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Content<br />

<strong>International</strong> <strong>Forum</strong> on Football for the Community<br />

Short <strong>Summaries</strong> & <strong>Final</strong> <strong>Declaration</strong><br />

1 Opening Ceremony <strong>International</strong> Swiss U16 Cup ............................................................... 2<br />

2 Opening Ceremony <strong>International</strong> <strong>Forum</strong> on Football for the Community......................... 2<br />

2.1 Hans Brunhart, Board of Directors <strong>Scort</strong> Foundation .................................................. 3<br />

2.2 Wilfried Lemke, United Nations....................................................................................... 3<br />

2.3 Tim Vine, Premier League................................................................................................ 4<br />

2.4 Klaus Fuchs, Volkswagen AG ......................................................................................... 4<br />

2.5 Dr. Gregor Hovemann & Tim Breitbarth, Sporthochschule Köln (German Sport<br />

University Cologne).......................................................................................................... 5<br />

3 2 nd Day of the <strong>International</strong> <strong>Forum</strong> on Football for the Community................................... 5<br />

3.1 Welcome Address ............................................................................................................ 5<br />

3.2 Klaus-Dieter Fischer, Werder Bremen ............................................................................ 6<br />

3.3 Bill Bygroves, Liverpool FC............................................................................................. 6<br />

3.4 Eli A. Wolff, Northeastern University Boston ................................................................ 7<br />

3.5 Marco Bode, deepblue sports ......................................................................................... 7<br />

3.6 Jürgen Griesbeck, streetfootballworld ........................................................................... 8<br />

3.7 Amy Farkas, UNICEF ........................................................................................................ 8<br />

3.8 Brian Klein, AFRICA TEN ................................................................................................. 9<br />

3.9 Prof. Dr. Norbert Müller, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz ................................ 9<br />

3.10 Anna-Lisa Schwarz, Bundesliga-Stiftung (Bundesliga Foundation) ......................... 10<br />

3.11 Panel Discussion ............................................................................................................ 10<br />

3.12 Close Statement ............................................................................................................. 11<br />

3.13 Closing Words ................................................................................................................ 12<br />

4 <strong>Final</strong> <strong>Declaration</strong> ................................................................................................................... 13<br />

1


1 Opening Ceremony <strong>International</strong> Swiss U16 Cup<br />

From left to right: Massimo Busacca, Hanspeter<br />

Rothmund, Wilfried Lemke and Hugo Quaderer<br />

(© Michele Willi)<br />

Secretary-General on Sport for Development<br />

and Peace and patron of the event, praised<br />

the event as an opportunity to bring together<br />

young people from all over the world. According<br />

to Mr. Lemke, more important than the<br />

result of the tournament is the nature of the<br />

event as a peaceful gathering of all participants,<br />

regardless of cultural and religious<br />

background. Following the speeches, the<br />

Special Guest Team Sudan played against<br />

Newcastle United FC in the opening match.<br />

The match was led by the well-known FIFA-<br />

Referee Massimo Busacca.<br />

Organisers and supporters of the <strong>International</strong><br />

Swiss U16 Cup launched the event by offering<br />

brief introductory speeches. First, the players<br />

and the other guests were welcomed by<br />

Hanspeter Rothmund, CEO of the <strong>Scort</strong> Foundation<br />

and President of the Organising Committee<br />

of the tournament. Hugo Quaderer, Minister<br />

for Sport of the Principality of Liechtenstein,<br />

continued by noting the value of the humanitarian<br />

and social aspects offered by the tourna-<br />

ment – aspects that account for his country’s<br />

support of the tournament.<br />

<strong>Final</strong>ly, Willi Lemke, Special Adviser to the UN<br />

2 Opening Ceremony <strong>International</strong> <strong>Forum</strong> on Football for the Community<br />

Moderator: Victor Rohner<br />

Victor Rohner (© Michele Willi)<br />

Wilfried Lemke, UN Special Adviser and Patron of Cup<br />

and <strong>Forum</strong> (© Andreas Hörner)<br />

“Viva la vida” – with this impressively performed song by Coldplay,<br />

Andrew Coleman offered a reflective and dynamic start to the Opening<br />

Ceremony of the <strong>International</strong> <strong>Forum</strong> on Football for the Community.<br />

