The 12th International Conference on Environmental ... - Events

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The 12th International Conference on Environmental ... - Events

FINAL PROGRAM

ICEM’09/

DECOM’09

ong>Theong> ong>12thong> ong>Internationalong> ong>Conferenceong>

on Environmental Remediation and

Radioactive Waste Management

JOINTLY ORGANIZED BY

Date: 11-15 October 2009

Liverpool Arena and Convention Center, UK

www.icemconf.com

by kind permission of Sellafield Ltd.

by kind permission of Sellafield Ltd.


WELCOME TO ICEM’09/DECOM’09

We welcome you to the Twelfth ong>Internationalong> ong>Conferenceong> on Environmental Remediation and Radioactive Waste

Management (ICEM’09). It is a global information exchange, featuring engineering and scientific solutions to

environmental problems. More than 600 scientists, engineers, managers, project directors, business representatives,

equipment vendors and government officials from more than 30 countries are expected to attend the conference, held this

year in Liverpool, United Kingdom, at the Liverpool Arena and Convention Center (ACC).

ong>Theong> Nuclear Engineering and the Environmental Engineering Divisions of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers

(ASME) have joined forces with the Institution of Mechanical Engineers and the Nuclear Institute (NI) for ICEM’09 and

DECOM’09. ong>Theong> conference and exhibition offer a unique opportunity to foster cooperation and establish contacts with

participants from many countries. ong>Conferenceong> participants will be able to speak directly with peers who are reporting new

research, initiating and managing environmental projects, establishing national and international regulations and applying

new methods and equipment. ICEM’09 is expected to feature 350 technical papers, research presentations and discussions

of field applications. A diverse group of international organizations will be exhibiting related technologies and services.

We have organized this Final Program so you can easily find additional details on the technical program and ways to

participate. Also included is a listing of Exhibitors, Sponsors and their services, and the technical abstracts. Please take a

look inside for more details. We are sure you will find something of interest. We hope that you have a successful meeting

and welcome to Liverpool!

ong>Conferenceong> General Co-Chairs Honorary Co-Chairs

Kenneth Kok, URS Washington Division (USA) Dr. Ines Triay, Assistant Secretary-US DOE

Fred Sheil, Sellafield Ltd. (UK) EM Program (USA)

Hans Forström, Director of Nuclear Fuel Cycle

ong>Conferenceong> Manager and Waste Technology IAEA (AUSTRIA)

Gary Benda, ICEM’09 ong>Conferenceong> Manager (USA) Stephen Henwood, Chairman, Nuclear

Decommissioning Authority (UK)

During the conference, in case of emergency,

contact + 44 (0) 777 1797 783 or + 44 (0) 207 9731 258

ong>Theong>re will be a guest message board located at the IMechE stand (in the exhibition hall)

and at the registration desk (on the second floor).

We would like to thank the following companies for sponsoring

the following events at the ICEM’09 ong>Conferenceong>.

~ Platinum Sponsors ~

BNS NUCLEAR SERVICES — Host of the Golf Simulator

URS CORPORATION — Host of the Monday Luncheon

~ Gold Sponsors ~

AMEC — Host of the Tuesday Luncheon

~ Silver Sponsors ~

CH2M HILL • ENERGYSOLUTIONS INTERNATIONAL GROUP

NATIONAL NUCLEAR LABORATORY (NNL) • NSG ENVIRONMENTAL

VT GROUP • NUVIA LTD. • WESTINGHOUSE

~ Bronze Sponsor ~

ASSYSTEM ENERGY & NUCLEAR • DEWDROPS • PACTEC

WE THANK OUR MEDIA SPONSORS FOR YOUR SUPPORT

Maney Publishing • Nuclear Engineering ong>Internationalong> • Nuclear Future Journal


Table of Contents

ICEM’09/DECOM’09 Corporate Sponsors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inside Front Cover

Background, Location and Contact Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Objectives and Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Format and Venue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

City of Liverpool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Hotel Pre-registration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Travel & Currency. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Foreign Exchange and Traveler’s Checks/Cheques (Currency) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Disclaimer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Insurance and Liability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

ICEM’09/DECOM’09 Organizing Societies and Cooperating ong>Internationalong> Agencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

U.S. Societies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

European Societies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Cooperating ong>Internationalong> Agencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Social Events and Guest Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Social Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Welcome Reception (Sunday) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Exhibit Reception (Tuesday) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

ong>Conferenceong> Banquet (Wednesday) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Guest Tours “Welcome Reception” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Tours #1-5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

ong>Conferenceong> Registration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

On-Site Registration Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Speaker/Author/Co-Chair - Check-in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Technical Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Participating Attendees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

ong>Conferenceong> Venue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Major Topics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Plenary - Opening Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Poster Sessions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Special Panel Sessions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

ong>Conferenceong> Proceedings on CD-ROM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Daily Speaker/Session Co-Chair Briefing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Lunch Periods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

AV Office / Speaker Ready Area. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

Coffee/Tea Breaks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

Technical Tours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

Acronym List. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

MAPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-12

Liverpool Region Map. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Liverpool City Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

Convention Center - All Three Levels Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Convention Center - 2nd Floor Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Condensed ong>Conferenceong> Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

Technical Program Session Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

Poster Session Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

ICEM’09 A/V Schedule and Loading of Revised PowerPoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

Technical Program at a Glance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-15

Technical Program Descriptions - Sessions 1-63 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-31

Exhibition Hours and Exhibitor Floorplan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Exhibitor Listing (Alphabetical & Numerical) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

Exhibitor Company Descriptions & Ads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34-57

Technical Program Abstracts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58-139

Pre-Registered Attendees by Country. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140-143

Pre-Registered Attendees by Last Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143-146

ICEM’09 Confernce Program Organisers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147

Steering Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147

Technical Program - Track Co-chairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147

Session Organisers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147

Schedule of Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148

Convention Center Map. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inside Back Cover

1


2

Background, Location and

Contact Information

Objectives and Background

ong>Theong> Twelfth ong>Internationalong> ong>Conferenceong> on

Environmental Remediation and Radioactive Waste

Management (ICEM) promotes a broad global

exchange of information on technologies, operations,

management approaches, economics, and public

policies in the critical areas of environmental

remediation and radioactive waste management. ong>Theong>

conference provides a unique opportunity to foster

cooperation among specialists from countries with

mature environmental management programs and those

from countries with emerging programs. Attendees will

include scientists, engineers, technology developers,

equipment suppliers, government officials, utility

representatives and owners of environmental problems.

ICEM’09 is the twelfth in a series of biennial

international conferences on environmental remediation

and radioactive waste management organized by

ASME. ong>Theong> first conference was held in Hong Kong in

1987, followed by Kyoto, Japan; Seoul, Korea; Prague,

Czech Republic; Berlin, Germany; Singapore; Nagoya,

Japan; Bruges, Belgium; Oxford, England; Glasgow,

Scotland, and Bruges, Belgium in 2007. ong>Theong> ICEM

conferences benefit from worldwide participation from

more than 30 countries.

Format and Venue

ong>Theong> ICEM’09/DECOM’09 technical program includes

concurrent technical sessions in five subject tracks:

1) Low/Intermediate-Level Waste Management

2) Spent Fuel, Fissile, Transuranic, High-Level

Waste Management

3) Facility Decontamination and Decommissioning

4) Environmental Remediation

5) Environmental Management / Public Involvement

ong>Theong> technical program consists of an opening plenary

session and several parallel program tracks with up to

eight concurrent sessions. ong>Theong> sessions include 25

minute oral presentations, panels, and poster displays

which are designed to enhance dialogue between

presenters and participants.

ong>Theong> ICEM’09/DECOM’09 Program is divided into 63

technical sessions conducted over three and a half days.

A listing of the specific sessions within each of the five

technical program tracks can be found in the “Technical

Program at a Glance” section. ong>Theong> full registration fee

includes entrance to all technical presentations, the

exhibit hall, the Sunday evening Welcome Reception,

the Tuesday evening Exhibitor Reception, all

refreshments during the conference breaks and lunch

for three days. ong>Theong> meeting material provided includes

the final program which includes the technical session

abstract book, and a complete CD-ROM containing all

approved papers that were presented, which will be

mailed after the conference.

City of Liverpool

Liverpool ACC is the flagship project in Liverpool’s

year as the 2008 European Capital of Culture and the

new jewel in Liverpool’s crown. From the world

famous ferry across the Mersey, to sports, culture and

world-class shopping, Liverpool has it all. Liverpool

has more buildings listed as being historically important

than any UK city other than London - in fact,

Liverpool’s waterfront area is a world heritage site,

putting it on a par with the Taj Mahal, the Great Wall of

China and Stonehenge. Just a few of Liverpool’s other

cultural highlights include: World Museum Liverpool,

the Tate Gallery - the largest gallery of modern &

contemporary art outside of London, the Maritime

Museum - which centers on Liverpool’s illustrious

history as a mercantile city, and the magnificent St

George’s Hall. Liverpool is home to the most successful

football team in England, Liverpool FC. Other sporting

attractions include horseracing at Haydock Park and

numerous golf courses. Not to mention ong>Theong> Beatles.

Those ‘four lads who shook the world’ were all

Scousers, and their imprint on their hometown is a

strong one. From the excellent Beatles Story Museum

to the Magical Mystery Tours that will show you places

like Penny Lane, Strawberry Field and the Cavern Club,

it is clear how proud Liverpool is of its most famous

sons.

Hotel – Pre-registration

ICEM has teamed with ong>Theong> Corporate Team to assist in

room accommodations. If you have made your hotel

arrangements through ong>Theong> Corporate Team and you

need to reach them for any reason. Contact: ong>Theong>

Corporate Team, Phone UK: 0845 604 4060, Phone

ong>Internationalong>: +44 (0) 20 7592 3050, Fax: +44 (0) 20

7828 6439, or Email: events@corporateteam.com;

www.corporateteam.com/events/8488FS. ong>Theong>

ICEM’09 Committee is not responsible for any

violations of any ordinances, and all other claims of

losses, costs, and damages arising from the attendee’s

occupancy at any of the local hotels.

Travel & Currency

Transportation by Air to Liverpool

Manchester ong>Internationalong> Airport provides direct access

to and from major European and North American cities

and is a 50-minute drive or 40 minutes by train ride

from Liverpool. Alternatively, the Liverpool John

Lennon Airport is nine miles southeast of the city

center. ong>Theong> Airline 500 bus services runs to the city

center at least every 30 minutes (~GBP £3, one-way)

and the new Liverpool South parkway train station is

nearby, with regular bus service to and from the airport.

A taxi to the city center takes around 20 minutes and

costs ~GBP £12. Both airports are served by many

international carriers.

Transportation by Coach to Liverpool

Many UK coach operators run services to the Liverpool

Bus Station. ong>Theong> S2 and S3 city center circular buses

run every 15 minutes and cost just GBP £1 per journey

(free if you have a daily or weekly ticket).

Transportation by Rail to Liverpool

ong>Theong> easiest way to get to Liverpool from within the UK

mainland or from Manchester Airport is by train. Trains

leave from the airport several times every hour. It is not

necessary to order tickets in advance. Lime Street is the

national railway network station in Liverpool, and there

is a National Express coach station too. ong>Theong> Mersey

travel network makes getting around the Liverpool

region by rail or bus easy, whatever your individual

needs. Visit www.merseytravel.gov.uk or call Traveline

on +44 0871-200-2233 to plan your journey. Off-peak

day tickets and weekly passes are available.


Transportation by Ferry to Liverpool

ong>Theong> Mersey Ferry runs regularly between Liverpool’s

Pier Head and Seacombe and Woodside in the Wirral.

At the same port, the new cruise liner facility sees many

ocean-going liners touring Liverpool.

Foreign Exchange and Traveler’s

Checks/Cheques (Currency)

ong>Theong> conference secretary on-site will accept only GBP

(no US$ or Traveler’s Checks) for payment of any

registration or optional ticket fees. Visa and MasterCard

are also accepted.

Disclaimer

Neither ASME, Institution of Mechanical Engineers nor

NI can accept any liability for death, injury, or any loss,

cost or expense suffered or incurred by any person if

such loss is caused or results from the act, default or

omission of any person other than an employee or agent

of ASME, Institution of Mechanical Engineers, or NI.

In particular, neither ASME, Institution of Mechanical

Engineers, nor NI can accept any liability for losses

arising from the provision or non-provision of services

provided by hotel companies or transport operators. Nor

can ASME, Institution of Mechanical Engineers, nor NI

accept liability for losses suffered by reason of war

including threat of war, riot and civil strife, terrorist

activity, natural disaster, weather, flood, drought,

technical, mechanical or electrical breakdown within

any premises visited by delegates and/or partners in

connection with the conference, industrial disputes,

governmental action, regulations or technical problems

which may affect the services provided in connection

with the conference. Neither ASME, Institution of

Mechanical Engineers, or NI is able to give any

warranty that a particular person will appear as a

speaker or panelist.

Insurance and Liability

All participants are encouraged to make their own

arrangements for health and travel insurance. Neither

ASME, Institution of Mechanical Engineers, NI nor

their agents, can be held responsible for any personal

injury, loss, damage, accident to private property or

additional expenses incurred because of delays or

changes in air, rail, sea, road or other services, strikes,

sickness, weather or any other cause.

ICEM’09/DECOM’09

Organizing Societies and

Cooperating ong>Internationalong> Agencies

U.S. Societies

ong>Theong> Nuclear Engineering Division and the

Environmental Engineering Division of ASME are the

primary organizing societies of the ICEM conference.

Since its inception in 1987, the original as well as

current objective has been to conduct international

conferences on key environmental management topics

in locations convenient to large numbers of technical

experts from emerging environmental programs. ASME

is committed to continue to provide this global

conference wherever the greatest need and interest are

shown.

ICEM’09 is also organized in cooperation with the U.S.

Department of Energy (US DOE), the U.S. Nuclear

Regulatory Commission (US NRC) and the U.S.

Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) along with

several other major international technical societies and

governmental organizations. Each agency has had

significant involvement with the ICEM series. ong>Theong> US

DOE is responsible for managing the wastes and

cleaning the sites from the past U.S. government

nuclear operations, thus the US DOE staff has viewed

this conference series as an opportunity to identify new

technical solutions and to provide information on the

results of their programs to the international

community. Federal regulatory participants from both

the US EPA and US NRC have also been active in

program development and participation.

European Societies

ong>Theong> ICEM conferences have always been conducted

jointly with a major local technical society and other

co-societies in the host country. For ICEM’09, the

Institution of Mechanical Engineers and the Nuclear

Institute will again help in the organization as they did

at ICEM’03 and ICEM’05. In addition, the Nuclear

Decommissioning Authority (NDA) will continue

supporting the ICEM conferences by participating as a

major UK cooperating agency.

Cooperating ong>Internationalong> Agencies

Since the beginning, the ICEM meetings have been

held in cooperation with major international

organizations responsible for programs and research in

radioactive waste management and environmental

remediation fields. ong>Theong> ong>Internationalong> Atomic Energy

Agency (IAEA) has been assisting this conference in

several ways. ong>Theong>ir support has included assistance in

the technical program preparation, presentation of

technical papers and other agency information,

promotion of the conference to their member states, and

providing financial and technical assistance.

Social Events and Guest Program

Social Events

ong>Theong> conference registration fee includes lunch for three

days (Monday to Wednesday), the Sunday Welcome

Reception and the Tuesday Exhibitor Reception.

Tickets for the ong>Conferenceong> Banquet on Wednesday are

optional and are charged at a nominal price. Please note

space is limited and tickets will be issued on a firstcome

first-served basis.

Welcome Reception

Sunday: 18:00-20:00 Room: Exhibition Hall 2A

All conference participants are invited to attend the

Welcome Reception in the Exhibit Hall at the ACC on

Sunday from 18:00 to 20:00. Attendance is included in

the conference registration fee. Guests are welcome to

purchase a ticket at GBP £15 (USD $27) plus VAT.

Delegate badges are required to gain entry and will be

available at the registration desk between 16:00 - 19:00.

Exhibit Reception

Tuesday: 18:00-19:30 Room: Exhibition Hall 2A

A complimentary reception for registrants will be held

from 18:00 to 19:30 in the Exhibit Hall. Please take this

opportunity to review, evaluate and test the current

products and services of the exhibiting companies.

Guests are welcome to purchase a ticket at GBP £15

(USD $27) plus VAT. Delegate/guests badges are

required to gain entry.

3


4

ong>Conferenceong> Banquet

Wednesday: 19:00 Off Site: Britannia Adelphi Hotel

ong>Theong> entertainment hallmark of the ICEM conference is

the traditional and culturally festive banquet, reflective

of the host country. This year’s ICEM 2009 banquet

will be held at the Britannia Adelphi Hotel which is as

much a part of Liverpool’s heritage as the River

Mersey. ong>Theong> evening will begin at 19:00 with a wine

and ale reception as guests visit with other members of

the international ICEM family. At 20:00, guests will

enter the banquet room where you will be transported

back to the ‘swinging sixties’ where a band called the

Beatles topped the record charts all over the world.

What will the rest of the evening hold... one can only

“Imagine”! ong>Theong> Britannia Adelphi Hotel also known as

just “Adelphi Hotel” is located about six minutes by car

from the convention center at Ranelagh Place.

Tel: +44 (0) 151 709 7200.

A coach transport between the ACC and Adelphi is

available for banquet attendees. However, you are most

welcome to make your own way there if you prefer.

Coaches will leave the ACC at 18:45 and return from

the Adelphi at 23:45.

ong>Theong> ICEM ong>Conferenceong> Banquet is an optional extra, but

truly memorable. ong>Theong>re is a nominal cost to attend for

fully registered conference participants. For conference

guests, a tickets and badge will be required to gain

entrance.

Guest Tours “Welcome Reception

Monday: 08:30 Room: 4B

ICEM will sponsor a “Guest Welcome Receptionon

Monday morning hosted by Dianne Benda. Ms. Benda

has hosted our guests programs in Oxford, Glasgow and

Bruges and will do so again this year.

This “Guest Welcome Reception” will review all of our

scheduled tour options (1 per day, Sunday-Thursday) as

well as having a native Liverpool representative that

will be available to answer any questions you may have

about fabulous opportunities in the city and surrounding

areas for shopping and sightseeing. While there will be

tourism information available throughout the event, we

encourage you to visit with the representative on

Monday to answer questions and assist you in planning

your week in Liverpool and its surrounding areas to

make the most of your visit to Liverpool.

Upon availibilty, last minute tickets can be purchased.

You must arrive at lease a half hour prior to the

scheduled departure time of that scheduled tour. Only

GBP £ funds will be accepted.

Tour #1 - Day Trip, Southport £45+VAT

Sunday, October 11, 2009

Departure: 10:00 Return: 17:00

Depart Location: ACC - Water Side Loading Area

All conference participants and guests are invited to

take part in this trip to a classic English seaside resort.

You will travel by coach to Southport, accompanied by

a tour guide, where you will find glorious sandy

beaches, panoramic seafront and a Victorian pier.

Southport’s famous pier is the oldest surviving iron pier

in the UK and the longest overland pier in the country.

Described as sophisticated, cosmopolitan and vibrant,

Southport is the perfect place to enjoy a relaxing

daytrip. ong>Theong>re will be a guided tour around Southport

followed by free time to enjoy Southport’s Lord Street,

famous for its shopping. ong>Theong> leafy boulevard, with its

glass-canopied shops and stunning Wayfarers Arcade,

make it one of the Northwest’s leading shopping

destinations. ong>Theong> coach will pick up and drop off at the

ACC, Liverpool (returning in time to attend the Sunday

Welcome Reception).

Tour #2 - Liverpool City Tour £8+VAT

Monday, October 12, 2009

Departure: 10:00 Return: On your Own

Depart Location: Gowers Street

After meeting with the other guests for the welcome

orientation with coffee/tea and cookies, we will begin

our tour of the city with an open top Hop-On- Hop Off

guided tour bus. This is the best and easiest way to see

the city with 12 stops and narrations of the city sights

such as Albert Dock, ong>Theong> Cavern, Chinatown, the

cathedrals and other city sights. After the round trip tour

concludes, you may continue on the bus choosing

selected spots for shopping or lunch to visit on your

own or in small groups. Your bus ticket will continue to

provide you with transportation throughout the city for

the rest of the day (on this route only). ong>Theong> bus stops

near the Liverpool ACC for easy boarding and transport

throughout Liverpool.

Tour #3: - Port Sunlight and Chester £38+VAT

Tuesday, October 13, 2009

Departure:09:00 Return: 16:30

Depart Location: ACC - Water Side Loading Area

A visit to the unique village of Port Sunlight built by

William Lever for his factory workers then visit the

Lady Lever Art Gallery where we will enjoy tea and

biscuits. ong>Theong>n on to the Roman city of Chester, 20 miles

away, for a guided walk, lunch at the Chester Cathedral

Rectory or surrounding eateries, and then free time for

shopping and tea in this historic and quaint city. Lunch

or refreshments are not included.

Tour #4: Beatles Magical Mystery Tour £58+VAT

Wednesday, October 14, 2009

Departure: 10:00 Return: 15:00

Depart Location: ACC - Water Side Loading Area

Your trip to Liverpool would not be complete without a

visit to ong>Theong> Beatles Story Museum followed by the two

hour Magical Mystery coach tour. This day will

introduce you to the lives of the Beatles visiting their

homes, schools and places that inspired some of their

most memorable songs ending at the legendary Cavern

Club. This full day experience will leave you immersed

in Beatle mania and ready for ICEM’s legendary

Cultural Banquet. Lunch or refreshments are not

included.

Tour #5: Liverpool Anglican £46+VAT

Cathedral & Speke Hall

Thursday, October 15, 2009

Departure: 09:00 Return: 17:00

Depart Location: ACC - Water Side Loading Area

A guided visit through the country’s largest cathedral,

followed by a coach tour to the superb Tudor House,

Speke Hall. This rambling, atmospheric house spans the

centuries - with a fine Great Hall and priest hole from

the 16th century and an Oak Parlour and smaller cozy

rooms from the Victorian era. Jacobean plasterwork and

intricately carved furniture complete the picture. ong>Theong>

fully equipped Victorian kitchen and servant’s hall give

a fascinating ‘below stairs’ experience. Lunch and

refreshments are not included.


ong>Conferenceong> Registration

On-Site Registration Hours

It is strongly recommended that the conference

participants register on Sunday, October 11, to avoid the

rush before the opening session on Monday morning,

October 12. Badges are required for the Sunday

Reception. ong>Theong> registration desk will be located in the

ACC on the 2nd floor foyer area, during the following

hours:

Sunday, October 11, 2009 16:00 to 19:00

Monday, October 12, 2009 07:15 to 18:00

Tuesday, October 13, 2009 07:15 to 18:00

Wednesday, October 14, 2009 07:15 to 18:00

Thursday, October 15, 2009 07:15 to 10:00

Speaker/Author/Co-Chair - Check-in

Upon your arrival and after you check-in at the

registration counter, please proceed to the

Speaker/Author check-in desk located on the second

floor. Here you will confirm your attendance,

presentation times, review your submitted documents

and hand in any last minute paperwork for the

conference.

Hours

Sunday, October 11, 2009 16:00 to 19:00

Monday, October 12, 2009 07:15 to 18:00

Tuesday, October 13, 2009 07:15 to 18:00

Wednesday, October 14, 2009 07:15 to 18:00

Thursday, October 15, 2009 07:15 to 13:00

Please be sure that you also attend the Speaker/Session

Co-Chair Briefing (continental breakfast) on the day of

your presentation in room 11B at the ACC. Full details

regarding your attendance are on page 7.

Technical Events

Participating Attendees

Over 300 abstracts have been accepted from more than

30 countries, from Western, Central and Eastern Europe,

the Far and Middle East, and from North and South

America. This strong technical program is expected to

draw more than 600 scientists, engineers, managers,

project directors, utility and other business

representatives, equipment vendors and government

officials from around the world. ong>Theong> traditionally strong

participation from countries with mature environmental

programs will be supplemented by a contingent of

attendees from Central and Eastern Europe, as well as

key representatives from other countries from around

the world with emerging programs. In the past, the

ICEM meetings have allowed participants to exchange

technical information, discover solutions to problems

and make valuable business contacts or even arrange

business agreements.

ong>Conferenceong> Venue

ong>Theong> 2009 conference will be held at the Liverpool Arena

and Convention Center (ACC) situated in the beautiful

location of the Kings Dock on the River Mersey. It

consists of the Echo Arena and the BT Convention

Center. ong>Theong> ACC offers visitors a unique experience in

one of the UK’s most vibrant cities. Host to the opening

ceremony of the Capital of Culture Year in January

2008, Echo Arena Liverpool is the center of

entertainment for concert goers and sports enthusiasts

across the North West and North Wales. ong>Theong> Arena and

Convention Center Liverpool is located at Monarchs

Quay, Liverpool, L3 4FP. Most accommodations are

within a 10-15 minute walk of the conference center.

Major Topics

ong>Theong> ICEM’09 Technical Program is divided into 63

technical sessions conducted over three and one-half

days. A listing of the specific sessions within each of

the six technical programs can be found in the

“Program at a Glance” Section.

Plenary - Opening Session

Monday: 09:00 Room: Hall 1A

ong>Theong> Opening Session will take place at the Liverpool

Arena and Convention Center (ACC) on Monday

morning at 09:00 with the keynote presentations setting

the theme for this year’s conference. Coffee will be

served in the exhibit hall from 07:30 until the program

begins at 09:00. Our current confirmed speakers are

listed below:

PLENARY SPEAKERS & HONORARY

CO-CHAIR’S:

Dr. Inés Triay: Assistant Secretary for Environmental

Management-DOE (USA)

Hans Forström: Director, Nuclear Fuel Cycle and

Waste Technology-IAEA (AUSTRIA)

Stephen Henwood: Chairman, Nuclear

Decommissioning Authority (UK)

Bill Poulson: Managing Director, Sellafield Ltd. (UK)

Poster Sessions

ong>Theong> conference technical program will contain five

major Poster Sessions on Monday, Tuesday and

Wednesday arranged from the five Technical Tracks.

ong>Theong> leading objective for the poster sessions is to

provide a forum for experts in the field and interested

attendees to gather for a half day in the ACC where

they can move around freely and engage in discussions,

which would normally not be possible during the oral

sessions.

Special Panel Sessions

PANEL: Environmental Cleanup Worldwide -

Challenges and Opportunities – Session 2A

Monday: 13:45 Room: 3A

This panel will provide a global perspective on the

current status of environmental management in the

world...

Panelists include: Marc Butez, CEA (FRANCE);

Hiroyuki Umeki, JAEA (JAPAN); Myung Jae Song,

Doosan (KOREA); Adrian Simper, NDA (UK); and

Samit Bhattacharyya, SRNL (USA).

PANEL: Will the Lack of Geological Repositories

Slow the Nuclear Renaissance? – Session 2B

Monday: 16:15 Room: 3A

ong>Theong> continued growth in interest in expanding nuclear

power programand the continuing challenge of implementing

geological disposal are strongly related issues.

New nuclear plants may be more acceptable if “the

waste problem” is seen to be solved – and thus more

effort may be devoted to this task. On the other hand,

the urgent need for more, CO2 free electricity may

tempt decision makers to downplay the back-end

issues. In either case, there may be direct impacts on

national disposal programand also on the support given

to multinational disposal initiatives that may provide

5


6

small and new nuclear programwith earlier, more

affordable, access to safe and secure repositories.

Panellists include: Professor W.E. (Bill) Lee, Imperial

College (UK); Hiroyuki Umeki, JAEA (JAPAN);

Ewoud Verhoef, COVRA (NETHERLANDS); and

Charles McCombie, Arius Association (UK).

Hot Topics and Emerging Issues in

D&D – Session 3

Monday: 13:45 Room: 3B

This panel will focus on current hot topics and emerging

issues in the decommissioning area worldwide. ong>Theong>

topics being considered include critical issues facing

D&D, privatization, supply chain issues, disposal

issues, cost-effectiveness, loss and retention of skills,

and international cooperation and networking.

Panelists include: Dr. Jas Devgun, Sargent & Lundy

LLC, (USA); Dr. Michele Laraia, IAEA (AUSTRIA);

Russ Mellor, Sellafield (UK); Dr. Charles Miller, US

Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USA); Mr. Richard

Mrowicki, NDA (UK); David Boath, AMEC (UK);

and Brad Smith, CH2M Hill (USA).

PANEL: YGN Roundtable “An Audience With...” –

Session 11A

Monday: 16:15 Room: 13

This round table discussion was developed due to the

fact that YGN members/panel in the UK don’t know

where to turn for career advice and feel that there is a

glass ceiling for progression dependent on age which

we want to investigate.

ong>Theong> session will be led by Russ Mellor, Decommissioning

Director at Sellafield Ltd and Miranda

Kirschel, Business Development Director at CH2M

HILL, ong>Internationalong> Nuclear Services. Both have had

varied and interesting career paths and are happy to

share their experiences with younger members of

industry in a relaxed round table environment with

plenty of time for questions and discussion. ong>Theong> session

is aimed at the encouragement for career development

of younger members of industry and to investigate

if there is a glass ceiling stopping career progression

in UK or elsewhere in the world.

YGN GENERAL MEETING – Session 11B

Monday: After Session 11A Room: 13

A general YGN Meeting will be conducted to canvass

views of the younger members of the industry,

exchange knowledge across companies, and grow the

YGN network through the conference attendees. This

meeting will be used to share best practices, and

develop new ideas to progress the aims and objectives

of the YGN in the future.

Agenda: 1) Introductions; 2) Explanation of YGN Aims

and Objectives; 3) Discussion on Output of YGN

Questionnaire; 4) Sharing of ong>Internationalong> YGN Activities

and Events; 5) Personal Development and Career

Progression; 6) Education and Training Initiatives; 7)

Communications across the YGN Network; 8) External

Communications to wider industry and 9) Future Plans

and New Initiatives.

PANEL: Emerging Issues in the Management for

L/ILW – Session 13

Monday: 08:30 Room: 3B

This panel will focus on strategies for the management

of all low and intermediate level waste (L/ILW). Based

on experience in different national programs, it will

discuss various options and their merits for managing

L/ILW. It will consider the definition of different categories

of L/ILW and their potential routes for disposal

including waste of very low activity, often arising in

high volumes as contaminated land or from decommissioning.

Panelists include: Mr. Phil Davies, NDA, Head of

National Waste Mgmt. Strategy (UK); Mr. Hans

Forström, Director, Nuclear Fuel Cycle & Waste Technology

- IAEA, (AUSTRIA); Dr. S. D. Misra, Director

of Nuclear Recycle Group, BARC, (INDIA); Mr.

Michel Dutzer, Director Industrielle, ANDRA

(FRANCE); and Mr. David Bennett, Strategic Policy

Manager, Environmental Agency of England and Wales

(UK).

PANEL: ong>Internationalong> Decommissioning Network –

Session 14

Monday: 08:30 Room: 12

This panel will focus on IAEA’s ong>Internationalong> Decommissioning

Network (IDN). In this session IDNinvolved

organizations will be invited to report on their

experience in cooperating with the IAEA in the field of

decommissioning. ong>Theong> panel will be introduced by an

overview of progress achieved and plans developed

under the IDN. Since the IDN is intended to function

as a loose “Network of Networks”, other presentations

in this session should include work involving bilateral /

multinational agreements carried out by non-IAEA

organizations which form complementary “Networks”.

Active discussion can be expected to ensure dissemination

of information about and support for the IDN concept

by organizations not involved yet.

Panelists include: Staffan Linsdkog, SKI (Sweden);

Sean Bushart, EPRI, (USA); Leopold Weil, Federal

Office for Radiation Protection (BfS), (Germany);

Maria Lindberg, Studsvik UK Ltd, (UK); Doug Metcalfe,

Natural Resources Canada, (Canada); and

Michele Laraia, ong>Internationalong> Atomic Energy Agency

(IAEA), (Austria).

PANEL: Global Partnering in ong>Internationalong> Waste

and Cleanup Programs – Session 20

Monday: 10:45 Room: 11B

This panel will provide a global perspective on the

status of the clean-up of nuclear legacy sites in the

North West and Far East Russia and lessons learned by

key participants of the Global Partnership Program. ong>Theong>

speakers will discuss best practice in international

cooperation, meeting regulatory requirements and

approaches to ensure safe management of spent nuclear

fuel and radioactive waste. Speakers in this session will

discuss their Global Partnership activities, and explore

opportunities for future international collaboration.

Panelists include: Michael Washer, Department of

Foreign Affairs and ong>Internationalong> Trade (Canada);

Aleksey Maltzev, FSUE Zvyozdochka (Russia)

Konstantin Kulikov, NIPTB Onega (Russia); Sergey

Kazakov, Director of the Federal Nuclear Safety

Centre (Russia); and Lucien Pillette-Cousin, AREVA

(France)

PANEL: Current IAEA Activities in

Predisposal Management of L/IL Radioactive

Waste – Session 23

Tuesday: 13:45 Room: 3A

This panel will focus on Waste Technology Section

(WTS) of the ong>Internationalong> Atomic Energy Agency

(IAEA) which has a dedicated program focused on

waste predisposal activities. ong>Theong> objective of this program

is to strengthen the capability of Member States

to properly and safely process and store radioactive

waste. A range of activities are included in this pro-


gram to provide guidance on selection and program of

waste management strategies, to provide information

and guidance on best practices and technologies for

waste minimization, pre-treatment, treatment, conditioning,

packaging, transportation and storage, to support

research and development on new pre-disposal

technologies, etc. This panel will provide a forum for

the exchange of scientific and technical information

and guidance on pre-disposal radioactive waste management

with focus on current activities. ong>Theong> following

topics will be discussed by our panel with an opportunity

for interaction with the audience.

Panelists and Topics include: Dr. Antonio Morales

Leon - Approach to Development of Waste Acceptance

Criteria for all Individual Waste Management Steps:

Pre-treatment to Disposal; Zoran Drace - Economics

of Radioactive Waste Management - Cost Calculations

and Approach to Costing of Future Obligations (Liability

Assessment); Dr. Antonio Morales Leon - Standardized

Methodology for Waste Management Assessments

- An Optimized Approach to Establish Current

and Future needs and to Select Adequate Technical

Options; Dr. Sustanta Kumar - Modular and Mobile

Waste Processing Facilities; Zoran Drace - Long-term

Storage for L&IL and HL Waste - Technical Considerations;

Zoran Drace/Dr. Antonio Morales Leon -

Mixed Waste Processing/Storage and Disposal; and Dr.

Antonio Morales Leon - IAEA Network for Radioactive

Waste Characterization - Processing/Storage/Disposal.

PANEL: Young Generation Network (YGN) –

Session 44

Wednesday: 10:45 Room: 11B

This panel will focus on Young Generation Network

and Professional Development. ong>Theong> panelists and topics

will include Carl Dawson (NDA Graduate Program

Manager) and Craig Morrow (NDA Graduate) on the

creation and experiences of the Nuclear Decommissioning

Authority Graduate Scheme; Corhyn Parr

(UK YGN Vice Chair) presenting the results of a survey

of UK YGN members on attitudes and opinions of

the UK Nuclear Industry and Miguel Millan (Spanish

YGN) on the Development of the Spanish YGN.

PANEL: UK NDA and Tier 1 Funding, Contracting,

Subcontracting Selection and Arrangements –

Session 46

Wednesday 13:45 Room: 3A

This workshop will summarize and provide a status

report on funding, contracting and the competition program

for the NDA sites. ong>Theong> focus will be to discuss

openly with the audience’s experience, ideas and new

lessons that are applicable to the UK.

Panelists include: Mike Hawe, Commercial Director,

Magnox North; Keith Case, Commercial Director, Sellafield;

David Savage, Program Manager, Shared Services

Alliance; Ron Gorham, Head of Supply Chain

Development, NDA; and Keith Gibson, Low Level

Waste Repository.

PANEL: UMREG Panel/Roundtable – Session 47

Wednesday 13:45 Room: 3B

This panel with meeting roundtable will focus on uranium

mine and mill remediation issues as contemplated

by the international IAEA, Uranium Mining Remediation

Exchange Group (UMREG). UMREG constituted

itself during the ICEM’95 Berlin Meeting as an informal

network group for multilateral exchange on issues

related to uranium mine and mill remediation. ong>Theong>

USDOE UMTRA-Group and the German BMWi-WIS-

MUT Group started the exchange in 1993 on specific

topics related to major projects UMTRA Title I and

WISMUT. Since then, several meetings were held in

conjunction with international conferences focusing on

environmental remediation. Also, the Group has grown

into an international network including representatives

of regulating, permitting and supervising institutions,

operating and consulting companies, and research

organizations.

Panelists include: Alex Jakubick, UMREG (AUSR-

TIA); Jody Waugh, S. M. Stoller Corp., US DOE Contractor

(USA); Michael Paul, Wismut (GERMANY);

Marat Kaftaranov, Uranlikvidrudnik (KAZA-

KHSTAN); Peter Stegnar, NATO Central Asian Program

(SLOVENIA); Steve Brown, SENES Consultants

Ltd. (USA); Földig Gabor, MECSEK-ÖKO

(HUNGARY); Peter Waggitt, IAEA (AUSTRALIA)

and Esther Harlander, EBRD (UK)

PANEL: Future Direction in Knowledge

Management – Session 53

Wednesday 10:45 Room: 12

This panel will consider the initiative instigated by

JAEA in the context of the common requirement to

efficiently and rigorously manage increasing large and

complex fluxes of information produced in all

geological disposal programs. Emphasis will be on

distinguishing between program-specific constraints

and more generic areas, which could be a focus for

future collaborative projects.

Panelists include: P. Marjatta Palmu, Posiva Oy,

(FINDLAND); Richard Shaw, British Geological Survey

(BGS), (UK); Stuart Hunt, Nuclear Decommissioning

Authority, (UK); and Hiroyuki Umeki, Japan

Atomic Energy Agency, (JAPAN).

ong>Conferenceong> Proceedings on CD-ROM

Each conference registrant will receive the conference

proceedings on a CD-ROM mailed approximately three

months after the conference. Additional proceedings

may be ordered at an additional charge, by contacting:

ASME Order Department, 22 Law Drive, P.O. Box

2300, Fairfield, NJ 07007-2300, U.S.A., Telephone

1-800-THE-ASME.

Daily Speaker/Session Co-Chair Briefing

A morning briefing will be provided to all Speakers,

Panelists, and Session Co-Chairs on the day of their

session. ong>Theong> briefing will include coffee, tea, and

biscuits and will be served at the conference center.

Most hotels have breakfast included in the cost of the

room. ong>Theong> speaker’s briefing will give you the time for

final arrangements before your session. ong>Theong> attendance

at the briefing will provide an opportunity for the

Session Co-Chairs to meet with the speakers, and for all

to discuss the topics they will be addressing. It is

essential that all Panel and Oral Speakers/Co-Chairs

attend the briefing.

Monday, October 12, 2009 08:00 to 08:30

Room/Location: 11B

Tuesday, October 13, 2009 07:30 to 08:00

Room/Location: 11B

Wednesday, October 14, 2009 07:30 to 08:00

Room/Location: 11B

Thursday, October 15, 2009 07:30 to 08:00

Room/Location: 11B

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8

Lunch Periods

Lunch will be served in the Exhibit Hall. Lunches served on

Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday will mainly consist of hot

fork buffet food that can be easily consumed while visiting

the exhibits and posters. Luncheon hours are from 12:30 -

13:40. Paid full week registration includes the luncheon price

for all three days. If you prefer, there are also several local

restaurants near the conference center. A listing of local

restaurants for eating and drinking’ a will be given to

delegates upon arrival Additional information can be found

on their website at: www.accliverpool.com/liverpool.

AV Office / Speaker Ready Area

Room: 7 — Monday-Wednesday

ong>Theong> AV Office / Speaker Ready area will be available for

speakers to load and review their PowerPoint slides. This

area will be open from Monday to Wednesday from 07:15 -

17:00 on the 2nd floor room 7 at the ong>Conferenceong> Center.

Please refer to the AV schedule on page ??.

