24 Seven November 2020

cyacyl

24 Seven is a monthly, free magazine for personal growth, professional development, and self-empowerment. The approach is holistic, incorporating mind, body, soul, and spirit. As philosopher Francis Bacon said, “Knowledge is power.” Use this information to live your best life now.




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EDITOR IN CHIEF

Joan Herrmann

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Lindsay Pearson

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Matt Herrmann

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

Chris Giordano

Andrea Valentie

Oliver Pane

CONTRIBUTORS

Guy Finley

Lorie Gardner, RN, NBC-HWC

Gayle Gruenberg, CPO-CD, CVO

Rick Hanson, PhD

Joan Herrmann

Mark Hyman, MD

Linda Mitchell, CPC


FROM THE EDITOR

We are experiencing things in life today

that most have never encountered before.

People are navigating a pandemic, financial

uncertainty, employment insecurity, and a

host of family-related issues.

When people do not receive the outcome

they desire, they experience a range of

emotions. Some get angry, protest, and blame

themselves or others. Some get despondent,

feel hopeless, and sink into a depression.

Many get entangled with woulda, coulda,

shoulda type thoughts, that continue to fuel

their emotions. Whatever a person’s modus

operani, learning to accept what is and

surrender the notion of what was wanted, is

vital in order to achieve peace of mind and

heart.

The Serenity prayer offers sage advice that

can guide us through life:

God, grant me the serenity to accept the

things I cannot change, courage to change

the things I can, and wisdom to know the

difference.

While it is always important to do our

part in enacting change, equally important

is garnering the wisdom to know when

acceptance is the only remaining action.

Acting out, melting down, disparaging

others, doesn’t alter an outcome, it adds

unnecessary pain and suffering.

Things happen throughout the course of

our lives that we simply cannot control, no

matter how hard we try. All of the stress,

pain, and resentment can be a heavy

burden to bear.

Here are a few ways we can mitigate an

unwanted outcome and emerge stronger

and happier:

Untangle from negative thoughts. Ask

how acting on emotion will help us live

life in the long run. Will an angry outburst

solve the problem or will it create a greater

divide? Become aware of thoughts and

strive to change the internal narrative.

Feel emotions. Don’t fight what is felt

because those emotions will linger longer.

Grieve the loss and then find ways to let it

go. Take part in activities that are calming

– practice meditation or yoga, or take a

walk. Breathe into the part of the body

where tension is felt and release it.

Embrace the moment. Be teachable and

ask what can be learned from the situation.

Can the opportunity enhance a personal

trait? Can patience, kindness, empathy or

endurance be strengthened?

As the Rolling Stones said, we can’t

always get what we want. Learning

to accept the unacceptable can be the

pathway to peace.

— Joan Herrmann


KIMBERLY FRIEDMUTTER

ISSUE NO.121


INSIDE THIS

ISSUE

EAT HEALTHY ON A BUDGET

WITH THESE STRATEGIES

BY MARK HYMAN, MD

PAGE 12

ARE YOU TOO HARD ON YOURSELF?

BY RICK HANSON, PHD

PAGE 18

HOW WILL YOU REMEMBER 2020?

TIPS TO REWRITE THE NARRATIVE

BY JOAN HERRMANN

PAGE 22

ON THIS MONTH’S

COVER

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KIMBERLY IS A BOARD-CERTIFIED MASTER HYPNOTIST

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WAKE UP AND BE FREE TO

LOVE WITHOUT LIMITATIONS

BY GUY FINLEY

PAGE 26

OUR ISSUES LAND IN OUR TISSUES

BY LINDA MITCHELL

PAGE 30

VIRTUAL ORGANIZING: NOT JUST FOR A PANDEMIC

BY GAYLE GRUENBERG

PAGE 32

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT HAVING SURGERY

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PAGE 36

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ISSUE

NO.121

NOVEMBER

2020

E AT

HEALTHY

ON A

BUDGET

WITH

THESE

STRATEGIES

Knowing full well we are short on time and often money,

fast food manufacturers and grocers lure us into convenient,

heavily processed meals that take a toll on our waistline,

our overall health, and believe it or not, our budget.

Written by Mark Hyman, MD


W

With our busy lives, these

temptations seem so much easier and affordable than cooking.

Between our never-ending to-do lists, demanding jobs,

children’s busy schedules, and perhaps less-than-stellar skills

in the kitchen, cooking seems to slide down to the bottom of

our list of priorities.

Unfortunately, we’ve now raised several generations of

Americans who don’t know how to cook. And it’s killing us.