Host Victor Rohner welcomed all participants in the name of <strong>Scort</strong> and<br />

discussed what makes the work of the foundation so important – its<br />

effort to achieve social engagement and responsibility in and through<br />

football. Mr. Rohner then presented a video showing emotional moments<br />

from different football-related <strong>Scort</strong> projects in Kosovo, Liechtenstein,<br />

and Sudan. With his credo “Football for the community –<br />

responsibility for today and tomorrow“, Mr. Rohner passed the stage to<br />

Mr. Hans Brunhart, member of the Board of Directors of <strong>Scort</strong>.<br />

2


2.1 Hans Brunhart, Board of Directors <strong>Scort</strong> Foundation<br />

Address of Welcome<br />

Hans Brunhart, Member of the <strong>Scort</strong> Foundation’s<br />

Board of Directors, welcomed all participants in the<br />

name of <strong>Scort</strong>, an organization that works to meet<br />

its social obligations by encouraging football clubs to<br />

become engaged in social activities. He excused<br />

Gigi Oeri, President of the <strong>Scort</strong> Foundation and the<br />

FC Basel, due to an important qualification match of<br />

her team. Mr. Brunhart explained that as the most<br />

popular sport in the world, football has the power to<br />

bring about social change. However, many clubs do<br />

not take advantage of football’s positive potential.<br />

Hans Brunhart (© Michele Willi)<br />

Mr. Brunhart emphasized that the aim should therefore<br />

be to create networks, offering a platform for exchange between diverse interest groups. The<br />

creation of these networks will only succeed through the use of communication and cooperation.<br />

“Football can do more”, Mr. Brunhart finally claimed. It should therefore be used to bring young<br />

people together and offer them perspectives for a peaceful future.<br />

2.2 Wilfried Lemke, United Nations<br />

Special Adviser to the UN Secretary-General on Sport for Development and Peace<br />

Patron of the <strong>International</strong> <strong>Forum</strong> on Football for the Community & <strong>International</strong> Swiss U16 Cup<br />

“Unifying our youth through sport: The role of the United Nations”<br />

In his presentation, Wilfried Lemke, patron of the <strong>Forum</strong> and Special Adviser to the UN Secretary-<br />

General on Sport for Development and Peace, spoke about the role of sport in development of<br />

young people, highlighting the importance of mutual respect. After passing along kind regards<br />

from the UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, Lemke offered an overview of the global work of<br />

the United Nations. Using an example from Africa,<br />

Lemke emphasized the unique ability of sport to<br />

give people hope and encourage teenagers to fight<br />

against violence and drugs. “Sport is a wonderful<br />

means of bringing people together”, the avowed<br />

soccer fan stated. “It helps people respect each<br />

other”, he continued.<br />

Educating coaches and trainers is essential to sustaining<br />

and increasing society’s enthusiasm for<br />

football. In order to bring about this goal, there is a<br />

need to build networks. In this context, Lemke<br />

Wilfried Lemke (© Michele Willi)<br />

lauded the <strong>Scort</strong> Foundation, proclaiming, “What<br />

you are doing is exactly right!” Lemke concluded by reinforcing a message from the United Nations<br />

– that changes can occur, especially in conflict areas, through the use of the positive values<br />

of sport. To reach this goal, people must stand and work together.<br />

3


2.3 Tim Vine, Premier League<br />

“Creating Chances - the Premier League off the pitch”<br />

Tim Vine, Director Public Relations of the English<br />

Premier League, presented in his speech different<br />

projects currently being conducted by this football<br />

league. Social engagement has a long tradition in<br />

England. Many well-known teams participate in<br />

initiatives that use sports to change communities<br />

and society as a whole for the better. Mr. Vine<br />

described “Creating Chances”, a fund whose<br />

goals include social integration, education, health,<br />

and equal rights for children and young adults.<br />

Tim Vine<br />

Since its creation in 2000, “Creating Chances”<br />

(© Andreas Hörner)<br />

has expanded the quantity and quality of its activities.<br />

As explained by Mr. Vine, all funding provided by top leagues is specifically transferred to<br />

social projects. One especially successful project has been “Kickz”, which has reached a large<br />

number of teenagers liing in suburbs that struggle with a range of problems. Mr. Vine’s presentation<br />

ultimately highlighted the contribution of well-known Premier League players, who support<br />

different projects all over the world.<br />

2.4 Klaus Fuchs, Volkswagen AG<br />

“VfL Wolfsburg or World Cup 2010 in South Africa – no Sponsorship without the Heart and<br />

