ups for second homes. Call

Doug or Kelli 203-942-5905,

hughesdoug8@gmail.com.

ANDREW’S WINDOW

Cleaning - 802-236-5873 -

Professional Window and

Screen Cleaning

WANTED

HIGHEST PRICES PAID

Back home in Vermont

and hope to see new and

returning customers for the

purchase, sale and qualified

appraisal of coins, currency,

stamps, precious metals

in any form, old and high

quality watches and time

pieces, sports and historical

items. Free estimates. No

obligation. Member ANA,

APS, NAWCC, New England

Appraisers Association.

Royal Barnard 802-775-

0085.

EMPLOYMENT

LINE COOK. Hiring now!

Days, year round, open

7-3. The Rochester Cafe &

Country Store in Rochester

is looking for an experienced

line cook to join our team!

Call or text Stephanie at

802-349-4060. Thanks!

HOTEL HOUSEKEEPER

The Mountain Inn is seeking

a full time housekeeper to

join our team. Prior hotel

housekeeping experience

is a must for our newly

renovated property located

at the base of Killington

Resort. We have a great

benefit package including

PTO, 401k, health insurance

plus more! Rate of pay will

be commensurate with

experience.

HELP WANTED- Kitchen,

line cooks, dishwashers and

waitstaff. Full time/part time.

Apply in person at Moguls

Sports Pub.

KILLINGTON RESORT

Grand Hotel Front Desk

Manager. Works with the

hotel manager to ensure

the quality and efficiency

of operations. Visit

Killington.com/jobs to view

the complete job listing.

(800)300-9095 EOE

KILLINGTON RESORT

is now advertising for

their winter positions. Visit

Killington.com/jobs to view

our job listings. (800)300-

9095 EOE

KILLINGTON RESORT

Winter Food and Beverage.

Positions are now being

posted. Visit Killington.com/

jobs to view our job listings.

(800)300-9095 EOE

HOUSEKEEPER- Full time

year round/part time/flex time

positions available. Starting

immediately. Bonus. Please

call 802-422-2300 or email

gail@thekillingtongroup.

com. The Cleaning Crew, 10

West Park Road, Killington.

EQUAL

HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

All real estate and rentals

advertising in this newspaper

is subject to the Federal

Fair Housing Act of 1968

as amended which makes

it illegal to advertise‚ any

preference, limitation or

discrimination based on

race, color, religion, sex,

handicap, family status,

national origin, sexual

orientation, or persons

receiving public assistance,

or an intention to make such

preferences, limitation or

discrimination.

This newspaper will not

knowingly accept any

advertisement which

is in violation of the law.

Our readers are hereby

informed that all dwellings

advertised in this newspaper

are available on an equal

opportunity basis. If you feel

you’ve been discrimination

against, call HUD toll-free at

1-800-669-9777.

Want to submit a

classified?

Email classifieds@

mountaintimes.info

or call 802-422-2399.

Rates are 50 cents per

word, per week; free

ads are free.

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

SUDOKU

PUZZLES page 19

reward

For returning pack and/or any

misc items to Oke O’Brien at the

Inn at the Long Trail.

Grey and Black Sierra backpack

was stolen on Sept. 28.

Contents:

• Medicine/Round pill box

• Paperwork

• Historical papers

• Personal misc stuff that is

loved and missed

“I’m not looking for money, just

want my misc stuff back,” said Oke.

If seen/found call Oke at the Inn at

Long Trail 775-7181. Thank you!


Service Directory

The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020 • 37

WASHBURN & WILSON

AGENCY, INC.

144 Main St. • P.O. Box 77 • Bethel, VT 05032

Providing Insurance for your Home, Auto or Business

Short Term Rentals • High Value Homes

Free Insurance Quotes

Call Mel or Matt 802-234-5188

www.washburnandwilson.com

#1 RENTAL AND MANAGEMENT OFFICE

IN KILLINGTON FOR 45+ YEARS

- INCREASED RENTAL REVENUE

Professional Service, Professional Results

For All Your Plumbing & Heating Needs

Specializing in Home Efficiency & Comfort

24 Hour Emergency Service

(802) 353-0125

— Cabinets

— Countertops

— Flooring

WATER WELLS

PUMPS

COMPLETE

WATER SYSTEMS

HYDRO FRACKING

GEOTHERMAL

East Poultney, VT 05741

802-287-4016

parkerwaterwells.com

Kitchen and Bath

Design, LLC

— Hardware

— Plumbing Fixtures

— Installation

Kelly & Nick | 802.855.8113

125 Valley View Drive, Mendon, Vermont

kndesigns125@gmail.com

GIVE A CALL OR RENT YOUR STORAGE

UNIT ONLINE TODAY!