The food industry wants us to believe that cooking is

difficult, time-consuming, inconvenient, and expensive.

They’ve brainwashed us to believe that we “deserve a break

today.”

Nonsense. You can eat well for less money by making

simple, whole, fresh food. In fact, a simple dinner for a family

of four consisting of roast chicken, vegetables, and salad can

cost about half of what dinner at a fast food restaurant would.

While today over 50 percent of meals are consumed outside

the home, I want to help you reconnect with your kitchen,

discover the bounty of benefits it offers, and learn just how

inexpensive eating healthy and preparing your own food can

be.

The Expensive Cost of Cheap Food

When people tell me they cannot afford organic produce or

healthy cuts of meat, I ask them to consider the gargantuan

markup of many convenience foods. Manufacturers package

them in “value-priced jumbo sized” containers and grocery

stores promote them with price cuts to create the illusion we

are getting value.

When people tell me eating healthy is expensive, I ask them

to factor in what they spend on designer coffees, bodegas,

grab-and-go meals, and other conveniences that might spare

them a little time but at the expense of their health.

Relying on inexpensive, overly processed food is tempting

given our demanding lives and schedules, but the cost is

quite large.

Feasting on the sodium, fat, and sugar bombs disguised

as food can lead to serious diseases that cost hundreds of

dollars in doctor’s visits and prescription drugs. Chowing

down on these things make us sick and sluggish, resulting in

less productivity. When we feel crummy, it ripples into other

areas of our lives. We have less patience for our loved ones, for

instance, and less energy to work or enjoy ourselves.

In the bigger picture, that “value menu” is anything but a

value.

You Don’t Need to Spend Half Your Paycheck to Eat Healthy

Even if time and money aren’t on your side, you can still

eat healthy. This is one of the most common misconceptions

I hear. I understand the challenges of trying to eat well with

limited financial resources, limited time, or both. But you don’t

have to be rich or retired to eat well and take care of yourself.

Dispelling 3 “Healthy Eating on a Budget” Myths

The food industry spends billions of dollars each year and

has become incredibly crafty at convincing us that sugary,

processed foods are a real value. Let’s look at three of their

myths and consider the truth about eating healthy.

1. Healthy food costs more. Research shows eating

healthy, whole, real food isn’t necessarily more expensive than

eating junk food, fast food, processed foods, or convenience

foods. In fact, the top four things purchased in supermarkets

are ALL drugs: sugar, caffeine, nicotine, and alcohol! If

you give up those “drugs,” your grocery bill will go down

dramatically.

2. Healthy food is hard to find. You don’t have to shop

in a gourmet food store, a health-food store, a farmer’s market,

or eat only organic to eat well. There are plenty of healthy

foods right in your local supermarket. Just shop around the

outside aisles of the store. Another convenient way to access

healthy food is online.

3. Healthy food takes lots of time to prepare. You don’t

have to spend hours cooking complex meals to eat well. Good

quality, fresh food is easy to prepare and enjoy once you learn

how.

Strategies to Eat Well on a Budget

Ultimately, it is up to us to take control of our kitchens and

our lives. The most radical message we can send the food

industry – which considers money, not our health in regard to

its bottom line – is to prepare our own meals, make the best

food selections within our budgets, and reclaim our health.

This does not mean turning bargain food shopping into

a second hobby. We are all overworked, overstressed, and

overtaxed. Most of us don’t have time to scrupulously compare

store prices or cut coupons.


Even so, there are ways of making choices that work within

our resources. Here are ideas based on how I save time and

money and create better health for myself.

• Keep a journal. This might be the most eye-opening

experience you will encounter to better budget your time,

resources, and money. For just one week, keep a journal of

every cent you spend and how you spend every hour of the day.

Think of money as your life energy. It represents your time in

physical form. How do you want to spend this life energy?

• Choose three things that give you more money. For

example, don’t buy that $2 coffee every day — that’s $730 a

year! Likewise, you might find yourself gravitating to the

vending machine daily. You can put that money towards much

better use.

• Buy in season. You will almost always get fresher produce,

probably locally grown, for less money, when it is in season.

• Learn the dirty dozen. Not everyone has the budget to buy

100 percent organic, but the more you can, the more you will

avoid GMOs and have better health.

• Frequent discount grocery stores. Search out cheaper

sources of fresh, whole foods in your neighborhood. My top

choices are stores like Trader Joe’s and shopping clubs like

Costco or Sam’s Club, where you can buy vegetables, olive oil,

fruits, nuts, canned beans, sardines, and salmon at much lower

prices than regular supermarkets or other retail chains.