Social Competence”<br />

“Of course, the activities implemented by Volkswagon are always in line with the company´s economic<br />

interests, but not exclusively…” The head of the Sports-Communication Department of<br />

Volkswagen, Mr. Klaus Fuchs emphasized that sponsorship should never be undertaken without<br />

a commitment to social responsibility. He explained that the public´s acceptance of sponsorship<br />

could be improved in society through charitable projects. Furthermore, he stressed the importance<br />

of the German football club, VfL Wolfsburg, as a “social daughter” of Volkswagen.<br />

In order to demonstrate the social aspects of<br />

Volkswagen´s sponsorship initiatives, Mr.<br />

Fuchs highlighted projects like the Wölfeclub<br />

and the Krzysztof-Nowak-Foundation. The<br />

permanent presence of the club in social life<br />

is proof of the intensive cooperation between<br />

Volkswagen and VfL. Mr. Fuchs further demonstrated<br />

Volkswagen´s support of international<br />

projects by showing how Volkswagen<br />

not only financially but also personally supports<br />

South Africa in its efforts prepare for the<br />

FIFA World Cup 2010.<br />

Klaus Fuchs (© Michele Willi)<br />

4


2.5 Dr. Gregor Hovemann & Tim Breitbarth, Sporthochschule Köln (German Sport University<br />

Cologne)<br />

“Corporate Social Responsibility in Football”<br />

Footballl can do more ... This statement is indisputable. But how can football be used for social<br />

and non-profit purposes? To answer this question, initiated by the <strong>Scort</strong> Foundation, the Institute<br />

of Sport Economics and Sport Management at the German Sport University Cologne developed a<br />

research proposal to study the application and evaluation of corporate social responsibility (CSR)<br />

in European football. The study aims to investigate<br />

CSR in the context of European football,<br />

focussing on the top leagues of Switzerland,<br />

Germany and England. It also aims to contribute<br />

to the analysis, presentation, and optimisation of<br />

CSR activities. The motives of the football clubs,<br />

as well as those of their sponsors, are firmly in<br />

focus. Initial results of the study, which is<br />

planned to continue through May 2011, show<br />

that the CSR activities in the leagues considered<br />

differ. Furthermore, the clubs have set up different<br />

objectives than their corresponding sponsor-<br />

Dr. Gregor Hovemann (© Michele Willi)<br />

ing partners (value-based/idealistic vs. economic).<br />

Although not having necessarily the<br />

same understanding of CSR, the clubs and their sponsors seem to complement each other in<br />

current CSR co-operations.<br />

3 2 nd Day of the <strong>International</strong> <strong>Forum</strong> on Football for the Community<br />

3.1 Welcome Address<br />

Peter Gilliéron, President Swiss Football Association (SFV)<br />

Rheinhard Walser, President Liechtenstein Football Association (LFV)<br />

The Presidents of the Football Association of Switzerland and Liechtenstein welcomed the guests<br />

