DESIGN Anytime - Robin Boyd

craftact

To connect with audiences who cannot physically make it to Canberra during the festival, DESIGN Canberra is curating a DESIGN Anytime program. This new program includes self-guided tours of iconic architecture and contemporary design throughout Canberra. This will promote and celebrate Canberra as a global city of design every day of the year.
This zine was created for the 2020 DESIGN Canberra festival, as a curated collection of highlights of Robin Boyd’s architectural career in Canberra. This design experience can be enjoyed as a series of leisurely reflections over a week or an exciting day trip through the city.

Robin Boyd

Self-guided architectural tour

One city

200+ events

9—29 November

DesignCanberraFestival.com.au

DESIGN

Anytime


Introduction

DESIGN Canberra celebrates and promotes

Canberra as a global city of design. It is an

annual program that has been running seven

years strong.

The festival is presented by Craft ACT: Craft + Design Centre, a respected

and nearly 50-year-old membership organisation which represents the

Canberra region’s designers, artists and craftspeople at every stage of

their careers. Craft ACT is home to a community of glass artists, furniture

makers, textiles artists, ceramic artists and jewellers, and collaborates with

designers and architects across many disciplines.

CANBERRA

DESIGN

FESTIVAL

Back Cover: Manning Clark House

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Photo: Martin Miles


H1

Heading

H2 Heading

The self-guided tour

To connect with audiences who cannot physically

make it to Canberra during the festival, DESIGN

Canberra is curating a DESIGN Anytime program.

This new program includes self-guided tours of iconic

architecture and contemporary design throughout

Canberra. This will promote and celebrate Canberra as

a global city of design every day of the year.

Quote –“It was the biggest job ever built in

Australia at the time – a million square feet – it

was a city not a building! And I’m much more

interested in the building as part of the city,

in the urban forms of things, than I am in the

individual gem.”

This zine was created for the 2020 DESIGN Canberra

festival, as a curated collection of highlights of Robin

Boyd’s architectural career in Canberra. This design

experience can be enjoyed as a series of leisurely

reflections over a week or an exciting day trip through

the city.

3

Guidelines and etiquette

When taking this self-guided tour please be respectful

of the occupants of the buildings. By using this zine

you agree to comply with the following housekeeping

Body – Design Canberra celebrates and promotes Canberra

rules:

as a global city of design. It is an annual program that has

• View private property been running from the six street years or strong. footpath. The Do festival is presented by

not step onto private Craft ACT: property Craft at + any Design time. Centre, a respected and nearly

• Do not take photographs

50-year- old

of

membership

house interiors

organisation

or the

which represents the

buidling owners

Canberra

and occupants

region’s

and

designers,

respect their

artists and craftspeople at every

property.

stage of their careers. Craft ACT is home to a community

of glass artists, furniture makers, textiles artists, ceramic

artists and jewellers, and collaborates with designers and

architectsacross many disciplines.

Access. Body –Access details


Robin Boyd

Robin Boyd was a distinguished architect, writer and social

commentator and throughout the 1940s and 1950s was

Australia’s leading proponent of the modern movement. Boyd

made an important contribution to Canberra’s architectural

landscape during the 1950s and 1960s.

In 1953, Boyd formed the practice of Grounds, Romberg

and Boyd alongside Melbourne architects Roy Grounds and

Frederick Romberg. They practiced extensively in Australian

capital cities, including Canberra, where they maintained an

office

Boyd held a lifelong interest in modern architecture, and the

suburban house was often the focus of his work, both in design

and writing. Boyd’s influential book, The Australian Ugliness

(1960), critiqued the prevailing cultural and architectural tastes

in Australia at the time, condemning the visual pollution of

ornamental styles and decrying featurism.

With 2019 being the centenary of design for architect Robin

Boyd, this tour revisits the work of one of Australia’s most

influential designers.

Photo: Robin Boyd, 1979 by Mark Strizic.