• Think about joining your local food co-op. Co-ops are

community-based organizations that support local farmers

and businesses and allow you to order foods and products in

bulk at just slightly over the wholesale price. This takes a bit of

advance planning but will save you money.

• Join a community-supported agriculture program. Buy

direct and cut out the middleman. We get organic, mostly

seasonal, local vegetables delivered to our house for $55 a

week, or a little more than $10 a person for a family of four

per week. We don’t always get to choose what we get, but it

makes us more creative cooks.

• Keep some basics on hand. Develop a repertoire of

cheap, easy-to-prepare meals. Have the ingredients available

at home at all times so you don’t get stuck eating food that

doesn’t make you feel well or help you create the health you

want. This takes planning but is well worth it.

• Order staples online. Why pay retail for healthy kitchen

staples like turmeric, coconut oil, and almond butter?

About The Author

MARK HYMAN

Mark Hyman MD is the Director of Cleveland Clinic’s Center

for Functional Medicine, the Founder of The UltraWellness

Center, and a ten-time #1 New York Times Bestselling author.

To Learn More Visit:

www.drhyman.com


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Are You Too

Hard on

Yourself?

Written by Rick Hanson, PhD

M

Most people know their

less than wonderful qualities, such as too

much ambition (or too little), a weakness for

wine or cookies, something of a temper, or

an annoying tendency to rattle on about pet

interests. We usually know when we make

mistakes, get the facts wrong, could be more

skillful, or deserve to feel remorseful.

Some people err on the side of denying or

defending these faults (a word I use broadly

here). But most people go to the other

extreme, repeatedly criticizing themselves

in the foreground of awareness, or having a

background sense of guilt, unworthiness, and

low confidence.

It’s one thing to call yourself to task for a


fault, try to understand what

caused it, resolve to correct

it, act accordingly, and move

on. This is psychologically

healthy and morally

accountable. It’s another

matter entirely to grind on

yourself, to lambaste your

own character, to fasten on

the negative and ignore the

good in you, to find yourself

wanting – in other words,

to beat up yourself. This

excessive inner criticism

tears you down instead of

building your strengths;

it’s stressful and thus wears

on your mood, health, and

longevity.

Nor does beating up

yourself help others. Most

of the time, they don’t even

know you’re doing it, and if

they do, they usually wish

you’d stop it. Harsh selfcriticism

can also be a way to avoid feeling

genuine remorse, taking responsibility,

making amends for the past, and doing the

hard work of preventing the fault in the

future.

Further, the charges and scorn we throw at

ourselves are often based on nasty scoldings,

shamings, rejections, and humiliations

experienced as a child: bad enough that they

did this to you back then, and even worse that

you’re doing it to yourself today.

From The Story

“This excessive

inner criticism

tears you down

instead of

building your

strengths.”

fixations on the negative in the critical approach?

Let a real conviction form as to which approach

is better for you – and a real resolve to truly use

the one that’s best for you.

Then, when you find a fault in yourself – no

need to go looking, they appear on their own! –

really try to use the encouraging approach. Name

the fault to yourself and admit the facts of it

unreservedly. Open to any appropriate remorse.

Commit to skillful corrections for the future.

And then take a big breath and very

deliberately name to yourself three strengths or

virtues you have. Let the sense of them, and of

your natural goodness, sink in.

And then take another big breath and move on.

How to Stop Beating Yourself Up

Pick a small fault – such as being a few

minutes late, interrupting, or having too much

dessert – and then try on two approaches

about it. First, talk to yourself about it like

a supportive but no-nonsense friend, coach,

teacher, or therapist. Notice what this feels

like, and what the results are for you. Let’s call

this the encouraging approach. Second, talk to

yourself about it like an alarmed and intense

critic – maybe like your dad, big sister, or a

minister or teacher talked to you. What’s this

approach feel like, and what are its results?

Let the differences between approaches

sink in. How do you feel inside when you’re

“listening” to each one? What’s your sense of

the influences in your life that have created

each approach? What are the distortions or

About The Author

RICK HANSON, PHD

Rick Hanson, PhD, is a psychologist, Senior

Fellow of the Greater Good Science Center

at UYC Berkeley, and a New York Times bestselling

author. His books have been published

in 29 languages and include Neurodharma,

Resilient, and Hardwiring Happiness.

To Learn More Visit:

www.RickHanson.net


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HOW

WILL YOU

REMEMBER

2020?