on the second day of the <strong>Forum</strong> underlining the<br />

important social role of football. Especially in<br />

these times, where negative headlines dominate<br />

here and there, the social capability of football<br />

should be more benefitted from. Reinhard Walser<br />

emphasized concluding that it is very important<br />

“that we do not only talk about what is good in<br />

sports, but that we act”, and opened in this manner<br />

the second range of topics of the <strong>Forum</strong>: “Local<br />

and international engagement of football<br />

Peter Gilliéron (left) and Reinhard Walser<br />

(© Katie Scholl)<br />

teams in support of the development of the<br />

youth.”<br />

5


3.2 Klaus-Dieter Fischer, Werder Bremen<br />

“Social Responsibility of a Professional Football Club”<br />

“We cannot change the world on our own, but<br />

we place the first pieces of a puzzle!” Klaus-<br />

Dieter Fischer, President of the Werder Bremen<br />

football club, chose this motto to serve as the<br />

guideline of his speech, which centred upon the<br />

responsibility of professional football clubs to<br />

attend to their social duties. Fischer presented<br />

numerous social projects being undertaken by<br />

his football club and highlighted one of the<br />

club’s initiatives, which fights against discrimination<br />

and violence. He explained his belief that<br />

Klaus-Dieter Fischer (© Katie Scholl)<br />

issues of discrimination and violence had not<br />

yet been adequately addressed during the forum. Fischer continued by underscoring the enormous<br />

impact generated by the exemplary actions of professional football players. He emphasized<br />

the importance of capitalizing upon such positive actions as a means of counteracting the potentially<br />

adverse aspects of sport. Fischer concluded by expressing his desire that top football associations<br />

increase their support for social initiatives in the future.<br />

3.3 Bill Bygroves, Liverpool FC<br />

“Liverpool FC in the Community”<br />

Using illustrative slides and pictures, Bill Bygroves, Head of the Community Department of Liverpool<br />

FC, presented the social and charitable activities<br />

of his club. These activities range in focus,<br />

operating in the social sector on both a national<br />

and international level. The eighteen full time staff<br />

and forty seasonal staff members who comprise<br />

Liverpool´s community department are responsible<br />

for the various projects, such as football camps<br />

offered free of charge to socially deprived and<br />

disabled children. In close partnership with regional<br />

schools and institutions, the club engages in<br />

Bill Bygroves programs that work to prevent drug use and fight<br />

(© Katie Scholl)<br />

against racism. The “Young Person of the Year<br />

Award” is presented annually to children who have shown outstanding social commitment. All<br />

activities are financed by the club, the city, and the Premier League.<br />

6


3.4 Eli A. Wolff, Northeastern University Boston<br />

“Can I play too? - Equality, Community and Sport as a Human Right for All”<br />

Eli A. Wolff’s presentation dealt with equality and community in sport, particularly in football. He<br />

drew attention to the disparity of opportunity in the<br />

sporting world, whereby some individuals and<br />

communities are excluded from the most basic<br />

sporting and physical activities. Viewing sport as a<br />

universal human right and as a catalyst for positive<br />

human and community development, Mr. Wolff<br />

emphasized that every individual must be given<br />

the opportunity to participate in sports, without<br />

discrimination of any kind. The practice of sport<br />

should occur in the Olympic spirit, which requires<br />

mutual understanding and a spirit of friendship,<br />

Eli A. Wolff (© Katie Scholl)<br />

solidarity, and fair play. Mr. Wolff argued for the<br />

development of a strategy of athletes, advocates, and strategic allies to help break down barriers<br />

and thereby create a more inclusive and equitable society.<br />

3.5 Marco Bode, deepblue sports<br />

“The Social Dedication of a Professional Football Player - on the Example of the „One Nation<br />

Cup”<br />

Marco Bode, former Professional Football Player of Werder Bremen and Player of the German<br />

national team, highlighted how a Football Player can also be socially engaged beyond the pitch to<br />

teach children and teenagers values as fairness and<br />

social cooperation. “We, as Professional Football<br />

Players can be figures of identification and therefore<br />

are able to teach values and emotions easily to kids.“<br />

Bode explains that for himself it is not the money and<br />

glory, which he relates to football but rather friendship<br />

and the meaning of “Fair Play“. As one of the founders,<br />

Bode also presented the “One Nation Cup”,<br />

which was held in Bremen in the run-up of the Football<br />

World Cup 2006. Ten youth teams from every<br />

Marco Bode (© Katie Scholl)<br />

continent participated at the tournament. „Not only<br />

classical club teams participated at the “One Nation Cup” but also a Football team, composed of<br />

street children“, explained Bode. Because of the success, the “One Nation Cup” could be hold<br />

again in Durban; this time with 16 teams from all over the world. On the occasion of the Woman’s<br />