Acronym List

ACC Arena and Convention Centre

AEA Atomic Energy Agency

ALARA As Low As Reasonably

Achievable

ASME American Society of

Mechanical Engineers

BWR Boiling Water Reactor

CEA Commissariat a l’Energie

Atomique

CERCLA Comprehensive Environmental

Response, Compensation and

Liability Act

CH-TRU Contact Handled- Transuranic

Waste

DAW Dry Activated Waste

DNFSB Defense Nuclear Facilities

Safety Board

DOE Department of Energy

EIS Environmental Impact

Statement

EM Environmental Management

EPA Environmental Protection

Agency

EPRI Electric Power Research

Institute

ER Environmental Remediation

FUSRAP Formerly Utilized Sites

Remedial Action Program

HEPA High Efficiency Particulate Air

HEU Highly Enriched Uranium

HLW High Level Waste

IAEA ong>Internationalong> Atomic Energy

Agency

IDN ong>Internationalong> Decommissioning

Network

ILW Intermediate Level Waste

IPSN Institut de Protection et de

SureteNucleaire

ISM Integrated Safety Management

JAERI Japan Atomic Energy Research

Institute

KAERI Korea Atomic Energy Research

Institute

LEU Low Enriched Uranium

LILW Low- intermediate Level Waste

LLW Low Level Waste

LSA Low Specific Activity

M&I Management & Integration

M&O Management & Operation

MOX Mixed Uranium-Plutonium

Oxide

MW Mixed Waste

N-DA Non-Detectable Activity

NDA Nuclear Decommissioning

Authority

NEA Nuclear Energy Agency

NED Nuclear Engineering Division

NEI Nuclear Energy Institute

NEPA National Environmental Policy

Act

NI Nuclear Institute

NNSA National Nuclear Security

Administration

NORM Natural Occurring Radioactive

Material

NPO Nuclear Power Operations

NPP Nuclear Power Plant

NWPA Nuclear Waste Policy Act

Coffee/Tea Breaks

Complimentary coffee and tea will be served for all

meeting participants in the Exhibit Hall during the

morning and the afternoon breaks each day of the

conference.

Technical Tours

Four technical tours are planned to see the UK

radioactive waste management programs first hand.

ong>Theong>se tours will take place immediately after the

conference on Thursday and Friday. ong>Theong>se tours are

full, however a cancellation could have occurred.

Please check-in at our registration desk to confirm your

attendance if you registered for a tour. If you are

interested as a replacement for a cancellation, please

also contact us for the available options.

Tour 1A - Sellafield

(Sponsored by Nuclear Management Partnership)

Tour 1B - UK Low Level Waste Repository

Tour 2 - Springfield Fuel Fabrication Plant

Tour 3 - Trawsfynydd

OECD Organization for Economic

Cooperation & Development

PRA Probabilistic Risk Analysis

PWR Pressurized Water Reactor

R&D Research & Development

RCRA Resource Conservation and

Recovery Act

RH-TRU Remote Handled- Transuranic

Waste

ROC Republic of China

RPV Reactor Pressure Vessel

RW Rade Waste

SNF Spent Nuclear Fuel|

SRNL Savannah River National

Laboratory

SRW Solid Radioactive Waste

TENORM Technologically Enhanced

Naturally Occurring Radioactive

Material

TRU Transuranic

TRUPACT Transuranic Package

Transporter

USACE United States Army Corps of

Engineers

USDOD US Department of Defense

USDOE US Department of Energy

USNRC US Nuclear Regulatory

Commission

WAC Waste Acceptance Criteria

WIPP Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

WM Waste Management

WNA World Nuclear Association


Notes

9


10

Liverpool Region


Liverpool City Center Map

Bus

Loading

11


12

Convention Center — Cross Section of All Three Levels

Escalator to

the 1st floor

1. Convention Center Entrance

1st Floor

4. Exhibition Hall Entrance

Basement Level

Convention Center — 2nd Floor

Entrance at 1st Floor

2. Registration and Technical Meeting Ro oms 3. Exhibitor Loading Bay

(Riverside Terrace) — 2nd Floor

Basement Level

5. River Mersey 6. Tour Bus Loading Area

Entrance at 1st Floor

Registration Area

Meeting Room Locations

Meeting Room Locations

This is a view of the 2nd Level

of the ong>Conferenceong> Center

Room 1

Plenary

Session

Guest, Technical Tours

and Wednesday Evening

Banquet buses will

load/unload from this

area of the ACC.

River Mersey Side


Condensed ong>Conferenceong> Schedule

ICEM’09

Tracks

Technical Program Session Schedule

Approximate Presentation Times

Morning Presentation Start Time

Session Start 8:30

Paper 1 8:35

Paper 2 9:00

Paper 3 9:25

Paper 4 9:50

Break 10:15- 10:40

Session Start 10:45

Paper 5 10:50

Paper 6 11:15

Paper 7 11:40

Paper 8 12:05

Session Ends 12:30

Lunch 12:30-13:40

ong>Theong> above approximate presentation times are provided so you can tentatively arrange your schedule. We rely on the Session Co-Chairs to

manage the presentations to this schedule so that you can move between sessions and attend the presentations you desire. We recognize

however that due to cancellations or other unplanned events, the order time may be changed at the conference. ong>Theong> session posters outside

each speaking room are intended to show the cancelled papers and any changed times. We also encourage the Session Co-Chairs to

manage the session time in the best interest for the majority of the attendees and request that they mark any changes on the posters before

the session starts. We offer our regrets if you missed a presentation due to these changes.

Poster Session Schedule

ICEM’09 A/V Schedule and Loading of Revised PowerPoints

Afternoon Presentation Start Time

Session Start 13:45

Paper 1 13:50

Paper 2 14:15

Paper 3 14:40

Paper 4 15:05

Break 15:30 -16:10

Session Start 16:15

Paper 5 16:20

Paper 6 16:15

Paper 7 17:10

Paper 8 17:35

Session Ends 18:00

Poster Times Set-Up Poster Displayed Poster Presenter at Booth Tear Down

Session 12

Session 22

Session 34

Session 45

Session 56

Mon. pm - Mon. pm Tues. am - Tues. pm Wed. am - Wed. pm Thurs. am

Low Level /

Intermediate Level WM

High Level Waste /

Spent Nuclear Fuel WM

Decontamination

& Decommissioning

Environmental

Remediation

Environmental Mgmt /

Crosscutting Issues

Posters

#1

L

U

N

C

H

12:30 – 13:30

08:00 – 08:30

12:30 – 13:30

08:00 – 08:30

12:30 – 13:30

#4 #13

#5 #6 #15

#2A #2B #16

#17

#3 #18

#14

#7 #8

#10 #11 #19 #20

#9

#21

#12 #22

13:30 – 17:45

08:30 – 12:45

13:30 – 17:45

08:30 – 12:45

13:30 – 17:45

#23

#27

#28

#29 #30

#25 #26

#24

#31

#32 #33

#38

#39 #40

#41

#36

#37

#42 / #43

#44

#45

15:30 – 16:10 17:15 - 17:45

10:15 – 10:40 12:15 – 12:45

15:30 – 16:10 17:15 - 17:45

10:15 – 10:40 12:15 – 12:45

15:30 – 16:10 17:15 - 17:45

#48

#59

#49 #50 #60

#51 #61

#52 #53

#54 #57

#55 #58

#47 #62

17:45 – 18:00

12:45 – 13:00

17:45 – 18:00

12:45 – 13:00

17:45 – 18:00

Please Note: If your poster presentation is not removed by the above listed times, your presentation will be removed by the

association and held at the speaker check-in desk until the end of the conference (Thursday, October 15, 2009 @12:30).

If you do not pick up your presentation before the conference ends, your presentation will be discarded).

L

U

N

C

H

Monday 7:15 - 9:30 Reserved for Monday Morning Plenary Loading/Transfer/Set-up Session 1

Monday 9:30 - 12:30 Reserved for Loading Monday Afternoon Sessions 2-12

Monday 12:30 - 14:00 Reserved for Monday Afternoon Transfer/Set-up Sessions 2-12

Monday 14:00 - 17:00 Loading Powerpoints — All Sessions 13-63

Tuesday 7:15 - 9:00 Reserved for Tuesday Morning Transfer/Set-up Sessions 13-22

Tuesday 9:00 - 12:30 Reserved for Loading Tuesday Afternoon Sessions 23-34

Tuesday 12:30 - 14:00 Reserved for Monday Afternoon Transfer/Set-up Sessions 23-34

Tuesday 14:00 - 17:00 Loading Powerpoints — All Sessions 35-63

Wednesday 7:15 - 9:00 Reserved for Wednesday Morning Transfer/Set-up Sessions 35-45

Wednesday 9:00 - 12:30 Reserved for Loading Wednesday Afternoon Sessions 46-56

Monday 12:30 - 14:00 Reserved for Wednesday Afternoon Transfer/Set-up Sessions 46-56

Wednesday 14:00 - 17:00 Loading Powerpoints — All Sessions 57-63

Thursday 7:15 - 9:00 Thursday Morning Transfer/Set-up Sessions 57-63

#34

L

U

N

C

H

#46

#56

#63

13


SESSION #

14

Technical Program at a Glance

MONDAY AM - OCTOBER 12, 2009

1 Opening Session ALL X Room 1 09:00

MONDAY PM - OCTOBER 12, 2009

2A Panel: Environmental Cleanup Worldwide - Challenges and Opportunities X X Room 3A 13:45

2B Panel: Will the Lack of Geological Repositories Slow the Nuclear Renaissance X Room 3A 16:15

3 Hot Topics and Emerging Issues In D&D X Room 3B 13:45

4 National Programs For L/ILW X Room 12 13:45

5 LLW Characterization, Treatment & Packaging Developments - Part 1 of 2 X Room 4B 13:45

6 LLW Characterization, Treatment & Packaging Developments - Part 2 of 2 X Room 4B 16:15

7 National and ong>Internationalong> ER Programs X Room 11B 13:45

8 Experiences In ER Clean-Up Actions X Room 11B 16:15

9 National, Multi-National and ong>Internationalong> Programs X Room 11C 13:45

10 EM Life-Cycle Economics and Cost-Benefit Analysis X Room 13 13:45

11A Panel: YGN Roundtable “An Audience With”... X Room 13 16:15

11B General YGN Meeting (Directly after Session 11A) X Room 13

12 Poster Session: Spent Fuel, Fissile, TRU and HLW Management X 2nd Floor 13:30

TUESDAY AM - OCTOBER 13, 2009

13 Panel: Emerging Issues in the Management For L/ILW X Room 3B 08:30

14 Panel: ong>Internationalong> Decommissioning Network X Room 12 08:30

15 Disposal Site and Waste Form Characterization and Performance Assessment X Room 4B 08:30

16 National and ong>Internationalong> Programs For Spent Fuel, Fissile, TRU, and HLW Management X Room 3A 08:30

17 HLW Characterization / Recent Advances in HLW Treatment Systems X Room 13 08:30

18 D&D of Power Reactors and Research Reactors X Room 11C 08:30

19 Global Partnering in ong>Internationalong> Clean-Up Programs X Room 14 08:30

20 Panel: Global Partnering in ong>Internationalong> Waste and Cleanup Programs X Room 11B 10:45

21 Environmental Management Health and Safety Issues X Room 14 10:45

22 Poster Session - Facility Decontamination and Decommissioning X 2nd Floor 08:30

TUESDAY PM - OCTOBER 13, 2009

SESSION TITLES

23 Panel: Current IAEA Activities in Predisposal Management of L/ILRadioactive Waste X Room 3A 13:45

24 National and ong>Internationalong> D&D Programs X Room 3B 13:45

25 Treatment, Management and Recycle of D&D Materials X Room 4B 13:45

26 D&D Update and Management Issues X Room 4B 16:15

27 Waste Minimization, Avoidance and Recycling X Room 11B 13:45

28 Repository Programs: Site Selection & Characterization, URL, Eng. & Geological Barriers X Room 11C 13:45

29 Modeling Approaches for HLW, SNF, and TRU Waste Disposition X Room 12 13:45

30 Spent Fuel, HLW, and TRU Waste Management - Crosscutting Issues X Room 12 16:15

31 ER Site Characterization and Monitoring - Part 1 of 2 X Room 13 13:45

32 Local Participation and Decision-Making Processes, Behavior and Politics X Room 14 13:45

LLW

HWL

D&D

ER

EM

ROOM #

TIME


SESSION #

Technical Program at a Glance

TUESDAY PM - OCTOBER 13, 2009

SESSION TITLES

33 Dialogue Techniques: Dialogue Versus Consultation, Comm. of Risk, Edu., Use of Web Tech. X Room 14 16:15

34 Poster Session - Low/Intermediate Level Waste X 2nd Floor 13:30

WEDNESDAY AM - OCTOBER 14, 2009

35 Panel 35 has been merged with Panel 46

36 D&D Technologies - Part 1 of 2 X Room 3B 08:30

37 D&D Radiological Characterization and Monitoring X Room 3A 08:30

38 Siting, Design, Construction, and Operation of L/ILW Disposal Facilities X Room 11C 08:30

39 L/ILW Waste Handling, Technologies, and Data Analysis - Part 1 of 3 X Room 13 08:30

40 L/ILW Waste Handling, Technologies, and Data Analysis - Part 2 of 3 X Room 13 10:45

41 Transportation and Storage of HLW, Fissile, TRU, and SNF X Room 4B 08:30

42 ER Site Characterization and Monitoring - Part 2 of 2 X Room 12 08:30

43 Uranium Mining and Milling Sites ER (Directly after Session 42) X Room 12

44 Panel: Young Generation Network (YGN) - “An Audience with…” X Room 11B 10:45

45 Poster Session Environmental Remediation/EM X 2nd Floor 08:30

WEDNESDAY PM - OCTOBER 14, 2009

46 Panel: UK NDA and Tier 1 Funding, Contracting, Subcontracting Selection and Arrangements X Room 3A 13:45

47 Panel: UMREG Panel/Roundtable X Room 3B 13:45

48 Liquid Waste Treatment Process and Experience X Room 11C 13:45

49 L/ILW Waste Handling, Technologies, and Data Analysis - Part 3 of 3 X Room 14 13:45

50 Quality Assurance and Control in Radioactive Waste Management X Room 14 16:15

51 Vitrification and Borosilicate Glass Alternatives for Immobilization X Room 4B 13:45

52 A Synopsis of Knowledge Management Systems X Room 12 13:45

53 Panel: Future Directions in Knowledge Management X Room 12 16:15

54 D&D Technologies - Part 2 of 2 X Room 11B 13:45

55 Regulatory Compliance, Radiological Surveys, and Facility Release X Room 13 13:45

56 Posters: Projects In Progress X 2nd Floor 13:30

THURSDAY AM - OCTOBER 15, 2009

57 D&D of Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities X Room 3B 08:30

58 D&D Management Approaches and Planning Tools X Room 12 08:30

59 Safety Considerations Associated with L/ILW Management X Room 11B 10:45

60 L/ILW Treatment Technology Development and Implementation X Room 11C 08:30

61 Characterization and Performance Assessment For HLW, Fissile, TRU, and SNF X Room 13 08:30

62 Recent Developments in ER Technologies X Room 4B 08:30

63 Natural Analogues in Radwaste Disposal - Answering the Hard Questions X Room 14 08:30

LLW

HWL

D&D

ER

EM

ROOM #

TIME

15


Monday AM Technical Sessions

Monday, October 12, 2009

SESSION 1

Monday 09:00 - 12:30 Room:1

PLENARY - OPENING SESSION

Co-Chairs: Kenneth Kok, URS Washington Division (USA)

Fred Sheil, Sellafield Ltd. (UK)

Welcome to the ICEM’09 ong>Conferenceong> —

Welcome to Liverpool —

Plenary speakers that have confirmed:

• Dr. Inés Triay, Assistant Secretary- US DOE EM Program

(USA)

• Hans Forström, Director of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste

Technology IAEA (AUSTRIA)

• Stephen Henwood, Chairman, Nuclear Decommissioning

Authority (UK)

• Bill Poulson, Managing Director, Shellafield Ltd. (UK)

ong>Conferenceong> Organization and Administration:

Gary Benda, ong>Conferenceong> Manager (USA)

SESSION 2A

Monday 13:45 Room:3A

PANEL: ENVIRONMENTAL CLEANUP WORLDWIDE -

CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

Co-Chairs: Ana M. Han, US DOE (USA)

James Marra, SRNS (USA)

Organizers: Kurt Gerdes, Ana Han

This panel will provide a global perspective on the current status of

environmental management in the world ...

Panelists include: Marc Butez, CEA (France); Hiroyuki Umeki,

JAEA (Japan); Myung-Jae Song, Doosan (Korea); Adrian Simper,

NDA (UK); and Samit Bhattacharyya, SRNL (USA).

SESSION 2B

Monday 16:15 Room:3A

PANEL: WILL THE LACK OF GEOLOGICAL

REPOSITORIES SLOW THE NUCLEAR RENAISSANCE

Co-Chairs: Phillip Gregory, Washington TRU Solutions (USA)

Charles McCombie, Arius Association (UK)

Organizers: Murthy Devarakonda, Charles McCombie

ong>Theong> continued growth in interest in expanding nuclear power program

and the continuing challenge of implementing geological disposal are

strongly related issues. New nuclear plants may be more acceptable if

“the waste problem” is seen to be solved – and thus more effort may

be devoted to this task. On the other hand, the urgent need for more,

CO2 free electricity may tempt decision makers to downplay the backend

issues. In either case, there may be direct impacts on national

disposal programs and also on the support given to multinational

disposal initiatives that may provide small and new nuclear programs

with earlier, more affordable, access to safe and secure repositories.

Panelists include: Professor W.E. (Bill) Lee, Imperial College (UK);

Hiroyuki Umeki, JAEA (Japan); Ewoud Verhoef, COVRA

(Netherlands); and Charles McCombie, Arius Association (UK).

SESSION 3

Monday 13:45 Room: 3B

HOT TOPICS AND EMERGING ISSUES IN D&D

Co-Chairs: Jas S. Devgun, Sargent & Lundy (USA)

Michele Laraia, IAEA (AUSTRIA)

Organizer: Jas Devgun

This panel will focus on current hot topics and emerging issues in the

decommissioning area worldwide. ong>Theong> topics being considered

include critical issues facing D&D, privatization, supply chain issues,

16

disposal issues, cost-effectiveness, loss and retention of skills, and

international cooperation and networking.

Panelists include: Dr. Jas Devgun, Sargent & Lundy LLC, (USA);

Dr. Michele Laraia, IAEA (Austria); Russ Mellor, Sellafield (UK);

Dr. Charles Miller, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USA); Mr.

Richard Mrowicki, NDA (UK); David Boath, AMEC (UK); and

Brad Smith, CH2M Hill (USA).

SESSION 4

Monday 13:45 Room: 12

PANEL: NATIONAL PROGRAMS FOR L/ILW

Co-Chairs: Juergen Krone, DBE TECHNOLOGY GmbH

(GERMANY)

Angie Jones, AMEC Earth & Environmental (USA)

Organizer: Angie Jones

1. UK Strategy for Nuclear Industry LLW – 16393

Matthew Clark, Joanne Fisher, NDA (UK)

2. ong>Theong> Role of the National Low Level Waste Repository In

Delivering New Solutions for the Management of Low Level

Wastes in the UK – 16217

Martin Walkingshaw, LLW Repository Ltd, (UK)

3. Sellafield Site Low Level Waste Management Strategy – 16234

Laurence Cook, David Loudon, Charles Mason, Sellafield

Limited, (UK)

4. Regulatory Review of Preliminary Safety Assessment for the

Baita Bihor Repository, Romania – 16031

Enrique Biurrun, Bernt Haverkamp, DBE Technology GmbH,

(Germany); Klaus-Jürgen Röhlig, Clausthal University of

Technology, (Germany)

—————— Break ——————

5. An Overview of US EPAs Current Radioactive Waste

Management Efforts – 16104

Tom Peake, Loren Setlow, Daniel Schultheisz, Ken Czyscinski,

US Environmental Protection Agency, (USA)

6. Analysis of Management and Disposal Alternatives for Low

Activity Radioactive Waste – 16192

Keith Anderson, ECC (USA)

7. Strategy and Practice in Spent Sealed Sources Management in

Belgium – 16335

Vincent De pooter, NIRAS/ONDRAF (Belgium); Marnix

Braeckeveldt, David Vanleeuw, Gunter Van Zaelen,

NIRAS/ONDRAF (Belgium)

8. Improvement of the Management of Institutional Radioactive

Waste in Slovenia – 16092

Marija Fabjan, Agency for Radwaste Management, SI-1000

(Slovenia); Jože Rojc, RŽV- Mine Žrovski vrh, (Slovenia); Koen

Lenie, Leniko, (Belgium); Yves Niels, IRE, (Belgium); Gasper

Tavar, Matjaž Stepišnik, Institut “Jožef Stefan” (Slovenia)

SESSION 5

Monday 13:45 Room: 4B

LLW CHARACTERIZATION, TREATMENT & PACKAGING

DEVELOPMENTS - PART 1 OF 2

Co-Chairs: Kapil Goyal, Los Alamos National Laboratory (USA)

Hans Codee, COVRA N.V. (NETHERLANDS)

Organizer: Kapil Goyal

1. Treatment of Irradiated Core Components from BWR and PWR

Nuclear Power Plants – 16043

Joerg Viermann, Joerg Radzuweit, Andreas Friske, GNS

Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH (Germany)

2. Characterization of NORM Sources in Petroleum Coke

Calcining Processes – 16314

Ian Hamilton, Donald Halter, Matthew Arno, Foxfire Scientific

(USA); Robert Berry, Foxfire Scientific, Inc. (UK)

3. Measurement of Solid-Liquid Mixtures Using Electrical

Tomography Measurement Techniques – 16088

Gary Bolton, Industrial Tomography Systems (UK); Steven

Stanley, National Nuclear Labpratory (UK)


Technical Sessions Monday PM

SESSION 6

Monday 16:15 Room: 4B

LLW CHARACTERIZATION, TREATMENT & PACKAGING

DEVELOPMENTS - PART 2 OF 2

Co-Chairs: Hans Codee, COVRA N.V. (NETHERLANDS)

Kapil Goyal, Los Alamos National Laboratory (USA)

Organizer: Angie Jones, AMEC Earth & Environmental (USA)

1. Increasing Operational Efficiency in a Radioactive Waste

Processing Plant – 16100

Tom Turner, Stuart Watson, UKAEA (UK)

2. Management of Historical Radioactive Waste – 16267

Gheorghe Dograu, Felicia Dragolici, Laura Ionascu, Gheorghe

Rotarescu, National Institute of Reserch & Development for

Physics and Nuclear Engineering-Horia Hulubei (Romania)

3. Volume Reduction of Radioactive Concrete Wastes Generated

by Dismantling Nuclear Facilities – 16165

Byung youn Min, Wang-Kyu Choi, Jung-Woo Park, Kune-Woo

Lee, Korea Atomic Energy Research institute, (Korea)

SESSION 7

Monday 13:45 Room: 11B

NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL ER PROGRAMS

Co-Chairs: Steve Brown, SENES Consultants (USA)

Organizer: Leo van Velzen, NRG (SWITZERLAND)

1. Expectations for Managing Contaminated Ground and

Groundwater: Developing a Common View of NDA and

Regulators – 16252

Anna Clark, Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (UK)

2. ong>Theong> Government of Canada’s Programmes for Radioactive

Waste Cleanup and Long-Term Management – 16133

David McCauley, Doug Metcalfe, Marcia Blanchette, Tom

Calvert, Natural Resources Canada (Canada)

3. European Radiation Survey and Site Execution Manual

(EURSSEM) – 16176

Leo P.M. van Velzen, Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group

(Switzerland); Lucien Tuenckens, Colenco Power Engineering

Ltd.(Switzerland); Marek Vasko, Decom, a.s. (Slovakia);

Kristina Kristofova, Decom a.s.(Slovakia); Igor Matejovic, Eva

Hajkova, DECOM, a.s.(Slovakia); Vladimir Daniska, Deconta,

a.s. (Slovakia)

4. IAEA - Environet: ong>Theong> Network on Environmental Management

and Remediation – 16421

Horst Monken-Fernandee, IAEA (AUSTRIA, Decommissioning

Authority, (UK)

SESSION 8

Monday 16:15 Room:11B

EXPERIENCES IN ER CLEAN-UP ACTIONS

Co-Chairs: Leo van Velzen, NRG (SWITZERLAND)

Art Desroiser, SEC (USA)

Organizer: Leo van Velzen

1. Safe and Compliant Management Approach to Environmental

Remediation of the Hanford Site Central Plateau – 16025*

John Lehew, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company

(USA)

2. Remediation of the Site of a Former Active Handling Building

in the United Kingdom – 16041

Jack Armitage, Nuvia Limited (UK); Rowland Cornell, Nuvia

Limited (UK); Andy Staples, United Kingdom Atomic Energy

Authority (UK)

3. A Successful Remediation Project – 16400

L. Max Scott, Louisiana State University (USA)

4. Evaluation and Potential Remediation of the Industrial Norm

Legacy in Liverpool – 16096

Nigel Reeves, Gordon John, Bob Major, AMEC Nuclear Ltd.

(UK)

SESSION 9

Monday 13:45 Room: 11C

NATIONAL, MULTI-NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL

PROGRAMS

Co-Chairs: Mick Bacon, Health and Safety Executive (UK)

Ondrej Slavik, VUJE, a.s. (SLOVAKIA)

Organizer: Jennifer Biedscheid, Washington Division of URS

(USA)

1. ong>Theong> Nuclear Engineering Doctorate and NTEC CPD & Masters

Programmes: Education, Training And Research For ong>Theong>

Decommissioning Skillsbase. – 16395

John Roberts, ong>Theong> University of Manchester (UK)

2. Collaborative Retek Exchange – An Innovative Solution to the

Skills and Resource Shortage in the Nuclear Industry – 16396

Corhyn Parr, ReTek Consulting, (UK)

3. European Regional Repositories, Developing a Practical

Implementation Strategy – 16310

Ewoud Verhoef, COVRA (Netherlands) Charles McCombie,

Neil A. Chapman, Arius Association (Switzerland)

4. UK Surplus Source Disposal Programme, (SSDP) – 16097

Nigel Reeves, Gordon John, AMEC (UK)

—————— Break ——————

5. Geological Siting Regions Proposed by Nagra for the L/ILW and

the HLW Repositories as the First Step in the Application of the

Recently Established Swiss Site Selection Plan – 16295*

Jürg W. Schneider, Andreas Gautschi, Piet Zuidema, Nagra

(Switzerland)

6. A Summary of Radiological Waste Disposal Practices in ong>Theong>

United States and the United Kingdom – 16379

Victoria Maranville, AMEC Earth and Envorinmental (USA);

Richard McGrath, AMEC Nuclear (UK)

7. Best in Class Project and Contract Management Initiative at the

Department of Energy’s Office of Environmental Management –

16062

Scott Van Camp, U.S. Dept. of Energy (USA); Mike Deiters,

Project Time & Cost, Inc. (USA)

8. Education and Industry Partnership: A Case Study of Co-

Delivery – 16065

Timothy Mercer, John Tyndall Institute for Nuclear Research

(UK); Jonathan Francis, University of Central Lancashire (UK)

SESSION 10

Monday 13:45 Room: 13

EM LIFE-CYCLE ECONOMICS AND COST-BENEFIT

ANALYSIS

Co-Chairs: Charles Negin, Project Enhancement Corp (USA)

Terry Wickland, Nuclear Filter Technologies (USA)

Organizer: Jennifer Biedscheid, Washington Division of URS

(USA)

1. UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority - Value Framework, its

Development and Role in Decision Making – 16399

Mark Wareing, NDA (UK)

2. Strategic Environmental Assessment for UK LLW Management

– 16392

Andrew Craze, Matthew Clark, NDA (UK); Pete Davis, Entec

UL Ltd. (UK)

3. ong>Theong> Belgian Inventory of Nuclear Liabilities – 16317

Christian Cosemans, Jacques Cantarella, Gerda Bal,

ONDRAF/NIRAS (Belgium)

4. Financial Risks of Post-Closure Custodial Care for the Barnwell

Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility – 16155

Robert Baird, Washington Division, URS Corporation (USA);

William Newberry, South Carolina Energy Office (USA)

17


Monday PM Technical Sessions

SESSION 11A

Monday 16:15 Room: 13

PANEL: YGN ROUNDTABLE “AN AUDIENCE WITH...”

Co-Chairs: Corhyn Parr, Nuclear Enterprise Ltd. (UK)

Chris Williams, VT Nuclear Services (UK)

Organizers: Corhyn Parr, Chris Williams

This round table discussion was developed due to the fact that YGN

members in the UK don’t know where to turn for career advice and

feel that there is a glass ceiling for progression dependent on age

which we want to investigate.

ong>Theong> session will be led by Russ Mellor, Decommissioning Director at

Sellafield Ltd and Miranda Kirschel, Business Development Director

at CH2MHILL, ong>Internationalong> Nuclear Services. Both have had varied

and interesting career paths and are happy to share their experiences

with younger members of industry in a relaxed round table

environment with plenty of time for questions and discussion. ong>Theong>

session is aimed at the encouragement for career development of

younger members of industry and to investigate if there is a glass

ceiling stopping career progression in UK or elsewhere in the world.

SESSION 11B

Monday: After Session 11A Room: 13

YGN GENERAL MEETING

Co-Chairs: Corhyn Parr, Nuclear Enterprise Ltd. (UK)

Chris Williams, VT Nuclear Services (UK)

Organizers: Corhyn Parr, Chris Williams

A general YGN Meeting will be conducted to canvass canvass view of

the Younger members of the industry, exchange knowledge across

companies, and grow the YGN network through the conference

attendees. This meeting will be used to share best practice, and

develop new ideas to progress the aims and objectives of the YGN in

the future.

Agenda: 1) Introductions; 2) Explanation of YGN Aims and

Objectives; 3) Discussion on Output of YGN Questionnaire; 4)

Sharing of ong>Internationalong> YGN Activities and Events; 5) Personal

Development and Career Progression; 6) Education and Training

Initiatives; 7) Communications across the YGN Network; 8) External

Communications to wider industry and 9) Future Plans and New

Initiatives.

SESSION 12

Monday 13:30 Room: 2nd Floor

POSTER SESSION — SPENT FUEL, FISSILE, TRANSURANIC

AND HIGH LEVEL WASTE MANAGEMENT

Co-Chairs: Phillip Gregory, Washington TRU Solutions (USA)

Gerry McGill, AMEC (UK)

Organizers: Murthy Devarakonda, Gerry McGill

A. Selective Uptake of Palladium from High-Level Liquid Wastes

by Hybrid Microcapsules Enclosed with Insoluble Ferrocyanides

– 16382

Hitoshi Mimura, Takashi Sakakibara, Wu Yan, Yuichi Niibori,

Toyko University (Japan); Shin-ichi Koyama, Takashi Ohnishi,

Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan).

B. Up-take of 14C-Acetic Acid by Rice Plant Related to Root

Function and Microbial Activity in Rhizosphere – 16111

Shinichi Ogiyama, National Institute of Radiological Sciences

(Japan); Nobuyoshi Ishii, Shigeo Uchida, National Institute of

Radiological Sciences (Japan)

C. Characteristics on the SAP- Based Wasteform Containing

Radioactive Molten Salt Waste – 16137

Hwan-Seo Park, In-Tae Kim, Hwan-Young Kim; Han-Soo Lee,

Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea)

D. Realistic Integration of Sorption Processes in Transport

Programs for Long-term Safety Analysis – 16370

Madlen Stockmann, FZ Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany);

Vinzenz Brendler, Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.

(Germany) Ulrich Noseck, Gesellschaft für Anlagen- und

Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH (Germany)

18

E. Emerging Challenges in Nuclear Waste Management in India in

View of its Expansion Programme – 16364

Murty.S Ganti, Andhra University (India)

F. Towards an Implementing Geological Disposal Technology

Platform in Europe – 16365

Marjatta Palmu, Posiva Oy, (Finland); Torsten Eng, SKB

(Sweden)

G. WVP Melter Analysis and Modelling for Lifetime Extension

16209*

Clare Booth, Sellafield Sites (UK); Mark D’Vaz, Sellafield Ltd

(UK)

H. FEBEX in Situ Test - Showing the Value of Very Long Term

(>10 years) Experiments – 16422*

Irina Gaus, NAGRA (Switzerland); Erik Thurner, SKB

(Sweden); Marjut Vahanen, Posiva, (Finland); Pedro Luis

Martín Martín, CIEMAT (Spain); Juan Carlos Mayor, ENRESA

(Spain); Jose Luis García-Siñeriz, Aitemin, (Spain); Antonio

Gens, UPC (Spain)

I. Partitioning Ratios Among Solid-, Liquid-, and Gas-phases for

C-14 Labeled Sodium Acetate in Paddy and Upland Soils –

16112*

Nobuyoshi Ishii, National Institute of Radiological Sciences

(Japan)

J. A Study on the Once-through Back-end Fuel Cycle Scenario –

16129

Yoon Hee Lee, Kunjai Lee,Kunjai Lee, KAIST (Korea);

Jongsoon Song, Chosun University (Korea)

K. Aerodynamic Resistance of a New Filters for Cs-137 Vapour

Capture at High Temperature – 16146*

Albert Aloy, Alexander Strelnikov, Khlopin Radium Institute

(Russia); Sergey Rovny, Nikolay Pyatin, PA “Mayak” (Russia)

L. Separation of Rare Earth Precipitates from LiCl-KCl Eutectic

Salts by a Distillation at a Reduced Pressure – 16162

Hee-Chul Eun, Korea Atomic Energy Research

Institute(Korea); Hee-Chul Yang, Yung-Zun Cho, Han-Soo Lee,

In-Tae Kim, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea)

M. Development of a LCC Structure for the Recovery of Actinides

from Molten Salt – 16167*

Seungwoo Paek, Si-Hyung Kim, Dal-Seong Yoon, Joon-Bo

Shim, Do-Hee Ahn, Han-Soo Lee, Korea Atomic Energy

Research Institute (Korea)

N. ong>Theong> Standard- Legal Regulation of SNF Import from Foreign

Reactors in the Russian Federation – 16171

Nekhozhin Mikhail, FSUE FCNRS (Russia)

Tuesday, October 13, 2009

SESSION 13

Tuesday 08:30 Room: 3B

PANEL: EMERGING ISSUES IN THE MANAGEMENT FOR

L/ILW

Co-Chairs: Angie Jones, AMEC Earth & Environmental (USA)

Andy Baker, Andy Baker Consulting Ltd. (UK)

Organizers: Angie Jones, Andy Baker

This panel will focus on strategies for the management of all low and

intermediate level waste (L/ILW). Based on experience in different

national programs, it will discuss various options and their merits for

managing L/ILW. It will consider the definition of different categories

of L/ILW and their potential routes for disposal including waste of

very low activity, often arising in high volumes as contaminated land

or from decommissioning.

Panelists include: Mr. Phil Davies, NDA, Head of National Waste

Mgmt. Strategy (UK); Mr. Hans Forström, Director, Nuclear Fuel

Cycle & Waste Technology - IAEA (Austria); Dr. S. D. Misra,

Director of Nuclear Recycle Group, BARC (India); Mr. Michel

Dutzer, Director Industrielle, ANDRA (France). and Mr. David

Bennett, Strategic Policy Manager, Environmental Agency of

England and Wales (UK).


Technical Sessions Tuesday AM

SESSION 14

Tuesday 08:30 Room: 12

PANEL: INTERNATIONAL DECOMMISSIONING NETWORK

Co-Chairs: Michele Laraia, IAEA (AUSTRIA)

Takeshi Ishikura, ong>Theong> Institute of Applied Energy

(JAPAN)

Organizer: Michele Laraia

This panel will focus on IAEA’s ong>Internationalong> Decommissioning

Network (IDN). In this session, IDN-involved organizations will be

invited to report on their experience in co-operating with the IAEA in

the field of decommissioning. ong>Theong> panel will be introduced by an

overview of progress achieved and plans developed under the IDN.

Since the IDN is intended to function as a loose “Network of

Networks”, other presentations in this session should include work

involving bilateral / multinational agreements carried out by non-

IAEA organizations which form complementary “Networks”. Active

discussion can be expected to ensure dissemination of information

about and support for the IDN concept by organizations not involved

yet.

Panelists include: Staffan Linsdkog, SKI (Sweden); Sean Bushart,

EPRI (USA); Leopold Weil, Federal Office for Radiation Protection

(BfS) (Germany); Maria Lindberg, Studsvik UK Ltd. (UK); Doug

Metcalfe, Natural Resources Canada, (Canada); and Michele Laraia,

ong>Internationalong> Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) (Austria).

SESSION 15

Tuesday 08:30 Room: 4B

DISPOSAL SITE AND WASTE FORM CHARACTERIZATION

AND PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT

Co-Chairs: Ed Bentz, E.J. Bentz & Associate (USA)

Ian Beadle, AMEC Nuclear UK Limited (UK)

Organizers: Ian Beadle, Angie Jones, AMEC Earth &

Environmental (USA)

1. A Preliminary Postclosure Safety Assessment of OPGs Proposed

L&ILW Deep Geologic Repository, Canada – 16289

Richard Little, Quintessa Limited (UK); John Avis, Nicola

Calder, Intera Engineering Limited (Canada); Nava Garisto,

Senes Consultants Limited (Canada); Paul Gierszewski, Helen

Leung, Nuclear Waste Management Organization (Canada);

Laura Limer, James Penfold, George Towler, Russell Walke,

Robert Walsh, Quintessa Limited (UK)

2. Numerical Assessment of the Long-Term Safety of the

Morsleben Repository for Low- and Intermediate-Level

Radioactive Waste – 16346

Juergen Wollrath, Juergen Preuss, Bundesamt fuer

Strahlenschutz (BfS) (Germany); Dirk-Alexander Becker, Joerg

Moenig, Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit

(GRS) mbH (UK)

3. ong>Theong> Development and Use of the GGM and T2GGM Codes for

the Postclosure Safety Assessment of OPGs Proposed L&ILW

Deep Geologic Repository - Canada – 16291

Paul Suckling, Quintessa Limited (UK); Nicola Calder, Intera

Engineering Limited (Canada); Paul Humphreys, University of

Huddersfield (UK); Fraser King, Integrity Corrosion Consulting

Limited (Canada); Helen Leung, Nuclear Waste Management

Organization (Canada)

4. Curing Time Effect on the Fraction Of 137CS from Immobilized

Radioactive Evaporator Sludge by Cement – 16329

Ilija Plecas, Slavko Dimovic, Vinca Institute (Serbia)

—————— Break ——————

5. Modelling Long-Term Corrosion of Cemented Waste Forms in

Salt Brines – 16202

Bernhard Kienzler, Volker Metz, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe

(Germany)

6. Coupling Time-Dependent Sorption Values of Degrading

Concrete with a Radionuclide Migration Model – 16220

Janez Perko, Dirk Mallants, Diederik Jacques, Lian Wang,

Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN (Belgium)

7. A Numerical Study of Factors Affecting Radioactive Gas

Migration in the Far-Field – 16273*

Elina Kuitunen, Michael A. Hicks, ong>Theong> University of

Manchester (UK)

SESSION 16

Tuesday 08:30 Room: 3A

NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS FOR SPENT

FUEL, FISSILE, TRU, AND HLW MANAGEMENT

Co-Chairs: Natraj Iyer, SRNL (USA)

Hans Codee, COVRA N.V. (NETHERLANDS)

Organizer: Hans Codee

1. NUMO-RMS: a Practical Requirements Management System

for the Long-Term Management of the Deep Geological

Disposal Project – 16304

Hiroyoshi Ueda, Satoru Suzuki, Katsuhiko Ishiguro, Nuclear

Waste Management Organization of Japan (NUMO) (Japan);

Kiyoshi Oyamada, JGC Corporation (Japan); Shoko Yashio,

Obayashi Corporation (Japan); Matt White, Roger Wilmot,

Galson Sciences Limited (UK)

2. Strategic Plan for the Management of Spent Nuclear Plan –

16024*

Hitesh Nigam, Edgardo (Gary) DeLeon, Department of Energy

(USA)

3. Disposal Technologies for Spent Fuel from German Nuclear

Power Plants – 16028

Reinhold Graf, GNS mbH (Germany); Wolfgang Filbert, DBE

Technology GmbH(Germany); Klaus-Jürgen Brammer, GNS,

Gesellschaft für Nuklear-Service mbH (Germany); Wilhelm

Bollingerfehr, DBE Technology GmbH (Germany)

4. Characteristics of the Spent Fuel Generated in Korea – 16227

Donghak Kook, Jongwon Choi, Heuijoo Choi, Dongkeun Cho,

KAERI (Korea)

—————— Break ——————

5. New Safety Concept for Geological Disposal in Japan – 16339

Kazumi Kitayama, Nuclear Waste Management Organization of

Japan (NUMO) (Japan)

6. Proposals on Management of AMB SNF – 16169*

A.V. Yescherkin, V.A. Zotov, S,V. Kazakov, M.A. Nekhozhin, V.P.