1723 KILLINGTON ROAD, KILLINGTON, VT

Renovations, Additions & New Construction

Vision

(802) 342-6026

www.VisionBuildersVt.com

FREE ESTIMATES • FULLY INSURED

ALL CALLS RETURNED

ERIC SCHAMBACH • 36 Years Experience

• Structural

Repairs

• Preventative

Maintenance

• Siding

• Framing

• Decks

Clifford Funeral Home

2 Washington Street • Rutland, VT 05701

(802) 773-3010

Gary H. Clifford • James J. Clifford

- PROPERTY MANAGEMENT SERVICES

PRIVATE HOMES AND CONDOS, ASSOCIATIONS

- CONCIERGE SERVICES

FOR OWNERS WHO RENT THEMSELVES

- STEAM CARPET AND UPHOLSTERY CLEANING

KILLINGTONGROUP.COM

KILLINGTON ROAD - (802) 422-2300

RED DUCK

REFUSE RECYCLE

Weekly • Bi-Weekly • Seasonal • Year-Round

802-422-2230

Reliable Service Since 1980

candido electric

residential & light commercial • licensed & insured

office: 802.772.7221

cell: 802.353.8177

frank candido rutland/killington

candidoelectric@yahoo.com

we help you see the light!

Transportation to low cost cat spay/neuter clinic Nov. 9

RCHS is working with VT-CAN! Spay/Neuter

Clinic, a low cost cat spay/neuter clinic in

Middlesex, to offer transportation from RCHS to

Middlesex and back on Nov. 9. If interested please

e-mail info@vt-can.org and schedule for Nov. 9.

Please include your name, phone number, complete

address (no PO boxes), e-mail address, your

cat’s name, sex, age, color and whether it’s long

or short hair. $75 includes the surgery, rabies,

distemper and Revolution. If you want Revolution

and Dewormer, the fee is $85. You would need to

drop your cat off at RCHS at 6 a.m. and pick your

cat up later that day, likely around 6 p.m. Space is

limited so sign up today.

For All Your Home and

Commercial Petroleum Needs

746-8018 • 1-800-281-8018

Route 100, Pittsfield, VT 05762 • cvoil.com


38 • REAL ESTATE

The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020

151 Acres in the Heart of the Green

Mountains. This extraordinary

property provides astonishing views

from the proposed homesite -Mount

Washington to the east, Camel’s

Hump to the north, Killington & Pico

to the south and Sable Mountain to

the west. A four-bedroom septic

system is in place and the property

features several existing structures,

including a 30 x 60 garage &

workshop w/beautiful living

quarters above. The land features

numerous trails, direct VAST trail

access and a complete forestry plan.

There are few opportunities to own a

legacy property of this caliber where

you can design and build an estate

that will endure for generations.

Offered at $998,000

www.117InnsbruckLane.com

See videos of all our listings on

YouTube!

www.2076SouthHillRoad

One of the Strongest Investment

Opportunities in Killington.

Completely renovated inside and

out, 8BR duplex. This is a legal

two-family home in rental-ready

condition, complete w/required

code-compliant features. If a

large, single-family home is a

better fit, the dividing wall on the

main level has been reconfigured

as a non-load bearing wall for

easy conversion. This turn-key

investment property with solid

income history is offered fully

furnished and ready for winter

rentals. Offered at $724,900

2814 Killington Rd.

802-422-3600

www.KillingtonPicoRealty.com

REALTOR ®

Celebrating

30 years!

802.775.5111 • 335 Killington Rd. • Killington, VT 05751

QUALITY HOME ON 4.2A+/-

• 4 Bedrooms + Den,office,

rec room

• Lg. kitchen,fam.rm.lv.rm,dn.rm

• Porch,Patio,4 car garage

• Solar panels, Heat pump,Oil

• Landscaped, $620,000

WORK FROM HOME

ON DEPOSIT

• 4BR, 3.5 BA, 3100 sq.ft.,

3.8 Ac

• 2 car garage, priv. office

above

• Sunporch, patio

• Fireplace, wood stove

• Call for an appointment.

$365K

MTN GREEN – MAIN BLDG (#3)

• 1BR/1BA: $124K-$142,500

• Onsite: Indoor & Outdoor Pools,

Whirlpl, Restaurant, Ski & Gift

Shops, Pilate Studio, Racquetball/basketball;

Shuttle Bus

SKI HOME - SHUTTLE OUT

• Edgemont ..This won’t last!