Sourced from robinboyd.org.au

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Travel Route

Scan the QR code or click on

this click to access the map

A. Churchill House

B. Roche House

C. Manning Clark House

D. Verge House

216 Northbourne Avenue, Braddon

4 Bedford Street, Deakin

11 Tasmania Circuit, Forrest

204 Monaro Crescent, Red Hill


Churchill House

1969-1971

Churchill House was Boyd’s last major commission, and

he died prior to its completion in 1971. It is one of a small

number of opportunities Boyd had to work on a larger

project.

Churchill House was commissioned for the Winston

Churchill Memorial Trust of Australia. The complex is

made up of a main building that connects an east and

south wing, a separate pavilion, the central pool, and a

rear car park. The main building and northern pavilion

form an L shape which encloses the courtyard, an

example of Boyd’s interest in creating intimate outdoor

spaces in his designs.

The key feature of the building is the central pool,

flanked by walls of precast concrete fins for sun

protection and vertical slit windows.

ADDRESS. 216 Northbourne Avenue, Braddon

Churchill House. Photo: Darren Bradley @modarchitecture.


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Roche House

1954

‘The suburb was the major

element of Australian society.”’

This unpretentious, one bedroom plus study house was

designed by Boyd for Dr Hilary and Barbara Roche in

1954. Dr Roche came to Canberra from Melbourne in the

early 1950s to work in the Department of Health (Division

of Tuberculosis).

The house was designed in the early stages of the

Grounds, Romberg and Boyd partnership and is a good

example of Boyd’s more economical designs from the

early 1950s: linear, single storey houses sited on narrow

blocks with long unbroken rooflines, widely projecting

eaves and large areas of timber-framed windows.

These high-set windows are of particular interest here,

allowing the roof form to appear to ‘float’ above the

simple rectangular shape of the house. The waist height,

horizontal windows are designed to offer glimpses of the

landscape while the inhabitants of the house are seated.

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ADDRESS. 4 Bedford Street, Deakin 2600

Roche House. Photo: By AYArktos - Own work, CC BY-SA 2.5, https://

commons. wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=554721 wikimedia.

org/w/index.php?curid=554721


8710


Manning Clark

House

1952

Boyd designed this house for Professor Manning and

Dymphna Clark in 1952. In July 1949, the Clarks had

moved to Canberra from Melbourne for Manning

to take up the post of professor of history at what

would become the Australian National University. The

Manning Clark House was one of the first modernist

houses built in post-war Canberra.

The house has a low-pitched gable roof, widely

projecting eaves and large areas of timber framed

windows. Two separate parallel wings divide the

living and sleeping areas, which are connected by a

glass walled passage and entrance. Either side of this

passage is a courtyard, one facing north and the other

(the main entrance) facing south.

Visible from the street is the famous study, positioned

over the entrance. It is here that Clark wrote his six

volume History of Australia.

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ADDRESS. 11 Tasmania Circuit, Forrest

Manning Clark House. Photo: ManningClarkHouse.com


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The Verge

House

1963-64

The Verge House was designed by Robin Boyd in 1964

for Will Graves Verge, the grandson of the leading

colonial architect, John Verge.

Boyd had a keen interest in early colonial architecture

and believed that John Verge’s Elizabeth Bay House

had ‘the most famous architectural detail in the

country’—a cantilevered staircase which lead to a

gallery capped by a domed ceiling with lantern-like

windows.

Boyd paid homage to this by constructing a central

staircase for the Verge House which led to a gallery

connecting all the main rooms. The house is topped

by an octagonal skylight, which lights the central

space of the dwelling.

Observe from the street how the house is flanked

by wide timber-lined eaves which are shaved back

at the four corner pillars: the house is essentially a

square with truncated corners, but with an octagonal

roof. All rooms are arranged aroeyeund a two-storey,

octagonal central atrium and main stair landing.

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ADDRESS. 204 Monaro Crescent, Red Hill

Verge House. Photo: Darren Bradley @modarchitecture.


PROUDLY PRESENTED BY

GOVERNMENT PARTNERS

Craft ACT Craft and Design Centre is

supported by the ACT Government, the Visual

Arts and Craft Strategy - an initiative of the

Australian, State and Territory Governments,

and the Australia Council for the Arts - the

Australian Governments arts funding and

advisory body.

PLATINUM PARTNERS

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