Smirnov, FSUE FCNRS (Russia); D.A. Goncharov, OOO NPF

Sosny, Dmitrovgrad; E.G. Kudryavtsev, A.V. Khapyorskaya,

Rosatom; Kovacz Y., Hamvas, I., NPS Paks, (Hungary)

7. An Overview on the National Radwastes Management Strategy

into the Context of the Nuclear Program Development – 16356

Panait Adrian, Maria Radu,Gheorghr Barariu, Center of

Technology and Engineering for Nuclear Objectives (CITON)

(Romania), Gheorghe Negut, Cristian Litescu, Nuclear Agency

for Radwaste Management (Romania)

SESSION 17

Tuesday 08:30 Room: 13

HLW CHARACTERIZATION / RECENT ADVANCES IN HLW

TREATMENT SYSTEMS

Co-Chairs: Pierre Van Iseghem, SCK.CEN, Mol (BELGIUM)

David Hobbs, SRNL (USA)

Organizer: Pierre Van Iseghem

1. Separation of Fission Products and Actinides from Savannah

River Site High-Level Nuclear Wastes – 16174

David Hobbs, Thomas Peters, Michael Poirier, Fernando

Fondeur, Charles Nash, Samuel Fink, Savannah River

NationalLaboratory (USA)

2. Safety Assessment of Geological Disposal of High-Level

Radioactive Waste in Boom Clay: Relation with the

Radionuclide Inventory – 16418

Pierre Van Iseghem, Jan Marivoet, SCK.CEN (Belgium)

3. Design of Pyroprocess Digital Mockup and Workspace Analysis

of Devices – 16140*

Hee Seoung Park, Chang-Hwan Choi, Sung-Hyun Kim, Byung-

Seok Park, Ki-Ho Kim, Ho-Dong Kim, Korea Atomic Energy

Research Institute (Korea)

19


Tuesday AM Technical Sessions

4. Designing a New Highly Active Liquor Evaporator – 16075

Paul Robson, Emma Candy, Sellafield Limited (UK)

—————— Break ——————

5. ong>Theong> Hydrolysis of Hydroxamic Acid Complexants in the

Presence of Non-Oxidizing Metal Ions – 16230*

Fabrice Andrieux, University of Central Lancashire (UK);

Colin Boxall, Lancaster University (UK); Iain May, Los Alamos

National laboratory (UK); Robin J Taylor, National Nuclear

Laboratory (UK)

6. Developing Ceramic Based Technology for the Immobilisation

of Waste on the Sellafield Site – 16049

Charlie Scales, Ewan Maddrell, National Nuclear Laboratory

(UK); Mark Dowson, Sellafield Ltd. (UK)

7. ong>Theong> Use of Hot-Isostatic Pressing to Process Nuclear Waste

Forms – 16253

Martin Stewart, Sam Moricca, Tina Eddowes, Yingjie Zhang,

Eric Vance, Gregory Lumpkin, Melody Carter, ANSTO

(Australia); Mike James, Mark Dowson, Sellafield (UK)

8. Design Innovations for the Management of Alpha Contaminated

Unserviceable Glove Boxes – 16224

R.K. Gupta, D.S Sandhanshive, S.R. Shendge, A.K. Singh,

M.N.B. Pillai, Arun Kumar, PP Mazumdar, Bhabha Atomic

Research Centr (India)

SESSION 18

Tuesday 08:30 Room: 11C

D&D OF POWER REACTORS AND RESEARCH REACTORS

Co-Chairs: Jas S. Devgun, Sargent & Lundy (USA)

David Boath, AMEC (UK)

Organizer: Jas Devgun

1. Transport of the Reactor Pressure Vessels in the Greifswald

Nuclear Power Plant – 16012

Ralf Borchardt, Energiewerke Nord GmbH (Germany)

2. Technology Development for Decommissioning in FUGEN and

Current Status – 16108

Koichi Kitamura, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan);

Kazuya Sano, Yasuyuki Nakamura, Akira Matsushima, Masahiro

Ishiyama, Hidehiko Matsuo, Masashi Tezuka, Takahiro Haneda,

Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Reginald Coomans,

Tecnubel (Belgium)

3. Seeking the Optimum Solution for Reactor Decommissioning

Waste – 16391

Lisa Hughes, NDA (UK)

4. Modelling of Radiation Fields and Estimation of Doses during

Dismantling of RBMK-1500 Reactor Emergency Core Cooling

System – 16247

Povilas Poskas, Audrius Simonis, Lithuanian Energy Institute

(Lithuania)

—————— Break ——————

5. Dismantling the Reactor Containment of Germany´s First NPP –

16272

Ludger Eickelpasch, NUKEM Technologies GmbH (Germany)

6. Use of Remote Equipment in Reactor Decommissioning –

16326

Scott Martin, Matt Cole, Scott Adams, S.A.Robotics (USA)

7. Experience in Chemical Decontamination of PWR Systems and

Components – 16274

Claude Steinkuhler, DDR Consult (Belgium); Koen Lenie,

Reginald Coomans, Tecnubel (Belgium)

8. Assessment of Decommissioning Waste for Korean Standard

Nuclear Power Plant – 16126

Jai-Hoon Jung, Han-Jung Na, Jung-Su Park, Byung-Sik Lee,

Jong-Hyuck Lee, KOPEC (Korea)

20

SESSION 19

Tuesday 08:30 Room: 14

GLOBAL PARTNERING IN INTERNATIONAL CLEAN-UP

PROGRAMS

Co-Chairs: Michael Cull, Teledyne Brown Engineering (USA)

Mark Gerchikov, AMEC NSS (CANADA)

Organizers: Michael Cull, Mark Gerchikov

1. Decommissioning and Dismantling Solution Development for

Volodarsky Civil Nuclear Fleet Support Ship – 16386

Konstantin N. Koulikov, Rinat A. Nisamutdinov, NIPTB

ONEGA OAO (Russia); Andrey N. Abramov, Atomflot FGUP

(Russia), Anatoly I. Tsubanikov, Aspect-Conversion ANO

(Russia)

2. Dismantlement of Nuclear Powered Submarines in Russia –

16414

Alexey Maltsev, JSC SC Zvyozdochka (Russia)

3. Environmental Assessments of Nuclear Submarine

Decommissioning in the Russian Far East – 16360

Michael Washer, Department of Foreign Affairs and

ong>Internationalong> Trade (Canada); Mark Gerchikov, AMEC NSS

(Canada); Michael Cull, Teledyne Brown Engineering (USA)

Konstantin Koulikov, NIPTB Onega (Russia)

4. Remediation of Gremikha Coastal Maintenance Base in North-

West Russia – 16279

Boris S. Stepennov, Kurtchatov Institution (Russia); Alexandre

Gorbatchev, CEA (France); Lucien Pillette-Cousin, AREVA TA

(France)

SESSION 20

Tuesday 10:45 Room: 11B

PANEL: GLOBAL PARTNERING IN INTERNATIONAL

WASTE AND CLEANUP PROGRAMS

Co-Chairs: Michael Cull, Teledyne Brown Engineering, Inc.

(USA)

Mark Gerchikov, AMEC NSS (CANADA)

Organizers: Michael Cull, Mark Gerchikov

This panel will provide a global perspective on the status of the cleanup

of nuclear legacy sites in the North West and Far East Russia and

lessons learned by key participants of the Global Partnership Program.

ong>Theong> speakers will discuss best practice in international cooperation,

meeting regulatory requirements and approaches to ensure safe

management of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste. Speakers in

this session will discuss their Global Partnership activities, and

explore opportunities for future international collaboration.

Panelists include: Michael Washer, Department of Foreign Affairs

and ong>Internationalong> Trade (Canada); Aleksey Maltzev, FSUE

Zvyozdochka (Russia) and Konstantin Kulikov, NIPTB Onega

(Russia); Sergey Kazakov, Director of the Federal Nuclear Safety

Centre (Russia); and Lucien Pillette-Cousin, AREVA (France)

SESSION 21

Tuesday 10:45 Room: 14

ENVIROMENTAL MANAGEMENT HEALTH AND SAFETY

ISSUES

Co-Chairs: Kenneth Kok, URS - Washington Division

Safety Management Solutions (USA)

Paul Gubanc, URS - Washington Division Safety

Management Solutions (USA)

Organizer: Kenneth Kok

1. Dose Assesment of Personnel Handling Conditioned

Radioactive Waste – 16149

Michal Panik, Matej Zachar, Vladimir Necas, Slovak University

of Technology in Bratislava (Slovakia)


Technical Sessions Tuesday AM

2. Risk Analysis and Cost-Benefit Analysis of Remedial Actions in

the Central Asia: Amydarya and Syrdarya Rivers Basins

Transboundary Pollution due to Uranium Mining Industry –

16187

Vladimir Georgievskiy, Russian Research Center “Kurchatov

Insitute” (Russia)

3. Parametric Studies for Nuclear Criticality Safety Using

Microsoft Excel – 16404

Michael Crouse, URS - Washington Division (USA)

4. Processing and Conditionning of Radioactive Sludge – 16417

Olivier Lemaire, Bouygues Construction Services Nucléaires

(France); Bertrand Lantes, EDF, (France); Christophe Le-

Nagard, Bouygues Construction Services Nucléaires (France)

SESSION 22

Tuesday 08:30 Room: 2nd Floor

POSTER SESSION — FACILITY DECONTAMINATION AND

DECOMMISSIONING

Co-Chairs: Jean-Marie Cuchet, Belgonucleaire (BELGIUM)

Arthur Desrosiers, Safety and Ecology Corporation

(USA)

Organizers: Jas Devgun, Michael Laraia

A. Building 18: Operating Feedback from Cleaning and

Dismantling of Glove Boxes and Shielding Lines – 16046

Michel Jeanjacques, Marie Pierre Bremond, Laurent Gautier,

Guy Viellard, Eric Pichereau, David Estivié, Commissariat à

l’Energie Atomique (France)

B. Automated Vehicle and Waste Package Survey System – 16223

Arthur Desrosiers, Phillip Mann, Safety and Ecology

Corporation (USA)

C. Technical Performance Characterization of Fourier Transform

Profilometry for Quantiative Waste Volume Determination under

Hanford Waste Tank Conditions – 16281

David Monts, Ping-Rey Jang, Zhiling Long, Olin Norton, Walter

Okhuysen, Yi Su, Charles Waggoner, Mississippi State University

(USA)

D. ong>Theong> Emergence of Sustainable Practice within

Decommissioning – 16059

David Adamson, Sellafield Limited (UK); Jonathan Francis,

University of Central Lancashire (UK)

E. CFD Studies of Vortex Amplifier Design In ong>Theong> Context Of

Sellafield Nuclear Operations – 16061

Martin J Birch, John Tyndall Institute for Nuclear Research

(UK); Darren Parker, Land Securities Trillium (UK); Jonathan

Francis, University of Central Lancashire (UK); Raymond Doig,

Sellafield Limited (UK); G. Zhang, ong>Theong> University of

Manchester (UK)

F. Decommissioning of a Uranium Conversion Plant and a Low

Level Radioactive Waste for a Long Term Disposal – 16071

Yun D. Choi, D.S. Hwang, U.S. Chung, Korea Atomic Energy

Research Institute (Korea)

G. Rehabilitation Project for Podolsk Nonferrous Metals Plant –

16136

Alexander V. Chesnokov, Victor G. Volkov, Anatoly Volkovich,

Alexey Lemus, Vitaly Pavlenko, Sergey Semenov, Russian

Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, (Russia); Maxim Gizay,

Sergey Krahotkin, FSUE Federal Property Management Center

(Russia)

H. Remote Radiation Sensor Based on Epoxy Resin and Optical

Fiber for Monitoring of High-level Decommissioning Facilities

– 16160

Bum-Kyoung Seo, Chan-Hee Park, Dong-Gyu Lee, Kune-Woo

Lee, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea)

I. Algorithmisation of Dismantling Techniques in Standardised

Decommissioning

Costing Using the Standardised Cost List – 16201

Peter Bezak, DECOM, a.s. (Slovakia); Vladimír Daniaka,

Deconta, a.s.(Slovakia); Ivan Rehak, Decom, a.s. (Slovakia);

Vladimir Necas, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava

(Slovakia)

J. ong>Theong>rmal Cutting Technologies for Decommissioning of Nuclear

Facilities – 16297

Harald Bienia, NUKEM Technologies GmbH (Germany)

K. Involvement of ANDRAD in Endorsement of Decommissioning

Documentation of Nuclear Facilities in Romania – 16315

Marin Dinca, National Agency for Radioactive Waste

(Romania)

L. Visualization of Radioactive Sources without Gamma-Radiation

with UV Imaging Systems – 16145

Oleg Ivanov, Alexey Danilovich, Vyacheslav Stepanov, Sergey

Smirnov, RRC Kurchatov Institute (Russia); Anatoly Volkovich,

Russian Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, (Russia)

M. OXIPROBE - A Non Destructive Tool for Determining Steam

Generator Oxide Characteristics – 16250

John P. Krasznai, Kinectrics Inc. (Canada)

N. Methods of Control of Inaccuracy in Calculation of Nuclear

Power Plant Decommissioning Parameters – 16383

Frantisek Ondra, DECOM, a.s.,(Slovakia); Vladimír Daniaka,

Deconta, a.s.,(Slovakia); Ivan Rehak, Decom, a.s., (Slovakia);

Vladimir Necas, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava

(Slovakia)

SESSION 23

Tuesday 13:45 Room: 3A

PANEL: CURRENT IAEA ACTIVITIES IN PREDISPOSAL

MANAGEMENT OF L/IL RADIOACTIVE WASTE

Co-Chairs: Zoran Drace, IAEA (AUSTRIA)

Angie Jones AMEC Earth & Environmental (USA)

Organizers: Zoran Drace, Angie Jones

This panel will focus on Waste Technology Section (WTS) of the

ong>Internationalong> Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) which has a dedicated

program focused on waste predisposal activities. ong>Theong> objective of this

program is to strengthen the capability of Member States to properly

and safely process and store radioactive waste. A range of activities

are included in this program to provide guidance on selection and

implementation of waste management strategies, to provide

information and guidance on best practices and technologies for waste

minimization, pre-treatment, treatment, conditioning, packaging,

transportation and storage, to support research and development on

new pre-disposal technologies, etc. This panel will provide a forum

for the exchange of scientific and technical information and guidance

on pre-disposal radioactive waste management with focus on current

activities. ong>Theong> following topics will be discussed by our panel with an

opportunity for interaction with the audience.

Panelists and Topics include: Dr. Antonio Morales Leon -

Approach to Development of Waste Acceptance Criteria for all

Individual Waste Management Steps: Pre-treatment to Disposal;

Zoran Drace - Economics of Radioactive Waste Management - Cost

Calculations and Approach to Costing of Future Obligations (Liability

Assessment); Dr. Antonio Morales Leon - Standardized

Methodology for Waste Management Assessments - An Optimized

Approach to Establish Current and Future Needs and to Select

Adequate Technical Options; Dr. Sustanta Kumar - Modular and

Mobile Waste Processing Facilities; Zoran Drace - Long-term

Storage for L&IL and HL Waste - Technical Considerations; Zoran

Drace/Dr. Antonio Morales Leon - Mixed Waste Processing/Storage

and Disposal; Dr. Antonio Morales Leon - IAEA Network for

Radioactive Waste Characterization - Processing/Storage/Disposal.

SESSION 24

Tuesday 13:45 Room: 3B

NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL D&D PROGRAMS

Co-Chairs: Ernest Warnecke - (BfS) (GERMANY) -

Grant Koroll, AECL (CANADA)

Organizers: Jas Devgun, Michael Laraia

1. Decommissioning in the United States - Past, Present and Future

– 16318

Jas S. Devgun, Sargent & Lundy (USA)

2. Decommissioning Strategies Worldwide: A Re-Visited Overview

of Relevant Factors – 16016

Michele Laraia, ong>Internationalong> Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

(Austria)

21


Tuesday PM Technical Sessions

3. A Nationwide Modeling Approach to Decommissioning – 16182

Bernard Kelly, University of Manchester (UK); Paul E Mort,

Sellafield Ltd. (UK); Andrew J Lowe, University of Manchester

(UK)

4. Implementation and Ongoing Development of a Comprehensive

Program to Deal with Canadas Nuclear Legacy Liabilities –

16039

Douglas Metcalfe, Pui Wai Yuen, David McCauley, Natural

Resources Canada (Canada); Sheila Brooks, Joan Miller,

Michael Stephens, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (Canada)

—————— Break ——————

5. ong>Theong> Swedish Program for Future D&D of Nuclear Power Plants

– 16143*

Jan Carlsson, Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management

Co (SKB) (Sweden)

6. AREVA Decommissioning Strategy and Programme – 16036

Guy Decobert, AREVA (France) Arnaud Gay, AREVA NC

(France)

7. Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning in Germany - Projects,

Regulation and Experience – 16359

Leopold Weil, Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS)

(Germany); Bernd Rehs, Federal Office for Radiation

Protection (Germany)

8. Variation of Light Water Reactor Decommissioning Strategies in

Japan – 16113*

Takeshi Ishikura, Shigenbu Hirusawa, ong>Theong> Institute of Applied

Energy (Japan); Yoshihiko Horikawa, ong>Theong> Kansai Electric

Power Company (Japan)

SESSION 25

Tuesday 13:45 Room: 4B

TREATMENT, MANAGEMENT AND RECYCLE OF D&D

MATERIALS

Co-Chairs: Maria Lindberg, Studsvik UK Ltd (UK)

Leopold Weil, Federal Office for Radiation Protection

(BfS) (GERMANY)

Organizers: Maria Linberg, Leopold Weil

1. Waste Reduction by Re-Use of Low Activated Material – 16035

Ulrich Ehrlicher, Heinz Pauli, Paul Scherrer Institut

(Switzerland)

2. Analytical Methodology for Optimization of Waste Management

Scenarios in Nuclear Installation Decommissioning Process –

16148

Matej Zachar, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava

(Slovakia); Vladimir Daniska, Deconta, a.s. (Slovakia); Ivan

Rehak, Marek Vasko, Decom, a.s.(Slovakia); Vladimir Necas,

Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava (Slovakia)

3. Characterisation of Reactor Graphite to Inform Strategies for

Disposal of Reactor Decommissioning Waste – 16389

Andrew Hetherington, Phil Davies, NDA (UK)

4. Demonstration of UK ILW Treatment by GeoMelt Vitrification

16105

Keith Witwer, Kevin Finucane, Eric Dysland, AMEC, GeoMelt

Division (USA)

SESSION 26

Tuesday 16:15 Room:4B

D&D UPDATE AND MANAGEMENT ISSUES

Co-Chairs: Anthony Banford, NNL (UK)

Mark Lesinski, Magnox South Ltd. (UK)

Organizers: Anthony Banford, Mark Lesinski

1. Renewing the Focus on Decommissioning: Bringing a New

Management Perspective to Sellafield – 16243

Russ A Mellor, Sellafield Ltd (UK)

2. Embedding Nuclear, Environmental and Safety Measures from

Design through to Decommissioning – 16212*

Jack Williamson, Sellafield Ltd, Seascale (UK)

3. Optimising the UK Waste Management Programme Using

Inventory Modeling – 16394

Mervin McMinn, NDA (USA)

22

4. Innovative Highly Selective Removal of Cesium and Strontium

Utilizing a Newly Developed Class of Inorganic Ion Specific

Media – 16221

Mark Denton, Kurion, Inc., (USA) Dr. Mercouri Kanatzidis,

Northwestern University (NWU) (USA)

5. Plans and the Basic Technical Decisions on SNF Removal from

Andreeva Bay – 16170*

Nekhozhin Mikhil, FSUE FCNRS (Russia)

SESSION 27

Tuesday 13:45 Room: 11B

WASTE MINIMIZATION, AVOIDANCE AND RECYCLING

Co-Chairs: Sean Bushart, Electric Power Research Institute

(USA)

David Wallace, CDM (USA)

Organizers: Sean Bushart, David Wallace

1. A Model for a National Low Level Waste Program – 16372

James Blankenhorn, URS - Washington Division (USA)

2. CEAs Contaminated Lead Recycling Routes – 16011

Marc Butez, Frédéric Hornung, CEA (France)

3. WASAN: A Structured Methodology for the Minimisation of

Avoidable Waste – 16347

Neil Blundell, Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (UK); Duncan

Shaw, Aston Business School (UK)

4. Delivering Step Change Improvements to UK Low Level Waste

Strategy – 16188

Jason Dean, National Nuclear Laboratory (UK); David

Rossiter, Low Level Waste Repository (UK)

—————— Break ——————

5. BPEO/BPM in Recycling of Low Level Waste Metal in the UK

– 16210

Joe Robinson, Kevin Dodd, Maria Lindberg, Simon Dickson;

Mike McMullen, Studsvik (UK)

6. External Ddisposal of 4 Steam Generators out of the

Decommissioning of the Nuclear Power Plant Stade (KKS) –

16045

Martin Beverungen, GNS Gesellschaft für Nuklear-Service

mbH (Germany)

7. Factors Influencing the Performance and Lifetime of Fibrous

Glass and Metal Media HEPA Filters – 16285

Charles Waggoner, Michael Parsons, Mississippi State

University (USA)

8. ong>Internationalong> Radioactive Metals Recovery, Trans-Frontier

Shipment and Processing for Beneficial Reuse – 16303*

Al Johnson, Magnox South (UK)

SESSION 28

Tuesday 13:45 Room: 11C

REPOSITORY PROGRAMS: SITE SELECTION &

CHARACTERIZATION, UNDERGROUND RESEARCH LABS,

ENGINEERING & GEOLOGICAL BARRIERS

Co-Chairs: Pierre Van Iseghem, SCK•CEN (BELGIUM)

Bernhard Kienzler, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe

(GERMANY)

Organizer: Pierre Van Iseghem

1. Global Developments in Multinational Initiatives at the Back

End of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle – 16294

Charles McCombie, Neil A. Chapman, Arius Association

(Switzerland); Tom Isaacs, LLNL/Stanford University (USA)

2. US EPAs Experiences Implementing Environmental Safety

Standards at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant – 16103

Tom Peake, Chuck Byrum, Mike Eagle, Ed Feltcorn, Shankar

Ghose, Rajani Joglekar, US Environmental Protection Agency

(USA)

3. Repository Site Characterization - Learning from Experience –

16082

Martin Goldsworthy, Golder Associates (Germany); Till Popp,

IfG Institut für Gebirgsmechanik GmbH (Germany); Knut


Technical Sessions Tuesday PM

Seidel, GGL Geophysik und Geotechnik Leipzig GmbH

(Germany); Johannes Bruns, Golder Associates (Germany)

4. Amendments to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agencys

Public Health and Environmental Radiation Protection

Standards for Yucca Mountain, Nevada – 16156

Ray L. Clark, Ken Czyscinski, Reid J. Rosnick, Daniel

Schultheisz, US Environmental Protection Agency (USA)

—————— Break ——————

5. Experience with Technical Advisory Groups in the Japanese LW

Disposal Programme – 16290

Hiroyuki Tsuchi, Kazumi Kitayama, Akira Deguchi, Yoshiaki

Takahashi, Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan

(Japan); Toshiaki Ohe, Tokai University

(Japan): Charles McCombie, Arius Association (Switzerland);

Ian McKinley, McKinley Consulting (Switzerland)

6. Current Statue of Phase II Investigation, Mizunami

Underground Research Laboratory (MIU) Project – 16262

Tadahiko Tsuruta, Masahiro Uchida, Katsuhiro Hama, Hiroya

Matsui, Shinji Takeuchi, Kenji Amano, Ryuji Takeuchi,

Hiromitsu Saegusa, Toshiyuki Matsuoka, and Takashi Mizuno,

Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan)

7. Approaches for Modelling Transient Unsaturated-Saturated

Groundwater Flow During and After Construction – 16242

Matt White, Galson Sciences Limited (UK); Jordi Guimera,

AMPHOS XXI Consulting S.L (Spain); Hiroshi Kosaka, Takuya

Ohyama, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan) Peter Robinson,

Quintessa Limited (UK) Hiromitsu Saegusa, Japan Atomic

Energy Agency (Japan)

8. Integrated Model of Korean Spent Fuel and High Level Waste

Disposal Options – 16091

Yongsoo Hwang, KAERI (Korea); Ian Miller, GoldSim

Technology Group (USA)

SESSION 29

Tuesday 13:45 Room 12

MODELING APPROACHES FOR HLW, SNF, AND TRU

WASTE DISPOSITION

Co-Chairs: James Marra, SRNL (USA)

Jeff Griffin, SRNL (USA)

Organizer: Murthy Devarakonda, Washington TRU Solutions

LLC (USA)

1. Development of the ENVI Simulator to Estimate Korean SNF

Flow and its Cost – 16060

Yongsoo Hwang, KAERI (Korea); Ian Miller, GoldSim

Technology Group (USA)

2. Integration of the H2 Inhibition Effect of UO 2 2 Matrix

Dissolution into Radiolytic Models – 16239

Lara Duro, Abel Tamayo, Jordi Bruno (Spain); Aurora

Martínez-Esparza, ENRESA (Spain)

3. Separation of Lanthanoid Phoshates from the Spent Electrolyte

of Pyroprocessing – 16265

Ippei Amamoto, Hirohide Kofuji, Munetaka Myochin, Japan

Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Tatsuya Tsuzuki, Central Glass

Co.Ltd (Japan); Yasushi Takasaki, Akita University (Japan);

Tetsuji Yano, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Takayuki

Terai, ong>Theong> University of Tokyo (Japan)

4. Implementation of a Geological Disposal Facility (GDF) in the

UK by the NDA RWMD: Coupled Modelling of Gas Generation

and Multi-Phase Flow between the Co-Located ILW and

HLW/SF Components of a GDF – 16307

Alex Bond, George Towler, Alan Paulley, Quintessa Limited

(UK); Simon Norris, NDA RWMD (UK)

SESSION 30

Tuesday 16:15 Room: 12

SPENT FUEL, HLW, AND TRU WASTE MANAGEMENT -

CROSSCUTTING ISSUES

Co-Chairs: Andy Malkin, Dounreay (UK)

Vomvoris Stratis, NAGRA (SWITZERLAND)

Organizers: Andy Malkin, Vomvoris Stratis

1. ong>Theong> U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental

Management (DOE-EM) ong>Internationalong> Cooperative Program -

Efforts being Conducted under the Statement of Intent between

DOE-EM and U.K. Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA)

and Future ong>Internationalong> Activities – 16338

Steven L. Krahn, Kurt D. Gerdes, Ana M. Han, U.S.

Department of Energy (USA); James Marra, SRNL (USA).

2. Implementation of a Geological Disposal Facility (GDF) in the

UK by the NDA RWMD: ong>Theong> Potential for Interaction between

the Co-Located ILW/LLW and HLW/SF Components of a GDF

– 16306

George Towler, Quintessa Limited (UK); Tim Hicks, Galson

Sciences Ltd (UK); Sarah Watson, Quintessa Limited (UK);

Simon Norris, NDA RWMD (UK)

3. ong>Theong> Role of the Savannah River National Laboratory as ong>Theong>

DOE Environmental Management Corporate Laboratory –

16175*

Samit Bhattacharyya, John Marra, Jeff Griffin, William

Wilmarth, Savannah River National Laboratory (USA)

4. Evolution of the Quality Assurance Program for TRU Waste

Repository Operations, Waste Characterization and

Transportation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant – 16152*

Ava L. Holland, Department of Energy (USA)

SESSION 31

Tuesday 13:45 Room:13

ER SITE CHARACTERIZATION AND MONITORING - PART

1 OF 2

Co-Chairs: Leo van Velzen, NGR (SWITZERLAND)

Virgene Mulligan, ARS ong>Internationalong> (USA)

Organizer: Virgene Mulligan

1. A Practical Approach to Characterise and Assess a Site Drainage

System in Support of Site Restoration – 16008

Angela Bartlett, UKAEA Harwell (UK); Gavin Coppins,

UKAEA (UK); Peter Burgess, Nuvia (UK)

2. Benefits of Low Resolution Gamma Spectroscopy (LRGS) in

Assessment and Remediation of Alpha Contamination – 16023

Martha McBarron, Aker Solutions (UK); Jim Cassidy, Fathoms

Ltd (UK); Louise Hutton, Low Level Waste Respository (UK)

3. Safe Management of Radioactive Materials found in Public

Locations – 16032

Andrew Lewcock, Safeguard ong>Internationalong> Solutions Ltd. (UK);

Colette Grundy, Catherine Shaw, Environment Agency (UK)

4. An Integrated System for Conducting Radiological Surveys of

Contaminated Sites – 16312

Charles Waggoner, Donna Rogers, Jay McCown, Mississippi

State University (USA)

—————— Break ——————

5. Interdigitated Electrode Array Based Sensors for Monitoring of

Caesium – 16123

Ian D Nickson, John Tyndall Institute for Nuclear Research

(UK); Colin Boxall, Lancaster University (UK); G. Garnham,

National Nuclear Laboratory (UK); Simon. N Port, DSTL (UK)

6. Cone Penentration Testing of Radiologically Contaminated

Burial Trenches – 16086

Gareth Walker, Matt Lennard, Jeremy Lightfoot, Golder

Associates (UK); Nick Jefferies, Serco Assurance (UK)

7. ong>Theong> Advanced Pegasus Overland Radiation Detection System –

16321

Jeffrey Lively, Alejandro Lopez, Michael Marcial, MACTEC

(USA); Mark Liddiard, Joe Toole, WorleyParsons (UK)

23


Tuesday PM Technical Sessions

8. ong>Theong> Effect of Shielding Geometries on Dose Rate Mapping

Using In-Situ Gamma Spectrometry and Dose Inferring

Software N-Visage (TM)

– 16130

Jamie Adams, Lancaster University (UK); Matthew Mellor,

React Engineering Ltd. (UK); Malcolm Joyce, Lancaster

University (UK)

SESSION 32

Tuesday 13:45 Room: 14

LOCAL PARTICIPATION AND DECISION-MAKING

PROCESSES, BEHAVIOR AND POLITICS

Co-Chairs: Nadja Zeleznik, ARAO (SOLVENIA)

Grant Koroll, AECL (CANADA)

Organizer: Jennifer Biedscheid, Washington Division of URS

(USA)

1. Threats and Benefits the Updated Information on Local

Opinions Regarding the Spent Nuclear Fuel Repository in

Finland – 16128

Matti Kojo, University of Tampere (Finland); Mika Kari, Tapio

Litmanen, University Jyväskylä (Finland)

2. Applying Best Practical Environmental Optioneering (BPEO) to

a Complex Clean Up Programme; A Ponds & Silos Case Study –

16154

Simon Candy, Sellafield Ltd. (UK)

3. Stakeholder Participation for the Legacy Ponds and Legacy

Silos (LP&LS) Facility at Sellafield, Cumbria. UK: ong>Theong> Nature

and Effectiveness of the Dialogue – 16030

John Whitton, UK National Nuclear Laboratory (UK)

4. Experience in Choices for Decommissioning the Dounreay Site

– 16183

Fred Catlow, Fred Catlow, Independent Nuclear Consultant

(UK)

SESSION 33

Tuesday 16:15 Room:14

DIALOGUE TECHNIQUES: DIALOGUE VERSUS

CONSULTATION, COMMUNICATION OF RISK,

EDUCATION, USE OF WEB TECHNOLOGY

Co-Chairs: Mark Wareing, NDA (UK)

Rolf Sjöblom, Tekedo AB (SWEDEN)

Organizer: Jennifer Biedscheid, Washington Division of URS

(USA)

1. Training Activities and Perspectives in the Radioactive Waste

Management Area of Moscow SIA “Radon” – 16131

Olga Batyukhnova, Scientific and Industrial Association

“Radon” (Russia); Arthur Arustamov, Natalia Arustamova,

Sergey Dmitriev, SUE SIA “Radon” (Russia); Michael Ojovan,

University of Sheffield (UK); Zoran Drace, ong>Internationalong> Atomic

Energy Agency (Austria)

2. Evaluating LILRW Repository Impacts Due to Technologic

Stigma – 16229

Mojca Golobic, Alenka Cof, University of Ljubljana (Slovenia);

Marko Polic, University of Ljubljana (Slovenia)

3. Radioactive Waste: Show Time? – 16309

Hans Codee, COVRA N.V., Ewoud Verhoef, COVRA

(Netherlands)

4. Experiences of Teaching Decommissioning – 16179

Fred Catlow, Independent Nuclear Consultant (UK)

24

SESSION 34

Tuesday 08:30 Room: 2nd Floor

POSTER SESSION

Co-Chairs: Ian Beadle, AMEC Nuclear UK Limited (UK)

David Wallace, CDM (USA)

Organizer: Ian Beadle, AMEC, (UK)

LOW/INTERMEDIATE LEVEL WASTE

A. ong>Theong> Rock Creep Evaluation in the Analysis System for the

Long-Term Behavior of TRU Waste Disposal System – 16110

Shintaro Ohno, Seiji Morikawa, Kajima Corporation (Japan);

Morihiro Mihara, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan)

B. Comparison of Actinides Separation by Coprecipitation and

Actinide Chromatographic Resin (Dipex®) for Gross Alpha

Determination – 16249

Esperanza Lara, Marina Rodriguez, CIEMAT (Spain)

C. Novel Antimonysilicate Material Quasar-N for the Removal of

Radionuclides from Acidic Decontamination Liquids – 16157

Risto Harjula, Airi Paajanen, University of Helsinki (Finland)

D. Further Development of Iodine Immobilization Technique by

Low Temperature Vitrification with BiPbO2I – 16268

Atsushi Mukunoki, Tamotsu Chiba, JGC Corporation (Japan);

Yasuhiro Suzuki, JGC Corporation (Japan); Kenji Yamaguchi,

Tomofumi Sakuragi, Radioactive Waste Management Funding

and Research Center (Japan); Tokuro Nanba, Okayama

University (Japan)

E. Improvement of Institutional Radioactive Waste Management

Via the Implementation of the Environmental Management

System – 16094

Marija Fabjan, Agency for Radwaste Management (Slovenia);

Metka Kralj, Bojan Hertl, ARAO - Agency for Radwaste

Management (Slovenia); Jože Rojc, RŽV - Mine Žirovski

vrh (Slovenia)

F. ong>Theong> KNOO Research Consortium: Work Package 3 An

Integrated Approach to Waste Immobilisation and Management

– 16375

Simon Biggs, Michael Fairweather, James Young, University of

Leeds (UK); Robin Grimes, Imperial College London (UK); Neil

Milestone, University of Sheffield (UK): Francis Livens, ong>Theong>

University of Machester (UK)

G. Hydraulic Behaviour Of Nuclear Waste Flows – 16376

Simon Biggs, Michael Fairweather, David Harbottle, Bo Lin,

James Young, Jeff Peakall, University of Leeds (UK)

H. Engineering Properties of Nuclear Waste Slurries – 16378

Simon Biggs, Michael Fairweather, Tim Hunter, Qanita

Omokanye, Jeff Peakall, James Young, University of Leeds (UK)

I. Radioactive Waste Management in Kenya – 16366

Anthony Shadrack, Ministry of Health (Kenya)

J. ong>Theong> Complexation of Tc(IV) with Gluconic Acid at High pH –

16381*

Sneh Jain, Ricky Hallam, Peter Warwick, Nick Evans,

Loughborough University (UK)

K. Management of Metal Waste with High Concentration of

Natural Radionuclides, its Problems and Experience – 16222

Alexander B. Gelbutovskiy, JSC “ECOMET-S"(Russia) Peter I.

Cheremisin, Alexander V. Troshev, Ecomet-S (Russia)

L. Study of the Radioactive Silt Sediment Cementation Techniques

– 16138

Andrey Varlakov, Sergey Karlin, Aleksandr Barinov, Moscow

Scientific-Industrial Association Radon (Russia); Elena

Zaharova, Vycheslav Ermolaev, IPCE RAS (Russia)

M. 5000th Mosaik - Cask Delivered in 2007 - A Story of Success –

16216

Olaf Oldiges, GNS Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear (Germany)

N. Cementation of Problem LRW Using Porous Concrete – 16139

Andrey Varlakov, Aleksandr Germanov, Aleksandr Barinov,

Sergey Dmitriev, Moscow Scientific-Industrial Association

Radon (Russia); Arthur Arustamov, SUE SIA Radon(Russia)

O. Separation of Lanthanide Fission Products in a Eutectic Waste

Salts Delivered from Pyroprocessing of a Spent Oxide Fuel by

Using Lab-Scale Oxidative Precipitation Apparatus – 16127

Yung-Zun Cho, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea)


Technical Sessions Wednesday AM

Wednesday, October 14, 2009

SESSION 35 - MERGED WITH #46

Wednesday AM

THIS PANEL HAS BEEN MERGED WITH PANEL SESSION 46

SESSION 36

Wednesday 08:30 Room: 3B

D&D TECHNOLOGIES - I

Co-Chairs: Maria Lindberg, Studsvik UK Ltd (UK)

Keith Anderson, ECC (USA)

Organizers: Detlef Schmidt, Keith Anderson

1. Options for the Removal of Contaminated Concrete from the

Bore of the Windscale Pile Chimney – 16083

Colin Campbell, Dr. Jeremy Hunt, Sellafield Limited (UK);

Stephen Hepworth, Sellafield Ltd (UK)

2. Decommissiong of Active Effluent Gantries - AWE Aldermaston

– 16099*

Graham Rogers, NSG Environmental Ltd (UK)

3. Verification Test of Clearance Automatic Laser Inspection

System for Surface Contamination Measurement – 16109

Michiya Sasaki, Haruyuki Ogino, Takeshi Ichiji, Takatoshi

Hattori, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry

(Japan)

4. Preliminary Study of Cryogenic Cutting Technology for

Dismantling Highly Activated Facilities – 16006

Sung-Kyun Kim, Korea Atomic Energy Reserach Institute

(Korea); Dong-Gyu Lee, Kune-Woo Lee, Korea Atomic Energy

Research Institute (Korea)

—————— Break ——————

5. ong>Theong> Abrasive Blasting Unit at JRC-Ispra – 16270

Georg Braehler, Philipp Welbers, NUKEM Technologies GmbH

(Germany); Gianfranco Brunetti, Diederik van Regenmortel,

Joint Research Centre (Italy); Mike Kelly, Nuvia Limited (UK)

6. Decommissioning of the A-1 NPP Long-Term Storage Facility –

16299

Jan Medved, VUJE, Inc. (Slovakia); Ladislav Vargovcik, ZTS

VVU KOSICE a.s. (Slovakia)

7. Use of Full Recovery Hydrolasing Equipment for Facility

Decommissioning – 16325

Scott Martin, Scott Adams, S.A.Robotics (USA)

8. Current Activities of AllDeco at Decommissioning of the A1

NPP – 16333*

Jan Rezbarik, Stanislav Sekely, Jaroslav Katrlik, Dusan

Majersky, All Deco s.r.o. (Slovakia)

SESSION 37

Wednesday 08:30 Room: 3A

D&D RADIOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND

MONITORING

Co-Chairs: Michele Laraia, IAEA (AUSTRIA)

Ernest Warnecke, BfS (GERMANY)

Organizer: Michiya Saski

1. Critical Evaluation on the Use of Non-Destructive Assay of

Nuclear Packages through Destructive Breakdown and

Inventory Recovery – 16081

Stephen Hepworth, Rob Way, Sellafield Ltd (UK); Johathan

Sharpe, VT Nuclear Services (UK)

2. Decommissioning of a Vitrification Facility: Rinsing Phase –

16231

Marielle Asou, CEA (France); Sebastien Leblanc, Fabrice

Bouchet, Franck Martin, AREVA (France)

3. ong>Theong> Level of Uncertainty in Materials Clearance – 16090

Peter Burgess, Nuvia (UK)

4. Environmental Remediation and Using a New Sorting and Free

Release System for Contaminated Soil at NPP A1 Site, Slovakia

– 16020

Ondrej Slavik, Miroslav Baca, Alojz Slaninka, VUJE, a.s.