TIPS TO

REWRITE

THE

NARRATIVE

Written by Joan Herrmann


Y

Yesterday, as I was driving in my car,

my minded started to wander, as it usually does, and I pictured

a day in the future when I will be sitting with my grandchild

reminiscing about the pandemic of 2020. As I envisioned that

encounter, my mind immediately shifted to my grandmother,

who for most of my life, brought every conversation back to her

experience during the Great Depression.

When the market crashed in 1929, she was a young wife and

mother. The years that followed turned her life upside down.

Lack became the mental foundation on which she built the

remaining years of her life; it became her story. The trauma,

pain, and scars stayed with her like a noose around her neck

and she was never able to break free.

As I remembered my grandmother I wondered, what will my

story be?

Today, people are experiencing financial devastation similar

to those during that horrific time in history. Many have lost

their jobs and homes, friends and family members are sick, and

they no longer have a sense of security. It is easy to get stuck in

the pain, and it’s challenging to see the proverbial bright side.

Over the years, I have witnessed people become a victim of

circumstance, bound to the dark periods of their life. They got

so lost that they couldn’t find a way out. For awhile, I was one

of those people. I felt sorry for myself and played the same story

over and over in my mind.

But once that story got old, I realized that it was time to let it

go and change the way I viewed the hand I was dealt. I finally

understood that no matter what happens around us, we always

have the power to change the way we see it and handle it.

The year 2020 will be a defining moment in many of our

lives, one that we will carry with us until our death. Health

concerns, financial insecurity, loss of loved ones, isolation,

caregiver PTSD, political unrest, have altered the world that we

know. The psychological fallout will likely be devastating. It will

be my grandmother’s depression.

And, as I imagined, years from now, we’ll share stories with

family and friends and tell our grandchildren about life in 2020.

But, how will we really remember this unprecedented event?

Will it be a source of pain from which a person never recovers,

like my grandmother, or will it be a springboard to something

different or possibly better?

While there’s no way to avoid what’s happening in the

world, there are ways to regain a sense of control, even when

everything feels so out of control.

Psychologist Dan McAdams developed the Theory of

Narrative Identity, which he describes as an internalized story

we create about ourselves. This story evolves and changes

based on the experiences we have. According to McAdams, our

stories tend to focus on the most extraordinary events, good

and bad, because those are the experiences we need to make

sense of and that shape us.

Research suggests that we can edit, revise and interpret the

stories we tell about our lives even as we are constrained by

the facts. Our power comes in rewriting the story in a more

positive way. So, while we can’t change the past, we can change

the story to provide meaning from hardships.

So, when thinking about your story, ask: Does the story

serve you? Is this the story you want to tell?

If the answer is no, here are a few ways that we can navigate

difficult times and not allow them to define us:

Accept what is. Change is an inevitable part of life. Fighting

events outside of our control drains our energy and creates

anxiety. Accepting a situation provides the freedom to devote

precious energy to the things we can control and change.

Don’t identify as a victim. A victim is defined as a person

harmed, injured, or killed as a result of a crime, accident, or

other event or action. By this definition we all are victims at

one time or another. But, some feel like victims all the time.

Don’t waste energy blaming or getting angry, but rather do

what you can to change the narrative. When the blaming

begins, turn your attention away from the negative thoughts.

Look for the positive in any situation. There is always

something for which to be grateful. Sometimes it may be

harder to find, but it is always there. Focus on the happy

memories being created by spending time with family. Dream

about the new job you may find. Recall the conversations with

long lost friends. Be thankful for good health.

Remember, we write our story and the power of the pen can

be life changing.

So, how will you remember 2020?

About The Author

JOAN HERRMANN

Joan Herrmann is the creator of the Change Your Attitude…

Change Your life brand and host of the radio show and podcast,

Conversations with Joan. She is a motivational speaker and the

publisher of 24 Seven magazine.

To Learn More Visit:

www.JoanHerrmann.com


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November 2020 Issue

Wake Up and Be Free to

Love Without Limitations

Written by Guy Finley

W

When in a fight of any kind, over

anything, we look over at the other person and “see” – almost

magically – exactly what’s wrong with him or her in that

moment. So confident are we in our conclusion as to the nature

of their problem – that the following has almost no chance to

dawn on us:

We can’t see that person is looking at us in this exact same

kind of “light” that is not a light at all. Negative reactions have

no awareness of themselves; there is no light in them, any more

than a cluster of bombs has compassion for whatever they fall

on and destroy.