• 3 bedrm. 1 1/2 bath

• 2 Level Master bedrm

with deck

• Wood burning frpl

• $149,000

SPECTACULAR KILLINGTON HOME SITE 7.42A+/-

• Privacy on a Large Buildling site

in Killington

• Inground septic design for 4

bedrooms

• 7.42A +/- Views,

• Level Building area

• 3 Underground spring fed ponds

• $170,000

BEAUTIFUL COUNTRY SETTING CHITTENDEN

• Beautiful country setting Chittenden

• 3Bedrm.2Bath Home

• Vast trail out your door

• Minutes to Chittenden reservoir

• 4.8A +/_Barn and outbuilding

• Septic permit allows for 4 bedroom

• $405,000

SKI IN-SHUTTLE OUT – TRAIL CREEK

• 1 BR/1BA, 785 sf., fireplace

• Propane heat, skylight, stacked w/dryer

• Deck, mud-entry room w/bench/closet

• On site: indoor pool/whirlpool, rec room

• Owner’s closet, furnished & equipped

• 18-hole golf course across the road

$189K

LOCATION & OPEN FLOOR PLAN

• 3BR, 3BA, office area,storage space

• Wood floors, lrg fireplc & hearth,

family rm

• Paved driveway, 2-car garage

• Turn-key home, furnished & equipped

• Home freshly painted, inside & out

• Winter retreat or full-time home

$664K

SKI-IN/SHUTTLE-OUT - WHIFFLETREE

ON DEPOSIT

• 1BR/1BA, 3rd level,

$114,900

• Updated, walk-out level, 1BR/1BA,

$134,500

• New appliances, granite counters & tiled bath

• Energy-efficient radiators & new sliders

• Short walk to outdoor pool & playground

• Winter shuttle bus route, hi-end BR furniture

• Adjacent to golf course. Furnished.

TRAILSIDE ON GREAT EASTERN TRAILSIDE DR

• Can’t beat this

• Very rare Trailside location

• Build your dream house

• state permit engineering

in process

• level Driveway.Great

access to & from trail

• $400,000

Daniel Pol

Associate Broker

Kyle Kershner

Broker/Owner

Jessica Posch

Realtor

Joseph Kozlar

Realtor

Jane Johnson,

ALHS, ASP(r)

Realtor

Lenore

Bianchi

‘tricia

Carter

Meghan

Charlebois

Merisa

Sherman

Pat

Linnemayr

Chris

Bianchi

Katie

McFadden

Over 140 Years Experience in the Killington Region REALTOR

Michelle

Lord

Kerry

Dismuke

MULTIPLE LISTING SERVICE

MLS

®

PEAK

PROPERTY

G R O U P

AT

802.353.1604

VTPROPERTIES.NET

IDEAL PROPERTIES CLOSE TO

KILLINGTON, OKEMO OR WOODSTOCK!

HOMES | CONDOS | LAND

COMMERCIAL INVESTMENT

AMAZING VIEWS

CLOSE TO KILLINGTON

OR OKEMO.

88+ ACRES development

potential! 5 bed/2 bath

home, 1 bed/1 bath apt,

2 car garage, 3 bay pole

barn & sugarhouse.

DIRECT ACCESS TO

VAST TRAILS! $599K

SNOWMOBILE

FROM YOUR DOOR

TO VAST TRAILS!

Gorgeous custom built

Post & Beam mountain

retreat! 4 bedrooms/

5 baths. Minutes to

Killington. Strong rental

investment. Great short

term rental potential.

$589,900

Marni Rieger

802.353.1604

Tucker A. Lange

303.818.8068

Marni@PeakPropertyRealEstate.com

59 Central Street, Woodstock VT

505 Killington Road, Killington VT

MENDON --BRAND NEW HOME!

COMPLETION DATE 10/31/20. High

end interior finishings throughout, inquire

for detailed list. 2 car attached garage.

1 min. to Pico. Property abuts state land.

MUST SEE! $549K

MAGICAL SPOT ON 350 FEET OF FRONTAGE ON LAKE

AMHERST. Minutes to Killington or Okemo. This special

property is being offered with a 1 bedroom plus den log home,

one car garage & 1 bedroom cottage. Amazing lake views from

every window. ACT NOW. $559,900

SKI IN/ SKI OUT MOUNTAIN CHALET ON

PICO! Only SLOPESIDE home on market at

Pico! Totally renovated open floor plan, 3 bed

+ den/rec room, 2 baths & great ski storage/

mud room! ACT NOW! $469K


The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020 REAL ESTATE • 39

Clean up: Volunteer efforts remove large amounts of trash from rivers

>

from page 3

their photos and stories online to connect

with each other in a new way using

#RiverWitness.”

Groups included local river and conservation

groups; elementary, high school,

and college students; Girl and Boy Scouts;

and many employee volunteer groups

from local businesses.

Final trash totals are still being tallied.

Drought conditions across the region

lowered water levels and revealed trash

that had been hidden underwater for

decades. One aspect of the Source to Sea

Cleanup that wasn’t possible this year was

coordination to remove large debris like

abandoned cars and boats, an oil pipe and

platform, tanks, and multiple tire dumps.