(Slovakia); Stanislav Janecka, Camberra Packard (Slovakia);

Ján Sirota, JAVYS, a.s. (Slovakia)

—————— Break ——————

5. ong>Theong> Use of Radiological Characterisation in Support of the

Design and Build of a New Facility in an Area of Elevated Dose

Rate – 16009

Karl Hughes, David Thornley, VT Nuclear Services Ltd (UK);

Czeslaw Pienkowski, Sellafield Ltd. (UK)

6. ong>Theong> Application of Additional, Off-line, Analysis Techniques to

PCM Monitor Results to Aid the Efficient and Cost Effective

Repackaging of Legacy PCM Wastes Containing Plutonium

Fluoride – 16034

David Thornley, Kareena McCrindle, Stephen Rayner,

Jonathan Sharpe, VT Nuclear Services (UK); Czeslaw

Pienkowski, Carl Phillips, Sellafield Ltd (UK)

7. ong>Theong> Radioactivity Depth Analysis Tool (RADPAT) – 16144

Alan Shippen, Malcolm Joyce, Lancaster University (UK)

8. Remote Measurements of Radioactivity Distribution with

BROKK Robotic System – 16147

Oleg Ivanov, Alexey Danilovich, Vyacheslav Stepanov, Sergey

Smirnov, Victor Potapov, RRC Kurchatov Institute (Russia)

9. Radiological Characterisation throughout the UK Nuclear

Industry – 16300

Chris Hannon, Studsvik UK (UK)

SESSION 38

Wednesday 08:30 Room:11C

SITING, DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION, AND OPERATION OF

L/ILW DISPOSAL FACILITIES

Co-Chairs: Cathy Hickey, URS (USA)

Philip Rendell, NDA (UK)

Organizers: Cathy Hickey, Angie Jones, AMEC Earth &

Environmental (USA)

1. Design Options for the UKs ILW Geological Disposal Facility –

16241

Tim Hicks, Matt White, Tamara Baldwin, Paul Hooker, Phil

Richardson, Galson Sciences Ltd (UK); Neil Chapman,

Chapman & Co. Consulting (Switzerland); Fiona Neall, Neall

Consulting Ltd (UK); Ian McKinley, McKinley Consulting

(Switzerland); Samantha King, NDA RWMD, (UK)

2. Lessons Learned from the Operation of a L/ILW National

Disposal Centre: ong>Theong> Cabril and the Spanish Case – 16029

Emilio Garcia Neri, Mariano Navarro, Fernando Gomez,

ENRESA (Spain)

3. Hydrogeologic Modelling in Support of a Proposed Deep

Geologic Repository in Canada for Low and Intermediate Level

Radioactive Waste – 16264

Jonathan Sykes, Stefano Normani, Yong Yin, University of

Waterloo (Canada); Eric Sykes, Mark Jensen, Nuclear Waste

Management Organization (Canada)

4. I-Graphite Waste Management in France – 16301

Odile Ozanam, Gerald Ouzounian, ANDRA (France)

—————— Break ——————

5. Industrial Complex for Solid Radwaste Management (ICSRM)

at Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Functionality of the Facilities

- Experience of Project Execution – 16057

Heiko Eichhorn, NUKEM Technologies GmbH (Germany)

6. Experiences Related to the Development of a High Volume Very

Low Level Waste Disposal Facility in the UK – 16371

Andy Baker, Andy Baker Consulting Ltd (UK); Andrea Borwick,

WRG (UK); KayLin Loveland, Adam Meehan, Mike Travis,

EnergySolutions (UK); Ian Warner, Magnox North Ltd (UK)

7. Establishing a Site for a Slovenian L/ILW Repository – 16151

Sandi Viršek, Janja Ŝpiler, Miran Veselič, ARAO (Slovenia)

25


Wednesday AM Technical Sessions

SESSION 39

Wednesday 08:30 Room: 13

L/ILW WASTE HANDLING, TECHNOLOGIES, AND DATA

ANALYSIS (1 OF 3)

Co-Chairs: Ronald Keyser, ORTEC – AMETEK (USA)

Karan North, Magnox South Ltd (UK)

Organizer: Ronald Keyser

1. Improved Practices for Packaging Transuranic Waste at Los

Alamos National Laboratory (LA-UR 09-00333) – 16280

Kapil Goyal, Peter Carson, Los Alamos National Laboratory

(USA)

2. Radiological Assessment of Petroleum Pipe Scale Waste

Streams from Dry-Rattling Operations – 16323

Ian Hamilton, Foxfire Scientific, Inc. (USA); Robert Berry,

Matthew Arno, Erich Fruchtnicht, Foxfire Scientific (UK)

3. ong>Theong> DIAMOND University Research Consortium: Nuclear

Waste Characterisation, Immobilisation And Storage – 16374

Simon Biggs, Michael Fairweather, James Young, University of

Leeds (UK); Neil Hyatt, University of Sheffield (UK); Francis

Livens, ong>Theong> University of Machester (UK)

4. ong>Theong> Next EDF Tracking System – 16292

Emmanuelle Julli, Bertrand Lantes, EDF (France)

SESSION 40

Wednesday 10:45 Room: 13

L/ILW WASTE HANDLING, TECHNOLOGIES, AND DATA

ANALYSIS (2 OF 3)

Co-Chairs: Ronald Keyser, ORTEC – AMETEK (USA)

Karan North, Magnox South Ltd (UK)

Organizer: Ronald Keyser

1. Characterization of the Radiochemical Activity in Candu Steam

Generators – 16204

Aamir Husain, Yury Verzilov, Sriram Suryanarayan, Kinectrics,

Inc. (Canada)

2. Improved Algorithm for Close Geometry Characterization of

Waste Using Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy – 16320*

John Guo, Richard Hagenauer, ORTEC-AMETEK (USA);

Ronald Keyser, ORTEC – AMETEK (USA)

3. Field Examples of Waste Assay Solutions for Curium-

Contaminated Wastes – 16259

Patrick Chard, Canberra UK Ltd. (UK); Barrie Greenhalgh,

Sellafield Ltd. (UK); Ann Ross, Dounreay Site Restoration

Limited (DSRL) (UK); Tom Turner, UKAEA (UK); Ian

Hutchinson, Canberra UK Ltd (UK); Stephen Croft, Canberra

Industries Inc. (USA)

4. ong>Theong>oretical Modelling of Nuclear Waste Flows – 16377

J.F. Adams, S.R. Biggs, M. Fairweather, D. Njobuenwu and J.

Yao,University of Leeds (UK)

SESSION 41

Wednesday 08:30 Room: 4B

TRANSPORTATION AND STORAGE OF HLW, FISSILE, TRU,

AND SNF

Co-Chairs: Ed Bentz, E.J. Bentz & Associates (USA)

Phillip Gregory, Washington TRU Solutions (USA)

Organizer: Ed Bentz

1. Experience with Dry Cask Storage Technology in Germany –

16416

Heinz Geiser, Jens Schroeder, Dietrich Hoffmann, GNS mbH

(Germany)

2. Contingency Options for the Dry Storage of Magnox Spent Fuel

in the UK – 16330

Jenny E. Morris, Galson Sciences Limited (UK); Stephen

Wickham, Phil Richardson, Galson Sciences Ltd. (UK); Colin

Rhodes, NDA (UK); Mike Newland, UKAEA (UK)

3. WIPP: A Perspective From Ten Years of Operating Success –

16189

Phillip C. Gregory, Washington TRU Solutions (USA)

26

4. Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Shipment from the Czech

Republic to the Russian Federation – 16195

Frantisek Svitak, Karel Svoboda, Josef Podlaha, Nuclear

Research Institute Rez plc. (Czech Republic)

—————— Break ——————

5. ong>Theong>rmal Safety Analysis of a Dry Storage Cask for the Korean

Standard Spent Fuel – 16159

Jeong-Hun Cha, B. S. Youn, S. N. Kim, Kyunghee University

(Korea); K. W. Choi, Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (Korea)

6. Contingency Options for the Drying, Conditioning and

Packaging of Magnox Spent Fuel in the UK – 16331

Jenny E. Morris, Phil Richardson, Stephen Wickham, Galson

Sciences Ltd. (UK); Colin Rhodes, NDA (UK); Mike Newland,

UKAEA (UK)

7. Nuclear Safety at the Heart of the Design of the New Sellafield

Product and Residue Store – 16077*

Alec Glover, Sellafield Limited (UK)

8. Engineering Challenges in the Mechanical Design of a New

Shielded Shipping Cask for Vitrified Waste Products – 16256

R.K. Gupta, S.P. Patil, D.S Sandhanshive, A.K. Singh, K.M.

Singh, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (India)

SESSION 42

Wednesday 08:30 Room:12

ER SITE CHARACTERIZATION AND MONITORING - PART

2 OF 2

Co-Chairs: Virgene Mulligan, ARS ong>Internationalong> (USA)

Steven Brown, SENES (USA)

Organizer: Virgene Mulligan, ARS ong>Internationalong> (USA)

1. Radiological Characterization of a Copper/Cobalt Mining &

Milling Site – 16322

Matthew Arno, Janine Arno, Foxfire Scientific (USA); Donald

Halter, Foxfire Scientific, Inc. (USA); Robert Berry, Foxfire

Scientific, Inc.(UK); Stephen Gilliland, Noel Hamilton, Foxfire

Scientific (USA); Ian Hamilton, Foxfire Scientific, Inc. (USA)

2. Radioactivity in Surface and Groundwater Near Old Radium and

Uranium Mines in Portugal – 16258

Fernando P. Carvalho, Instituto Tecnológico e Nuclear

(Portugal); João M. Oliveira, Magarida Malta, Nuclear and

Technological Institute (Portugal)

SESSION 43

Wedneday: Directly After Session 42 Room: 12

URANIUM MINING AND MILLING SITES ER

Co-Chairs: Steven Brown, SENES (USA)

Peter Waggitt, IAEA (AUSTRIA)

Organizer: Steve Brown, SENES Consultants Ltd. (USA)

1. Design Improvements and ALARA at U.S. Uranium In Situ

Recovery Facilities – 16415

Steven Brown, SENES, Englewood (USA)

2. Radionuclide Transfer from Uranium Mine Water Treatment

Ponds to Vegetation – 16260

Fernando P. Carvalho, Instituto Tecnológico e Nuclear

(Portugal); João M. Oliveira, Magarida Malta, Nuclear and

Technological Institute (Portugal)

—————— Break ——————

3. Completion of the South Alligator Valley Remediation, Northern

Territory, Australia – 16198

Peter Waggitt, IAEA (Austria); Mike Fawcett, Fawcett Minesite

Rehabilitation Services (Australia)

4. Gunnar Uranium Mine Environmental Remediation - Northern

Saskatchewan – 16102

Joseph Muldoon, Laurier Schramm, Saskatchewan Research

Council (Canada)

5. Sustainable Covers for Uranium Mill Tailings, USA: Alternative

Design, Performance, and Renovation – 16369

William J. Waugh, S.M. Stoller Corporation (USA); Craig H.

Benson, University of Wisconsin-Madison (USA); William H.

Albright, Desert Research Institute (USA)


Technical Sessions Wednesday AM

SESSION 44

Wednesday 10:45 Room: 11B

PANEL: YOUNG GENERATION NETWORK (YGN)

Co-Chairs: Chris Williams, VT Nuclear Services (UK)

Robert Berry, Foxfire Scientific, Inc. (UK)

Organizers: Chris Williams, Robert Berry

This panel will focus on Young Generation Networks and Professional

Development. ong>Theong> panelists and topics will include Carl Dawson,

NDA National Graduate Program Manager and Craig Morrow (NDA

Graduate) on the creation and experiences of the Nuclear

Decommissioning Authority Graduate Scheme; Corhyn Parr (UK

YGN Vice Chair) presenting the results of a survey of UK YGN

members on attitudes and opinions of the UK Nuclear Industry and

Miguel Millan (President Spanish YGN) on the Development of the

Spanish YGN.

SESSION 45

Wednesday 08:30 Room: 2nd Floor

POSTER SESSION

Co-Chairs: Heather Klebba, Nuclear Filter Technologies(USA)

Terry Wickland, Nuclear Filter Technologies (USA)

Organizers: Don Goebel, SEC (USA); Jennifer Biedscheid,

Washington Division of URS (USA)

ENVIRONMENTAL REMEDIATION/EM POSTERS

A. New Uses for Natural Analogues - Determining Site Clean-Up

Criteria? – 16073*

Alison Robinson, University of Central Lancashire (UK)

B. Particle Detection - A New Mindset, MACTECs Detector

Research and Testing

Facility – 16284*

Alejandro Lopez, Michael Marcial, Michael McDonald, Jeffrey

Lively, MACTEC (USA)

C. Independent Monitoring of Radiological Impact in

Decommissioned NPP A1 Site – 16074

Ondrej Slavik, Martin Listjak, Alojz Slaninka, Jozef Moravek

(SlovaKia); Frantisek Soos, JAVYS, a.s. (Slovakia); Sylvia

Dulanska, Comenius University (Slovakia)

D. Experience of the ong>Internationalong> Cooperation under the Russian-

American Agreement on Repatriation HEU SNF of Research

Reactors (export from Bulgaria, Latvia, Hungary, etc. the

countries) – 16172

Borovitskiy Stepan, FSUE FCNRS (Russia)

E. Plan for Site Release of Decommissioning Project of KRR-1&2

– 16287*

Sang Bum Hong, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute

(Korea)

F. Present State of Remediation of Mecsek Uranium Mines,

Radioactive Parameters – 16337*

András Várhegyi, MECSEK-ÖKO Environment Co. (Hungary);

Zorán Gorjánácz, MECSEKÉRC Environment Co. (Hungary);

János Somlai, Pannon University (Hungary)

SESSION 46

Wednesday 13:45 Room: 3A

PANEL: UK NDA AND TIER 1 FUNDING, CONTRACTING,

SUBCONTRACTING SELECTION AND ARRANGEMENTS

Co-Chairs: Richard Mrowicki, Nuclear Decommissioning

Authority (UK)

Fred Sheil, Sellafield Ltd. (UK)

Organizors: Richard Mrowicki, Fred Sheil

This workshop will summarize and provide a status report on funding,

contracting and the competition program for the NDA sites. ong>Theong> focus

will be to discuss openly with the audience experience, ideas and new

lessons that are applicable to the UK.

Panelists include: Mike Hawe, Commercial Director, Magnox North;

Keith Case, Commercial Director, Sellafield; David Savage, Program

Manager, Shared Services Alliance; Ron Gorham, Head of Supply

Chain Development, NDA; and Keith Gibson, Low Level Waste

Repository.

SESSION 47

Wednesday 13:45 Room:3B

PANEL: UMREG PANEL/ROUNDTABLE

Co-Chairs: Alex Jakubick, UMREG (AUSTRIA)

Steve Brown, SENES Consultants Ltd. (USA)

Organizer: Alex Jakubick

Panelists and topics include:

• Opening of the meeting. Activities of the past year.

Alex Jakubick, UMREG (Australia)

• US DOE’s Legacy Management Program: Implementation and

Experience

Jody Waug, S. M. Stoller Corp., US DOE Contractor (USA)

• Long Term Stewardship Program at the Wismut Legacy Sites,

Germany

Michael Paul, Wismut (Germany)

• Proposed Program for Long Term Monitoring and Maintenance

of Legacy Sites in Kazakhstan

Marat Kaftaranov, Uranlikvidrudnik (Kazakhstan)

ong>Theong> Central Asian NATO Program and Status of the UNDP

Framework Document for Central Asia

Peter Stegnar, NATO Central Asian Program (Slovenia)

• Risks, Control and Monitoring of ISR. Does ISR Require a LTS

Program?

Steve Brown, SENES Consultants Ltd. (USA)

• Hydrogeological Monitoring Experience at the Hungarian

legacy Sites

Földig Gabor, MECSEK-ÖKO (Hungary)

• Developments in the Uranium Industry in Africa

Peter Waggitt, IAEA (Austria)

• Environmental and Clean-up Projects: An EBRD Perspective

Esther Harlander, EBRD (UK)

• Closure and Future Direction of UMREG

Alex Jakubick and Peter Waggitt

SESSION 48

Wednesday 13:45 Room:11C

LIQUID WASTE TREATMENT PROCESS AND EXPERIENCE

Co-Chairs: Paul Haigh, ong>Theong> Paul Haigh Partnership (UK)

Michael Ojovan, University of Selifield (UK)

Organizers: Alun Ellis, Radioactive WM Directorate (UK)

Angie Jones, AMEC Earth & Environmental, (USA)

1. U.S. Department of Energy’s “Initiatives for Proliferation

Prevention” Program: Solidification Technologies for

Radioactive Waste Treatment In Russia – 16037

Dennis Kelley, Pacific Nuclear Solutions (USA); Yury

Pokhitonov, V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute(Russia)

2. Operational Experience with a Commercial Plant for

Stabilisation of Radioactive Sludge and Other Materials in the

United Kingdom – 16042

Madoc Hagan, Rowland Cornell, Brian Riley, Nuvia Limited

(UK); Bryan Ware, UK Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority(UK)

3. ong>Theong> Development of a Method for the Simultaneous

Measurement of Cerium (IV) and Chromium (VI) Species in

Nitric Acid Media – 16124

Ian D Nickson, John Tyndall Institute for Nuclear Research

(UK); Colin Boxall, Lancaster University (UK); Angela

Jackson, Guy O.H. Whillock, National Nuclear Laboratory(UK)

4. Treatment of Liquid RAW - Trial Operation of Final Treatment

Center Mochovce – 16178*

Tibor Krajc, Milan Zatkulak, Marian Stubna, VUJE, a.s.

(Slovakia); Vladimir Remias, JAVYS, a.s., (Slovaki)

—————— Break ——————

5. Radioactive Oil Decontamination Development An Overview –

16251

John Krasznai, Kinectrics Inc. (Canada)

27


Wednesday PM Technical Sessions

6. Incineration of Contaminated Oil from Sellafield – 16246

Craig Broadbent, Studsvik UK Limited (UK); Helen Cassidy,

Sellafield Limited (UK); Anders Stenmark, Studsvik Nuclear AB

(Sweden)

7. Solidification of Radioactive Liquid Wastes, Treatment Options

for Spent Resins and Concentrates – 16405

Andreas Roth, Hansa Projekt Anlagentechnik GmbH (Germany)

8. ong>Theong> Sorption and Mechanical Properties of the Modified

Concrete Matrix Used for Conditioning of Radioactive Waste –

16255

Daniela Dogaru, National Commission for Nuclear Activities

Control (Romania); Ortenzia Niculae, National Agency for

Radioactive Waste (Romania); Gheorghita Jinescu, Politehnica

University of Bucharest (Romania); Octavian G. Duliu,

University of Bucharest (Romania); Gheorghe Dogaru, National

Institute of Reserch & Development for Physics and Nuclear

Engineering-Horia Hulubei (Romania)

SESSION 49

Wednesday 13:45 Room: 14

L/ILW WASTE ANALYSIS TECHNOLOGIES - PART 3 OF 3

Co-Chairs: Ronald Keyser, ORTEC – AMETEK (USA)

Karan North, Magnox South Ltd (UK)

Organizer: Ronald Keyser

1. Radiological Monitoring Systems for Waste Characterisation in

the Environment of our Decommissioning Solutions – 16013

Marina Sokcic-Kostic, Roland Schultheis, NUKEM

Technologies GmbH (Germany)

2. MGAv10: ong>Theong> Latest Evolution in the Multi-Group Analysis

Code – 16248

Stephen Croft, Andrey Bosko, Canberra Industries Inc. (USA;

Ray Gunnink, Consulant (USA); Sasha Philips, Joe

Lamontagne, Canberra Industries Inc. (USA); Markku Koskelo,

Canberra Albuquerque Inc. (USA); Robert McElroy, Canberra

Industries Inc. (USA)

3. Use of a Waste Tracking System as a Waste Management Tool –

16302*

Karan North, Magnox South Ltd (UK)

4. Design and Operation of the Combined Technology Automated

Waste Characterisation System – 16361

J. A. Mason, M. R. Looman, and R. Price, A. N. Technology

Ltd.(UK)

SESSION 50

Wednesday 16:15 Room:14

QUALITY ASSURANCE AND CONTROL IN RADIOACTIVE

WASTE MANAGEMENT

Co-Chairs: Jeroen Welbergen, COVRA (NETHERLANDS)

Bill Miller, AMEC, (UK)

Organizer: Angie Jones, AMEC Earth & Environmental, (USA)

1. Control of Materials Harmful to Water in the German KONRAD

Repository – 16125

Karin Kugel, Stefan Steyer, Peter Berneckee, Bundesamt fuer

Strahlenschutz (BfS (Germany); Detlef Gruendler, Wilma

Boetsch, Claudia Haider, ISTec GmbH (Germany)

2. Dose Validation in the Dutch Interim Waste Storage Facility –

16263

Jeroen Welbergen, Leo P.M. Van Velzen, Nuclear Research and

Consultancy Group (Switzerland)

3. Sorption Databases for Increasing Confidence in Performance

Assessment – 16053

Anke Richter, Vinzenz Brendler, Cordula Nebelung,

Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V. (Germany);

Timothy E. Payne, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology

Organization (Australia); Thomas Brasser, GRS Braunschweig

(Germany)

4. Decommissioning and Waste Treatment Hazard Evaluation and

Modeling – 16409

Martin Plys, Michael Epstein, Fauske & Associates, LLC (USA)

28

SESSION 51

Wednesday 13:45 Room:4B

VITRIFICATION AND BOROSILICATE GLASS

ALTERNATIVES FOR IMMOBILIZATION

Co-Chairs: Pierre Van Iseghem, SCK•CEN (BELGIUM)

Carl Steele, Sellafield Ltd. (UK)

Organizers: Pierre Van Iseghem, Carl Steel

1. ong>Theong> Results of Testing to Evaluate Crystal Formation and

Settling in the Cold Crucible Induction Melter – 16282

James Marra, SRNL (USA); Sergey Stefanovsky, Dmitriy

Suntsov,Vladimir Lebedev, SIA Radon (Russia)

2. Cold Crucible Vitrification of SRS SB4 Waste at High Waste

Loadings – 16197

Sergey Stefanovsky, Alexander Kobelev, Vladimir Lebedev,

Michael Polkanov, Oleg Knyazev, SIA Radon (Russia); James

Marra, SRNL (USA)

3. On Fluidization of Borosilicate Glasses in Intense Radiation

Fields – 16055

Michael Ojovan, Guenter Möbus, Jim Tsai, Stuart Cook,

University of Sheffield (UK); Guang Yang, University of

Chicago (USA)

4. Design Innovations in Advanced Vitrification System at Tarapur

– 16254

Kalyan Banerjee, Rajendra Gupta, Sudhakaran Nair, Sridutt

Misra, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (India)

—————— Break ——————

5. ong>Theong> Effect of Waste Loading on the Characteristics of

Borosilicate SRS SB4 Waste Glasses – 16196

Sergey Stefanovsky, Alexander Kobelev, Vladimir Lebedev,

Michael Polkanov, Dmitriy Suntsov, SIA Radon (Russia); James

Marra, SRNL (USA)

6. Diffusion of Helium in Borosilicate Glasses: A Comparative

Approach between Radioactive and Non-Radioactive Glasses –

16208*

Toby Fares, Sylvain Peuget, Atomic Energy Commission (CEA-

Marcoule) (France); Jacques Haussy, CEA (France); Xavier

Deschanels, ICSM (France)

7 Understanding Potential Release Mechanisms of Volatile

Ruthenium During the Vitrification of High Level Waste –

16288

Chris Brookes, Sellafield Ltd (UK); Yvonne Lawson, Mark

Sarsfield, National Nuclear Laboratory (UK); Carl Steele,

Sellafield Ltd. (UK)

SESSION 52

Wednesday 13:45 Room:12

A SYNOPSIS OF KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

Co-Chairs: Hiroyuki Umeki, Japan Atomic Energy Agency

(JAPAN)

Stuart Hunt, NDA (UK)

Organizer: Hiroyuki Umeki

1. Use of the Safety Case to Focus KMS Applications – 16348

Hideaki Osawa, Kazumasa Hioki, Hiroyuki Umeki, Japan

Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Hiroyasu Takase, Quintessa

Japan, (Japan); Ian McKinley, McKinley Consulting

(Switzerland)

2. Practical Application of the KMS: 1) Total System Performance

Assessment – 16349

Hitoshi Makino, Kazumasa Hioki, Hiroyuki Umeki, Japan

Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Hongzhi Yang, Hiroyasu

Takase, Quintessa Japan (Japan); Ian McKinley, McKinley

Consulting (Switzerland)

3. Practical Application of the KMS: 2) Site Characterization

16355

Takeshi Semba, Hideaki Osawa, Kazumasa Hioki, Japan

Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Shoko Tachibana, Hiroyasu

Takase, Quintessa Japan (Japan); Ian McKinley, McKinley

Consulting (Switzerland)


Technical Sessions Wednesday PM

4. Challenges for the JAEA KMS: Fostering Inventive Design and

Problem Solving – 16351

Hitoshi Makino, Kazumasa Hioki, Hiroyuki Umeki, Japan

Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Shoko Tachibana, Hiroyasu

Takase, Quintessa Japan (Japan); Ian McKinley, McKinley

Consulting (Switzerland)

5. Overview of the JAEA KMS Knowledge Management System

Supporting Implementation and Regulation of Geological

Disposal in Japan – 16354

Hiroyuki Umeki, Kazumasa Hioki, Japan Atomic Energy

Agency (Japan); Hiroyasu Takase, Quintessa Japan (Japan);

Ian McKinley, McKinley Consulting (Switzerland)

SESSION 53

Wednesday 16:15 Room: 12

PANEL: FUTURE DIRECTION IN KNOWLEDGE

MANAGEMENT

Co-Chairs: Hiroyuki Umeki, Japan Atomic Energy Agency

(JAPAN)

Stuart Hunt, NDA (UK)

Organizers: Hiroyuki Umeki, Ian McKinley

This panel will consider the initiative instigated by JAEA in the

context of the common requirement to efficiently and rigorously

manage increasing large and complex fluxes of information produced

in all geological disposal programs. Emphasis will be on

distinguishing between program-specific constraints and more generic

areas, which could be a focus for future collaborative projects.

Panelists include: P. Marjatta Palmu, Posiva Oy, (FINDLAND);

Richard Shaw, British Geological Survey (BGS), (UK); Stuart

Hunt, Nuclear Decommissioning Authority, (UK); and Hiroyuki

Umeki, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, (JAPAN)

SESSION 54

Wednesday 13:45 Room:11B

D&D TECHNOLOGIES - PART 2

Co-Chairs: Christophe Le Goaller, CEA (FRANCE)

Maria Lindberg, Studsvik UK Ltd (UK)

Organizers: Christophe Le Goaller, Maria Lindberg

1. Advanced Radioactive Soil Screening and Sorting Technology –

16283

Jeffrey W. Lively, Michael R. Marcial, MACTEC (USA); Mark

Liddiard, Worley Parsons (UK); Javid Kelley, MACTEC (USA);

Joseph Toole, Worley Parsons (UK)

2. Fluorescence Spectral Imaging as a Tool for Locating Uranium

Deposited on Surfaces – 16089

David L. Monts, Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET)

(USA); Guangjun Wang, Yi Su, Ping-Rey Jang, Charles A.

Waggoner, ICET (USA)

3. Surface Decontamination by Photocatalysis – 16068

R. J. Wilbraham, C. Boxall, Lancaster University (UK): R. J.

Taylor, National Nuclear Laboratory (UK)

4. ong>Theong> Development of a Prototype of a Multi-Arm Robotic

System for Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D)

Applications within the Nuclear Industry – 16017

Mohamed J. Bakari, Derek W. Seward, Taylor C. James,

Lancaster University (UK)

—————— Break ——————

5. A Review Of Vortex Amplifier Design in the Context of

Sellafield Nuclear Operations – 16063

Martin Birch, John Tyndall Institute of Nuclear Research (UK);

Raymond Doing, Sellafield Limited (UK); Johathan Francis,

University of Central Lancashire (UK); Darren Parker, Land

Securities Trillium (UK); Guobin Zhang, School of Electrical

and Electronic Engineering (UK)

6. Developments in the Long Term Preservation of Digital

Information for Nuclear Decommissioning – 16412

Jon Tilbury, Christina Tealdi, Tessella, (UK)

SESSION 55

Wednesday 13:45 Room:13

REGULATORY COMPLIANCE, RADIOLOGICAL SURVEYS,

AND FACILITY RELEASE

Co-Chairs: Simon Candy, Sellafield Ltd. (UK)

Axel Baecker, EWN, (BELGIUM)

Organizers: Simon Candy, Axel Baecker

1. Radiological, Technical and Financial Planning for

Decommissioning of Small Nuclear Facilities in Sweden –

16177

Rolf Sjöblom, Tekedo AB (Sweden); Staffan Lindskog, Swedish

Radiation Safety Authority (Sweden)

2. MARSAME: Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Assessment

of Materials and Equipment – 16181

Kathryn Snead, Nidal Azzam, U.S. Environmental Protection

Agency (USA); Colleen F. Petullo, U.S. Public Health Service

(USA); Ramachandra Bhat, Craig Bias, U.S. Air Force (USA);

David P. Alberth, Gerald Falo, U.S. Army, Aberdeen Proving

Ground (USA); Steven Doremus, U.S. Navy, Yorktown (USA); W.

Alexander Williams, Amanda Anderson, U.S. Department of

Energy (USA); Robert A. Meck, George E. Powers, U.S. Nuclear

Regulatory Commission (USA)

3. Determination of the Radionuclide Inventory of Samples from a

Spallation Neutron Source – 16225*

Dorothea Schumann, Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland)

4. Measurement of Radioactive Aerosol Behavior during

Dismantling and Reflection to the Exposure Dose Evaluation

16107

Yukihiro Iguchi, Masami Kato, Japan Nuclear Energy Safety

Organization (Japan)

—————— Break ——————

5. IAEA Decommissioning Safety Activities – 16397

Vladan Ljubenov, Ernst Warnecke, Mark Hannan, ong>Internationalong>

Atomic Energy Agency (Austria)

6. Plasma ARC Cutting Experiments using Radioactive Materials

for Evaluation of Airborne Dispersion Ratio – 16106

Taro Shimada, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Atsushi

Takamura, Science System Laboratory (Japan); Atsushi Kamiya,

Nihon Advanced Technology (Japan); Takenori Sukegawa,

Tadao Tanaka, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan)

7. ong>Theong> Development and Efficacy of the Continued Operations

Safety Report – 16067

Jonathan Francis, University of Central Lancashire (UK);

Gavin Smith, Sellafield Limited (UK); Ian D Nickson, John

Tyndall Institute for Nuclear Research (UK)

8. Planning for Decommissioning of an Irradiation Facility used

for Research Purposes in Cuba – 16120

Juan Carlos Benitez-Navarro, Mercedes Salgado-Mojena,

CPHR (Cuba); Evelio Soto Alvarez, Daniel Fraga Acosta,

CENSA (Cuba); Jose Quevedo, Yolanda Perez, CNSN (Cuba)

SESSION 56

Wednesday 13:30 Room: 2nd Floor

PROJECTS IN PROGRESS: NON-PAPER POSTER

Co-Chairs: Gary Benda, ong>Conferenceong> Manager (USA)

Organizer: Gary Benda

This Poster Session is for presentations received after the acceptance

deadline and where a paper is not required.

1. Real System Analyses of PA Relevant Processes in Sediments:

ong>Theong> Ruprechtov Natural Analogue Site – 16342*

Vaclava Havlova, Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc.(Czech

Republic); Ulrich Noseck, Gesellschaft für Anlagen- und

Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH (Germany); Melissa Denecke,

Wolfgang Hauser, FZK INE (Germany), Juhani Suksi, Helsinki

University (Findland); Kazimierz Rozanski, AGH (Poland)

2. A Truly Industrial Solution for the Elimination of Radioactive

Contaminated Oils or Solvents – 16232

Albert Jacobs, William Everett, Dewdrops (UK)

29


Thursday AM Technical Sessions

Thursday, October 15, 2009

SESSION 57

Thursday 08:30 Room:3B

D&D OF NON-REACTOR NUCLEAR FACILITIES

Co-Chairs: Jean-Marie Cuchet, Belgonucleaire (BELGIUM)

Neil Robson, Sellafield Ltd (UK)

Organizers: Jean-Marie Cuchet, Neil Robson

1. Progress and Experiences from the Decommissioning of the

Eurochemic Reprocessing Plant – 16022

Robert Walthery, Wim Van Laer, Patrick Lewandowski, Nancy

Reusen, Bart Ooms, Belgoprocess (Belgium)

2. Decommissioning of Buildings 105X and 122X at Belgoprocess

– 16052

Bart Ooms, Robert Walthery, Bert Lievens, Wim Van Laer,

Belgoprocess (Belgium)

3. Cleansing and Dismantling of CEA-Saclay Nuclear Licensed

Facilities – 16047

Michel Jeanjacques, Rebecca Glévarec, Isabelle Tirel,

Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (France)

4. Decommissioning of High Hazard Legacy Facilities:

Comparison of Approaches in the Nuclear and Chemical Sectors

– 16084

Trevor Jones, Nuvia Limited (UK); Des Kelly, E4 Industry (UK)

—————— Break ——————

5. Challenges During the Decommissioning of the WAK Site -

Dismantling of Highly Contaminated HLLW-Storage Tanks –

16054

Joachim Dux, Oliver Fath, Belgium)WAK Rückbau- und

Entsorgungs-GmbH (Germany)

6. Uranium Workshops Decommissioning – 16219

Pierre Lisbonne, CEA (France)

7. Feasibility Study into the Application of Aggressive

Decontamination Techniques in Support of Reprocessing Plant

Decommissioning – 16079

Heather Moore, Sellafield Limited (UK); Stephen Hepworth,

Sellafield Ltd (UK)

8. Decommissioning of AECL Whiteshell Laboratories – 16311

Grant Koroll, Randall Swartz, Jeffrey Harding, AECL (Canada);

Michael Rhodes, McAlpine Enterprises (Canada); Randall

Ridgway, Dennis Bilinsky, AECL, Pinawa (Canada)

SESSION 58

Thursday 08:30 Room:12

D&D MANAGEMENT APPROACHES AND PLANNING

TOOLS

Co-Chairs: Ian Wheeler, Sellafield Ltd (UK)

Mark Denton, Kurion, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN, (USA)

Organizers: Ian Wheeler, Mark Denton

1. NEC3 - Managing Change – 16380

Charles Wilsoncroft, Hill ong>Internationalong> (UK)

2. A Successful Transition from Operating to Dismantling a UO2-

PuO2 Fuel Fabrication Facility – 16058

Thierry Flament, Jean-Louis Lemarchand, Marc Dalmier,

Dominique Pecquais, AREVA NC (France)

3. Tailoring Engineering Activities to D&D Projects – 16056

Charles Negin, Project Enhancement Corp.(USA); Andrew

Szilagyi, Yvette Collazo, U.S. Department of Energy (USA);

Charles Urland, Project Enhancement Corp. (USA); John

Gladden, Joe Santos, Savannah River National Laboratory

(USA)

4. Data Tracking System for Standardised Decommissioning

Costing – 16191

Vladimir Daniska, Ivan Rehak, Peter Bezak, Frantisek Ondra,

Marek Vasko, Decom, a.s. (Slovakia); Vladimir Necas, Slovak

University of Technology (Slovakia)

—————— Break ——————

5. Pet Cyclotron Design for Decommissioning and Waste

Inventory Reduction – 16098

Robert Major, AMEC (UK)

30

3. A Systematic Planning Tool for Environmental Characterisation

– 16010

Steven Wilcox, Richard I Wilkins, Martin R Lyons, AMEC (UK)

SESSION 59

Thursday 10:45 Room: 11B

SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH L/ILW

MANAGEMENT

Co-Chairs: Ian Crossland, Crossland Consulting (UK)

Stephen Wickham, Galson Sciences Ltd (UK)

Organizers: Ian Corssland, Stephen Wickham

1. Development of Joint Regulatory Guidance on the Management

of Higher Activity Radioactive Wastes on Nuclear Licensed

Sites – 16095

Michael Bacon, Health and Safety Executive (UK); Doug Ilett,

Environment Agency (UK); Andrew Whittall, Scottish

Environment Protection Agency (UK)

2. Monte Carlo Simulation of a Compartment Model of

Radionuclide Migration at a Radioactive Waste Repository –

16168

Enrico Zio, Francesco Cadini, Diana Avram, Tommaso Girotti,

Politecnico (Italy); Alfredo Luce, ENEA CR Saluggia (Italy);

Alberto Taglioni, ENEA (Italy)

3. Preliminary Waste Acceptance Critera for LILW repository in

Slovenia – 16115

Nadja Zeleznik, ARAO (Slovenia); Dejan Skanata, Enconet

ong>Internationalong> (Croatia)

4. Safety Evaluation for Regulatory Management of Australian

Waste Operations Facilities – 16236

Samir Sarkar, Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear

Safety Agency (Australia)

SESSION 60

Thursday 08:30 Room: 11C

L/ILW TREATMENT TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AND

IMPLEMENTATION

Co-Chairs: Keith Anderson, ECC (USA)

Ewoud Verhoef, COVRA (NETHERLANDS)

Organizers: Keith Anderson, Hans Codee

1. A New Approach to the Combined Conditioning of Solid and

Sludge Nuclear Waste – 16218

Lisa Hayes, Doug Kirk, BNES Nuclear Services (UK)

2. Experience with Operation of Movable Cementation Facility at

A1 NPP – 16038

Zuzana Holicka, Dusan Kevicky, Tibor Krajcl, Marian

Urbanec, VUJE, Inc. (Slovakia)

3. Construction and Operation of a Microfiltration Plant for the

Treatment of Radioactive Wastewater – 16019

Andreas Vesely, Herbert Trombitas; Nuclear Engineering

Seibersdorf (Austria)

4. NDA Generic Research Programme for Higher Activity Waste

Management Issues – 16390

James McKinney, Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (UK)

—————— Break ——————

5. Side Radwaste Treatment Facilities for the Westinghouse

AP1000 Projects in Sanmen und Haiyang, PR China – 16410

Andreas Roth, Hansa Projekt Anlagentechnik GmbH

(Germany); John Merrell, Westinghouse Electric Co Uk Ltd

(UK)

6. Statistical Modelling Applied to the Contents of Waste Drums –

16085

Richard Bull, Ian Pearman, Nuvia Limited (UK)

7. Study of the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment by

Coprecipitation: from Modelling to New Process Designs –

16018

Barré Yves, Pacary Vincent, Atomic Energy Commission

(France)

8. Trials of Experimental Module for Removal of Radioactive

Slurry from LRW Storage Tanks – 16238

Vadim A. Ilin, Moscow SIA “Radon” (Russia)(France)


Technical Sessions Thursday AM

SESSION 61

Thursday 08:30 Room:13

CHARACTERIZATION AND PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT

FOR HLW, FISSILE, TRU, AND SNF

Co-Chairs: Hans Codee, COVRA N.V. (NETHERLANDS)

Phillip C. Gregory, Washington TRU Solutions (USA)

Organizers: Murthy Devarakonda, Washington TRU Solutions;

Gerry McGill, AMEC (UK)

1. Developing Design Premises for a KBS-3V Repository Based

on Results from the Safety Assessment – 16027

Johan Andersson, JA Streamflow AB (Sweden); Allan Hedin,

SKB (Sweden)