What we need in these moments is the light of a new kind of

understanding. We need to awaken to, and realize a higher level

of awareness that allows us to appreciate two things at once:

first, to see that just like us, the other person is in some kind

of pain and is being moved, just as we are, to find someone to

blame for it.

In other words, the same negative forces are at work in

both of us. And second, even though these opposing forces are

blind, that doesn’t mean that we have to be! The more we can

wake up to the presence of these unconscious forces and how,

undetected, they keep us at odds with one another, the freer we

become to love without their limitations.

When we’re negative – in a “power struggle” with someone

over whatever is being contested – we’re reduced to being little

more than a puppet. We’re literally “strung out” – momentarily

animated – by unseeing forces in us that can only do one thing:

mechanically oppose whatever seems to oppose them.

I understand this last image is not very flattering, but let’s be

honest: experience validates the fact of it. Each time we’re drawn

into a fight, it’s exactly as if someone “turns out the lights.” All

we can “see” in that slowly enveloping darkness of our negative

state is someone that we’re sure it’s our duty to change, control,

or “make sorry” for what he or she has done to us... even as they

are trying to do the same to us.

The conflict in these emotional tugs-of-war is the stuff of

sorrow and take us nowhere except back and forth. If this

is true, and we know it is, then, with what are we left? From

where will come this new light needed in the midst of these

dark moments knowing, as is obvious by now, that we can’t

illuminate our partner, our friends, or anyone else.

Assuming we can all agree with this last revelation – that it’s

not in our power to illuminate another – here’s what we’re left

with; its simplicity is both beautiful and powerful at the same

time:

If we hope to see any real transformation take place in our

relationships – whether with family, friends, or our partner for

life – then it is we who must become illuminated. The kindness,

the patience, the love we seek is going to have to start with us...

even if our best efforts get thrown right back in our face!

Challenging? No doubt – perhaps more so than anything

we may have ever tried to do before. Rewarding? Let’s see, and

then you decide:

What if rather than allowing these blind, opposing forces

to set you against another person, you could learn how to

start using them; where even a hint of their pressure would

not only awaken you to their presence but – in that same

moment – empower you to consciously separate yourself from

their punishing influences? This would be like owning a kind

of spiritual “alarm clock” that goes off just before you start to

blame – or resent – another; a silent but unmistakable alert

system that serves, at once, to reveal and release you from

the unseen parts of your own consciousness that tend to

automatically oppose any unwanted moment.

About The Author

GUY FINLEY

Guy Finley is the founder and director of Life of Learning Foundation,

a nonprofit center for spiritual discovery in Merlin, Oregon. Finley

presents two free online talks each week open to all. Every class

is different, but the underlying theme is “The Limit of Your Present

View, is Not the Limit of Your Possibilities.” This article is excerpted

from Relationship Magic by Guy Finley, Llewellyn Worldwide, 2018.

To Learn More Visit:

www.guyfinley.org



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November 2020 Issue

Virtual Organizing:

Not Just for a Pandemic

Written by Gayle M. Gruenberg

A

After sheltering in

place for the majority of 2020, and

in anticipation of functioning in an

environment that continues to be

uncertain, clients are looking at their

homes and offices as places where they

can still exercise a modicum of control.

Creating systems, being organized, and

feeling the attendant sense of peace is

crucial to that exercise. But how is that

possible if we can’t let people into our

homes or workplaces?

Enter Virtual Organizing (VO), which

uses technology to connect an organizing

professional with client. Over a video

platform, or even with still photos and

a phone, the professional can guide the

client through the organizing process, as

long as the client is physically able to do

the work.

A virtual session can be useful when

someone needs to create a new system

at work and internal guidance is nonexistent,

is still working from home and

balancing personal and professional

lives, or may be comfortable with video

technology but shuts down when faced

with having to create a digital file system.

VO is good for clients’ physical and

mental health. Many of my clients are

chronically disorganized and/or have

brain-based conditions that inhibit

their ability or desire to get organized.

Depressed clients may take to their

beds and not get up for days. Result: a

neglected house.

A virtual organizing session forces the

client to get out of bed. It gives a purpose

to a person’s day, gets their blood flowing,

and encourages him or her to get things

done. Moving around, doing the actual

organizing, brings oxygen to the brain,

promoting focus and enhancing mood.

People with Hoarding Disorder or

OCD can get help without having to let

someone in.

The organizer sees only a screenor

photo-worth of space, saving the

client from feeling embarrassed or

ashamed. For people who live alone,

Virtual Organizing is a lifeline. Studies

have shown that social isolation and

loneliness can contribute to premature

death. The virtual session may be the

only social interaction a client may have

that day.