Football World Cup 2011 the Cup will be hold in Germany again. Then, girls will participate the<br />

first time.<br />

7


3.6 Jürgen Griesbeck, streetfootballworld<br />

“Development through Football – a Networking Approach”<br />

After sport has been accepted to contribute to an important extent to social change, it is now time<br />

to define factors of success, quality standards<br />

as well as innovative and efficient ways of cooperation<br />

among all actors engaged in the field<br />

of CSR. Jürgen Griesbeck, founder and CEO of<br />

streetfootballworld, presented during his<br />

Jürgen Griesbeck (© Katie Scholl)<br />

speech about “Development through football –<br />

a Networking Approach” his company’s method<br />

of operation. He focused on “how” the network<br />

acts instead of explaining “what” the content of<br />

the work is. Griesbeck considers trust and<br />

transparency among co-operation partners to<br />

be the most important factors of success and<br />

principles of streetfootballworld. Furthermore<br />

an outstanding individual intention beyond personal interests to contribute to social change is<br />

indispensable. Another crucial factor is to aim for fair co-operation of organisations and protagonists<br />

in the field of action. Existing platforms must be used to exchange ideas and to support and<br />

assist each other.<br />

3.7 Amy Farkas, UNICEF<br />

“Improving Children’s Lives and Strengthening Communities: UNICEF’s Sport for Development<br />

Approach”<br />

Amy Farkas, UNICEF Sport for Development Specialist, discussed the approach adopted by<br />

UNICEF to improve the lives of children and<br />

strengthen communities through sport. As Ms.<br />

Farkas explained, football reaches millions of children<br />

worldwide. UNICEF sees sport not only as a<br />

right in itself, but also as a tool that allows children<br />

to develop mentally and physically. Based upon<br />

years of experience, UNICEF has identified two<br />

main components to its approach. First, initiatives<br />

must be child-centred, with programmes developed<br />

and led by children. Secondly, sport activities<br />

must be delivered in protective environments, so<br />

Amy Farkas (© Katie Scholl)<br />

that children can participate without the fear or risk<br />

of getting hurt, or of experiencing violence or abuse.<br />

8


3.8 Brian Klein, AFRICA TEN<br />

“Using Technology, Media and Sport to deliver Hope – an Introduction to AFRICA TEN”<br />

Two themes are important to Brian Klein: Connection and hope. Through the connection of mind<br />

and heart we move on. People driven by faith are the ones that make significant history is what<br />

he believes. That hope can be found<br />

in/through football was shown in the documentary<br />

film about the AFRICA TEN project.<br />

As chairman of this project, he was able to<br />

emphasize/gain personalities such as Nelson<br />

Mandela, Desmond Tutu or the head of<br />

“Black Eyed Peas”, Will I. Am, for the AF-<br />

RICA TEN project. In combination with music<br />

great messages can be heard.<br />

The upcoming FIFA Football Worldcup 2010<br />

in South Africa shall not be about charity but<br />

about opportunity, as Will I. Am says. Key is<br />

Amy Farkas (© Katie Scholl)<br />

to involve the African, local partners to seize<br />

those opportunities because for Brian Klein, “the leaders that will change Africa are not the Westerners<br />

but the Africans.” “Sport can change the world and individuals can change the world.” And<br />

therefore, Brian Klein´s final statement was: “Let´s go change the world. Our world and the world<br />

around us.”<br />

3.9 Prof. Dr. Norbert Müller, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz<br />

“Fair Play Education in Football”<br />

„Do unto others as you would wish them to do unto you.“ Quoting the Golden Rule of the Sermont<br />

on the Mount, which is valid for all world religions, Prof. Dr. Norbert Müller opened his presentation<br />

on the topic „Fair Play Education in Football.“<br />

Fair play is an essential value in sport.<br />

Fair play is sport. Without fair play, there<br />

would be no such thing as sport. Without the<br />

acceptance of teammates as well as opponents,<br />

without mutual respect, without the<br />

acceptance of referees, and without common<br />

rules, the core values of sport would be destroyed.<br />

Sport should remain sport. Therefore,<br />

ethical fair play education in and through sport<br />

is indispensable. Fair play education in football<br />

should not be distinguished from social<br />

Prof. Dr. Norbert Müller (© Katie Scholl)<br />

learning in general. Fair play education starts<br />

during early childhood; children learn about fair play through their families, kindergarten classes,<br />