2. Characterization of a Fe- Based Alloy System for a GNEP

Metallic Wasteform – 16134

Mark Williamson, Savannah River National Lab (USA); Marie

Kane, Savannah River National Laboratory (USA); Bob

Sindelar, Savannah River National Lab (USA)

3. ong>Theong> Collaborative EC Project ReCosy – 16203

Bernhard Kienzler, Gunnar Buckau, Forschungszentrum

Karlsruhe (Germany)

4. Modelling Radionuclide Mobility of Spent Fuel in a Deep

Geological Repository Located in a Clay Bedrock – 16240

Abel Tamayo, Lara Duro, Jordi Bruno, Amphos 21 (Spain);

Aurora Martínez-Esparza, ENRESA (Spain)

—————— Break ——————

5. Evaluation of Mechanical Effects of the Fault Movement on the

Engineered Barrier System – 16269

Yuya Saito, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, (Japan); Mayuka

Nishimura, Takashi Hirai, Takenaka Civil Engineering &

Construction Co., Ltd, (Japan); Kenji Tanai, Morimasa Naito,

Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan)

6. Study on Performance Assessment for HLW Repository in China

– 16228

Weiming Chen, Ju Wang, Rui Su, Yunfeng Li, Beijing Research

Institute of Uranium Geology (China)

SESSION 62

Thursday 08:30 Room:4B

RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN ER TECHNOLOGIES

Co-Chairs: Leo van Velzen, NRG (SWITZERLAND)

Virgene Mulligan, ARS ong>Internationalong> (USA)

Organizer: Leo van Vezen

1. ong>Theong> Development of Metallised Membranes for Analytical

Separation Processes – 16069

Michael A. Bromley, John Tyndall Institute for Nuclear

Research (UK); Colin Boxall, University of Lancaster (UK);

Sarah Galea, John Tyndall Institute for Nuclear Research (UK);

Jonathan Francis, University of Central Lancashire (UK)

2. Characterization of Cadmium-Resistant Bacteria and their

Application for Cadmium Bioremediation – 16072

Surasak Siripornadulsil, Wilailak Siripornadulsil, Khon Kaen

University (Thailand)

3. Enhanced Bioremediation as a Cost Effective Approach

following ong>Theong>rmally Enhanced Soil Extraction for Sites

Requiring Remediation of Chlorinated Solvents – 16296

Anna-Maria Kozlowska, AIG Engineering Group Limited (UK);

Steve R. Langford, AIG Engineering Group Limited (UK); Dr

H.G. Williams, EnviroGene Ltd (UK)

4. Bioavailability of Mercury in Contaminated Oak Ridge

Watershed and Potential Remediation of River/Runoff/Storm

Water by an Aquatic Plant – 16319

Yi Su, Fengxiang X. Han, Jian Chen, Yunju Xia, David L. Monts,

Mississippi State University (USA)

—————— Break ——————

5. Remediation of Uranium- and CHC-Contaminated Groundwater

on a Former Nuclear Fuel-Element Production Site – 16244

Joerg Woerner, Sonja Margraf, RD Hanau (Germany)

6. Polyphosphate Amendments for In-Situ Remediation of

Uranium – 16026

Dawn Wellman, Eric Pierce, Chase Bovaird, Pacific Northwest

National Laboratory (USA); John Bargar, Sam Webb, SSRL

(USA); Vince Vermeul, John Fruchter, Pacific Northwest

National Laboratory (USA)

SESSION 63

Thursday 08:30 Room:14

NATURAL ANALOGUES IN RADWASTE DISPOSAL -

ANSWERING THE HARD QUESTIONS

Co-Chairs: W. Russell Alexander, Bedrock Geosciences

(SWITZERLAND)

Tony Milodowski, British Geological Survey (UK)

Organizer: W. Russell Alexander

1. Implications of Microbial Redox Catalysis in Analogue Systems

for Repository Safety Cases – 16336

Julia M West, British Geological Survey (UK); Ian McKinley,

McKinley Consulting (Switzerland); Simcha Stroes-Gascoyne,

2. AECL, Whiteshell Laboratories (Canada)

Altered Crystalline Rock Distributed Along Groundwater

Conductive Fractures and the Retardation Capacity in the

Orogenic Field of Japan -16332

Yoshida Hidekazu, Nishimoto Shoji, Nagoya University

(Japan); Richard Metacalfe, Quintessa, Oxfordshire (UK)

3. Geochemical Behaviour of Uranium in Sedimentary Formations:

Insights from a Natural Analogue Study – 16340

Ulrich Noseck, Gesellschaft für Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit

(GRS) mb (Germany); Juhani Suksi, Helsinki University

(Finland); Vaclava Havlova, Radek Cervinka, Nuclear Research

Institute Rez plc. (Czech Republic); Thomas Brasser, GRS

Braunschweig (Germany)

4. ong>Theong> Ruprechtov Natural Analogue Site (CZ) Study: Mobile

Natural Organic Matter Idenification, Characterization and Link

to PA Relevant Processes – 16341

Vaclava Havlova, Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc. (Czech

Republic); Ulrich Noseck, Gesellschaft für Anlagen- und

Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH (Germany); Radek Cervinka,

Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc. (Czech Republic); Thomas

Brasser, GRS Braunschweig (Germany); Josef Havel, Masaryk

University (Czech Republic)

—————— Break ——————

5. ong>Theong> Archaeological Analogue Approaches to Predict the Long

Term Corrosion Behaviour of Carbon Steel Overpack and

Reinforced Concrete Structures in the French Disposal Systems

– 16343

Delphine Neff, CEA (France); Mandana Saheb, CEA/ANDRA

(France); Judith Monnier, CNRS (France); Solenn REGUER,

Synchrotron SOLEIL (France); Walter Chitty, AREVA (France);

Stéphane Perrin, Michael Descostes, Valérie L’Hostis, CEA

(France); Didier Crusset, ANDRA (France); Philippe

Dillmann, CNRS (France)

6. Formation of Secondary Minerals and Uptake of Various Anions

Under Naturally-Occurring Hyperalkaline Conditions in Oman -

16344

Sohtaro Anraku, Tsukuba Sato, Tetsuro Yoneda, Hokkaido

University (Japan); Kazuya MORIMOTO, National Institute for

Materials Science (Japan)

7. Reaction of Bentonite in Low Alkali Cement Leachates:

Preliminary Results from the Cyprus Natural Analogue Project

(CNAP) – 16276

W. Russell Alexander, Bedrock Geosciences (Switzerland)

8. Developments in Hyperalkaline Natural Analogue

Studiesaround the Zambales Ophiolite, Philippines - 16278

C. Pascua, M. L.L. Honrado, University of Philippines

(Philippines); W. Russell Alexander, Bedrock Geosciences

(Switzerland); Yamakawa, N. Fujii, RWMC (Japan); K. Namiki,

K. Kawamurs, Obayashi Corpration (Japan); I.G. McKinley,

McKinley Consulting (Switzerland)

31


32

Exhibition Hours and Exhibitor Floorplan

Sunday, October 11, 2009 18:00 - 20:00

Monday, October 12, 2009 07:30 - 18:00

Tuesday, October 13, 2009 07:30 - 19:30

Wednesday, October 14, 2009 07:30 - 16:30


Exhibitors Listings

We would like to thank all of our exhibiting companies.

Company descriptions and contact information is listed in the next section, along with our Sponsors ads.

Exhibitors in Alphabetical Order

STAND COMPANY

48 AMEC (Gold Sponsor)

21 A. N. TECHNOLOGY LTD

8 AREVA

7 ASEM, IMECHE & INFORMATION POINT

15 ASSYSTEM ENERGY & NUCLEAR

(Bronze Sponsor)

32 ATKINS

40 ATTENTIONIT LTD

36 AUGEAN PLC

28 BELGOPROCESS

50 BNS NUCLEAR SERVICES (Platinum Sponsor)

CH2M Hill (Silver Sponsor - Sponsor Only)

6 CVD NUCLEAR SOLUTIONS

55 DAHER

45 DEWDROPS (Bronze Sponsor)

5 DIAMND DECTORS LTD.

2 DOOSAN BABCOCK ENERGY LIMITED

41 ENERGYSOLUTIONS (Silver Sponsor)

26 GNS GESELLSCHAFT FÜR

NUKLEAR- SERVICE

58 GOLDSIM TECHNOLOGY GROUP

1 GRAVATOM

11 GREIF UK LTD

42 HALLIN ROBOTICS LIMITED

7 IMECHE & INFORMATION POINT

69 INTERNATIONAL NUCLEAR SERVICES

71 INUTEC (formerly WMT LTD)

67 JFIMS & JFN

68 JORDAN NUCLEAR

74 LLW REPOSITORY LTD.

10 LOKRING TECHNOLOGY LLC

38 MECH-TOOL ENGINEERING LTD

25 NAC INTERNATIONAL

46 NATIONAL NUCLEAR LABORATORY (NNL)

(Silver Sponsor)

13 NI

39 NIA

53 NIS LTD

52 NSG ENVIRONMENTAL LTD (Silver Sponsor)

59 NUCLEAR FILTER TECHNOLOGY

23 NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGIES

24 NUKEM TECHNOLOGIES GmbH

43 NUVIA LIMITED (Silver Sponsor)

31 ORTEC

20 OXFORD TECHNOLOGIES LTD

73 PACTEC, INC. (Bronze Sponsor)

19 PAR SYSTEMS, INC.

62 PROJECT TIME & COST UK, LTD/PROJECT

TIME & COST, INC.

54 REMEDI8

22 S.A. ROBOTICS LTD

65 SELLAFIELD LTD

34 STUDSVIK

30 TESSELLA

33 UKAEA

37 UNITECH SERVICES GROUP

60 URS CORPORATION (Platinum Sponsor)

18 VENN ENGINEERING SERVICES LTD

3 VT GROUP (Silver Sponsor)

14 YGN - YOUNG GENORATION NETWORK

63 WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC COMPANY

(Silver Sponsor)

56 WORLEYPARSONS

Exhibitors in Numerical Order

STAND COMPANY

1 GRAVATOM

2 DOOSAN BABCOCK ENERGY LIMITED

3/4 VT GROUP (Silver Sponsor)

5 DIAMOND DETECTORS LTD

6 CVD NUCLEAR SOLUTIONS

7 ASEM, IMECHE & INFORMATION POINT

8/9/16/17 AREVA

10 LOKRING TECHNOLOGY LLC

11/12 GREIF UK LTD

13 NI

14 YGN - YOUNG GENORATION NETWORK

15 ASSYSTEM ENERGY & NUCLEAR

(Bronze Sponsor)

18 VENN ENGINEERING SERVICES LTD

19 PAR SYSTEMS, INC.

20 OXFORD TECHNOLOGIES LTD

21 A. N. TECHNOLOGY LTD

22 S.A. ROBOTICS LTD

23 NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGIES

24/27 NUKEM TECHNOLOGIES GmbH

25 NAC INTERNATIONAL

26/29 GNS GESELLSCHAFT FÜR NUKLEAR-

SERVICE

28 BELGOPROCESS

30 TESSELLA

31 ORTEC

32 ATKINS

33 UKAEA

34/35 STUDSVIK

36 AUGEAN PLC

37 UNITECH SERVICES GROUP

38 MECH-TOOL ENGINEERING LTD

39 NIA

40 ATTENTIONIT LTD

41 ENERGYSOLUTIONS (Silver Sponsor)

42 HALLIN ROBOTICS LIMITED

43/44 NUVIA LIMITED (Silver Sponsor)

45 DEWDROPS (Bronze Sponsor)

46/47 NATIONAL NUCLEAR LABORATORY

(NNL) (Silver Sponsor)

48/49 AMEC (Gold Sponsor)

50/51/83/84 BNS NUCLEAR SERVICES

(Platinum Sponsor)

52 NSG ENVIRONMENTAL LTD

(Silver Sponsor)

53 NIS LTD

54 REMEDI8

55 DAHER

56/57 WORLEYPARSONS

58 GOLDSIM TECHNOLOGY GROUP

59 NUCLEAR FILTER TECHNOLOGY

60/61 URS CORPORATION (Platinum Sponsor)

62 PROJECT TIME & COST INC/UK LTD

63/64 WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC COMPANY

(Silver Sponsor)

65/66 SELLAFIELD LTD

67 JFIMS & JFN

68 JORDAN NUCLEAR

69/70 INTERNATIONAL NUCLEAR SERVICES

(INS)

71/72 INUTEC (formerly WMT LTD)

73 PACTEC, INC. (Bronze Sponsor)

74/75 LLW REPOSITORY LTD

33


AMEC STAND: 48/49

GOLD SPONSOR

Contact: Tony Lawrence

601 Faraday Street, Birchwood, Warrington,

Cheshire, WA3 6QN

UNITED KINGDOM

Tel: +44 (0)1925 675000

Email: anthony.lawrence@amec.com

www.amec.com

AMEC has experience of decommissioning in the UK, Canada,

Eastern and Western Europe, Lithuania, Ukraine, Armenia and

Russia. We offer a complete range of nuclear services that span

the full life-cycle of any decommissioning project, from

developing the initial concept through to hands-on

decommissioning and clean-up.

With our safety, health physics and environmental support we

act as a single supplier, delivering the full range of skills and

services for the completion of any decommissioning project;

managing the decontamination and decommissioning of

facilities to minimise the environmental impact and pave the

way for site regeneration.

We have acknowledged experts in waste management, health

physics and all radiological and environmental services to

include, RPA, waste characterisation and management,

dosimetry, monitoring, analysis and subsequent clean-up. We

have waste characterisation experience using on-site gamma

spectrometry measurement and analysis via NIRAS

Laboratories.

AMEC also provides all levels of nuclear safety case, design

substantiation and ALARP/BPEO justification, including

regulatory support. ong>Theong> radiological capability includes

analysis and modelling; criticality and shielding assessments,

and the application of thermohydraulic and radiological

analysis codes.

Our commitment to safe and efficient on-site operations

demand highly skilled and innovative project management, and

our project teams focus on ensuring that our customers’

requirements are met.

A. N. TECHNOLOGY LTD STAND: 21

Contacts: Units 5/6 Thames Park

Lester Way

Wallingford

Oxfordshire, OX10 9TA

UNITED KINGDOM

Tel: +44 01491 824444

www.antech-inc.com

For more than 20 years ANTECH have produced a range of

nuclear instrumentation solutions for the measurement and

characterisation of SNM and radionuclides in waste and

provide sales, service and support worldwide.

Our products are used to measure waste in crates, boxes, drums

and cans and fall into three basic categories or combinations

thereof:

• Gamma Ray Measurement Systems

• Neutron Measuring Measurement Systems

• Calorimeter Measurement Systems

• Combined Technology Systems and Instruments

• including Portal Monitoring for Homeland Security

• Custom Systems

ong>Theong> Company also provides fully automated waste

characterisation systems employing multiple technologies,

conveyors and drum handling equipment.

AREVA STAND: 8

Contact: www.areva.com

All over the world, AREVA provides its customers with

solutions for carbon-free power generation and electricity

transmission. With its knowledge and expertise in these fields,

the group has a leading role to play in meeting the world’s

energy needs.

Ranked first in the global nuclear power industry, AREVA’s

unique integrated offering covers every stage of the fuel cycle,

reactor design and construction, and related services.

In addition, the group is developing a portfolio of operations in

renewable energies. AREVA is also a world leader in electricity

transmission and distribution and offers its customers a

complete range of solutions for greater grid stability and

energy efficiency.

Sustainable development is a core component of the group’s

industrial strategy. Its 75,000 employees work every day to

make AREVA a responsible industrial player that is helping to

supply ever cleaner, safer and more economical energy to the

greatest number of people.

ASSYSTEM STAND: 15

ENERGY & NUCLEAR

BRONZE SPONSOR

Contact: Derek Williams, Sales Director

Club Street

Bamber Bridge

Preston PR5-6FN

UNITED KINGDOM

Tel: +44 ( 0)1772 645 000

email: dwilliams@assystemuk.com

www.assytem.com

ong>Theong> ASSYSTEM Group is one of Europe’s leading Engineering

Services providers with a total turnover of £650m and

employing over 9500 staff at its offices throughout France, the

UK and worldwide. Since it originated in the Nuclear sector

over 40 years ago, the ASSYSTEM Group has achieved an

impressive record of growth and diversification, and the

Group’s client base now covers a broad range of industry

sectors, ranging from Aerospace and Automotive to Nuclear

and Process industries.

ong>Theong> ASSYSTEM Energy & Nuclear Business Unit consists of

over .0 Engineers across Europe with a turnover of approx

£145m. Operating within the Civil, Naval & Defence sectors,

Group capabilities include new plant design, construction &

commissioning and the provision of maintenance support and

outage management, to decommissioning and the design and

development of special purpose plant and equipment, including

remote handling systems.

ASSYSTEM has offices located close to most major nuclear

sites in the UK and France, at Preston, Westlakes, Dounreay,

Sunderland, Derby and Bristol in UK; and in France at

Cherbourg, Suresnes, St Quentin en Yvelines, Geneva, Lyon,

Bordeaux, Ardoise, and Marseille. This enables the Group to

provide a network of local support to major clients, backed up

by specialist engineering support from the Group’s Technical

Centres. ong>Theong> Groups key clients in the nuclear sector include

AWE, Areva British Energy, EdF, Sellafield Ltd., Rolls-Royce,

UKAEA, CEA, CERN, IRSN.

ASSYSTEM has established an international reputation in

nuclear systems engineering, specialising in the design and

development of a wide range of high integrity plant and

equipment for the nuclear industry.

35


ATKINS STAND: 32

Contact: Nigel Thornton

Woodcote Grove, Ashley Road, Epsom

Surrey, KT18 5BW

UNITED KINGDOM

Tel: +44 (0) 1946 692345

Email: nigel.thornton@atkinsglobal.com

www.atkinsglobal.com

Atkins is involved in the planning, designing and enabling of

complex capital projects. We lead the way in a diverse range of

disciplines, from designing the world’s tallest buildings to

improving the efficiency of major public transport systems.

Atkins is the largest engineering consultancy in the UK, the

fourth largest multidisciplinary consultancy in the world and

the largest multidisciplinary consultancy in Europe. Our size

and expertise bring significant value to our clients, allowing us

to harness an unrivalled pool of creative, professional people to

produce outstanding solutions to challenging problems.

Atkins has been providing support to the nuclear sector for

more than four decades. From civil and structural design for

Berkeley power station in the early 1960’s, we now deliver

multi-discipline solutions across all sectors of the industry.

Today, we are involved in three of the largest engineering

projects within the nuclear sector:

• AWE Design House – Providing multi-discipline teams

for the major capital programme at AWE

• British Energy Technical Support Alliance – Providing

technical support to the operating stations

• Sellafield Legacy Ponds – Part of a Joint Venture with

Aker Solutions and Carillion delivering whole life cycle

projects at the legacy ponds

36

ATTENTIONIT LTD STAND: 40

Contact: Dan Smith

Newton House, Ste 101, Birchwood Park

Warrington, Cheshire, WA3 6FW

UNITED KINGDOM

Tel: +44 (0) 1925 320070

Email: dsmith@attentionit.com

www.attentionit.com

AttentionIT has been assisting facilities since 2001 using our

expertise in environmental waste tracking and consulting

services to stream line processes in the Waste Management

arena. Our software, eMWaste ® tracks and manages all

radioactive, hazardous and mixed waste streams and materials.

eMWaste ® electronically stores all information related to;

characterization, storage, movement, processing, treatment,

shipping, and disposal. eMWaste ® is web-based software,

operating under a secure connection with servers installed at

the CSC facility.

eMWaste ® provides the ability to create and detail

Waste/Material shipments and generate all shipping paperwork

conforming to regulatory requirements of Department for

Transport from a single source. This limits errors and reduces

the amount of time needed for data entry.

AttentionIT also has extensive consulting capabilities. With our

operational experience we can provide knowledge on site

design, waste management, IT configuration and more. We are

looking forward to working with you.

AUGEAN PLC STAND: 36

Contact: Gene Wilson

East Northants RMF, Stamford Road

Kings Cliffe, PE8 6XX

UNITED KINGDOM

Tel: +44 (0)1733 444900

Email: genewilson@augeanplc.com

www.augeanplc.com

Augean PLC is a market-leading UK based specialist waste

and resource management group delivering a broad range of

services to the hazardous waste sector.

We offer a complete solution for the management of hazardous

wastes and work in partnership with our clients to develop long

term answers to the treatment and disposal of their waste and

operates proactively to meet or exceed regulatory standards.

We own more than eight million cubic metres of landfill void

space, seven treatment and recycling centres and employ over

200 people across our eleven sites. We are:

A safety and compliance led business:

• BSI certified for our integrated management system

including environment, health and safety and quality

• Sector leader in the modernisation and introducing new

technologies

• Members of organisations including: Achilles;

Environmental Services Association and Environmental

Industries Commission

At its East Northants Resource Management Facility, Augean

will provide LLW disposal services with the following features:

• LLW of specific activity of up to 200Bq/g

• Radioactive contaminated asbestos

• Radioactive inert, non-hazardous and hazardous wastes

• Wide range of isotopes tailored to the UK inventory

• High radioactive capacity

• Receipt in bags and drums

• Centralised location in the UK


BELGOPROCESS STAND: 28

Belgoprocess brings 50 years of operational experience in

waste management and in decommissioning of nuclear

facilities. We are experts in minimising the amount of

radioactive waste produced and maximising clearance of

decontaminated material while optimising operational costs.

Our integrated nuclear waste management and

decommissioning services include:

• Turnkey solutions for processing and storage of radioactive

wastes and for decommissioning nuclear facilities,

including alpha-contaminated facilities and installations

• Advice on decontamination and dismantling

techniques/methods and on waste processing techniques,

taking into account the stringent safety requirements of

any national or international regulations

• Feasibility tests and demonstration runs in existing

facilities

• Research, development and technical demonstration of

process control techniques

• Characterisation, both chemical, physical and

radiological, of waste streams

• Assistance in the commissioning of nuclear processing

facilities

• Problem solving of existing waste treatment facilities and

optimisation of implemented solutions.

• Capability to process foreign waste of different origins in

our installations

Belgoprocess knows how to decide on strategies for processing

waste and for decommissioning. We also know how to carry

out the careful balancing act between criteria such as worker

dose, environmental impact, financial aspects, technical

constraints, waste storage and disposal capabilities and public

acceptance. This experience, combined with our focus on

40

client-oriented post-commissioning services, make us unique in

the industry.

From providing consulting services in specific areas to

managing entire projects, we are committed to our clients and

to doing the job right, the first time around.

BNS NUCLEAR STAND: 50/51/83/84

SERVICES

PLATINUM SPONSOR

Contact: Liz Pulford

Cambridge Road, Whetstone

Leicester, LE8 6LH

UNITED KINGDOM

Tel: +44 (0)116 201 5346

Email: liz.pulford@babcock.co.uk

www.babcock.co.uk

ong>Theong> challenge of decommissioning the UK’s civil nuclear

assets is a challenge that has been embraced by BNS Nuclear

Services. Our decommissioning business has experience in the

retrieval, processing and management of active materials on

sites across the UK and overseas, with projects ranging from

concept design to on site operations and services. Areas of

expertise include:

• Retrieval, analysis and segregation of solid waste.

• Retrieval of sludges and liquids.

• Versatile encapsulation process combining solid and

liquid wastes.

• Ion exchange and effluent management.

• Safety Case support and legislative compliance.

• Waste storage solutions.

• On-site decommissioning services.

In developing the above capabilities, BNS Nuclear Services

have drawn on our strengths in mechanical handling and


emote operations. Our background of systems integration and

equipment supply, coupled with our safety case capability and

our practical hands-on site experience, place us in a unique

position to provide a holistic and comprehensive

decommissioning and waste management service.

CH2M HILL SPONSOR ONLY

SILVER SPONSOR

Contact: www.ch2m.com

CVD NUCLEAR SOLUTIONS STAND: 6

Contact: Mr. Garry Downie

CVD Nuclear Solutions

CVD Building

Coddington Crescent

Motherwell

ML1 4YF

Tel: 0845 450 1701

Email: gdownie@cvdltd.co.uk

www.cvdltd.co.uk

As a progressive company in the field of Nuclear

Decommissioning our mission to provide highly qualified and

competent personnel ensures that the services we offer meet

and exceed the health, safety and environmental needs of the

operating organisations that we serve.

Finding safer and clearer techniques within this sector is vital

and as a consequence are proud to embed innovation at the

heart of our business model; Working closely with our partners,

we have developed specifically designed diamond cutting

segments and pioneered close loop water recycling allowing

for safe drilling into Uranium fuel cells as well as a patented

filtration system which allows for easier capture and disposal

of slurry particles within operations resulting in reduced

generation of waste. By combining best practice techniques

with our innovation capability, the potential for the creation of

new hazards from decommissioning activity will be

significantly reduced.

Our Services:

• Diamond Drilling and Cutting

• Dry Diamond Wire Sawing (>99.98% Dust Capture)

• Diamond Wire Technology for in-cell size reduction and

demolition

• Remote Controlled Robotic Demolition

• Training capability to enable mitigation and effective

management of the Socio-Economic impact of

decommissioning activity

DAHER STAND: 55

Contact: Mr. Jason Podmore

DAHER

Amberley Drive

Sinfin Lane

Sinfin

DERB

DE24 9RE

Tel: +44(0)1332 274 373

Email: j.podmore@daher.co.uk

www.daher.co.uk

ong>Theong> DAHER Group is an European integrated equipment and

services supplier, dedicated to Nuclear, Defence, Aerospace

and Automotive sectors with three principal activities;

transport, service, and manufacturing, that combined, enables

DAHER to create an integrated offering.

DAHER’s UK turnover during 2008 was c£12.7m generated

from 145 employees. Worldwide, 2008 turnover was c€609m

generated from 7,000 employees.

In the nuclear industry, DAHER undertakes design,

development, manufacturing and licensee activities to produce

handling and packaging equipment for transport and

warehousing of radioactive fuel and waste.

DAHER also offers a complete transport service within the

nuclear fuel cycle and for nuclear research centers, including

UF6, UO2, irradiated fuel assemblies and radioactive waste.

Our DAHER facility in Germany (NCS) not only has design

and manufacture capability but also a repository as part of its

portfolio.

DAHER currently supports, amongst others, Sellafield Ltd.,

UKAEA and the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK

and CEA, EDF and AREVA in France as well as GNS,

NUKEM and URENCO in Germany.

DEWDROPS STAND: 45

BRONZE SPONSOR

Contact: Dr. Albert JACOBS

219 Avenue du Marechal Leclerc

59450 Sin Le Noble

FRANCE

Tel: +33 327 904 334

Email: dewdrops@dewdrops.fr

www.dewdrops.fr

Dewdrops is an independent French company based in Sin le

Noble in the north of France, 20 minutes away from Lille and

less than an hour from Paris Charles de Gaulle airport by direct

express train. Dewdrops provides a full treatment service for

toxic waste oils and solvents with a special capacity in the

nuclear field. Our state-of-the-art patented technology enables

41


us to eliminate a wide range of mixtures of radioactive oils.

Together with a volume reduction factor of at least 20 times,

the process combines reliability and versatility with a minimal

environmental footprint. ong>Theong> proprietary mobile plant cuts out

customer investment and heritage costs and brings risks under

control. ong>Theong> nominal unit treatment capacity is 100 liters per

day with the actual production depending on the exact nature of

the liquid to be treated. Year in year out, Dewdrops devotes

more than 20% of its resources to develop constantly improved

solutions for our customers. In October 2009, as a bronze

sponsor, we will be welcoming our international customers at

our stand at the ICEM09 exhibition hall.

DIAMOND DETECTORS LTD STAND: 5

Contact: Alex Brown

16 Fleetsbridge Business Centre

Upton Road, Poole, Dorset, BH17 7AF

UNITED KINGDOM

Tel: +44 (0)1202 441031

Email: alex.brown@diamonddetectors.com

www.diamonddetectors.com

“From Concept through Design & Prototype to Manufacture”

DDL design and manufacture resilient CVD Diamond based

devices for monitoring and measuring radiation.

In 2008 BAE Systems purchased a 50% share in Diamond

Detectors Ltd (DDL) a subsidiary set up by Element Six, the

world leader in the development of Chemical Vapour

Deposition (CVD) diamond technology.

DDL’s mission is to develop a range of “resilient radiation

detectors” and packaged devices for civil nuclear applications

through research and partnership with academia and industry.

DDL’s expertise includes world class diamond processing with

surface roughness


GOLDSIM STAND: 58

TECHNOLOGY GROUP

Contact: Ian Miller

300 NE Gilman Blvd., Suite 100

Issaquah WA 98027

USA

Tel: +1 425-295-6985

Email: IMiller@GoldSim.com

www.GoldSim.com

Originally funded by the United States Department of Energy,

JAEA and ENRESA, GoldSim is a software tool that is used

worldwide for long-term safety assessment of radioactive

waste repositories and contaminated sites. GoldSim has been

used to model existing and proposed radioactive waste disposal

facilities in the US, the UK, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan,

China, France, Germany, and Spain, amongst others. GoldSim

is also widely used for other environmental applications,

ranging from municipal water resource management to mine

water quality management.

GRAVATOM STAND: 1

Gravatom Engineering Systems Limited designs, manufactures

and commissions engineering solutions worldwide. Bought by

ONET Technologies at the end of December 2008, the

acquisition enhances the range of products and services

supplied by Gravatom to the nuclear industry and adds a vast

range of remediation, decommissioning, decontamination and

new build capability and expertise build up by ONET in France

over the past 30 years.

Our UK clients include AMEC plc, AWE plc, Babcock Marine,

British Energy plc, GE Healthcare Ltd, NDA, NNL, UKAEA

plc, Varian Medical Systems Inc, VT Projects ONET are the

principal decommissioning contractor in France working for

CEA, Edf and AREVA. ONET Technology also has the unique

ability to provide front end risk assessments and safety case

studies before or in parallel with optioneering and design

schemes.

We provide support and facilitation at every stage of the

project. Our capabilities extend to:

• Feasibility Studies

• Cost Options

• Project Initiation

• Mock Up and Prototype Development

• Design and Specification

• Manufacture, Supply and Installation

• Commissioning, Qualification and Validation

• Support Services including compliance, monitoring,

training, servicing and spares.

GREIF UK LTD STAND: 11/12

Contact: Lynne Brown

Greif UK Ltd, Merseyside Works, Oil Sites Road,

Ellesmere Port, Cheshire CH65 4EZ

UNITED KINGDOM

Tel: + 44 (0) 7720 040115 / + 44 (0) 151 373 2000

Email: lynne.brown@greif.com

www.greif.com

Greif was founded in 1877 and is a world leader in industrial

packaging products and services. ong>Theong> company creates

competitive advantage for its customers through extensive

experience in steel, plastic, fibre and protective packaging for

various industries and applications. In the United Kingdom

Greif have two manufacturing facilities, specialising in the

production of mild steel, galvanised steel and stainless steel

containers with capacities ranging from 5 litres to 500 litres,

43


many of which are UN approved. Having such a diverse choice

of products and services to offer, we are able to supply

containers to many different markets which include the

chemical, nuclear and pharmaceutical industries. We offer an

extensive range of standard products along with the skills and

technology to allow us to design and develop containers to

meet our customers individual requirements.

HALLIN ROBOTICS LIMITED STAND: 42

Contact: David Arnold

Unit 10, Cross Lane Estate

Seascale, Cumbria, CA20 1EZ

UNITED KINGDOM

Tel: +44 (0)1946 729770

or

Unit E, Riccal DriveYork Road Business Park

Malton, North Yorks. YO17 6YE

UNITED KINGDOM

Tel: +44 (0)1653 697514

Email: enquiries@hallinrobotics.com

www.hallinmarine.co.uk

Hallin Robotics specialises in providing innovative and

practical remote engineering solutions for the nuclear and

offshore markets. We have built up a first-class team of

engineers who have developed a deep understanding of the

technicalities of remote engineering and decommissioning to

produce industry-leading solutions all supported by a mature

supply chain.

Hallin implements HSE Management based on OHSAS18001

and operates an ISO9001 Quality Management System. All

Remote solutions are operated by Hallin Robotics employees.

Full training can also be given to client operators to supplement

remote operations. We have rig hall space available for fullscale

test rigs, to verify functionality and assist stakeholder

management.

Hallin Robotics offers a turnkey delivery service including:

• Project Management

• Optioneering

• Risk Management

• Nuclear safety case

• Scheme design

• Detailed design

• Documentation support

• Management of manufacture and assembly

• Environment characterisation: laser scanning; ground

radar

• Installation and commissioning of remote solutions

• Operation of remote handling equipment

Commercially our team is aware of the shifting context of

delivery, the need to demonstrate value for money and the

overall balance of managing the legacies whilst reducing the

hazards to protect people and the environment.

INTERNATIONAL STAND: 69/70

NUCLEAR SERVICES

Contact: Nick Bold

Pelham House, Calderbridge,

Cumbria CA20 1DB

UNITED KINGDOM

Tel: +44 (0)1925 802656

Email: nick.m.bold@innuserv.com

www.innuserv.com

ong>Internationalong> Nuclear Services Limited (INS) is a wholly

owned subsidiary of the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority

(NDA) in the UK.INS has a dual role; as a commercial and

44

contract management agency for the NDA and as the world’s

most experienced shipper of nuclear materials internationally.

As the NDA’s commercial and contract management agent,

INS manages contracts and relationships, on behalf of the

NDA, with utility customers in the UK and overseas for

services from the Sellafield site, such as the storage and

recycling of irradiated nuclear fuel.

INS has safely transported radioactive cargoes worldwide for

over 40 years. Our subsidiary company, Pacific Nuclear

Transport Ltd is the world’s most experienced shipper of

nuclear materials with a fleet of INF3 class ships. We provide a

complete transport service to our customers, from the design of

nuclear transport packages through to transportation of nuclear

materials using our dedicated fleet of ships.

INS provides complete solutions to customers for their

irradiated nuclear fuel management and transportation needs.

We have the capability to offer our customers a range of

consultancy services, strategic assessments and feasibility

studies on irradiated fuel management. We also advise utility

customers and government agencies on their strategic and

technical options relating to the nuclear fuel cycle.

INUTEC (FORMERLY WMT) STAND: 71

Contact: Kevin Butter

B44, Winfrith, Dorchester

Dorset, DT2 8WQ

UNITED KINGDOM

Tel: +44 (0)1305 202291

Kevin.butter@wmt.co.uk

www.Inutec.co.uk

Inutec is a specialist provider of an integrated offering on

radioactive waste management services, covering the full

Waste Cycle through application of our technical expertise and

operation of unique facilities on our Licensed Site to the UK

and overseas nuclear market. Inutec has the ability for both onsite

and off-site Waste Processing and holds a unique UK

Tritium Waste Capability.

Few companies in the UK can offer similar depth and breadth

of resource and expertise or the comprehensive range of

Radioactive Waste Management capabilities. INUTEC is able

to provide a full range of services for Radioactive Waste

Management and Decommissioning, including:

• Waste Management Assessments and Consultancy

• Waste Sampling and Characterisation

• Advanced Waste Treatment Processes

• Recycling, Recovery and Recategorisation (e.g.

Detritiation)

• Waste Packaging and Immobilisation

• Impact and Fire Testing of Transport Packages

• Radioactive Materials Transport

• Analytical and Radiochemistry

• Waste Management Plant Optimisation, Design Review

and Validation

Inutec has wide experience of the UK regulatory requirements

for both plant and processes, including the NDA LoC process,

specifications and disposal concepts, the safety requirements

for a nuclear licensed site and environmental regulation and

legislation.


JFIMS & JFN STAND: 67

Contact: JFIMS JFN

Alan Lewis Steve Tulk

Factory Road Ennerdale Mill

Sandycroft Egremont

Deeside Cumbria

Flintshire, CH5 2QJ CA22 2PN

UNITED KINGDOM UNITED KINGDOM

Tel:+44 (0)1244 520058 Tel: +44 (0)1946 823502

Contact@JFIMS.co.uk Contact@JFNL.co.uk

www.jfims.co.uk www.jfnuclear.co.uk

James Fisher Inspection and Measurement Services Limited

(JFIMS) provides inspection and measurement capabilities for

the nuclear, defence, homeland security, aerospace, offshore

and other industries. ong>Theong> core business of JFIMS is the

measurement and application of radiation. In partnership with

international market leaders the company offers a range of

products and services addressing radiation measurement,

radiological protection, non destructive testing (NDT) and

industrial radiography.

JFIMS aims to deliver products and services to a high standard

and lays great emphasis on the importance of safety, quality

and the impact of the Company’s operations on the

environment.

JFN provides remote handling, engineering, design, trialling,

training, development and plant characterisation services, to

nuclear and industrial clients operating in challenging

environments. JFN focuses on delivering robust, reliable,

maintainable and above all cost-effective solutions for working

in hostile and harsh environments whilst taking care to operate

in a safe and environmentally friendly manner and meet

customers quality requirements

With over 20 years experience working with robotic arms,

manipulators and ROVs, JFN have the experience to tackle

almost any remote handling challenge including the

deployment of our plant characterisation tools into tough and

unfriendly surroundings.

JORDAN NUCLEAR STAND: 68

Contact: Rod Fretwell, Business Development Manager

Kelton House

Westlakes

Cumbria, CA24 3HX

UNITED KINGDOM

Tel: +44 01946 591915

Email: info@jordannuclear.co.uk

www.jordannuclear.co.uk

‘Excellence in the safe reliable delivery of nuclear engineering’

Jordan Nuclear is a well established business offering its

clients ‘total capability’ multi-discipline, nuclear and process

engineering services. We are equipped to handle asset

management and support, new build, refurbishment and

decommissioning services utilising our highly skilled and

experienced teams.

For over 40 years we have developed working relationships

with all of the UK’s atomic and nuclear agencies plus many

leading construction, engineering and manufacturing

companies.

LLW REPOSITORY LTD STAND: 74/75

Contact: Martin Walkingshaw

Greengarth Business Centre, Glengdale Court

Holmrook, Cumbria, CA19 1UL

UNITED KINGDOM

Tel: +44 (0) 19467 22263

Email: martin.walkingshaw@llwrsite.com

www.llwrsite.com

LLW Repository Ltd is the site licence company responsible

for the operation and future development of the UK National

Low Level Waste Repository, located near the village of Drigg

in West Cumbria.

LLW Repository Ltd provides a range of services for waste

producers in many sectors, ranging from defence to healthcare.

Our primary services include:

• Disposal of compactable and non-compactable solid Low

Level radioactive waste, (LLW).

• Treatment of LLW prior to final disposal (including

supercompaction, thermal treatment and metallic waste

recycling).

• Provision of approved LLW transport and disposal

containers for national and international use.

• Advice and guidance on all aspects of waste

characterisation, forecasting, packaging and transport

• Decision Support – participation at all levels in waste

management options studies and assessments

In addition, LLW Repository Ltd is proud to be working in

partnership with the UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority

(NDA) to develop and implement an integrated strategy for the

management of Low Level Radioactive Waste across the UK.

LOKRING TECHNOLOGY LLC STAND: 10

Contact: Martin Parker

Lokring Europe Ltd

Monument Crescent

Shawfarm Industrial Estate

Prestwick

Scotland

KA9 2RQ

Tel: (44) 1292 678866

Email: mparker@lokring.com

www.lokring.com

ong>Theong> shortage of skilled labour, in particular pipe welding

ability, and the need to minimise exposure of personnel to

radioactive environments, are two practical constraints faced

by the Nuclear Industry. Lokring Technology LLC provides a

cost effective solution to these issues.

Lokring eliminates hot work issues by utilising patented Elastic

Strain Preload technology. Lokring produces permanent,

leak free, weld equivalent pipe connections, in a fraction of the

time required for welding, without the need for highly skilled

personnel. A three point visual inspection confirms correct

installation, eliminating the need for X-rays or other expensive

NDT methods.

Additional Benefits of Lokring include the elimination of

airborne contamination due to welding, no need to dry systems

prior to installation, lower overall cost and faster project

completion times.

Lokring Stainless and Carbon Steel Connectors are qualified to

ASME B31.1/B31.3 Pressure Piping Codes, with a history of

over 30 years use in the process industries, Lokring is used

extensively on Nuclear Power Stations and Processing facilities

in the UK, North America, Scandinavia and other countries.