Neuroplasticity is the brain’s ability to

reorganize itself by forming new neural

connections, essential for coping with

a constantly changing environment.

VO creates new neural pathways. Since

the client must physically participate

in the process, she/he learns new skills;

during on-site sessions, the organizing

professional may do most of the work,

and the client may tune out or get

distracted.

Repetition is the key to building neural

pathways. VO sessions are often shorter

and more frequent than on-site sessions

and focus on organizing concepts.

This serves clients with attention

challenges by keeping the momentum

going, preventing backsliding, creating

more structure and accountability,

and supporting clients to overcome

procrastination. The organizing process

is sped up, and clients gain insight into

their thought processes, emotions, and

perspectives.

About The Author

GAYLE M. GRUENBERG

Gayle M. Gruenberg, CPO-CD ® , CVO, is the

chief executive organizer of Let’s Get Organized,

LLC, an organizer coach, and the creator

of the Make Space for Blessings system.

To Learn More Visit:

www.LGOrganized.com



Our Issues

Land in Our

Tissues

Written by Linda Mitchell, CPC

Is there a particular part of your body that’s

chronically bothersome? Are there a few areas that

always ache, irritate or give you trouble despite

non-specific diagnostic results? Your body is calling

out to you – it has a message and it’s trying to get

your attention!

Our bodies hold immense amounts of

valuable information if you’re ready to listen.

The body speaks its own language; constantly

sending messages and nudging you to its truth.

The body never lies. It holds so much wisdom

and intelligence yet it’s a resource that’s often

overlooked or underappreciated.

As a bodyworker and coach, I’ve spent the last

20 years listening to the wisdom and information

of other’s bodies and teaching them how to discern

the valuable knowledge held inside in order to

heal old physical and emotional wounds. When

we listen deeply, we find a treasure trove of precise

healing directives.

When this idea of listening to the body is first

introduced, people either raise their eyebrows in

intrigue or furrow them in dismissiveness. It’s a

new concept for many and let’s face it, humans

often disregard things they don’t understand.

But for those willing to learn to listen to the

wisdom of their bodies, it’s a welcome wakeup call

to better health and deep healing. Each body part

has its own meaning and holds different issues.

Your body knows best and once you tune in, it

becomes a trusted compass for optimal health so

you can live with more ease, joy and peace.

Many eastern and ancient traditions revere

the body as a sacred temple but here in the west,

we limit ourselves to consulting the brain for


catalyzing information. That’s

not wrong – it’s just woefully

incomplete.

Our bodies hold all sorts

important insights and

intelligence and is a bountiful

and accurate resource. From

decades of doing in person

bodywork and long-distance

healing, I’ve seen very specific

patterns emerge. Let’s examine

some of the most obvious

places where our issues land in

our tissues.

Ever wonder why people

hold so much tension in their

shoulders? Those who have

boulders in their shoulders

are people who constantly

remind themselves of all their

obligations and all the things they should do. To

these people I say; stop ‘shoulding’ on yourself! Do

you often take on other’s duties and responsibilities

or feel unduly obligated to a situation or person?

Over time your shoulders will feel like they’re

holding the weight of the world. It’s the shoulders

that are burdened under our sense of obligation

and responsibility.

Is your neck often tight, tense or stiff? The neck

reflects lack of choice. When we feel out of control,

feel like others are controlling us or we have a strong

desire to always be in control, it’s the neck that

begins to absorb this stress and tension.

Each body part holds its own story. Those who

prefer everything to be just right and delight in

structure and order or have tendencies towards

perfectionism often display right shoulder issues.

Show me someone who’s left shoulder is chronically

irritated or always higher than the other and I’ll

show you someone who feels they rarely get what

they want.

Experiencing lots of accidents, injuries or issues

on the left side of your body? Our left is our feminine

side. It’s all about receiving and reflections of future.

Ask yourself two things. First, how comfortable

are you receiving help? Do you struggle to receive

compliments gracefully and really prefer to be the

one giving versus receiving gifts? Second, how are

you feeling about the future? Do you typically worry

or fear future conditions? These issues land in the

left side of the body.

In contrast, the right side of the body represents

our masculine side, linear thinking and thoughts

about the past. Issues like fear of repeating the past

or dealing with difficult male relationships will land

From The Story

“Our bodies

are the outer

representation

of our inner

landscape.”

in the right side of the body. What the specific issue

is, determines where on the right side of the body it

will present.