“Large items like these require special

equipment and coordination. Some

require permits,” said Andrew Fisk, CRC’s

executive director. “If anyone wants to help

out and has boats, large trucks, winches, or

SCUBA skills, please get in touch.”

Now, focus shifts to preventing trash in

the first place. While the Cleanup event is

over for this year, CRC continues to work

on trash pollution year-round.

“Our work isn’t done until we put ourselves

out of the river clean-up business,”

continued Fisk. After cleaning up more

than 1,167 tons of trash over the past 23

years, CRC argues that repeated cleaning is

not the solution to our trash problem.

CRC is working with partners across

New England on laws and policies that will

improve recycling, redesign our single-use

economy to prevent waste, and extend

producer responsibility to include the

entire life cycle of products.

“We all have a responsibility to solve

this problem—individuals, manufacturers,

businesses, and government,” said

Fisk. “We need to show our legislators,

businesses, and manufacturers just how

bad the problem is and tell them – as

their constituents and customers – that

we can’t ignore this problem any longer.

We’ve been doing our part for 24 years

by cleaning up our rivers. It’s time they

finally do their part in helping solve our

trash problem. These ideas are going to

take time, decades even. And we’ll keep

at it as long as it takes. But our rivers

need us to start now.”

Eversource, USA Waste & Recycling, and

All American Waste are the Lead Source

to Sea Cleanup sponsors. “Sustaining the

environment for generations to come

drives our decisions as a family and company,”

said Frank M. Antonacci, COO of

USA Waste & Recycling. “The Source to Sea

Cleanup is very special to us – our family of

employees and their families participate in

this cleanup year after year and we donate

dumpster services to ensure the waste

collected is disposed of in a responsible

manner. CRC does a great job organizing

and we are proud to be a part of it!”

“We take great care to promote conservation

and protection of wildlife, natural

and cultural resources and strive to foster

the long-term vitality of the land we manage,”

said Eversource Manager of Sustainability

Clare Connolly.

Bret Williamson

BROKER, OWNER

FOR SALE IN KILLINGTON

47 McClallen Drive, Killington $529,000

Rare Investment Opportunity, 7-bedroom, 2-family

home located just of the Killington Road. Updates

include new carpeting in upper and lower units -rental

ready with separate utilities on each unit. Property is

being sold fully furnished.

135 East Mountain, Killington $169,900

This 2 bedroom 1.5 bathroom Mountain Green condo

is located on the top floor of building 1 with windows

facingthe woods and Killington Peak. Sold fully furnished

and with recently updated flooring, appliances and

water heater, your vacation home is move-in ready.

Judy Storch

BROKER

Alan Root

REALTOR ®

802-422-3610 killingtonvalleyrealestate.com

298 Prior Drive, Killington $ 1,100,000

This 4934 square foot, exquisitely detailed Tudor style

home would be stunning in any setting; situated as it is,

on a lush, impressively private 20 acre lot, this property

is in a class by itself. A five bedroom home, surrounded

by the grandeur of the green mountains.

Mountain Green 1 bdrm, Killington $ 111,900

Located in building 1, on C level this unit offers you the

least amount of stairs and is a short walk to building 3

which is the home to an indoor pool, hot tub, exercise

equipment, spa, services, dining & shopping as well as

a restaurant and ski shop.

Sarah Vigneau

REALTOR ®

LAKE ST. CATHERINE

views

77 Carver Street, Brandon, VT

$84,500 | MLS#4788407

9 Deer Street, Rutland City, VT

$155,000 | MLS#4815332

4 Taplin Road, Barre, VT

$545,000

3997 US 7 Route, Pittsford, VT

$89,900 | MLS#4803499

2826 Main Road, West Haven, VT

$199,000 | MLS#4818153

90 Center Street, Rutland City

$300,000 | MLS#4805730

237 Kinni Kinnic Lane, Poultney

$799, 000 MLS#4817250

233 Stratton Road, Rutland City, VT

$129,500 | MLS#4821043

206 Adams Street, Rutland City, VT

$244,000 | MLS#4823386

1851 York Street Extension, Poultney

$310,000 | MLS#4805347

Our Approach

Our office will follow the Vermont

Department of Health and CDC

guidelines and put your safety

first as you find your new home.

93 Baxter Street, Rutland City, VT

$135,000 | MLS#4816362

456 Hartsboro Road, Wallingford, VT

$225,000 | MLS#4822291

14 Franklin Street, Brandon

$374,900 | MLS#4796653

Alison

McCullough

Real Estate

ALISONM C CULLOUGHREALESTATE.COM

29 Center Street, Suite 1 • Downtown Rutland, VT • 802.747.8822


40 • The Mountain TimesOct. 21-27, 2020

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