Approved by the UK Ministry of Defence, Lokring are

45


currently used in the construction of the UK Nuclear

Submarines Programme.

Please attend our stand for a demonstration.

MECH-TOOL

ENGINEERING LTD STAND: 38

Contact: Phil Dunn

Mech-Tool House, Whessoe Road

Darlington, Co Durham, DL3 0QT

UNITED KINGDOM

Tel: +44 (0)1325 355141

Email: sales@mechtool.co.uk

www.mechtool.co.uk

Mech-Tool Engineering is a successful global supplier of

Packaged Equipment Modules, Industrial Noise Control

Products and Passive Fire & Explosion Protection Solutions.

We provide a complete design, project management and supply

service for:

• Packaged Equipment Modules

• Acoustic Noise Control and Mitigation

• Fire and Blast Protection

Capabilities

• In-house design and engineering capability

• State of the art 3D engineering

• Lloyds/DNV certified fire resistance to J60/H120 and

blast up to 4 bar

Products & Services

ong>Theong> company offers an extensive range of specialist products

and services including:

• Modules & Enclosures

46

• Purpose designed for specified explosion, fire, seismic

and acoustic performance

• Venting Systems

Rapid opening times on reaching trigger point

Pressure and temperature sensitive options available

• METLAG System

All metallic thermal insulation for RPV’s, SG’s,

pressurisers, pumps, primary and auxiliary pipework

• Re-Fuelling Pond Liners

Factory built modular sections, assembled on site to

provide integral shuttering for structural concrete pour

• Industrial Noise Control

Rotating machinery and power plant including turbines,

generators, compressors etc

NAC INTERNATIONAL STAND: 25

Contact: Juan C. Subiry

3930 East Jones Bridge Rd.

Norcross GA 30092

USA

Tel: +1 678 328-1282

Email: jsubiry@nacintl.com

www.nacintl.com

NAC ong>Internationalong> (NAC) is an industry-leading provider of

engineering and nuclear fuel management solutions for nuclear

facility operators, fuel cycle companies and government

agencies. ong>Theong> company offers a proven process for the design,

licensing and deployment of innovative technologies to store,

transport and manage nuclear materials, including waste and

spent fuel. In 2009, NAC received the U.S. NRC Certificate of

Compliance for the MAGNASTOR System dry storage

technology, offering spent fuel storage capacity and operational

advantages superior to those of any other concrete, canister-


ased system. Our professional staff possesses unsurpassed

industry knowledge and experience, necessary for today’s

demanding requirements for nuclear project management and

performance. NAC is also a leading provider of nuclear spent

fuel transportation services and operates a commercial fleet of

spent fuel transport casks.

In addition, NAC’s Consulting division continuously serves the

world’s most prestigious nuclear organizations in providing

impartial evaluation, consulting and training services in all

technical and business aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle. No

matter how complex the nuclear market may become, NAC’s

specialized consultants will be there to provide well-informed

analysis. NAC’s unique reputation for customer-centric service

is reinforced by its diverse customer portfolio of the world’s

leading nuclear organizations.

NATIONAL NUCLEAR STAND: 46/47

LABORATORY (NNL)

ong>Theong> UK’s National Nuclear Laboratory provides an extensive

and integrated range of technology services and solutions based

on a powerful combination of knowledge, experience and

unique facilities.

Our technology services underpin the full life cycle of nuclear

facility decommissioning. ong>Theong>y are based on over 40 years

experience and knowledge of legacy wastes found on nuclear

sites. Key services include: strategy development; waste

sampling and characterisation; waste retrieval; wasteforms and

waste processes.

ong>Theong>se services are supported by a broader offering of products

and services across the nuclear fuel cycle:

• Homeland Security and Non-Proliferation

• Nuclear Science

• Waste and Residue Management

• Plant Process Support

• Materials, Corrosion and Nuclear Chemistry

• Environmental Management

• Specialist Analytical Services

NIS LTD STAND: 53

Contact: Phil Monks

Ackhurst Road, Chorley

Lancashire, PR7 1NH

UNITED KINGDOM

Tel: +44 (0)1257 265656

Email: sales@nisltd.com

www.nisltd.com

Providing professional engineered solutions to complex

challenges demands a broad and diverse range of capabilities.

At NIS we are proud to offer a comprehensive range of

services that provide customers with the flexibility they need to

bring value to their projects, whatever the size, and at whatever

stage of maturity.

From front end definition and engineering consulting services,

through detailed design, in-house manufacture, installation and

commissioning, NIS bring a wealth of knowledge and

experience to assist in turning your concept into reality.

With an ingrained culture of Safety and Innovation, NIS

delivers across a wide range of markets, including the Nuclear,

Industrial, Security, Aerospace and Food sectors. This broad

industry presence provides excellent opportunities for

technology transfer, particularly in our specialist field of

equipment integration and automation.

Our custom built facilities in the North West of England are

complemented by a number of strategically placed customer

facing premises and further enhanced by additional

manufacturing capability in NIS China.

47


48

Dedicated procurement specialists ensure access to a global

supply chain, optimising value for money whilst maintaining

the highest levels of quality assurance through an ongoing

process of supply chain evaluation and management.

NSG ENVIRONMENTAL LTD STAND: 52

SILVER SPONSOR

Contact: James Rudd

Scientia House, Western Avenue

Matrix Park, Chorley, PR7 7NB

UNITED KINGDOM

Tel: +44 (0) 1772 458818

Email: sales@nsgltd.com

www.nsgltd.com

NSG Environmental Ltd has been providing Decommissioning

and Waste Management Services to the UK civil and defence

nuclear installations for more than 25 years. Our team is made

up of experienced scientists, engineers and decommissioning

operatives with many years’ experience of working in the

nuclear industry.

NSG has successfully completed projects on many of the UK’s

nuclear facilities, working with asset owners including

Sellafield, AWE, Magnox, and UKAEA, in radiological

conditions ranging from C2 to C4 and R2 to R4.

Our Site Operations Teams provide the following services:

• Installation

• Refurbishment and asset support

• Decommissioning

• Plant operations

• Radiological protection services

• Land remediation

Our Technical Services department specialise in the provision

of development programmes that support the nuclear

decommissioning and waste management industry. We have


assembled a team whose guiding principle is to find practical

and “fit for purpose” solutions that acknowledge existing

technologies, whilst pushing the boundaries of innovation.

We provide the following services:

• Test rig design and operation

• Technical consultancy

• Waste retrieval and processing

• Laboratory services

• Waste simulation

NUCLEAR FILTER STAND: 59

TECHNOLOGY

Contact: Terry Wickland, President

741 Corporate Circle

Suite R, Golden, Colorado 80401

USA

Tel: +1 303 384 9785

Email: terry@nucfil.com

www.nucfil.com

Nuclear Filter Technology (NucFil) is a small, minority-owned

business dedicated to providing packaging, shielding and

characterization technologies for transport, ventilation, storage

and disposal of radioactive and mixed waste. NucFil has

provided nuclear grade products and services to Department of

Energy weapons-complex sites since 1986, utilizing a

specialized staff of scientists and engineers who design,

fabricate, and test all products to meet quality requirements of

ANSI/AMSE Nuclear Quality Assurance-1 (NQA-1). NucFil

has well established Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H)

and Quality programs in place.

NucFil’s capabilities and experience include design,

fabrication, testing and certification of nuclear grade products

such as:

• Nuclear Material Storage Containers

• Radioactive Waste Bags

• Mobile Gas Analytical Equipment

• Drum Vent Filters

• Mobile Drum Venting Systems

• Remote Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Drum Venting

Equipment

• Non-sparking dart filters/sample ports

• Finite Element Analysis

• Sampling Tubes for Uranium Hexafluoride

NUCLEAR INDUSTRY STAND: 79

ASSOCIATION (NIA)

Contact: Amanda MacMillan

Carlton House, 22a St James’s Square

London SW1Y 4JH

UNITED KINGDOM

Email: Amanda.macmillan@niauk.org

www.niauk.org

ong>Theong> Nuclear Industry Association (NIA) is the trade association

and representative voice of Britain’s civil nuclear industry. It

represents more than 170 companies and some 40,000 UK

nuclear workers, including the operators of the nuclear power

stations, those engaged in decommissioning, waste

management, nuclear liabilities management and all aspects of

the nuclear fuel cycle. It also represents nuclear equipment

suppliers, engineering and construction firms, nuclear research

organisations, and legal, financial and consultancy companies.

ong>Theong> NIA supports a diverse energy mix for the UK including

clean coal, gas, renewables and nuclear.

NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGIES STAND: 23

Contact: Mrs. Agnes Ross

Sinclair Building

Janetstown, Thurso, KW14 7XF

UNITED KINGDOM

Tel: +44 01847 805070

Email: agnes.ross@nuclear.co.uk

www.nuclear.co.uk

Nuclear Technologies is a leading supplier of professional

scientific and engineering consultancy to the UK nuclear

industry specialising in:

• Environment and Radioactive Waste

• Safety and Radiation Physics

• Decommissioning Projects and Engineering

ong>Theong> company, founded in 1994, is firmly established as a

premier nuclear supplier with over 100 Consultants and a

turnover of £6.3m in 2008.

Nuclear Technologies was acquired by TÜV SÜD (UK) Ltd in

August 2006 providing us with international expertise from this

major German regulator. TÜV SÜD Industry Services division

supplies engineering, testing and inspection services for

manufacturers/operators of process-engineering plants,

buildings and infrastructural facilities.

Many of our Consultants are internationally recognised experts

with outstanding records of achievement in the nuclear industry

through previous employment in major nuclear companies,

providing the company with valuable hands-on experience of

facilities and operations on the main British nuclear sites.

Nuclear Technologies has a forward looking approach to

business allowing us to encompass the evolving needs of the

UK nuclear industry. This is further underpinned by an

enthusiastic staff development programme ensuring we have a

range of staff at varying levels and can deploy high calibre

senior staff, supported by well motivated junior consultants to

ensure an overall competitive service.

NUKEM STAND: 24/27

TECHNOLOGIES GMBH

Contact: Beate Scheffler

Industriestr. 13, 63755

Alzenau

GERMANY

Tel: +49 6023 911147

Email: beate.scheffler@nukem.de

www.nukemgroup.com

NUKEM Technologies GmbH is a leading service provider for

the nuclear industry world-wide. Main business activities

include the management of radioactive waste,

decommissioning, and engineering.

ong>Theong> company’s waste management program comprises a broad

spectrum of services ranging from the development, delivery

and operation of radioactive waste treatment systems (e.g.

sorting stations, evaporation, cementing and incineration

systems, high-pressure compactors, etc.) to the construction of

complete waste treatment centers.

NUKEM’s long-standing experience and successful projects

like the decommissioning and dismantling of the Kahl Nuclear

Power Test Plant in Germany underline the company’s role as

perfect partner for all decommissioning tasks.

ong>Theong> Group`s Engineering and Consulting services play an

important role in contributing to innovative design and build.

In particular, NUKEM possesses the technology leadership in

HTR fuel technology.

49


Consistent customer orientation and quality management are

essential cornerstones of NUKEM’s corporate philosophy. ong>Theong>

company places a high premium on individualized service,

timely project completion, complete and understandable

documentation and providing its customers with superiorquality

products.

NUVIA LIMITED STAND: 43/44

SILVER SPONSOR

Contact: Judith Horsley

Kelburn Court, Daten Park, Risley,

Warrington, WA3 6TW

UNITED KINGDOM

Tel: +44 (0) 1925 858 200

Email: info@nuvia.co.uk

www.nuvia.co.uk

Nuvia brings together the nuclear experience and expertise of

Nuvia Limited in the UK and the five companies that form

Nuvia France: NTS, Salvarem, Mecatiss, Millennium, and

Essor. Together the 1500 staff generate a turnover of more than

200 M€ per annum.

Nuvia is one of five businesses that form Soletanche

Freyssinet. With over 20,000 staff and a turnover in excess of

2,5 B€, Soletanche Freyssinet is a world leader in specialised

civil and geotechnical engineering and has a long history of

involvement in the nuclear industry through worldwide use of

its advanced engineering and specialist products.

Soletanche Freyssinet is a wholly owned subsidiary of VINCI,

the world’s largest integrated concessions and construction

group.

ong>Theong> Nuvia Group has five core activities: new build, plant life

extension, radiation safety services, decommissioning and

waste management. At a more detailed level the Company’s

capabilities range from front-end consultancy through design

and build to operation and final liabilities management.

Nuvia Limited’s breadth and depth of experience is enhanced

by an understanding of international best practice developed

through global operations and has resulted in the Company’s

proven ability to deliver practical and cost-effective solutions

to the most demanding problems faced by the nuclear industry

today.

ORTEC STAND: 31

Contact: Trevor Hatt

Advanced Measurement Technology

Spectrum House, 1 Millars Business Centre

Fishponds Close, Wokingham. RG41 2TZ

UNITED KINGDOM

Tel: +44 (0)118 936 1210

Email: ortec.uksales@ametek.co.uk

www.ortec-online.com

ORTEC is a global supplier and world leader in the

development and manufacture of nuclear and radiological

detection instrumentation, specialising in high-resolution

gamma-ray spectrometer systems, based on High Purity

Germanium (HPGe) detectors, as well as a wide range of other

detection technologies for gamma and neutron, and charged

particle detection. HPGe detectors are widely recognised as the

best detection technology for positively identifying

radionuclides.

ong>Theong> ORTEC product line of over 1600 products includes

instruments and systems for nuclear power plant and

government nuclear facility operations, waste assay, special

nuclear materials safeguards, search and identify operations,

and chemical weapons identification.

50

ORTEC continues to lead the industry in innovative techniques

and equipment to perform the most rigorous of measurements.

Specifically for site characterisation measurements and the

quantification of specific activities in and on surfaces such as

walls, floors and in soils, the ORTEC ISO-CART and ISOPlus

software, provides a complete solution for a variety of needs.

In conjunction with a portable, HPGe spectrometer (TRANS-

SPEC) it is possible to undertake extensive measurements in

the field. Also available is the lightweight, rugged digiDART

specifically designed for use in-situ. ong>Theong> digiDART can be

used with HPGe, Lanthanum Bromide or NaI detector

technology.

OXFORD TECHNOLOGIES LTD STAND: 20

Contact: Stephen Sanders

7 Nuffield Way

Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 1RJ

UNITED KINGDOM

Tel: +44(0)1235 522119

Email: stephen.sanders@oxfordtechnologies.co.uk

www.oxfordtechnologies.co.uk

Staff at Oxford Technologies Ltd have been delivering creative

solutions to challenging engineering problems in hostile

environments for over 15 years.

ong>Theong> company was formed by the team of engineers and

operators who developed and operated the remote handling

facilities for the maintenance of JET, the world largest nuclear

fusion machine. This team grew and went onto develop remote

maintenance concepts for some of the worlds most challenging

nuclear projects including the multi-billion euro ITER fusion

machine, the nuclear transmutation device MYRRA (SCK-

CEN), Dounreay Shaft & Silo decommissioning (D3200) and

many more.

Today we provide a wide range of professional engineering

services for clients engaged in manipulation of plant in hostile

environments. Our deep experience in manipulator and tooling

technologies and remote operations implementation provides

the platform to deliver cost effective and fit-for-purpose

solutions to our clients.

Our track record for client satisfaction is second to none and is

evidenced by our exceptional record of winning projects from

returning customers.

Our unique experience has recently taken us into space, where

we are working with some of the biggest players in this field to

design remote systems for the European EXOMARS project.

Oxford Technologies provides innovative solutions based on

sound experience.

More information about Oxford Technologies services can be

found on our website at www.oxfordtechnologies.co.uk

PACTEC, INC. STAND: 72

BRONZE SPONSOR

Contact: Stuart Bowe Wendall Reeves

PacTec, Inc. UK Mike Sanchez

ong>Theong> Gate House PacTec, Inc. USA

Calder Abby P.O. Box 8069

Calderbridge, Cumbria Clinton, LA 70722

CA20 1DZ Tel: +1800-272-2832

Tel: +44 07775 895 818 wendallreeves@pactecinc.com

stuartbowe@pactecinc.com mikesanchez@pactecinc.com

www.pactecinc.com

PacTec, Inc. has over 20 years experience in the quality

manufacturing of soft sided containers/packaging for the

radioactive waste, and hazardous waste industries. PacTec

specializes in providing custom designed products for our


demanding clients, and we also offer a wide range of project

proven standard items for your immediate needs. Our client list

includes URS/Washington Division, Energy Solutions, CH2M

Hill, and Bechtel Jacobs. Our products have been used on

several DOE sites across the US; Idaho National Labs, Oak

Ridge, Hanford, Rocky Flats, Fernald, and Los Alamos. We

also work with commercial nuclear sites providing containers

and packaging for Entergy Nuclear, Cameco Corporation,

Duke Energy, and Exelon.

Our product line includes IP-1 and IP-2 lift bag containers,

LSA and SCO wraps, rail car liners and tarps, disposable

polyethylene container liners, tarpaulins and accessories, spill

containment berms, dewatering filters and liners, specialized

waste bags, known as bladder or vacuum bags, and

soil/remediation covers. We stock a large inventory of products

for immediate shipping, and we also provide quick turn around

for our custom engineered and designed products. Contact our

UK sales director Stuart Bowe at 07775 895 818 or call

Wendall Reeves or Mike Sanchez at our US office at 800-272-

2832. www.pactecinc.com

PAR SYSTEMS, INC. STAND: 19

Contact: Karen Knoblock

707 County Road E. West

Shoreview, MN 55126-7007

USA

Tel: +1 651 528 5275

Fax: +1 651 483 2689

Email: kknoblock@par.com

www.par.com

PaR Systems is a leader in the design, manufacture and

installation of large scale systems for nuclear and

decommissioning markets throughout the world. PaR provides

systems for size reduction and hazardous material handling.

Products for hazardous environments include telerobotic

manipulators, powered manipulators, robotic systems and

transporters, including in-cell cranes.

Since 1961 PaR Systems has been providing specialized

material handling and automation equipment to many diverse

industries, including aerospace, defense, Department of

Energy, food and beverage, government, hazardous material

management, industrial manufacturing, life sciences, marine,

semi-conductor, and other specialized markets.

PaR has focused on the application of large scale, as well as

small and precise, high-accuracy, robotic and material handling

equipment and systems solutions for critical customer

applications. PaR Systems’ experience began with the

development of manipulator systems when the growth of the

nuclear industry created a demand for remote handling

equipment. Since then PaR has evolved this technology for

robotics across a variety of market segments, increasing its

expertise to provide equipment for a variety of specialized

applications, building on the automation capability developed

across a wide range of demanding commercial, government

and defense segments.

PROJECT TIME & COST UK STAND: 62

LTD/PROJECT TIME & COST INC

Contact: PT&C UK Ltd PT&C Inc

J. Michael Devine Andrew Reape

Westlakes Science & 2727 Paces Ferry Road,

Technology Park Atlanta, GA 30339

Innovation Centre, USA

Moor Row Tel: +1 770.444.9799

Cumbria CA24 3TP Email:

UNITED KINGDOM andy.reape@ptcinc.com

Tel: +44 (0) 1946 693144 www.ptcinc.com

Email: mike.devine@ptcinc.com

www.ptcinc.com

Project Time & Cost is the leading provider of professional,

independent, total cost engineering, project and program

management, and risk analysis services to both the public and

private industry sectors. Our effective application of best

practice cost engineering methodologies has been proven to be

the key to achieving project success. We can help deliver your

project on time and within budge.

With more than 27 years of experience, PT&C and PT&C UK

are committed to providing every client ong>Theong> Right

Answer...Right Now ® .

REMEDI8 STAND: 54

Contact: David Lewis

Scientia House, Western Avenue

Matrix Park, Chorley, PR7 7NB

UNITED KINGDOM

Tel: +44 (0) 7970700894

Email: sales@nsgltd.com

www.nsgltd.com

ong>Theong> Remedi8 alliance consists of a team made up of seven

Companies who together are experienced in delivering multi

disciplined decommissioning projects. Remedi8 recognises the

importance of Customer involvement throughout the project

lifecycle and one of our underlying principles is Client

involvement from start to finish on each project. With this in

mind, we work to form an integrated team with the Customer

who in turn, becomes the eighth member of the Project Team -

completing the Remedi8 alliance.

ong>Theong> Remedi8 alliance has a wealth of knowledge in the

decommissioning of contaminated facilities on the majority of

51


UK Nuclear Licensed Sites. Having experience as a Team on

previous projects working in radiological contaminated areas

ranging from C2/C4 and R2/R4, Remedi8 is well placed to

respond and adapt to both client and site requirements.

ong>Theong> key feature of our team is that we are solely focused on

decommissioning projects which brings benefit to our clients

by the transfer of knowledge and techniques from previous

projects.

Remedi8 have a clear understanding of the complex

requirements for decommissioning which enables us to develop

fit for purpose, cost effective and timely decommissioning life

cycle solutions.

S.A. ROBOTICS LTD STAND: 22

Contact: Christopher Woodhead

Whitehaven Commercial Park, Moresby Parks

Whitehaven, Cumbria, CA28 8YD

UNITED KINGDOM

Tel: +44 (0)1946 66680

Email: ukinfo@sarobotics.com

www.sarobotics.com

S.A. Robotics is an advanced technology and engineering

company. We design, build, test, and deploy an array of remote

handling, robotic, and containment systems and equipment in

use throughout the nuclear industry.

S.A. Robotics’ innovative systems and equipment are deployed

in some of the world’s most hazardous environments. We

specialise in a concept-to-creation fast-track delivery of remote

and robotic arms and manipulators, specialty tooling,

hazardous and radioactive containment structures, gloveboxes,

and waste handling and packaging systems.

SELLAFIELD LTD STAND: 65/66

Contact: Joanne Gavin

Email: joanne.gavin@sellafieldsites.com

www.sellafieldsites.com

Sellafield Ltd has two sites – Sellafield in West Cumbria and

Capenhurst in Cheshire.

Across our business we are carrying out some of the most

innovative and complex nuclear activities in the world.

Our site at Sellafield is spread across 6 square miles and is

home to more than 1,000 facilities, all performing a wide range

of tasks. ong>Theong>se include decommissioning the UK’s nuclear

legacy as well fuel recycling, manufacturing and the

management of low, high and intermediate level nuclear waste.

At Capenhurst, we are due to become the UK’s first nuclear

site to complete its decommissioning and clean-up programme

- and on the way has delivered the biggest demolition projects

ever undertaken in the UK nuclear industry. Our management

of the final stages of decommissioning offers other sites an

insight into the challenges they will face and provides a

blueprint for success.

STUDSVIK STAND: 34/35

Contact: Amanda Astrop

Unit 14, Princes Park, 4th Avenue,

Team Valley Trading Estate

Gateshead, Tyne and Wear, NE11 0NF

UNITED KINGDOM

Tel: +44 (0) 191 482 1744

Email: sales@studsvik.co.uk

www.studsvik.com

Studsvik offers a range of advanced technical services to the

international nuclear power industry in such areas as waste

52

treatment, decommissioning, engineering & services, and

operating efficiency. ong>Theong> company has 60 years experience of

nuclear technology and radiological services. Studsvik is a

leading supplier on a rapidly expanding market.

Studsvik offer specialist services to the international nuclear

power industry in four main areas:

Waste Treatment

• Processing of radioactive waste

• On-site waste services

• Transport logistics

• Waste management consulting services

• Health physics services

Decommissioning

• Decommissioning services

• On-site waste services

Operating Efficiency

• Fuel and Management performance

• Materials integrity and water chemistry

• Nuclear fuel analysis software

• Transport logistics

Service and Maintenance

• Operational and outage support

• Health physics services

• On-site waste services

Studsvik has 1,100 employees in 8 countries and the

company’s shares are listed on the NASDAQ OMX

Stockholm. Following a successful entry into the UK market in

2005, Studsvik have recently developed the Studsvik Metal

Recycling Facility. This is the first new nuclear licensed site to

be brought into operation in the UK in over 20 years. Low

level radioactive waste metal will be processed at the facility

by size reduction and shot-blasting.

TESSELLA STAND: 30

Contact: Shuaib Akhtar

26 ong>Theong> Quadrant, Abingdon Science Park, Abingdon

Oxfordshire, OX14 3YS

UNITED KINGDOM

Tel: +44 (0) 1235 555511

Email: info@tessella.com

www.tessella.com

Delivering innovative IT solutions to leaders in the nuclear and

other highly regulated industries

Tessella delivers innovative IT solutions to leaders in the

nuclear industry. Our quality processes consistently achieve

results, and are proven against the demanding regulatory

standards in several sectors. We draw on methods from a

variety of industries to enable our clients to achieve a vast

range of objectives, e.g. condition monitoring based on military

radar techniques enabled improvement in operations and

maintenance at a high level waste processing facility, and work

with UK national archives could preserve the digital legacy of

the industry for future decommissioning requirements. Tessella

has over 28 years of industry experience; starting at UKAEA

Harwell, still a client today.

UKAEA STAND: 33

Contact: ong>Theong> Manor Court, Harwell

Oxfordshire, OX11 0RN

UNITED KINGDOM

Tel: +44 (0)1235 431810

Email: info@ukaea.co.uk

www.ukaea.co.uk

UKAEA Ltd has extensive experience in nuclear site

management and operations, decommissioning and waste


management, and technical consultancy. Through projects

spanning the nuclear lifecycle, UKAEA Ltd provides industryleading

technical, design, engineering, safety, and programme /

project management services, both for UK clients and around

the world. Our unrivalled expertise ensures our solutions are

delivered safely, on time and within budget.

UKAEA Ltd’s track record over the years of operating nuclear

sites, fully decommissioning 15 reactors, obtaining over 100

Letters of Compliance, ensuring regulatory compliance and

managing stakeholder relations speaks for itself, as does our

excellent safety record

We work in partnership with our customers, gaining a clear

understanding of their specific requirements, to ensure that we

provide a tailored solution to achieve their unique key

objectives. ong>Theong>se fit-for-purpose solutions eliminate

unnecessary expenditure; ensure regulatory compliance and are

delivered safely, on time and to cost.

UNITECH STAND:37

Contact: www.unitech.ws

UniTech Services Group (UniTech) is the nuclear services

subsidiary of UniFirst Corporation. Founded in Springfield,

Massachusetts in 1957, UniTech has grown to more than 500

employees in 11 licensed facilities throughout the United

States, Canada and Europe. UniTech’s management team

features individuals with a diverse range of education, training

and skills. Collectively, UniTech management boasts over 200

years of nuclear/protective wear laundry experience. UniClean,

a division of UniFirst Corporation, is a full service cleanroom

laundry provider specializing in garment rental and processing.

URS CORPORATION STAND: 60/61

PLATINUM SPONSOR

Contact: www.urscorp.com

URS Corporation is a leading provider of engineering,

construction and technical services around the world.

Headquartered in San Francisco, the company operates in 34

countries with approximately 47,000 employees providing

services to federal, state and local governmental agencies as

well as private clients in the Energy, Industrial and

Infrastructure sectors.

ong>Theong> Washington Division of URS Corp has particular

expertise in environmental management and operation of

nuclear facilities on behalf of the United States government

and is the market leader in nuclear waste management, disposal

and clean-up.

It has the best overall safety record in the US nuclear industry

and since 1999 has brought this track record and capability to

nuclear waste programmes in the UK.

Washington Division leads the two consortia: UK Nuclear

Waste Management Ltd, and Nuclear Management Partners

Ltd which were successful in winning the management and

operations contracts with the UK Nuclear Decommissioning

Authority for the Low Level Waste Repository and Sellafield

Sites respectively.

VENN ENGINEERING STAND: 18

SERVICES LTD

Contact: Nick Meek

Venn House, Stonehouse Park, Sperry Way

Stonehouse, GL10 3UT

UNITED KINGDOM

Tel: +44 (0)1453 820 170

Email: nick.meek@vennengineering.com

www.vennengineering.com

Venn Engineering Services is a consultancy organisation who

provide support to Nuclear and other industries. Venn were

founded in 2006 and have enjoyed consistent growth ever

since. We have steadily expanded our customer base and have

successfully delivered projects across the UK Nuclear Arena

and in Eastern Europe and Japan. Venn have a commitment to

excellence in everything we do. We can provide our customers

with a level of responsiveness only achievable within a small

company and a depth of knowledge, experience and

underpinning that you would normally expect from a large

organisation.

Venn have capabilities in Decommissioning Planning, Waste

and Decommissioning Strategy Optimisation, Waste and

Decommissioning Technical Development, Project

Development, Project and Programme Management, Site

Inventory Production, Safety Case Support, Environmental

Management Consulting and all aspects of Risk Management.

53


ong>Theong> services provided by Venn are deployed as bespoke

consultancy projects and as customer resource enhancement.

Venn are accredited to ISO 9001 Quality and ISO 14001

Environment and are corporate members of the Association for

Project Management APM.

VT GROUP STAND: 3/4

SILVER SPONSOR

Contact: Michael McLoughlin

VT Group

100 Daresbury Park, Warrington,

Cheshire, WA4 4HS

UNITED KINGDOM

Tel: +44 (0) 1928 705000

Email: nuclearservices@vtplc.com

www.vtnuclearservices.co.uk

VT Group is a UK engineering-based support services

company employing more than 12,000 people with turnover of

£1bn. VT’s nuclear business was created through the

acquisition of British Nuclear Group Project Services, a

subsidiary of British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL).

As a former BNFL company, VT’s nuclear business has

extensive experience in the international nuclear sector gained

over a 40 year history. With a strong base of highly skilled and

experienced technical and engineering staff that also include

leading experts, VT has an enviable track record of delivering

nuclear clean-up and environmental solutions, particularly

across Western and Eastern Europe including the UK, France

and Bulgaria.

VT’s decommissioning and waste management capabilities are

extensive and include clean-up strategy, project management,

nuclear waste solutions (exempt/VLLW/LLW/ILW)

environmental consulting, sample analysis and waste

characterization.

56

In addition, VT’s radiometric services and instrumentation

capabilities provide a range of specialist services for the

detection and characterization of radioactive material that have

been deployed at many nuclear facilities around the world

including the Europe, USA, China and Japan.

Specific applications include nuclear material assay,

measurement and characterization, waste management and

spent nuclear fuel measurements all using world leading

detection technologies.

WESTINGHOUSE STAND: 63/64

ELECTRIC COMPANY

SILVER SPONSOR

Contact: John Merrell

Westinghouse Electric Company UK Limited.

Unit 5 - Albert Edward House,

ong>Theong> Pavillons, Ashton, Preston, PR2 2YB

UNITED KINGDOM

Tel: +44 (0)1772 842 092

Email: Merreljp@westinghouse.com

www.westinghousenuclear.com

Westinghouse Electric Company has a long and distinguished

history in the nuclear industry worldwide. ong>Theong> company

provides fuel, services, technology, plant design, and

equipment for the commercial nuclear electric power industry.

Westinghouse provides comprehensive integrated services and

solutions to the D&D and Waste Management industry. We

have acquired extensive experience in the dismantling of

nuclear installations from uranium mill plants to nuclear power

plants. Westinghouse also provides state-of-the art solutions for

the treatment and handling of radioactive waste. Westinghouse

offers proven solutions for the storage of low, intermediate and

high level waste.


WORLEYPARSONS STAND: 56/57

Contact: Mark Liddiard

Earlsgate House, 35 St Ninians Road

Stirling, FK8 2HE

UNITED KINGDOM

Tel: +44 1786 477320

Email: mark.liddiard@worleyparsons.com

www.worleyparsons.com

WorleyParsons is a globally recognised engineering

organisation with significant projects in power (including

nuclear), mining & minerals and oil & hydrocarbons. Our team

is 31,700 strong in 114 offices over 37 countries. We are

recognised for our commitment to health and safety and to the

environment through our HSE Framework OneWay. We

have opened an office in Stirling, Scotland devoted to the

provision of nuclear environmental services to the UK nuclear

industry. This complements the non-nuclear environmental

services offered by our other UK offices in Bristol, Leeds and

London. Polestar GB is a subsidiary of WorleyParsons

specialising in nuclear facility operations, deactivation and

decommissioning, safeguards and security which increases our

range of services to the nuclear decommissioning and new

build sectors.

SELECTED SERVICES

• Environmental radioactivity consultancy

• Conventional and Radioactively contaminated land

characterization and remediation

• Risk assessments and dose assessments

• Radioactive and non-radioactive waste management

• Radiometric surveys including NORM measurement

• Environmental Impact Assessments

• Marine modelling

• Deactivation and Decommissioning

• Radiological engineering and shielding

We also like to thank the following

companies for sponsoring

the following events at the

ICEM’09 ong>Conferenceong>.

~ Platinum Sponsors ~

BNS NUCLEAR SERVICES

Host of the Golf Simulator

URS CORPORATION

Host of the Monday Luncheon

~ Gold Sponsors ~

AMEC — Host of the Tuesday Luncheon

~ Silver Sponsors ~

CH2M HILL • ENERGYSOLUTIONS

INTERNATIONAL GROUP

NATIONAL NUCLEAR LABORATORY (NNL)

NSG ENVIRONMENTAL

VT GROUP • NUVIA LTD.

WESTINGHOUSE

~ Bronze Sponsor ~

ASSYSTEM ENERGY & NUCLEAR

DEWDROPS • PACTEC

57


Session 1-4 Abstracts

SESSION 1 - OPENING SESSION

ABSTRACTS NOT REQUIRED

SESSION 2A - PANEL: ENVIRONMENTAL CLEANUP WORLDWIDE -

CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

ABSTRACTS NOT REQUIRED

SESSION 2B - PANEL: WILL THE LACK OF GEOLOGICAL REPOSITORIES

SLOW THE NUCLEAR RENAISSANCE

ABSTRACTS NOT REQUIRED

SESSION 3 - HOT TOPICS AND EMERGING ISSUES IN D&D

ABSTRACTS NOT REQUIRED

SESSION 4 - NATIONAL PROGRAMS FOR L/ILW

1) UK STRATEGY FOR NUCLEAR INDUSTRY LLW – 16393

Matthew Clark, Joanne Fisher, NDA (UK)

In March 2007 the UK Government and devolved administrations (for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, from here on

referred to as ‘Government’) published their policy for the management of solid low level waste (‘the Policy’). ong>Theong> Policy sets out

a number of core principles for the management of low level waste (LLW) and charges the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority

with developing a UK-wide strategy in the case of LLW from nuclear sites. ong>Theong> UK Nuclear Industry LLW Strategy has been developed

within the framework of the principles set out in the policy.

A key factor in the development of this strategy has been the strategic partnership the NDA shares with the Low Level Waste

Repository near Drigg (LLWR), who now have a role in developing strategy as well as delivering an optimised waste management

service at the LLWR.

ong>Theong> strategy aims to support continued hazard reduction and decommissioning by ensuring uninterrupted capability and

capacity for the management and disposal of LLW in the UK. ong>Theong> continued availability of a disposal route for LLW is considered

vital by both the nuclear industry and non-nuclear industry low level waste producers. Given that the UK will generate significantly

more low level waste (~ 3.1 million m3) than there is capacity at the LLWR (~0.75 million m3), developing alternative

effective ways to manage LLW is critical.

ong>Theong> waste management hierarchy is central to the strategy, which includes strategic goals at all levels of the hierarchy to

improve its application across the industry.

2) THE ROLE OF THE NATIONAL LOW LEVEL WASTE REPOSITORY OPERATOR IN DELIVERING NEW

SOLUTIONS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF LOW LEVEL WASTES IN THE UK - 16217

Martin Walkingshaw, LLW Repository Ltd (UK)

ong>Theong> UK National Low Level Waste Repository (LLWR) is located near to the village of Drigg in West Cumbria. It is the principal

site for disposal of solid Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLW) in the United Kingdom.

This paper describes the program of work currently being undertaken by the sites operators, (LLW Repository Ltd and its newly

appointed Parent Body Organisation), to extend the life of the LLWR and reduce the overall cost of LLW management to the UK

taxpayer.

ong>Theong> current focus of this program is to prevent disposal capacity being taken up at LLWR by waste types which lend themselves

to alternative treatment and/or disposition routes.

ong>Theong> chosen approach enables consignors to segregate LLW at source into formats which allow further treatment for volume

reduction or, (for wastes with lower levels of activity), consignment in the future to alternative disposal facilities.

Segregated waste services are incorporated into LLW Disposal commercial agreements between the LLWR operator and waste

consignors.This paper outlines the forward strategy for managing the current and future Low Level Waste (LLW) arisings from the

Sellafield site, including Windscale.

ong>Theong> document addresses Sellafield Integrated Waste Strategy (IWS) requirements and reflects changes to the national Low

Level Waste (LLW) policy. ong>Theong> underlying driver is that the current estimates of the total volumes of LLW arisings from the Sellafield

site significantly exceed the disposal capacity of the Low Level Waste Repository near Drigg.

3) SELLAFIELD SITE LOW LEVEL WASTE MANAGEMENT STRATEGY - 16234

Laurence Cook, David Loudon, Charles Mason, Sellafield Limited, (UK)

ong>Theong> strategy encompasses all current and future low level wastes, including high volume low activity wastes, produced at the

Sellafield site. It derives from detailed consideration of existing management techniques that could be implemented to efficiently

avoid the generation of wastes and to efficiently manage the range of operational and decommissioning wastes that are generated.

It also incorporates the results of a recent stakeholder engagement exercise on Best Practicable Environmental Option Studies for

low level wastes arising on the Sellafield site.

58


Abstracts Session 4

ong>Theong> strategy is founded on the Waste Management Hierarchy. It focuses on the avoidance and minimisation of waste, and the

implementation of a range of techniques/approaches to process and dispose of generated waste. ong>Theong> strategy does not dictate where

the capability should be developed, rather that it should be developed, in accordance with the national strategy, and should be supported

by business cases and environmental justifications. A phased implementation approach is anticipated, with the ultimate aim

being a suite of capabilities that enable practical, cost-effective application of the WMH. ong>Theong> main aspects are

• Increase the focus on waste avoidance

• Further develop the characterisation function

• Develop a sorting and segregation capability

• Develop a thermal treatment capability

• Develop a metal decontamination capability

• Develop a specified landfill capability

• Review the requirement for additional on-site / near site landfill

4) REGULATORY REVIEW OF PRELIMINARY SAFETY ASSESSMENT

FOR THE BAITA BIHOR REPOSITORY, ROMANIA - 16031

Enrique Biurrun, Bernt Haverkamp, DBE Technology GmbH, (Germany);

Klaus-Jürgen Röhlig, Clausthal University of Technology, (Germany)

In the framework of a PHARE project DBE TECHNOLOGY GmbH carried out a regulatory review of the preliminary Safety

Assessment Report for the near surface LILW repository Băiţa-Bihor, Romania.

During the review process several shortcomings of the PSAR from the regulatory point of view were identified. Main findings

concerned shortcomings in regard to the operational safety, especially in the field of mining safety. From the regulatory point of

view, the long-term calculations appeared to lack a sufficient level of conservatism and the necessary clarity and traceability that

would be required to allow a proper evaluation of the concept used for calculating the long-term radionuclide migration and the

particular results of the PSAR.

Respective recommendations were drafted for the Romanian regulator about the changes that should be implemented in the

next version of the PSAR.

Another focus of this project was an investigation on the potential implementation of the Hydraulic Cage Concept for Băiţa-

Bihor. This concept, which originally was developed by DBE TEC for implementation at the Richard Repository, Czech Republic,

helped to decrease the potential future radiological impact for the Richard repository. As the geological situation and the condition

of the waste packages are similar for the two repositories, the Hydraulic Cage Concept or some adaption of itseemed be an obvious

choice to improve the safety of the Băiţa-Bihor repository should that turn out to be necessary. During execution of the project,

it was found that depending on the outcome of the next revised version of the PSAR it seems rather probable that some kind

of measure might be needed to reduce the potential radiological impact. According to the outcome of the project, an adapted simplified

Hydraulic Cage System would be a possible solution to limit the potential future radiological impact.