What about your legs? While different regions

exhibit different issues, they are largely about moving

forward. If we’re in a place where we’re fearful about

moving forward in our personal or professional lives,

often these issues will land in the lower limbs.

The knees hold so much detailed and site-specific

information that they deserve their own dissertation;

but in general, fear of commitment, reluctance to

allow yourself pleasure and specific relationship

issues, land in our knees.

The lower back holds issues of safety, security,

stability and conflict with authority. Recall times when

your low back was painful and reflect on what was

happening in your life personally and professionally.

It’s likely you had financial woes or your life lacked

the security you desired.

Issues in the lungs often center around grief

and unexpressed emotion. Every organ and body

part represent a different issue. Elbows reflect

flexibility issues. Foot issues represent questioning

or conflict with our foundational beliefs. TMJ reveals

unexpressed emotion or resentment. Even facial

creases have meaning. Look at your friends and

family…anyone have that cute dimple in their chin?

Warning - they’re the people who always need to be

right.

This just scratches the surface; the body is a vessel

of valuable information! When we learn to appreciate

and properly assimilate its wisdom and messages, we

can properly identify root causes which then help us

clear out old emotions and more rapidly heal physical

symptoms.

Our bodies are the outer representation of our

inner landscape. Our thoughts, beliefs, emotions

and unresolved issues land in our tissues. The good

news is, by listening to, discerning and honoring the

messages from the body, we can heal old patterns,

wounds and issues.

About The Author

LINDA MITCHELL

Linda Mitchell, CPC, is a board-certified coach,

speaker, reinvention expert and LMT. She

empowers people who are stuck, overwhelmed

or ready for change to release the struggle, gain

clarity, balance and radiant health as they move

through life’s challenges and transitions and step

into their highest purpose.

To Learn More Visit:

www.LivingInspiredCoaching.com


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ISSUE

NO. 121

CULMINATION

N O V

2020

Written by Lorie Gardner, RN, BSN, NBC-HWC

WHAT YOU

NEED TO

KNOW ABOUT

HAVING

SURGERY

Many people had to delay their elective surgery

due to COVID-19. Now, many of these surgeries

are being scheduled as the pandemic numbers

start to decrease and necessary precautions

and protections have been put in place.


What is important to know before you agree to

surgery? First and foremost, you should understand

the details of the surgery, why it is being recommended,

and what would happen if you did not do the surgery.

As a nurse-patient advocate, I always recommend a

second and sometimes a third medical opinion so you

can be sure you have enough information to make

your best decision. Many health insurance companies

are requiring these second opinions. The importance

of getting second and third opinions can’t be stressed

enough.

Equally important is knowing what the benefits of

the surgery will be and how long those benefits will

last. Discuss with your doctor if there are different

techniques for the surgery and why your surgeon

does it one way over another. Ask

if there are any alternatives to

surgery such as medical or nonsurgical

alternatives, or could

“watchful waiting” be an option.

Selecting a Surgeon

Isn’t it ideal to get a surgeon

with the most experience? That

is why it is crucial to find out

how many surgeries a year a

surgeon conducts. By seeing a

second opinion surgeon you can

compare this statistic. A review

of the surgeon’s outcomes,

complications, such as infection

rate and side effects, is important.

You can get a surgeon scorecard

at Propublica.org to assist you.

Not only can it matter greatly the surgeon you

choose to do your surgery, but the hospital you

select is important, too. Make sure to review the

hospital and what its safety score is by checking the

LeapFroggroup.org website.

Ask your surgeon who the anesthesiologist is and

what his or her credentials are. Ask to meet the

anesthesiologist before surgery.

Special Considerations for COVID-19

Here is a list of questions and answers that

should be considered when you are planning to have

elective surgery based on the recommended Re-Open

protocols for elective surgery:

• When and where should I be tested for Covid-19?

Most of the time the surgeon’s office will provide

you with directions on where to get tested. Your test

results will be sent directly to your physician. In most

cases, patients should be tested 72-96 hours before

their scheduled surgery. This result should be known

prior to surgery to safeguard the healthcare workers

“The

importance

of getting

second

and third

opinions can’t

be stressed

enough. ”

and other patients.

• Should I be self-isolating once I have my

pre-surgical Covid-19 test? Yes. Once you have

your pre-surgical Covid-19 test, you should be

self-isolating at home and avoid going out, if

possible.

• Should I report if I have been in contact

or exposed to anyone with Covid-19? Yes. If

you were exposed to someone with known

Covid-19 or suspected Covid-19, with signs and

symptoms, such as coughing, sneezing, fever,

or shortness of breath, report this to your

surgeon’s staff. This may delay or postpone

your surgical procedure.