peer groups, play time at school, and, of course, sports clubs. In particular, coaches of youth<br />

teams can have a tremendous impact on child development, serving as persons of trust and role<br />

models (along with parents and teachers). Therefore, it is essential that coaches be properly prepared<br />

for their tasks and that their social expertise is deepened through the integration of fair play<br />

modules into educational sessions.<br />

9


3.10 Anna-Lisa Schwarz, Bundesliga-Stiftung (Bundesliga Foundation)<br />

“The Bundesliga Foundation – Vision and Goals”<br />

In her presentation, Anna Lisa Schwarz<br />

discussed the mission and values of the<br />

Bundesliga Foundation. The Bundesliga,<br />

the premier football league in Germany, is<br />

integrated into society and enjoys great<br />

public popularity, with a brand-awareness<br />

of 99%. Given its strong presence in every<br />

part of society, the Bundesliga recognizes<br />

the importance of its commitment to social<br />

responsibility. The Bundesliga Foundation’s<br />

aim is to use the power and the popularity<br />

Dr. Anna-Lisa Schwarz (© Katie Scholl)<br />

of football to teach social values and to<br />

initiate change, so as to bring about justice, tolerance, and solidarity.<br />

3.11 Panel Discussion<br />

“Football ist more...”<br />

With:<br />

• Dr. h.c. Adolf Ogi, Former President of Switzerland, Former Special Adviser to the UN<br />

Secretary-General on Sport for Development and Peace, <strong>Scort</strong> Foundation’s Board of Directors<br />

• Tom Bender, DFL Deutsche Fussball Liga GmbH (German Football League)<br />

• Pierino Lardi, UEFA Delegate and FIFA Commissioner, Partner and Member of the<br />

Board of Banque Cramer & CIE SA Geneva<br />

• Wolfgang Holzhäuser, Bayer 04 Leverkusen<br />

• Franz Nietlispach, Novartis <strong>International</strong> AG<br />

The final panel discussion of the <strong>International</strong> Football <strong>Forum</strong> consisted of representatives specialized<br />

in economics, the media, politics, football, and Paralympic sport. Under the direction of<br />

the moderator, Victor Rohner, the panel members discussed the potential impact and determinants<br />

of social responsibility, as well as various ways of interpreting the notion of social responsibility.<br />

In spite of the panellists’ differing viewpoints, there emerged a general consensus concerning the<br />

significance and management of social responsibility through sport, especially through football:<br />

“Sport is a world language and football is the most spoken dialect,” stated Franz Nietlispach,<br />

quoting Kofi Annan. With these words, Mr. Nietlispach as the representative of the Paralympics<br />

synthesized the immeasurable public impact of sport and especially of football, which must be<br />

used with an eye towards social responsibility; the panel members agreed that progress can only<br />

be made if everybody pulls in the same direction. Through the memorable and often quoted<br />

words, “Think globally, act locally!” the former Federal President of Switzerland, Adolf Ogi, ap-<br />

10


pealed to all specialists of politics, the economy, and sports in seeking to increase communication,<br />

cooperation, and support for Sport for Development programs. Staging the <strong>International</strong><br />

Football <strong>Forum</strong> is a step in the right direction. Nevertheless, much work remains in order to unveil<br />

the full potential of social responsibility.<br />

From left to right: Victor Rohner, Wolfgang Holzhäuser, Tom Bender, Dr. h.c. Adolf Ogi, Pierino Lardi, Franz<br />

Nietlispach (© Katie Scholl)<br />

3.12 Close Statement<br />

Prof. Dr. Norbert Müller, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Board of Directors <strong>Scort</strong> Foundation<br />

& Hans Brunhart, Verwaltungs- und Privat Bank AG, Board of Directors <strong>Scort</strong> Foundation<br />

Professor Norbert Müller thanked all participants and summarised in a final statement all the<br />

presentations of the previous two days. Together, Professor Müller and the other <strong>Scort</strong> Directors<br />

had agreed to formulate a final statement on the forum, which was then presented by Hans Brunhart.<br />