5) AN OVERVIEW OF US EPAS CURRENT RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT

AND GENERAL RADIATION PROTECTION EFFORTS – 16104

Tom Peake, Loren Setlow, Daniel Schultheisz, Ken Czyscinski, US Environmental Protection Agency, (USA)

ong>Theong> United States Environmental Protection Agencys (EPA) Radiation Protection Division is the portion of EPA (or the

Agency) that develops environmental standards for radioactive waste disposal in the United States. One current issue of concern is

the disposal of low activity radioactive waste (LAW), including wastes that would be produced by a radiological dispersal device

(RDD), for which current disposal options may be either inconsistent with the hazard presented by the material or logistically problematic.

Another major issue is related to the resurgence in uranium mining. Over the past several years, demand for uranium for

nuclear power plant fuel has increased as has the price. ong>Theong> increase in price has made uranium mining potentially profitable in the

US. EPA is reviewing its relevant regulations, developed primarily in the 1980s, for potential revisions. For example, in-situ leaching

(also known as in-situ recovery) is now the technology of choice where applicable, yet our current environmental standards are

focused on conventional uranium milling. EPA has two actions in process, one related to the Clean Air Act, the other related to

revising the environmental standards that implement the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). Separately,

but related, EPA has developed over the last several years uranium mining documents that address technologically enhanced

natural occurring radioactive materials (TENORM) from abandoned uranium mines, and wastes generated by active uranium

extraction facilities.

Lastly, in 1977 EPA developed environmental standards that address nuclear energy, fuel fabrication, reprocessing, and other

aspects of the uranium fuel cycle. In light of the increased interest in nuclear power and the potential implementation of advanced

fuel cycle technologies, the Agency is now reviewing the standards to determine their continued applicability for the twenty-first

century.

6) ANALYSIS OF MANAGEMENT AND DISPOSAL ALTERNATIVES FOR

LOW ACTIVITY RADIOACTIVE WASTE – 16192

Keith Anderson, ECC (USA)

U.S. Government and Private decommissioning and remediation activities at nuclear sites and facilities often generate in large

volumes and mass radioactive waste that is of low activity. In large part, the low activity radioactive waste generated from decommissioning

and remediation activities are below regulatory limits for low level radioactive waste, while not meeting site specific

dose and risk-based cleanup criteria. Policies and strategies for the remediation, management, and disposal of low activity radioactive

waste in these circumstances often explore alternative options to fully licensed disposal. Primary goals in exploring alternative

disposal options are protection of the public and the environment, while achieve a cost-effective solution. Vague regulations and

arbitrary interpretation by federal and state regulators may enhance alternative disposal options or quash efforts by those conduct-

59


Session 4-5 Abstracts

ing the remediation and decommissioning. Fundamental to the issues is the overriding concern of a lack of clarity and increased

liability in the regulatory structure of the grey area that is low activity radioactive wastes. This paper explores the current efforts

by the United States and ong>Internationalong> regulatory community to better define low activity radioactive waste and to provide effective

and protective waste management and disposal policies and strategies.

7) STRATEGY AND PRACTICE IN SPENT SEALED SOURCES MANAGEMENT IN BELGIUM - 16335

Vincent De pooter, NIRAS/ONDRAF (Belgium);

Marnix Braeckeveldt, David Vanleeuw, Gunter Van Zaelen, NIRAS/ONDRAF (Belgium)

Radioactive sources are used for a variety of purposes, e.g. in medical treatment and diagnosis, research applications, measurement,

testing, detection and calibration in industry, educational activities in colleges and universities etc. As part of its mission,

ONDRAF/NIRAS, the Belgian Radioactive Waste Management Agency, draws up an inventory of all radioactive substances and

nuclear installations on the Belgian territory. In recent years this inventory has been used to launch specific campaigns for the collection

of different types of radioactive sources. In addition to this, the Royal Decree of 23 May 2006 concerning the transposition

into Belgian law of the Spent High Activity Sealed Sources and the Management of Orphan Sources Directive of the EU

(2003/122/EURATOM) has led to an increase in the number of requests addressed to ONDRAF/NIRAS for the collection of these

types of radioactive waste and to an intensified collaboration between ONDRAF/NIRAS and the Belgian Safety Authority

FANC/AFCN towards an effective management of orphan sources. Specific properties of these spent sources such as their activity,

external dose rate, weight, size and/or their invalid special form certificate may complicate the transport and final treatment and

conditioning of this type of waste and that is why these operations require careful attention. An overview of the radioactive sources

already collected as radioactive waste or still present in the nuclear installations, different cases and problems encountered are presented

in this paper, as well as the waste management options adopted by ONDRAF/NIRAS to deal with this type of waste.

8) IMPROVEMENT OF THE MANAGEMENT OF INSTITUTIONAL

RADIOACTIVE WASTE IN SLOVENIA – 16092

Marija Fabjan, Agency for Radwaste Management, SI-1000 (Slovenia);

Jože Rojc, RŽV- Mine Žrovski vrh, (Slovenia); Koen Lenie, Leniko, (Belgium); Yves Niels, IRE, (Belgium);

GasperTavar, Matjaž Stepišnik, Institut “Jožef Stefan” (Slovenia)

ong>Theong> Central Storage Facility (CSF) in Brinje is the only storage facility for institutional radioactive waste in Slovenia.

ong>Theong> storage has been in operation since 1986. Since the year 1999, operation of the CSF in Brinje and managing of institutional

radioactive waste in Slovenia has been under the control of Agency for Radwaste Management (ARAO).

At the time of taking over the CSF, the waste in store was not fully characterised and in some cases the available data did not

match records and inventories. Besides this, some shielded containers and drums were degraded, which creates a potential risk of

uncontrolled spread of contamination.

In addition, in 1999 the Slovene Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA) requested the ARAO to perform refurbishing works

in the CSF in order to reinforce and tighten the building on the one hand, and characterise and condition radioactive waste in store

on the other.

In order to improve the existing situation ARAO lunched considerable assistance and know-how transfer through training and

other technical cooperation within the IAEA and the EC projects.

In this context, several projects have been carried out in the period between 1999 and 2007.

However, these projects only addresses one third of the total inventory of radioactive waste.

In particular, the radioactive waste in the form of bulky material, which occupies a significant surface of the CSF, will not be

processed.

SESSION 5 - LLW CHARACTERIZATION, TREATMENT & PACKAGING DEVELOPMENTS - PART 1 OF 2

1) TREATMENT OF IRRADIATED CORE COMPONENTS FROM BWR

AND PWR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS - 16043

Joerg Viermann, Joerg Radzuweit, Andreas Friske, GNS Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH (Germany)

During Operation of Nuclear Power Plants Components inside the reactor core are exposed to neutron radiation. Removable

Components like control rods, flow restrictor assemblies or water channels are replaced from time to time to prevent a higher activation.

ong>Theong>se components are then stored in the fuel pond.

For disposal the components have to be cut to size in order to fit into flasks or containers suitable for a repository. For cutting

of core components GNS operates different under water shears, one of them a combination with a 700 tonnes compactor. Over a

period of more than 20 years core components have been treated at a number of NPP (PWR as well as BWR). Since 1996 GNS has

also been operating a hot cell facility for treatment of irradiated core components as a joint venture with the Research Centre Karlsruhe.

ong>Theong> presentation will give an overview of the different facilities, describe the processes, experiences and lessons learned.

2) CHARACTERIZATION OF NORM SOURCES IN PETROLEUM COKE CALCINING PROCESSES - 16314

Ian Hamilton, Donald Halter, Matthew Arno, Foxfire Scientific (USA); Robert Berry, Foxfire Scientific, Inc. (UK)

Petroleum coke, or “petcoke,” is a waste by-product of the oil refining industry. ong>Theong> majority of petcoke consumption is in

energy applications; catalyst coke is used as refinery fuel, anode coke for electricity conduction, and marketable coke for heating

cement kilns. Roskill has predicted that long-term growth in petroleum coke production will be maintained, and may continue to

increase slightly through 2012.

Petcoke must first be calcined to drive off any undesirable petroleum by-products that would shorten the coke productlife cycle.

As an example, the calcining process can take place in large, rotary kilns heated to maximum temperatures as high as approximately

1400-1540°C. ong>Theong> kilns and combustion/settling chambers, as well as some cooler units, are insulated with refractory bricks and

other, interstitial materials, e.g., castable refractory materials, to improve the efficiency of the calcining process. ong>Theong> bricks are typ-

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Abstracts Session 5-6

ically made of 70-85-percent bauxite, and are slowly worn away by the calcining process; bricks used to line the combustion chambers

wear away, as well, but at a slower rate. It has been recognized that the refractory materials contain slight amounts of naturally

occurring radioactive materials (NORM) from the uranium- and thorium-decay series. Similarly, low levels of NORM could be

present in the petcoke feed stock given the nature of its origin.

3) MEASUREMENT OF SOLID-LIQUID MIXTURES USING ELECTRICAL TOMOGRAPHY

MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES - 16088

Gary Bolton, Industrial Tomography Systems (UK); StevenStanley, National Nuclear Labpratory (UK)

Electrical Impedance Tomography measurement techniques have been applied to a variety of solid-liquid processes in the laboratory

and on industrial plant. This paper reviews the advances in the measurement techniques to determine key process information

in solid-liquid systems such as concentration mapping, mixture homogeneity, interface detection and suspension velocity.

A number of applications to solid-liquid flow applications are presented. ong>Theong> use of the technology for improved design and

operation is highlighted, as are the opportunities for on-line sensing for flow measurement, fault detection and process control. A

recent development in high-speed electrical imaging has allowed velocity maps to be calculated for fast flowing suspensions (up

to 10 ms-1).

ong>Theong> methodology for determining mixture homogeneity in both pipeline flows and agitated tanks are summarised. Finally the

application of a linear ERT electrode array to identify interfaces during the settling of solid-liquid mixtures is presented.

SESSION 6 - LLW CHARACTERIZATION, TREATMENT & PACKAGING DEVELOPMENTS - PART 2 OF 2

1) INCREASING OPERATIONAL EFFICIENCY IN A RADIOACTIVE WASTE PROCESSING PLANT - 16100

Tom Turner, Stuart Watson, UKAEA (UK)

ong>Theong> solid waste plant at Harwell in Oxfordshire, contains a purpose built facility to input, assay, visually inspect and sort

remote handled intermediate level radioactive waste (RHILW). ong>Theong> facility includes a suite of remote handling cells, known as the

head-end cells (HEC), which waste must pass through in order to be repackaged. Some newly created waste from decommissioning

works on site passes through the cells, but the vast majority of waste for processing is historical waste, stored in below ground

tube stores. Existing containers are not suitable for long term storage, many are already badly corroded, so the waste must be efficiently

processed and repackaged in order to achieve passive safety.

ong>Theong> Harwell site is currently being decommissioned and the land is being restored. ong>Theong> site is being progressively delicensed,

and redeveloped as a business park, which can only be completed when all the nuclear liabilities have been removed. ong>Theong> recovery

and processing of old waste in the solid waste plant is a key project linked to delicensing of a section of the site. Increasing the

operational efficiency of the waste processing plant could shorten the time needed to clear the site and has the potential to save

money for the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA).

2) MANAGEMENT OF HISTORICAL RADIOACTIVE WASTE - 16267

Gheorghe Dograu, Felicia Dragolici, Laura Ionascu, GheorgheRotarescu, National Institute

of Reserch & Development for Physics and Nuclear Engineering-Horia Hulubei (Romania)

ong>Theong> development of the nuclear techniques in Romania and the commissioning of the WWR-S research reactor belonging to

the Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering -(NIPNE) demand to deal with the storage and disposal of radioactive waste. ong>Theong>

institute decided to store the radioactive waste inside a building that belonged to the Defense of Capital City System named Fortwhich

is located on the Magurele site. About 5000 packages were produced and transferred to the storage facility of radioactive

waste treatment plant after decommissioning of Fort building. In the mean time a repository was commissioned and the most part

of the waste has been disposed. ong>Theong>re still were remained about 800 packages which, in time, became corroded. A huge effort was

put in place in order to repack the waste for disposal. At the end of 2008, the whole amount of historical waste have been treated,

and disposed or stored.

ong>Theong> paper describes the management of historical radioactive waste from the storage facility of Radioactive Waste Treatment

Plant.

3) VOLUME REDUCTION OF RADIOACTIVE CONCRETE WASTES GENERATED

BY DISMANTLING NUCLEAR FACILITIES - 16165

Byung youn Min, Wang-Kyu Choi, Jung-Woo Park, Kune-Woo Lee, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, (Korea)

In Korea, the decontamination and decommissioning of the retired research reactors (KRR-1&2) and a uranium conversion

plant (UCP) at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has already been under way. Hundreds of tons of concrete wastes

are produced from these facilities. ong>Theong> recycle or the volume reduction of the contaminated concrete wastes through the application

of appropriate treatment technologies have the merit from the view point of the increase in resource recycling as well as the

decrease in the amount of wastes to be disposed resulting the reduction of disposal cost and the enhancement of disposal safety. It

is well known that most of the radionuclide is concentrated on the one of the concrete constituents, a porous hydrated cement matrix

and the radionuclide can be easily removed from the concrete wastes by separating cement matrix which can be done by heating to

weaken the adherence force between the cement matrix and the aggregates followed by mechanical crushing and milling processes.

ong>Theong>refore, KAERI has developed the volume reduction technology applicable to an activated heavy concrete waste generated

by dismantling KRR-2 and a uranium contaminated light concrete produced from a UCP, which can separate relatively clean aggregates

from the dismantled concrete wastes contaminated with α and β-γ emitters. ong>Theong> separation of radioactive constituents from

contaminated concrete waste carried out by heating and mechanical crushing and milling with the light and heavy concrete to establish

the volume reduction process for the concrete wastes generated by dismantling nuclear facilities. ong>Theong> volume reduction rate

could be obtained above 70% for the heavy weight concrete waste from the KRR-2 and above 80% for the light weight concrete

61


Session 7 Abstracts

waste from the UCP. Also, we investigate the characteristics of chemical leaching for removal of radionuclide from the fine cement

powder as a radioactive waste produced during the course of the mechanical crushing and milling to minimize the final radioactive

waste volume for disposal. Chemical leaching of the radioactive fine cement powder was effective in HNO 3 solution. ong>Theong> removal

efficiency for the fine cement powder contaminated with uranium compound was achieved by up to 97%.

SESSION 7 - NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL ER PROGRAMS

1) EXPECTATIONS FOR MANAGING CONTAMINATED GROUND AND GROUNDWATER:

DEVELOPING A COMMON VIEW OF NDA AND REGULATORS - 16252

Anna Clark, NuclearDecommissioning Authority (UK)

ong>Theong> management of contaminated ground and groundwater is a notable contributor to the challenge we face in cleaning up the

legacy of the UKs civil nuclear industry in a safe, cost-effective and environmentally responsible manner. To facilitate this mission,

the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority and Regulators have elected to try and document our common expectations for the management

of contaminated ground and groundwater arising on and extending off nuclear licensed sites in the UK.

ong>Theong> aims are to:

• speak in one voice about land quality management, both outlining our common expectations and explaining any differing

expectations where consensus is difficult;

• act as the glue between existing NDA and regulatory principles and legislation;

• interpret principles to ensure they are unambiguous and implementable, therefore facilitating forward planning of programmes

and deliverables;

• clarify practical and strategic links between land quality management and related topics such as waste management and

site end states, including delicensing;

• provide a framework for dialogue against which progress in land quality management can be mapped; and,

• promote positive action to deliver hazard reduction in a proportionate and sustainable manner.

To achieve the above aims, this paper outlines the development of our common view on the optimum approach to issues such

as the control of contaminated ground and groundwater, justifying implementation or deferral of land remediation, and defining

intervention and remediation standards.

2) THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA’S PROGRAMMES FOR RADIOACTIVE WASTE

CLEANUP AND LONG-TERM MANAGEMENT - 16133

David McCauley, Doug Metcalfe, Marcia Blanchette, TomCalvert, Natural Resources Canada (Canada)

ong>Theong> Government of Canada’s 1986 Policy Framework for Radioactive Waste Management establishes that waste owners are

responsible for the management of their radioactive wastes. This includes the planning, funding, and implementation of long-term

waste management initiatives. Within this context, the Government has established three separate programmes aimed at addressing

the long-term management of radioactive wastes for which it has accepted responsibility.

ong>Theong> largest of these programs is the Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP). ong>Theong> objective of the NLLP is to address certain

radioactive waste and decommissioning liabilities resulting from 60 years of nuclear research and development at Atomic Energy

of Canada Limited sites in Canada. In 2005, the Government recognized this liability in its Public Accounts and, in 2006, it initiated

the first $520 million 5-year work plan of what is expected to be a 70-year strategy. ong>Theong> costs of implementing the full strategy

are estimated at $6.8 billion (2005$).

Canada’s Historic Waste Program is a second program that is designed to address low-level radioactive wastes across Canada

that are not managed in an appropriate manner for the long-term and for which the current owner can not be held responsible. ong>Theong>se

wastes mainly emanate from the 1930’s and the very early days of nuclear industry in Canada when radioactive ores were mined

and transported long distances for processing. While the Historic Waste Program has been in place since 1982, the Government of

Canada launched the Port Hope Area Initiative in 2001 to deal with the bulk of this environmental problem.

3) EUROPEAN RADIATION SURVEY AND SITE EXECUTION MANUAL (EURSSEM) - 16176

(Switzerland); Lucien Tuenckens, Colenco Power Engineering Ltd.(Switzerland) Marek Vasko, Decom, a.s. (Slovakia);

Kristina Kristofova, Decom a.s.(Slovakia) Igor Matejovic, Eva Hajkova,DECOM, a.s.(Slovakia) Vladimir Daniska,

Deconta, a.s.(Slovakia)

Within the framework of the “Co-ordination Network on Decommissioning of Nuclear Installations Project (2005- 2008)”

funded by the European Community a first edition of EURSSEM has been developed to promote common understanding of key

issues in the development of a strategy, implementation and execution of a programme to remediate radioactively contaminated

sites.

ong>Theong> objective of EURSSEM is to describe and provide a consistent consensus information and guidance on strategy, planning,

implementation and execution of stakeholder involvement, performing, and assessing radiological soil surface and groundwater

(final) status surveys to meet established dose- or risk-based release criteria, and/or remediation, restoration, reuse and stewardship

objectives, while at the same time encouraging effective use of human, raw material and financial resources.

To be able to provide a consistent guidance and leading practices to involved participants (stakeholders) in a remediation programme

for radioactively contaminated sites, an extensive literature study has been performed to collect important documents that

have been produced in this field by the ong>Internationalong> Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the SAFEGROUNDS Learning Network,

Multi- Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) and other national and international institutes.

EURSSEM incorporates information provided in those and other documents to conduct all actions at radioactively ted and potentially

radioactively contaminated sites and/or groundwater up to their release for restricted or unrestricted (re)use.

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Abstracts Session 7-8

Brief descriptions are provided about the background and the need for a document like EURSSEM, about key issues like

stakeholder involvement and archiving for future referencing including the follow-up of the further development of EURSSEM.

4) IAEA - ENVIRONET: THE NETWORK ON ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT AND REMEDIATION - 16421

Horst Monken-Fernandee, IAEA (AUSTRIA, Decommissioning Authority, (UK)

Over the past decade, a number of remediation methods have been developed worldwide to deal with the environmental cleanup

of radiologically contaminated sites. ong>Theong>y vary in terms of sophistication and costs and must be selected on a case-by-case basis.

However, the development of a successful remediation programme does not only rely on the availability of technology and expertise.

Good management plans are needed. Ultimately, planning is an essential component of the overall business and all the steps

need to be articulated in a reasonable way to avoid waste of time and resources. Countries that had to deal with extensive remediation

work have been able to test various approaches resulting in the selection of adequate strategies for remediation. As a consequence,

they are holders of expertise and know-how which may be useful and applicable to other countries that need to implement

remediation programmes. However, quite often, the implementation of a safe and economic approach consistent with good international

practice may be hindered by constrained human and financial resources and scarce expertise in environmental remediation.

Developing countries face specific challenges to implement remediation projects, not only because of the lack of resources

but also because of the lack of appropriate technology and expertise and these things can end-up constituting important barriers for

project implementation. Experience has shown that with appropriate planning and assistance remedial actions are more likely to be

implemented. As such the interaction of inexperienced with experienced countries facilitated by the IAEA may lead to better conditions

for real implementation of projects and lessons learned with this relationship may inspire countries to reproduce (after necessary

adaptation to local conditions and constraints) the experience gained by others. However, the benefits of networking may

not be restricted to the support of developing Member States. More developed Member States can also benefit from networking as

they will have an open and flexible environment to exchange experience and build up partnerships.

SESSION 8 - EXPERIENCES IN ER CLEAN-UP ACTIONS

1) SAFE AND COMPLIANT MANAGEMENT APPROACH TO ENVIRONMENTAL REMEDIATION

OF THE HANFORD SITE CENTRAL PLATEAU - 16025

John Lehew, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (USA)

CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) contractor responsible for

the safe, environmental cleanup of the Hanford Sites Central Plateau.

ong>Theong> 586-square-mile Hanford Site is located along the Columbia River in southeastern Washington State, U.S.A. A plutonium

production complex, housing the largest volume of radioactive and contaminated waste in the nation, with nine nuclear reactors and

associated processing facilities, Hanford played a pivotal role in the nation’s defense for more than 40 years, beginning in the 1940s

with the Manhattan Project. Today, under the direction of the DOE, Hanford is engaged in the world’s largest environmental cleanup

project.

ong>Theong> Plateau Remediation Contract is a 10-year project paving the way for closure of the Hanford Site through remediation of

over 700 waste sites, burial grounds, and groundwater systems; deactivation, decommission, decontamination, and demolition (D4)

activities of over 400 site buildings; treatment of sludge; and disposition of transuranic waste (TRU), spent nuclear material containers,

spent nuclear fuel, and reactors.

ong>Theong> $4.5 billion project, funded through the U.S. DOE Office of Environmental Management, focuses equally on reducing

risks to workers, the public, and the environment and on protecting the Columbia River. Specifically, CHPRCs scope includes:

• 100K Area remediation, sludge treatment, and reactor interim safe storage

• Plutonium Finishing Plant Closure

• Groundwater/vadose zone remediation

• Groundwater, soil, and facility regulatory decision/other documents

• Facility, waste site, and canyon remediation

• Waste retrieval, treatment and disposal, and fuels management

• Fast Flux Test Facility near-term shutdown activities

• Facility and waste site minimum-safe/surveillance and maintenance (S&M).

2) REMEDIATION OF THE SITE OF A FORMER ACTIVE HANDLING BUILDING

IN THE UNITED KINGDOM - 16041

Limited (UK); Andy Staples, United Kingdom Atomic EnergyAuthority (UK)

In 2000, Nuvia Limited was contracted to carry out the decommissioning of a former Active Handling Building A59 on the

United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) site at Winfrith. This is in support of UKAEA’s mission, which is to carry

out environmental restoration of its nuclear sites and to put them to alternative uses wherever possible. Recently UKAEA has been

reorganised and responsibility for the site lies with Research Sites Restoration Limited (RSRL) with funding provided by the

National Decommissioning Authority (NDA).

Following major decommissioning operations the main containment building structure and the two suites of concrete shielded

caves were demolished between June 2006 and March 2007 leaving just the base slab for final removal and the site remediation

operations undertaken. ong>Theong> base slab contained a quantity of encast, internally contaminated items including more than 100 steel

mortuary tubes set up to 6.6m deep into the slab. At the outset it was suspected that some leakage of radioactive contamination had

occurred into the ground although the precise location/s of the leakage was unknown. As a result the scope of the work required

the underlying soil to be carefully monitored for the presence of radioactive contamination and, if detected, its remediation to an

end state suitable for un-restricted use without planning or nuclear regulatory controls.

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Session 8-9 Abstracts

3) A SUCCESSFUL REMEDIATION PROJECT - 16400

L. Max Scott, Louisiana State University (USA)

As part of a program to visit formerly licensed sites to determine if they meet current uncontrolled release conditions, a United

States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) inspection was conducted in the fall of 1993 at a site that had possessed a

radioactive material license from about 1955 to 1970. While the license was in force, the plant processed magnesium scrap containing

up to 4 percent thorium. ong>Theong> source of the scrap is believed to be the aircraft manufacturing industry. ong>Theong> scrap was placed

in furnaces and heated to the melting point of magnesium, and the molten magnesium was drawn off, leaving the thorium with the

residue (dross). Under the regulation in existence at that time, the thorium dross was buried on site in an approximate 14 acre field.

In 1993 the inspector found readings up to 900uR/h.

Early in 1994 an informal grid survey of most of the 14 acre site was conducted. Based on that survey, it was concluded that

the thorium was widespread and extended beyond the property lines. ong>Theong> preliminary findings were reported to the USNRC, and

in 1994 the site was designated as a Site Decommissioning Management Plan (SMPD) site. A remediation team was formed which

included the following disciplines: remediation health physics, geology, hydrology, engineering, law, public relations, and project

management. This remediation team planned, participated in selecting vendors, and provided project over site for all activities from

site characterization through the final status survey. In 2006 the site was released for uncontrolled access.

A chronology of activities with lessons learned will be presented.

4) EVALUATION AND POTENTIAL REMEDIATION OF THE INDUSTRIAL

NORM LEGACY IN LIVERPOOL - 16096

Nigel Reeves, Gordon John, Bob Major, AMEC Nuclear Ltd.(UK)

Sefton, on the north side of Liverpool, holds a radioactive legacy from its industrial past. This legacy is in the form of Tin slag

buried in sub-surface seams. Located near the docks and adjacent to the rich Lancashire coal seams, Sefton became one of the main

production centres of Tin plate in Britain. A consequence of this industrial process is the production of mildly radioactive waste

slag.

Tin rich ores are heated under reducing conditions to produce a molten metal stream This is then separated into the component

metal streams. Solid wastes produced by this process are known as slag and were usually stored on site in spoil heaps. Because this

slag is a very hard, glassy material it has been historically used as aggregate in underlying roads and rail way sleepers. Many of

these sites pre-date the introduction of the regulation of radioactive substances in the UK and have never been under legislative

control under the Radioactive Substances Act, RSA93. ong>Theong>re is a risk that the existence may not be known of some of these sites.

U-238 and Th-232 and their associated decay chains, are the major contributors to the radionuclide inventory of the slags, levels

of these radionuclides being in the range 1-10Bq/g. A series of alpha and beta decays for both chains leads eventually to the

generation of a stable isotope of lead. Radiologically, the main area of concern is with the potential inhalation or ingestion of contaminated

dusts. ong>Theong>re is also a potential for Ra-226 to leach out into groundwater.

SESSION 9 - NATIONAL, MULTI-NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL

1) THE NUCLEAR ENGINEERING DOCTORATE AND NTEC CPD & MASTERS PROGRAMMES: EDUCATION,

TRAINING AND RESEARCH FOR THE DECOMMISSIONING SKILLSBASE - 16395

John W. Roberts, University of Manchester (UK)

Since its establishment in 2005 the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority has a remit to maintain the skillsbase for safe, secure

and cost effective decommissioning of the existing UK civil nuclear power plants and associated facilities. With an aging workforce

and a competitive tender process for each project a number of new companies are realising the potential of the UK decommissioning

market.

ong>Theong> Nuclear Engineering Doctorate and NTEC Masters Programmes have been designed to provide the nuclear workforce of

the future. ong>Theong> doctorate is a partnership between industry, a university partner and the research engineer with the benefit to industry

that the research engineer is based with the industrial partner. Technical and management modules are studied at the university

whilst the research project is carried out in the industrial environment.

ong>Theong> Masters programme draws on the expertise of 11 Higher Education Institutes and offers over 20 modules that are delivered

in a short-fat format either as stand alone CPD courses or, by taking further modules, a certificate, diploma or on completion

of a research project an M.Sc. Modules are available that cover the technical aspects of decommissioning as well as management

of the decommissioning process. ong>Theong> availability of modules in a Distance Learning format now enables students based around the

world to benefit from this programme.

This paper will describe the two programmes in detail and provide examples of current projects that are delivering the research

and workforce required for a successful decommissioning programme.

2) COLLABORATIVE RETEK EXCHANGE — AN INNOVATIVE SOLUTION TO THE SKILLS

AND RESOURCE SHORTAGE IN THE NUCLEAR INDUSTRY - 16396

Corhyn Parr, Retek Consulting (UK)

A Different Approach to the Skills and Resource Shortage. ong>Theong> Nuclear Industry has for many years been concerned about a

skills and resource shortage. This has been due to a poor perception of the industry by those on the outside, highly competitive

industries vying for the same resource pool, a steep retirement curve for highly qualified staff and a lack of graduates entering

industry.

Here in the UK the creation of the National Skill Academy for Nuclear (NSAN) has put in place a framework to record skills

and look to accredit the training providers in the nuclear industry to ensure that the correct skills for the future are available. This

has gone some way to solving the skills problem and developing a well recognised accredited system but what about resource where

are the additional qualified resources going to be found?

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Abstracts Session 9

3) SHARED, REGIONAL REPOSITORIES: DEVELOPING A PRACTICAL IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY - 16310

Ewoud Verhoef, COVRA (Netherlands) Charles McCombie,Neil A. Chapman, Arius Association (Switzerland)

ong>Theong> basic concept within both EC funded SAPIERR I and SAPIERR II projects (FP6) is that of one or more geological repositories

developed in collaboration by two or more European countries to accept spent nuclear fuel, vitrified high-level waste and

other long-lived radioactive waste from those partner countries. ong>Theong> SAPIERR II project (Strategic Action Plan for Implementation

of Regional European Repositories) examines in detail issues that directly influence the practicability and acceptability of such

facilities. This paper describes the work in the SAPIERR II project (2006-2008) on the development of a possible practical implementation

strategy for shared, regional repositories in Europe and lays out the first steps in implementing that strategy.

4) UK SURPLUS SOURCE DISPOSAL PROGRAMME - 16097

Nigel Reeves, Gordon John, AMEC (UK)

ong>Theong> UK Surplus Source Disposal Programme (SSDP), managed by the Environment Agency, was designed to remove redundant

radioactive sources from the public domain. ong>Theong> UK Government Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

(Defra) was concerned that disused sources were being retained by hospitals, universities and businesses, posing a risk to public

health and the environment.

AMEC provided a range of technical and administrative services to support the SSDP. A questionnaire was issued to registered

source holders and the submitted returns compiled to assess the scale of the project. A member of AMEC staff was seconded to the

Environment Agency to provide technical support and liaise directly with source holders during funding applications, which would

cover disposal costs.

Funding for disposal of different sources was partially based on a sliding scale of risk as determined by the IAEA hazard categorisation

system. This funding was also sector dependent.

5) GEOLOGICAL SITING REGIONS PROPOSED BY NAGRA FOR THE L/ILW AND THE HLW

REPOSITORIES AS THE FIRST STEP IN THE APPLICATION OF THE RECENTLY

ESTABLISHED SWISS SITE SELECTION PLAN - 16295

Jürg W. Schneider, Andreas Gautschi, Piet Zuidema, Nagra(Switzerland)

In Switzerland, the Nuclear Energy Law requires the disposal of all radioactive waste in deep geological repositories. ong>Theong>

Swiss programme foresees two types of repositories for this purpose: a low- and intermediate-level waste (L/ILW) and a high-level

waste (HLW) repository. ong>Theong> necessary scientific and technical work preparing for deep geological disposal is well advanced and

the feasibility of geological repositories that provide the required long-term safety has been successfully demonstrated for all waste

types arising in Switzerland. ong>Theong>se feasibility demonstrations have been approved by the Swiss Government (the Federal Council).

Sufficient knowledge is available to allow the next steps in the selection of repository sites to be defined. ong>Theong> legal framework is

also in place and organisational measures have been provided that will allow the tasks to be performed in the coming years to be

implemented efficiently. ong>Theong> concept part of the so-called Sectoral Plan Deep Geological Repositories (i.e. the rules for repository

siting) that was issued by the Federal Council on 2nd April 2008 plays a major role, as it regulates the details of the site selection

process to be conducted over the next years. ong>Theong> Sectoral Plan specifies that selection of geological siting regions and sites for

repositories in Switzerland will be conducted in three stages. Stage 1 ends with the proposal of geological siting regions within

which the repository projects will be elaborated in more detail in the later stages of the Sectoral Plan (stages 2 and 3); stage 3 will

comprise field investigations (boreholes, 3D reflection seismic surveys). ong>Theong> final step will be the identification of a L/ILW and a

HLW site for which general licences will be requested.

6) A SUMMARY OF RADIOLOGICAL WASTE DISPOSAL PRACTICES

IN THE UNITED STATES AND THE UNITED KINGDOM - 16379

Victoria Maranville, AMEC Earth and Envorinmental (USA);Richard McGrath, AMEC Nuclear (UK)

A systematic review of near-surface repositories for radioactive waste in the United States (US) was conducted. ong>Theong> main focus

of the review consisted of a literature search of available documents and other published sources on low level radioactive waste

(LLRW) disposal practices, remediation of LLRW sites in the US, and public participation for remediation efforts of near-surface

radiological waste disposal sites in the US. This review was undertaken to provide background information in support of work by

the UK’s Low Level Waste Repository (LLWR) and to aid in optimizing the future management of this site.

ong>Theong> review contained a summary of the US and United Kingdom (UK) radiological waste classification requirements including

a discussion of the waste types, disposal requirements, and the differences between US and UK disposal practices.

A review of the regulatory process and evolution of regulatory requirements in the US is presented. ong>Theong> UK regulatory environment

is also discussed and contrasted to the US process. ong>Theong> public participation, as part of the US regulatory process, is also

provided and the mechanism for stakeholder identification and involvement is detailed.

In an attempt to demonstrate how remediation of radiologically impacted sites is implemented in the US, existing US case studies,

in which remediation activities were carried out, were reviewed. ong>Theong> following information was compiled: type of wastes disposed

of to US shallow ground facilities [with comparison with UK classifications], facility designs (with special emphasis on those

directly comparable to the subsurface conditions in the UK), and deficiencies identified in operation or in demonstrating safe post

closure; and processes and difficulties in remedial actions encountered at the selected sites. Stakeholder involvement is also discussed

within the case studies.

Publicly available information related to radiological waste management and disposal practices were reviewed. Two sites are

presented in this publication for discussion. ong>Theong>se US sites were selected based on the site similarities to conditions in the UK.

65


Session 9-10 Abstracts

7) IMPLEMENTATION OF THE BEST IN CLASS PROJECT MANAGEMENT AND CONTRACT MANAGEMENT

INITIATIVE AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGYS OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT - 16062

Scott Van Camp, U.S. Dept. of Energy (USA); Mike Deiters,Project Time & Cost, Inc. (USA)

Since its creation in 1989, the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) has struggled with

a legacy of inadequate project management and contract management. This has been manifested in recurring scope changes, cost

overruns and schedule delays, and has been documented in multiple internal and external reviews. EM has committed itself to

improving project performance and undertaken a number of proactive management initiatives including the development of a Best

in ClassProject Management and Contract Management organization (i.e., the BICPM Initiative).

During 2007, EM assessed the status of project management and contract management at 15 EM sites. ong>Theong>se assessments evaluated

strengths and weaknesses in 12 key project management capabilities and three contract management benchmarks. ong>Theong> January

2008 Compilation Assessment Report showed that EM faces significant challenges in its mission execution due to staffing

shortages, project and contract management integration, insufficient project-oriented culture, and lack of a clear role for Headquarters

in BICPM.

EM then formulated a strategy to meet their objectives in the March 2008 Corporate Implementation Plan. It summarizes

BICPM efforts, introduces the vision for BICPM, identifies the strategy for achieving BICPM, and describes a process for implementing

BICPM. That is, it acts as a roadmap to address EMs challenges. It also documents 18 Recommended Priority Actions

(RPAs) that are the key to correcting these challenges. ong>Theong>se RPAs provide a clear path forward that can be communicated to the

entire EM organization and provide the foundation upon which a BICPM culture can be built. EM has since gained considerable

momentum and progress towards institutionalizing BICPM. This paper provides a discussion of the BICPM Initiative and its implementation.

8) EDUCATION AND INDUSTRY PARTNERSHIP: A CASE STUDY OF CO-DELIVERY - 16065

Timothy Mercer, John Tyndall Institute for Nuclear Research (UK);

Jonathan Francis, University of Central Lancashire (UK)

One of the essential elements for safe operation of a nuclear licensed site is the availability to the licensee in sufficient numbers

of suitably qualified and experienced people to carry out and manage the operations and associated design work. In the last

few years, there have been a number of reports to illustrate the recent and current problems of recruiting such people to work in the

traditional locations for nuclear personnel in the North-West of England. Concern for the immediate future is exacerbated by a peculiar

demographic of the people currently employed in positions demanding higher level skills.

In response to the growing realization that there is an impending skills gap that needs to be filled, Sellafield Talent Management

team (and latterly with support of the NDA) have been working with a number of education and training providers to put in

place bespoke courses aimed at overcoming this shortage. In the absence of a steady stream of willing graduates from technical and

management courses, the primary strategy has been to encourage life-long learning and up-skilling amongst its employees, targeting

those who, for whatever reason upon leaving school, missed their opportunity to study and progress to train at a high level, but

who possess that potential and have now developed a keenness to proceed with that study in later life.

One Foundation Degree has been selected for development of a unique approach to higher education. ong>Theong> work of University

of Central Lancashire and its West-Cumbrian education and training partners has featured as a case study in other media, but this

paper reports on a fresh development within that work: co-delivery.

SESSION 10 - EM LIFE-CYCLE ECONOMICS AND COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS

1) UK NUCLEAR DECOMMISSIONING AUTHORITY - VALUE FRAMEWORK,

ITS DEVELOPMENT AND ROLE IN DECISION MAKING - 16399

Mark Wareing, NDA (UK)

As part of its day to day business NDA must be able to demonstrate that it is delivering value for money across its entire estate,

as this is essential to securing funding from government and demonstrating to stakeholders that NDA is delivering on its mission.

Value comes in many forms such as an improved environment, hazard reduction, changes in sky line, social amenities, money,

employment etc. Depending on the perspective of the receiver, and their closeness to the effected area, the relative weighting they

place on the different aspects of value will vary. ong>Theong>refore the challenge to NDA has been how to get a consistent approach to measuring

value that is broadly acceptable to stakeholders and allows the different aspects of value to be compared and decisions made

on a national basis. This paper describes the work undertaken by NDA to

2) STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR UK LLW MANAGEMENT - 16392

Andrew Craze, Matthew Clark, NDA (UK); Pete Davis, EntecUL Ltd. (UK)

NDA is delivering a Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) to sit alongside the UK Nuclear Industry Low Level Waste

Strategy. ong>Theong> purpose of this assessment is to fulfil our requirements under the European Unions Strategic Environmental Assessment

(SEA) Directive (2004/42/EU) and transposing UK Regulations, and to underpin the development of the strategy. ong>Theong> outputs

of the SEA have provided input into particular aspects of the strategy, leading to a more robust and informed result.

Development of options to be assessed under the SEA has looked at a number of factors, including:

• what the strategy is aiming to achieve

• expectation from stakeholders as to what should be addressed

• consideration of tactical approaches to implementation of the strategy in addition to high level strategic issues

• links to other projects and programmes (for example the Environmental Safety Case for the Low Level Waste Repository

66


Abstracts Session 10-12

ong>Theong> SEA aims to provide a robust assessment of the environmental impacts of alternative strategies for providing continued

capability and capacity for the management and disposal of LLW in the UK. ong>Theong> assessment also considers other, more tactical,

issues around implementation of the strategy, for example: issues around the location of LLW management facilities; the environmental

impacts of alternative waste treatment options (metal recycling etc); considerations of alternative approaches to the classification

of radioactive waste and opportunities that would result.

Critical to the development of the SEA has been the involvement of statutory and non-statutory stakeholders, who have

informed both the output and the approach taken.