• Can my family come into the hospital with

me? This depends on hospital policy. Some

hospitals may allow one family member or no

family members, depending on its Covid-19

policy and the current CDC Guidelines. If a

family member is permitted, their temperature

will be taken prior to coming into the facility.

Your temperature will also be taken and you

both will be checked for signs and symptoms

of Covid-19.

• What can I bring with me to the hospital?

Hospitals are advising that you limit personal

items and clothing, especially for “same day”

surgical procedures. In most cases, you are

advised to wear comfortable loose clothing

and will change into a hospital gown at the

facility. You should also bring identification,

your insurance card, your cell phone, and a

charger.

• Is the staff at the hospital being screened for

Covid-19 on a regular basis? Yes. The hospital

or ambulatory surgery center is required to

screen staff daily by taking their temperature

and screening them for signs and symptoms of

Covid-19. They are also asked about any known

contact with a person who has Covid-19.

• Are hospitals cleaning and disinfecting

patient equipment and rooms regularly? Yes,

hospitals or surgery centers must follow the

cleaning protocols set by the CDC and use

approved disinfectants.

• Has the staff been educated on the protocols

to prevent the spread of Covid-19? Yes. The

hospital or surgery center must educate its

staff on the CDC infection prevention protocols

that prevent the spread of Covid-19, such as

meticulous handwashing for 20 seconds, using

personal protective equipment for contact

with patients, universal masking, social

distancing, and cleaning and disinfecting

patient care equipment between use.


Know What Insurance Covers

This article does not go into detail on the

insurance issues involved with having surgery,

but it is extremely important to contact both

your insurance company and all the providers

involved (surgeon, hospital, anesthesiologist,

pathologist and any specialists) to ensure

you will be covered by insurance and not get

any surprise bills. More and more patients

are being able to determine the costs of the

surgery ahead of time. You can also go to

websites such as Healthcare Bluebook and

Fairhealth Consumer to find out the typical

costs in different areas.

Be Prepared for Discharge

Ask about the recovery after surgery. You

need to determine if you will require help at

home or if you will be going to a rehabilitation

facility first before going home. Ask about any

specific medical equipment, therapy, or home

care assistance for treatments or devices that

you will need after surgery during recovery.

Prepare Your Body and Mind

It is important to physically and mentally

prepare for an upcoming surgery. You will

need to follow any preoperative instructions

the surgeon and medical team provide you,

but you can do more yourself. The list below

are some recommended suggestions to help

you prepare:

From The Story

Being in

the hospital

requires

that

you have

someone

to help you

understand

everything

going on

and be at

your side

with a

“watchful

eye”.

- Advance directive

- HCP document

- POSLT if you have it

- POA

- Name of a contact person and phone

number

- Your physician’s names & phone numbers

- Notebook and pen to take notes

- Cell phone and charger

- Book, newspaper or crossword if there is

waiting time

- Socks, sweaters in case of cool temps

- Disinfectant wipes- use frequently to wipe

down all high touch surfaces

Don’t Go It Alone!

You can see that there is a lot of preparation

and questions to be asked prior to surgery.

Enlist the help of a loved one or friend to

navigate this journey. You can also hire a

private healthcare advocate to assist you as

well. Remember, being in the hospital requires

that you have someone to help you understand

everything going on and be at your side with a

“watchful eye”.

• Eat plenty of protein to promote wound

healing and boost your immune system.

• Eat a high fiber diet of fruits and vegetables

to keep your GI system healthy when you are

not moving as much.

• Avoid sugary and processed foods.

• Increase your physical activity.

• Lose weight, if needed.

• Get a good amount of sleep.

• Discuss any fears or anxieties with a

trusted friend or therapist.

• Envision and focus on a positive outcome

and that your body is strong and will heal

quickly.

• Have your Hospital toolkit bag ready

consisting of:

- A list of your medications with dosages

and frequency and supplements as well as

a list of your medical conditions and past

surgeries and hospitalizations

- Insurance cards and you can keep a copy

of them in your bad

About The Author

LORIE GARDNER, RN

Lorie Gardner RN, BSN, NBC-HWC, founded

Healthlink Advocates, Inc., to assist people with

all aspects of their healthcare. As private nurse

patient advocates and board certified health &

wellness coaches, they partner with clients seeking

assistance navigating the complex healthcare

system and those seeking self-directed, lasting

health improvements aligned with their values.

To Learn More Visit:

www.healthlinkadvocates.com





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