In this document, the participants<br />

agreed on several points, such as attending<br />

to their social responsibilities more consistently<br />

and putting their ideas for social responsibility<br />

into practice. Participants recognized<br />

that doing so would require the creation<br />

of networks to achieve sustainability. As already<br />

mentioned by Wilfried Lemke, <strong>Scort</strong><br />

Foundation therefore has taken over an important<br />

assignment in its efforts to increase<br />

collaboration between organizations through<br />

this forum. Furthermore, participants agreed<br />

that football clubs should expand the reach of<br />

their local engagement to an international<br />

Hans Brunhart und Prof. Dr. Norbert Müller<br />

(© Katie Scholl)<br />

level. Cooperating with economic and political partners is thereby just as important as the integration<br />

of football into the work of NGOs. The final statement conveyed the participants´ consensus<br />

that further conferences like the <strong>International</strong> <strong>Forum</strong> on Football for the Community should be<br />

organised. However, due to the variety of crises worldwide and the constant occurrence of new<br />

problems, it is clear that it will take time to achieve success.<br />

11


3.13 Closing Words<br />

Johann Pingitzer, Representative Governement Principality of Liechtenstein<br />

The last person to speak was Johann Pingitzer, Government Representative of the Principality of<br />

Liechtenstein. After showing gratitude to all people involved, organisers as well as participants, he<br />

underlined the importance of committing to peace and human rights. As explained by Mr.<br />

Pingitzer, his country takes this mission very serious and therefore supports the <strong>Scort</strong> Foundation<br />

in its activities. It is important to give children happiness and hope, as this is the first step towards<br />

peace.<br />

12


4 <strong>Final</strong> <strong>Declaration</strong><br />

<strong>Final</strong> <strong>Declaration</strong><br />

«<strong>International</strong> <strong>Forum</strong> on Football for the Community»<br />

July 30 th /31 st , <strong>2009</strong>, Bad Ragaz (Switzerland)<br />

Representatives of leading European football clubs recognized their commitment to social responsibility<br />

and presented various social initiatives during the “<strong>International</strong> <strong>Forum</strong> on Football for<br />

the Community”, which was organised by the <strong>Scort</strong> Foundation and staged in Bad Ragaz/ Switzerland.<br />

Delegates of FC Basel, Werder Bremen, Liverpool FC, and Bayer 04 Leverkusen, as well as<br />

delegates from other top European national, and regional football associations and clubs, came to<br />

the following agreements:<br />

• The delegates accepted their responsibility to act with regard for their communities.<br />

• For this purpose, networks and co-operative initiatives must be set up to achieve wide<br />

impact, to foster sustainability, and to convey new visions.<br />

• According to the UN Special Adviser on Sport for Development and Peace, Wilfried<br />

Lemke, and the delegates of the <strong>Forum</strong>, the <strong>Scort</strong> Foundation follows an important mandate<br />

to help bridge a structural gap. The development initiative entitled “Integration and<br />

Education through Football” in Sudan, which was presented at the <strong>Forum</strong> and which is<br />

supported by the engagement of different professional football clubs, offers a convincing<br />

example.<br />

• The delegates of the <strong>Forum</strong> agreed that more clubs need to become aware of their social<br />

responsibility and need to be pro-active on an international level, to complement their often<br />

extensive local engagement. This international engagement should be based on<br />

trust and should involve partners who are willing to contribute technically and financially.<br />

• Partners from the fields of economics and politics, as well as both national and international<br />

football associations, are equally important to reaching these goals.<br />

• It is also important to integrate football into the work of non-governmental organizations<br />

(NGOs). In doing so, exemplary NGOs should be supported in their commitment to underprivileged<br />

persons through joint engagement.<br />

Conferences like the “<strong>International</strong> <strong>Forum</strong> on Football for the Community” should be staged regularly<br />

to showcase recent developments. The delegates are aware that quick outcomes are not<br />

possible due to the diversity of worldwide crisis regions and new arising social problems. However,<br />

we certainly need such visions to create a better and more peaceful world through football –<br />

and these visions must come about through joint initiatives.<br />

13

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