3) THE INVENTORY OF NUCLEAR LIABILITIES — A MISSION OF PUBLIC INTEREST - 16317

Christian Cosemans, Jacques Cantarella, Gerda Bal, ONDRAF/NIRAS (Belgium)

ong>Theong> safe management of a countrys radioactive substances in both the short and the long term implies a cost to its present society

and necessitates financial resources to cover these costs. Once they are needed, these financial resources may prove to be insufficient

or even completely lacking, leading to a nuclear liability. By virtue of article 9 of the Belgian law of ong>12thong> December 1997,

the Belgian Government wishes to avoid the occurrence of such nuclear liabilities. This law charges ONDRAF/NIRAS, the Belgian

Agency for Radioactive Waste and Enriched Fissile Materials with the mission to draw up a register of the localisation and the

state of all nuclear sites and all sites containing radioactive substances, to estimate the costs of their decommissioning and remediation,

to evaluate the existence and adequacy of the provisions for financing these future or current operations and to update the

resulting inventory of nuclear liabilities on a five-yearly basis.

This paper outlines the methodology put in place by ONDRAF/NIRAS to accomplish this assignment and highlights some of

the results of this exercise. It than focuses on the main recommendations ONDRAF/NIRAS made to the Belgian Government on

the field of avoiding potential nuclear liabilities.

4) FINANCIAL RISKS OF POST-CLOSURE CUSTODIAL CARE FOR THE BARNWELL

RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITY - 16155

Robert Baird, Washington Division, URS Corporation (USA);William Newberry, South Carolina Energy Office (USA)

This paper reports evaluations of the adequacy of the Barnwell Extended Care Fund in light of identified risks, with the conclusion

that the fund is sufficient to cover the costs and uncertainties associated with planned post-closure care of the Barnwell,

South Carolina low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. It reviews background information pertinent to the facilitys post-closure

monitoring and maintenance and describes financial responsibility for post-closure activities. It identifies and briefly characterizes

the activities planned to be conducted following facility closure and presents the mid-range estimate of planned post-closure

costs. ong>Theong> paper identifies and quantifies sources of uncertainty in activities and costs planned for post-closure care and presents

50-, 80-, and 95-percent confidence levels of planned costs. ong>Theong> fund is currently sufficient to cover some but not all of the costs

that might be incurred as a result of unplanned events. ong>Theong> paper identifies, characterizes, and quantifies unplanned events, possible

consequences, and probabilities of occurrence. ong>Theong> paper presents costs that might be incurred in responding to the unplanned

initiating events and identifies levels of confidence that the fund is adequate to cover such costs.

SESSION 11A - PANEL: YGN ROUNDTABLE “AN AUDIENCE WITH”...

ABSTRACTS NOT REQUIRED

SESSION 12 - POSTER SESSION: SPENT FUEL, FISSILE, TRU AND HLW MANAGEMENT

A) SELECTIVE UPTAKE OF PALLADIUM FROM HIGH-LEVEL LIQUID WASTES BY HYBRID

MICROCAPSULES ENCLOSED WITH INSOLUBLE FERROCYANIDES - 16382

Hitoshi Mimura, Takashi Sakakibara, Wu Yan, Yuichi Niibori,Toyko University (Japan);

Shin-ichi Koyama, Takashi Ohnishi, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan)

ong>Theong> fine crystalline powders of KCuFC were immobilized with alginate gel polymers by sol-gel methods. ong>Theong> uptake properties

of KCuFC-microcapsules (KCuFC-MC) were examined by batch and column methods. ong>Theong> size of KCuFC-MC particle was

estimated to be about 1 mm in diameter, and KCuFC powders were uniformly dispersed in KCuFC-MC particles. ong>Theong> uptake rate

of Pd2+ for KCuFC-MC was attained within 3 d, and the uptake of Pd2+ was independent of the temperature and coexisting HNO3 concentration. As for the breakthrough properties of Pd2+ through the column packed with KCuFC-MC, breakpoint of 5% breakthrough

was enhanced with lowering of flow rate and independent of coexisting HNO3 concentration. ong>Theong> Pd2+ ions were selectively

adsorbed on KCuFC crystal phase, while other metal ions such as Ru(NO) 3+ and ZrO2+ ions on alginate phase. High uptake

percentage of 98.6 % was obtained by using the dissolved solutions of spent fuel from FBR-JOYO (119 GWd/t, JAEA). ong>Theong> alginate

film enclosing KZnFC was further prepared by using the support of cellulose filter paper, and Pd2+ ions were selectively

adsorbed on the KZnFC-MC film. ong>Theong> alginate film enclosing insoluble ferrocyanides is expected for the selective separation of

Pd2+ as an ion-exchange filter. Thus, the microcapsules enclosing insoluble ferrocyanides are effective for the selective separation

of Pd2+ from high-level liquid wastes (HLLWs).

B) UPTAKE OF 14C-ACETIC ACID BY RICE PLANT AS RELATED TO ROOT FUNCTION

AND MICROBIAL ACTIVITY ON THE ROOT SURFACE - 16111

Shinichi Ogiyama, National Institute of Radiological Sciences(Japan); Nobuyoshi Ishii,

Shigeo Uchida, National Institute of Radiological Sciences (Japan)

Experiments using rice plants (Oryza sativa L.) were conducted to examine uptake of 14C-acetic acid via the root and 14C behavior on the root surface. For hydroponics, three types of rice plants were cultured with 14C-acetic acid solution: complete plant,

half-rooted plant, and non-rooted plant. Also, for the root incubation experiment, sterilized root and non-sterilized root were incubated

with 14C-acetic acid solution. ong>Theong> 14C radioactivities in the plant parts and solution were measured. Non- and half-rooted

plant had 14C radioactivity in their aerial part, but the complete plant did not. ong>Theong> trends of radioactivity levels in the solution were

67


Session 12 Abstracts

directly opposite to those of plant root biomass. A high level 14Cof 14C radioactivity was observed on the entire root surface of nonsterilized

root in the incubation experiment, and 14C radioactivity in the solution also remarkably decreased from 7 h to 96 h after

the 14C addition. ong>Theong>se results suggest that the amount of 14C-acetic acid absorbed by the plant through the roots is very small.

However, the plant absorbs 14C-acetic acid through breaks in the roots. Once 14C-acetic acid is inside the plant, it immediately

transfers to the shoots. Degradation of 14C radioactivity in the solution and 14C fixation on the root surface arise from the context

of microbial activities.

C) CHARACTERISTICS ON THE SAP-BASED WASTEFORM CONTAINING

RADIOACTIVE MOLTEN SALT WASTE - 16137

Hwan-Seo Park, In-Tae Kim, Hwan-Young Kim,

Byeung-Gil Ahn, Han-Soo Lee, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea)

This study investigated a unique wasteform containing molten salt wastes which are generated from the pyro-process for the

spent fuel treatment. Using a conventional sol-gel process, SiO2-Al2O3-P2O5 (SAP) inorganic material reactive to metal chlorides

were prepared. By using this inorganic composite, a monolithic wasteform were sucessfully fabricated via a simple process, reaction

at 650℃ and sintering at 1100℃. This unique wasteform should be qualified if it meets the requirements for final disposal.

For this reasons, this paper characterized its chemical durability, physical properties, morphology and etc. In the SAP, there are

three kinds of chains, Si-O-Si as a main chain, Si-O-Al as a side chain and Al-O-P/P-O-P as a reactive chain. Alkali metal chlorides

were converted into metal aluminosilicate(LixAlxSi1-xO2-x ) and metal phosphate(Li3PO4 and Cs2AlP3O10 ) while alkali earth

and rare earth chlorides were changed into only metal phosphates (Sr5(PO4)3Cl and CePO4). ong>Theong>se reaction products were compatible

to borosilicate glasses which were functioned as a chemical binder for metal aluminosilicate and a physical binder for metal

phosphates. By these phenomena, the wasteform was formed homogenously above μm scale. This would affect the leaching behaviors

of each radionuclides or component of binder. ong>Theong> leach rates of Cs and Sr under the PCT-A test condition were about 10- 3g/m2day. ong>Theong> physical properties (Cp, k, ρ, Hv, and etc) were very reasonable. Other leaching tests (ISO, MCC-1P) are on-going.

From these results, it could be concluded that SAP can be considered as an effective stabilizer on metal chlorides and the method

using SAP will give a chance to minimize the waste volume for the final disposal of salt wastes through further researches.

D) REALISTIC INTEGRATION OF SORPTION PROCESSES IN TRANSPORT

PROGRAMS FOR LONG-TERM SAFETY ANALYSIS - 16370

Madlen Stockmann, FZ Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany);Vinzenz Brendler, Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.

(Germany) Ulrich Noseck, Gesellschaft für Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH (Germany)

Safety assessment of radioactive waste repositories in salt rock formations considers the overlying sedimentary rock above the

salt domes as important barrier. Sorption on mineral surfaces of the sediment can retard the transport of many contaminants, namely

radionuclides, considerably. Previously, the retention of radionuclides has been described in respective computer programs by

temporally constant distribution coefficients.

In the present study, an existing transport program r3t is extended towards a more realistic description of the radionuclide

migration under changing geochemical conditions. ong>Theong> methodology developed here is based on a description of the sorption of

radionuclides as a function of important influence factors such as pH, pCO2, ionic strength, and the mineral phases being present.

Applying surface complexation models, multidimensional matrices of smart Kd-values can be computed a-priori. ong>Theong> reactive

transport model r3t then can call for each time-space point Kd values adapted for the correct geochemical conditions. ong>Theong> biggest

challenge here was finding a fast and robust algorithm for search and averaging in multidimensional matrices with non-equidistant

population. First results are presented for a test case where respective site-specific geochemical conditions in the overlying rock

have been evaluated, mainly consisting of tertiary and quaternary sands and clays.

E) EMERGING CHALLENGES IN NUCLEAR WASTE MANAGEMENT IN INDIA

IN VIEW OF ITS EXPANSION PROGRAMME - 16364

Murty.S Ganti, Andhra University (India)

Presently the contribution of nuclear power to the total power production in India is around 4000 MWe and about 2500 MWe

will be added by the year 2010. Plans are are ahead to add another 15000 MWe by the end of XI th plan with import options.

Estimates show that in India about 2000 t of natural uranium was irradiated in PHWRs 533t in research reactors and 397t in

BWR by the end of the year 2000. How ever the BWR fuel which is slightly enriched and spplied remained unprocessed ( as spent

fuel) while the rest is under reprocessing. Thisese operations generated about 5000 cubic meters of HLW 35000 cubic meters of

ILW.

India’s reprocessing was initiated in 1964 with PUREX technology with Al clad natural uranium from Canada India research

reactorat Trombay. Based on this experiance reprocessing facilities for power reactor fuels was developed sucesfully.Further fast

Breeder test reactor mixed carbide fuel reprocessing plant was installed at kalpakkam with a view to process fuels from FBR with

mixed oxide and metallic fuels in future.ong>Theong> challenges to be addressed in tackling these future fuels with high burn up levels will

be highlighted.

F) TOWARDS AN IMPLEMENTING GEOLOGICAL DISPOSAL TECHNOLOGY PLATFORM IN EUROPE - 16365

Marjatta Palmu, Posiva Oy, (Finland); Torsten Eng, SKB (Sweden)

Several European waste management organizations have started the work on creating a technology platform to accelerate the

implementation of deep geological disposal of radioactive waste in Europe. ong>Theong>re is an increasing consensus in the international

community about geological disposal as the preferred option for solving the long-term management of spent fuel, high-level waste,

and other long-lived radioactive wastes. At the same time, the European citizens have a widespread wish for a solution for highlevel

radioactive waste disposal. A majority of the European countries with nuclear power have active waste management programmes,

but the current status and the main challenges of those programmes vary. ong>Theong> most advanced waste management programmes

in Europe (i.e. Sweden, Finland and France) are prepared to start the licensing process of deep geological disposal facilities

within the next decade. Despite the differences between the timing and the challenges of the different programmes, there is a

68


Abstracts Session 12

joint awareness that cooperation on the scientific, technical, and social challenges related to geological disposal is needed, and the

cooperation will be beneficial for the timely and safe implementation of the first geological disposal facilities. Such a demonstration

of a viable solution for the management of high-level radioactive waste will enhance stakeholder confidence in Europe. Several

decades of research, development and demonstration (RD&D) have been carried out in the field of geological disposal. ong>Internationalong>

opportunities of cooperation and establishing a technology platform were explored in the European Commission co-funded

projects like Net.Excel and CARD. According to the CARD project, the majority of the funding for RD&D in waste management

comes from the implementing organizations.

G) WVP MELTER ANALYSIS AND MODELLING FOR LIFETIME EXTENSION - 16209

Clare Booth, Sellafield Sites (UK); Mark D’Vaz, Sellafield Ltd (UK)

ong>Theong> purpose of the Sellafield Waste Vitrification Plant (WVP) is to immobilise highly active liquors produced during reprocessing

of magnox and oxide fuel operations by means of a Vitrification process bonding the fission products as metal oxides into

a borosilicate glass matrix. This provides the stability required for safe long term storage of waste fuel products.

Over the last two years the WVP technical department has carried out a study in prolonging the life of the melter vessels used

within WVP. ong>Theong> melter vessel is a critical part of the vitrification process. ong>Theong> purpose of this vessel is a crucible in which to heat,

mix and react glass and fission products (as a calcine) and pour the glass product into a stainless steel container for long term storage.

Several research projects have been carried out in partnership with the National Nuclear Laboratory to further understand the

failure mechanisms within the melter vessel. Research has been focused in two areas:

ong>Theong> metallographic destructive examination of two inactive melters used to simulate plant conditions experienced within

WVP active lines with respect to thermal recycling and corrosion attack. From relating this work to plant process data such

as thermal cycling temperatures and HAL chemical composition, a set of operation parameters can be established with the

intention of prolonging the life of the melter vessels within WVP.

ong>Theong> development of modelling techniques. ong>Theong> models have been designed to simulate a variety of operating conditions

and aim to predict behaviour of the vessel and melt in a large variety of control regimes, and glass characteristics for a

large set of feed compositions. From this information we can formulate operating envelopes that extend the life of the

melter vessel by anticipating required operating conditions given different feedstocks and mitigating or postponing primary

failure modes.

H) FEBEX IN SITU TEST - SHOWING THE VALUE OF VERY LONG TERM (>10 YEARS) EXPERIMENTS - 16422

Irina Gaus, NAGRA (Switzerland); Erik Thurner, SKB (Sweden); Marjut Vahanen, Posiva, (Finland);

Pedro Luis Martín Martín, CIEMAT (Spain); Juan Carlos Mayor, ENRESA (Spain);

Jose Luis García-Siñeriz, Aitemin, (Spain); Antonio Gens, UPC (Spain)

ong>Theong> FEBEX experiment at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) consists of an in-situ full-scale engineered barrier system (EBS) test

for the disposal of high level waste (HLW) performed under natural conditions.

With heating starting in 1997 and led by Enresa, the FEBEX experiment, is the longest running experiment of its scale and has

been the research subject in three subsequent European projects. In 2008, a consortium of four partners (SKB, Ciemat, Posiva,

Nagra) continued running the experiment under the project name FEBEXe until at least 2012, when excavation of the second and

last heater is planned.

ong>Theong> experiment is based on the Spanish reference concept in crystalline rock in which the canisters are placed horizontally in

drifts and surrounded by a clay barrier constructed of highly compacted bentonite blocks. A constant temperature of 100°C has been

maintained, while the bentonite buffer has been slowly hydrating in a natural way. A total of 632 sensors were installed in the clay

barrier, the rock mass, the heaters and the service zone to measure the following variables: temperature, humidity, total pressure,

displacement, water pressure etc. Partial dismantling and sampling of the in-situ test was carried out during 2002.

Although one of the main goals of the experiment has been fulfilled (demonstrating the feasibility of handling and constructing

the EBS), with the length of the dataset increasing, the observed thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) and thermo-hydro-geochemical

(THG) behaviour has revealed several features of interest, such as the underestimation of re-saturation times and the degree of

uncertainty in key parameters.

I) PARTITIONING RATIOS AMONG SOLID-, LIQUID-, AND GAS-PHASES FOR C-14

LABELED SODIUM ACETATE IN PADDY AND UPLAND SOILS - 16112

Nobuyoshi Ishii, National Institute of Radiological Sciences (Japan)

In Japan, transuranic (TRU) waste is grouped into four types. Group 2 type includes hulls and end pieces, which contain significant

amounts of C-14. As C-14 is long-lived, soluble and has little sorption properties, it is the key nuclide in safety assessment

for a geological repository of TRU waste.

Recently, the possibility of leaching of organic carbon compounds from hull waste has been reported. However, there is little

information for reliable migration data sets of such organic C-14. Thus, it is hard to deny any possible migration of organic C-14

from a TRU repository site to the sphere of human habitation.

To assess human expose to C-14 through crops intake, it is necessary to understand the behavior of organic C-14 in agricultural

fields. In this study, we determined solid-, liquid-, and gas-partitioning ratios of organic C-14 in paddy and upland soils by using

batch cultures. Investigation of factors affecting the partitioning ratios between paddy soils and upland soils was also carried out.

Paddy soils (n = 63) and upland soils (n = 79) were collected from throughout Japan. Each of these agricultural soils was flooded

with deionized water at a solid-liquid ratio of 1:10 in a bottle. ong>Theong> flooded samples supplemented with [1, 2-14C] sodium acetate

were shake-incubated for 7 days. At the end of incubation, radioactivites of C-14 in the soil suspension and the supernatant were

counted by using liquid scintillation counting. Values of the sample pH were measured at the end of incubation.

69


Session 12-14 Abstracts

J) A STUDY ON THE ONCE-THROUGH BACK-END FUEL CYCLE SCENARIO - 16129

Yoon Hee Lee, Kunjai Lee,Kunjai Lee, KAIST (Korea);Jongsoon Song, Chosun University (Korea)

ong>Theong>re are three options for spent fuel management, recycle, once-through and wait and see. ong>Theong> national policy for spent fuel

in Korea is wait and seeand it has to be clearly decided for spent fuel management. ong>Theong> final disposal is the last stage is essential

even though the recycling option will be chosen for spent fuel management. And the long-term management considering safety and

retrievability is needed.

In this study, once-through fuel cycle was focused on for back-end fuel cycle. ong>Theong> international trend for SF management policy

and the Korean situation has been investigated. ong>Theong> once-through back-end fuel cycle scenarios has been developed and

screened. It is evaluated that the technical and economical aspect for the scenarios.

ong>Theong> optimal scenario has been derived by relative comparison and the long-term SF management strategy has been proposed

which satisfies both domestic conditions and international trends.

K) AERODYNAMIC RESISTANCE OF A NEW FILTERS FOR CS-137

VAPOUR CAPTURE AT HIGH TEMPERATURE - 16146

Albert Aloy, Alexander Strelnikov, Khlopin Radium Institute (Russia);

Sergey Rovny, Nikolay Pyatin, PA “Mayak” (Russia)

Major characteristics of two alumosilicate filters based on fly ash (FAF) and porous shamotte (PS) were studied for high-temperature

trapping of Cs-137 vapours. To determine aerodynamic resistance of the filters, a test facility was designed and built to

determine that the aerodynamic resistance of the initial PS was significantly lower than that of the FAF at linear air flows up to 15

cm/sec.

ong>Theong>rmal treatment at 1400-15000С made it possible to increase mechanical strength of the PS by factors of 1.5- 3.4, without

any significant aggravation of other characteristics that exceeded similar parameters for the FAF.

L) SEPARATION OF RARE EARTH PRECIPITATES FROM LICL-KCL EUTECTIC SALTS

BY A DISTILLATION AT A REDUCED PRESSURE -16162

Hee-Chul Eun, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute(Korea); Hee-Chul Yang,

Yung-Zun Cho, Han-Soo Lee, In-Tae Kim, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea)

Distillation and condensation characteristics of LiCl-KCl eutectic salts containing rare earth precipitates were investigated to

separate the rare earth precipitates from the salts effectively. ong>Theong> distillation flux of the salts was increased by about 1,000 times

by reducing the ambient pressure from 760 Torr to 0.5 Torr. ong>Theong> salt vapors were almost changed into salt lumps during a salt distillation

at the ambient pressure of 0.5 Torr and they were collected in the condensed salt storage. However, fine salt particles were

formed when the salt distillation was processed at 10 Torr and it is difficult for them to be recovered. ong>Theong>refore, it is thought that

a salt vacuum distillation and condensation should be processed to recover almost all of the vaporized salts at a pressure below 0.5

Torr.

M) DEVELOPMENT OF A LCC STRUCTURE FOR THE RECOVERY OF

ACTINIDES FROM MOLTEN SALT - 16167

Seungwoo Paek, Si-Hyung Kim, Dal-Seong Yoon, Joon-Bo Shim, Do-Hee Ahn,

Han-Soo Lee, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea)

Pyroprocessing technologies have been known as the non-proliferation process in the treatment of spent nuclear fuel, because

actinide elements, including uranium and TRU, and small amounts of rare earth fission products could be simultaneously recovered

using LCC (Liquid Cadmium Cathode). However, the electro-deposition of a U/TRU mixture on a LCC has been recognized

to be disturbed by the growth of uranium dendrites which act as a solid cathode resulting in the obstruction of TRU deposition.

ong>Theong>refore, the inhibition of the growth of uranium dendrite on LCC is considered as a key technique for the electrowinning process.

In this study, the stirrer type and the mesh type LCC structures have been prepared to develop a LCC assembly with a high efficiency.

ong>Theong> electro-deposition behaviors of uranium on the different type LCC structures in molten salt electrolyte were investigated

to make an efficient LCC assembly. ong>Theong> experimental results showed that the mesh type LCC could crash the uranium dendrite

at LCC interface and precipitate it into the bottom of a cadmium crucible. Several experiments were conducted under various operating

conditions such as the current density and the salt concentration to optimize the design of LCC.

N) THE STANDARD-LEGAL REGULATION OF SNF IMPORT FROM FOREIGN

REACTORS IN THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION - 16171

Nekhozhin Mikhail (Russia)

Abstract not available.

70

SESSION 13 - PANEL: EMERGING ISSUES IN THE MANAGEMENT FOR L/ILW

ABSTRACTS NOT REQUIRED

SESSION 14 - PANEL: INTERNATIONAL DECOMMISSIONING NETWORK

ABSTRACTS NOT REQUIRED


Abstracts Session 15

SESSION 15 - DISPOSAL SITE AND WASTE FORM CHARACTERIZATION AND PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT

1) A PRELIMINARY POSTCLOSURE SAFETY ASSESSMENT OF OPGS PROPOSED

L&ILW DEEP GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY, CANADA - 16289

Richard Little, Quintessa Limited (UK); John Avis, Nicola Calder, Intera Engineering Limited (Canada); Nava Garisto,

Senes Consultants Limited (Canada) Paul Gierszewski, Helen Leung, Nuclear Waste Management Organization

(Canada);Laura Limer, James Penfold, George Towler, Russell Walke,Robert Walsh, Quintessa Limited (UK)

Ontario Power Generation (OPG) is proposing to build a Deep Geologic Repository (DGR) for Low and Intermediate Level

Waste (L&ILW) near the existing Western Waste Management Facility at the Bruce site in the Municipality of Kincardine, Ontario.

ong>Theong> Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO), on behalf of OPG, is currently preparing an Environmental Impact Statement

(EIS) and Preliminary Safety Report (PSR) for the proposed repository. This involves investigation of the site’s geological

and surface environmental characteristics, conceptual design of the DGR, and technical studies to demonstrate the operational and

long-term safety of the proposed facility. A preliminary postclosure safety assessment (SA) was undertaken in 2008 and 2009.

Consistent with the guidelines for the preparation of the EIS for the DGR and the regulatory guide on assessing the long-term

safety of radioactive waste management, the SA evaluated the DGR’s performance and its potential impact on human health and

the environment through pathway analysis of contaminant releases, contaminant transport, receptor exposure and potential effects.

Consideration was given to the expected long-term evolution of the repository and site following closure (the Normal Evolution

Scenario) and four disruptive (what if) scenarios (Human Intrusion, Severe Shaft Seal Failure, Open Borehole, and Extreme Earthquake),

which considered events with uncertain or low probability that could disrupt the repository system.

2) NUMERICAL ASSESSMENT OF THE LONG-TERM SAFETY OF THE MORSLEBEN REPOSITORY

FOR LOW- AND INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE - 16346

Juergen Wollrath, Juergen Preuss, Bundesamt fuerStrahlenschutz (BfS) (Germany); Dirk-Alexander Becker, Joerg

Moenig, Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH (UK)

ong>Theong> Morsleben repository has been in operation since 1971 as a repository for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste.

Until the end of the disposal phase in 1998 a waste volume of about 37,000 m3 with a total activity of 4.5·1014 Bq was disposed

of. Currently, the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) is applying for the licence to finally close the repository.

Concerning the possible release of radionuclides to the biosphere, the repository is subject to German radiation protection regulations.

ong>Theong>ir fulfilment has to be proven by means of numerical calculations as a part of the safety case.

A simplified repository model has been developed by GRS and used for calculating the consequences of different scenarios

and variants, as well as for a probabilistic uncertainty and sensitivity analysis. ong>Theong> application for licensing is, among others, based

on these results.

In this paper the main features of the model and the underlying assumptions, as well as the most important calculation results

are presented and explained.

3) THE DEVELOPMENT AND USE OF T2GGM: A GAS MODELLING CODE FOR THE POSTCLOSURE SAFETY

ASSESSMENT OF OPGS PROPOSED L&ILW DEEP GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY, CANADA - 16291

Paul Suckling, Quintessa Limited (UK); Nicola Calder, Intera Engineering Limited (Canada);

Paul Humphreys, University of Huddersfield (UK); Fraser King, Integrity Corrosion Consulting Limited Canada);

Helen Leung, Nuclear Waste Management Organization (Canada)

As part of the postclosure safety assessment of Ontario Power Generation’s (OPG’s) proposed Deep Geologic Repository

(DGR) for Low and Intermediate Level Waste (L&ILW) at the Bruce site, Ontario, a Gas Generation Model (GGM) has been developed

and used to model the detailed generation of gas within the DGR due to corrosion and microbial degradation of the organics

and metals present.

ong>Theong> GGM is based on a kinetic description of the various microbial and corrosion processes that lead to the generation and

consumption of various gases. It takes into account the mass-balance equations for each of the species included in the model,

including three forms of organic waste (cellulose, ion-exchange resins, and plastics and rubbers), four metallic waste forms and

container materials (carbon and galvanised steel, passivated carbon steel, stainless steel and nickel-based alloys, and zirconium

alloys), six gases (CO2 , N2, O2 , H2 , H2S, and CH4 ), five terminal electron acceptors (O2 , NO3 , Fe(III), SO 2-

4 , and CO2 ), five forms

of biomass (aerobes, denitrifiers, iron reducers, sulphate reducers, and methanogens), four types of corrosion product (FeOOH,

FeCO3 , Fe3O4 , and FeS), and water. ong>Theong> code includes the possibility of the limitation of both microbial and corrosion reactions

by the availability of water.

4) CURING TIME EFFECT ON THE FRACTION OF 137CS FROM IMMOBILIZED

RADIOACTIVE EVAPORATOR SLUDGE BY CEMENT - 16329

Ilija Plecas, Slavko Dimovic, Vinca Institute (Serbia)

Traditional methods of processing evaporator concentrates from NPP are evaporation and cementation.ong>Theong>se methods allow to

transform a liquid radioactive waste into the rather inert form, suitable for a final disposal. To assess the safety for disposal of

radioactive mortar-waste composition, the leaching of 137Cs from immobilized radioactive evaporator concentrate into a surrounding

fluid has been studied. Leaching tests were carried out in accordance with a method recommended by IAEA. Curing conditions

and curing time prior to commencing the leaching test are critically important in leach studies since the extent of hydration of the

cement materials determines how much hydration product develops and whether it is available to block the pore network, thereby

reducing leaching. Incremental leaching rates Rn (cm/d) of 137Cs from evaporator concentrates after 180 days were measured. ong>Theong>

results presented in this paper are examples of results obtained in a 20-year concrete testing project which will influence the design

of the engineer trenches system for future central Serbian radioactive waste storing center.

71


Session 15-16 Abstracts

5) MODELLING LONG-TERM CORROSION OF CEMENTED WASTE FORMS IN SALT BRINES - 16202

Bernhard Kienzler, Volker Metz, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

Since 1979, leaching and corrosion experiments have been performed at the Asse II salt mine using simulated full-scale

cemented waste forms. ong>Theong> cement blocks, doped with 137Cs and uranium, have been exposed to saturated salt brines. ong>Theong> brines

have been sampled regularly and analysed with respect to the mobilized radionuclides, pH, and major solution components. In

2006, four of the cement blocks samples were recovered and solid samples were obtained by drilling vertically into the corroded

cement forms. ong>Theong> drill cores as well as abraded drill dust were analysed with respect to chemical and mineralogical compositions,

distributions of radionuclides and major waste components, thermogravimetric and mechanical properties. Results of these methods

show consistently that cement forms, having an initial W/C = 0.5, were homogeneously corroded in MgCl2 rich brine. No vertical

or radial variations were found with respect to major chemical components and mineral phases. In the cement blocks corroded

in NaCl saturated brine, spatial heterogeneities in the distribution of major anions (chloride, nitrate) and the trace cation Cs+

show that these cement / NaCl systems have not been completely homogenized within 22 years. Concentration profiles of Cl-, NO3 - and Cs+ were compared with calculated profiles to quantify diffusion coefficients and to get information on the kinetics of relevant

processes. Simulations of chemical alteration of the cement / brine system indicate that both MgCl2-rich and NaCl systems are

close to equilibrium with respect to stabilities of secondary mineral phases.

6) COUPLING TIME-DEPENDENT SORPTION VALUES OF DEGRADING

CONCRETE WITH A RADIONUCLIDE MIGRATION MODEL - 16220

Janez Perko, Dirk Mallants, Diederik Jacques, Lian Wang,Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN (Belgium)

Safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal facilities is usually carried out by means of simplified models. Abstraction of

the numerical model from the real physical environment is done in several steps. One of the most challenging issues in safety

assessment concerns the long time scales involved and the evolution of engineered barriers over thousands of years. For some

processes occurring in specific engineered barriers the uncertainties related to long time scales are addressed by implementing conservative

assumptions in the radionuclide migration models. Other processes such as chemical concrete degradation, however, can

be estimated for long time periods by the use of coupled geochemical transport models. For many near-surface disposal facilities,

concrete is a very important engineered barrier because it is used in the construction of disposal modules or vaults, in production

of high-integrity monoliths and their backfilling and for waste conditioning. Knowledge on the durability of such concrete components

and its relation to radionuclide sorption is important for a defensible safety assessment. Chemical degradation typically occurs

as the result of decalcification, dissolution and leaching of cement components and carbonation. ong>Theong>se reactions induce a gradual

change in the solid phase composition and the concrete pore-water composition, from “fresh” concrete porewater with a pH above

13 to a pH lower than 10 for “evolved” porewater associated with fully degraded concrete.

7) A NUMERICAL STUDY OF FACTORS AFFECTING RADIOACTIVE

GAS MIGRATION IN THE FAR-FIELD - 16273

Elina Kuitunen, Michael A. Hicks, ong>Theong> University of Manchester (UK)

Gases are produced in radiological waste repositories through several processes. While the bulk of the gas produced is expected

to be hydrogen, some gases labelled with radionuclides such as tritium and carbon-14 are also formed. ong>Theong> consequences of the

generation and migration of these gases need to be assessed in order to ensure the safety of a radiological waste repository.

Different disposal concepts are employed internationally to deal with repository gases and radionuclide migration. This paper

presents the results of preliminary analyses carried out using the code TOUGH2. Specifically, parametric studies for simplified

geometries have been carried out in order to assess the relative importance of the governing parameters of gas migration. This forms

the first stage of numerically assessing the safety of different repository designs with regards to radioactive gas migration. By identifying

the near-field factors with the highest impacts on gas migration in the far-field, the repository designs can be further

improved.

SESSION 16 - NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS FOR SPENT FUEL, FISSILE,

TRU, AND HLW MANAGEMENT

1) NUMO-RMS: A PRACTICAL REQUIREMENTS MANAGEMENT SYSTEM FOR THE LONG-TERM

MANAGEMENT OF THE DEEP GEOLOGICAL DISPOSAL PROJECT - 16304

Hiroyoshi Ueda, Satoru Suzuki, Katsuhiko Ishiguro, NuclearWaste Management Organization of Japan (NUMO)

(Japan);Kiyoshi Oyamada, JGC Corporation (Japan); Shoko Yashio, Obayashi Corporation (Japan);

Matt White, Roger Wilmot,Galson Sciences Limited (UK)

NUMO (Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan) has the responsibility for implementing deep geological disposal

of high-level (HLW) and transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste from the Japanese nuclear programme. A formal Requirements Management

System (RMS) is planned to efficiently and effectively support the computerized implementation of the management strategy

and the methodology required to drive the step-wise siting processes, and the following repository operational phase,. ong>Theong> RMS

will help in the comprehensive management of the decision-making processes in the geological disposal project, in change management

as the disposal system is optimised, in driving projects such as the R&D programme efficiently, and in maintaining structured

records regarding past decisions, all of which lead to soundness of the project in terms of long-term continuity.

ong>Theong> system is planned to have information handling and management functions using a database that includes the

decisions/requirements in the programme under consideration, the way in which these are structured in terms of the decisionmaking

process and other associated information. A two-year development programme is underway to develop and enhance an existing trial

RMS to a practical system. Functions for change management, history management and association with the external timeline management

system are being implemented in the system development work. ong>Theong> database format is being improved to accommodate

the requirements management data relating to the facility design and to safety assessment of the deep geological repository.

72


Abstracts Session 16

2) STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF SPENT NUCLEAR PLAN - 16024

Hitesh Nigam, Edgardo (Gary) DeLeon, Department of Energy, Washington, DC,United States

ong>Theong> Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 established geologic disposal as the United States policy for disposal of spent nuclear

fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). ong>Theong> Department of Energy (DOE) has established programs and plans to disposition

its SNF and HLW at the geologic repository in accordance with this Act. ong>Theong> DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste

Management is responsible for the disposition of all DOE managed SNF, commercial SNF, and HLW. Yucca Mountain in Nevada

has been selected as the geologic repository site and is planned to commence operation in 2020. ong>Theong> DOE Office of Environmental

Management (EM) is responsible for safe, secure, and cost-effective storage of its SNF and HLW, preparing its SNF and HLW

for shipment, and meeting the acceptance criteria of the geologic repository. ong>Theong> focus of this presentation is to discuss DOE EM

Strategic Plan for the management of approximately 2,400 metric tons SNF.

EM has to work very diligently with its many stakeholders and protect the environment and the health and safety of workers

and the public to manage its inventory of SNF, which is located primarily at 4 sites around the country. However, EM is also responsible

for managing SNF from many research reactors in the U.S. as well as foreign research reactors. Majority of the EMs SNF is

dry stored, the remaining SNF is in wet storage, with plans to dry store in the future.

3) DISPOSAL TECHNOLOGIES FOR SPENT FUEL FROM GERMAN NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS - 16028

Reinhold Graf, GNS mbH, Essen,Germany, Wolfgang Filbert, DBE Technology GmbH, Peine,Germany, Klaus-Jürgen

Brammer, GNS mbH, 45127 Essen,Germany, Wilhelm Bollingerfehr, DBE Technology GmbH, 31224 Peine,Germany

ong>Theong> direct disposal of spent fuel as a part of the current German reference concept was developed as an alternative to spent

fuel reprocessing and vitrified HLW disposal. ong>Theong> technical facilities necessary for the implementation of this part of the reference

concept the so called POLLUX-concept, e.g. interim storage buildings for casks containing spent fuel, a pilot conditioning facility,

and a special cask POLLUX for final disposal - have been built. With view to a geological salt formation all handling procedures

for the direct disposal of spent fuel for the repository were tested aboveground in a test facility at a 1:1 scale. To optimise the

reference concept all operational steps have been reviewed for possible improvement. ong>Theong> two most promising variants resulting

from this optimisation process for direct disposal of SF are the BSK 3 -concept and the DIREGT-concept. ong>Theong> latter one is the most

recent developed concept and has been designed for the direct disposal of large multipurpose casks. Both concepts rely on borehole

emplacement technology, vertical boreholes for the BSK3-concept und horizontal boreholes for the DIREGT-concept. ong>Theong>

paper describes these two favoured concept variants and their status as of today with focus on the BSK3-concept.

Supported by the EU and the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology DBE TECHNOLOGY GmbH built an

aboveground test facility at a 1:1 scale to simulate all relevant handling procedures for the BSK 3-concept and GNS as representative

of the German utilities provided the procurement of the hard-ware components. Up to now about 200 emplacement cycles have

been performed successfully. ong>Theong> emplacement system in total comprises the emplacement device, the borehole lock, a transport

cart, a transfer cask, which will shuttle between the aboveground conditioning facility and the underground repository, and the

BSK3-canister itself, designed to contain fuel rods from three PWR-fuel assemblies with a total of about 1.5 t HM. ong>Theong> BSK3-concept

simplifies the operation of the repository by using the same handling procedures and techniques that will be developed for the

disposal of reprocessing residues.

4) CHARACTERISTICS OF THE SPENT FUEL GENERATED IN KOREA - 16227

Dong Hak Kook, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon,Korea (Republic), Jongwon CHOI, Korea Atomic

Energy Research Institute, Daejon,Korea (Republic), Heuijoo Choi, DongKeun Cho, Korea Atomic Energy Research

Institute, Daejeon,Korea (Republic)

Nuclear power has satisfied the national electric power demand for three decades, and there are only two reactor types in Korea.

ong>Theong> nuclear fuel species, however, have a large variety of fuel types, dimensions, initial enrichment, and fuel supply vendors. A

spent fuel accumulation problem has arisen like any other country that uses nuclear power. ong>Theong> spent fuel wet storage capacity in

the reactor pool is getting close to its limit, and so hence, short & long-term solutions are being actively proposed.

First the general status for the nuclear industries and spent fuels will be introduced, then spent fuel characteristics will follow,

and last the future anticipation of spent fuel management will close this article.

keywords: spent fuel, characteristic, Korea

5) NEW SAFETY CONCEPT FOR GEOLOGICAL DISPOSAL IN JAPAN 9 -16339

Kazumi Kitayama, Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan, Tokyo,Japan

This paper describes a new safety concept for the Japanese geological disposal program, which is a development of the conventional

multi-barrier system concept. ong>Theong> Japanese government established the Nuclear Waste Management Organization of

Japan (NUMO) as an implementation body in 2000 based on the Final disposal actfollowing the publication of the H-12 Report,

which confirmed the scientific and engineering feasibility of HLW geological disposal in Japan. Since then, NUMO has undertaken

further technical developments aimed at achieving safe and efficient implementation of final disposal. ong>Theong> safety concept developed

in the H-12 Reportprovides sufficient safety on the basis of site-generic considerations. However, it is considered to be overconservative

and therefore does not represent the most probable performance of the engineered or natural barriers. Recently, concrete

measures have been proposed requiring the safety case to be presented in terms of a realistic assessment of the most probable

performance. This approach takes into account the safety functions of both engineered and natural barriers as well as the longterm

static geochemical equilibrium. In particular, the evolution of the safety performance of engineered and natural barriers can

be efficiently augmented by the realistic long-term geochemical equilibrium.

73


Session 16-17 Abstracts

6) PROPOSALS ON MANAGEMENT OF AMB SNF - 16169

Nekhozhin Mikhail, FSUE FCNRS, Moscow,Russia

A.V. Yescherkin, V.A. Zotov, S,V. Kazakov, M.A. Nekhozhin, V.P. Smirnov, FSUE FCNRS (Russia);

D.A. Goncharov, OOO NPF Sosny, Dmitrovgrad; E.G. Kudryavtsev, A.V. Khapyorskaya,

Rosatom; Kovacz Y., Hamvas, I., NPS Paks, (Hungary)

AMB SFAs have been storing more than 50 years in cassettes in cooling ponds BV-1 and BV-2 of BNPS Phase 1. Cassettes

are defined as chromium or carbon steel tubes in bundles containing 17 and 35 pieces. At the present time, the condition of these

ponds cannot guarantee safe operation in all modes of SNF storage and management. Accident risk depends, on the one hand, on

expired service life of pond cladding, on the other hand, by unsatisfactory state of SFA and carbon steel cassettes in which spent

fuel assemblies are stored.

ong>Theong> previously adopted technology of management of AMB SFA envisaged construction of a dry storage facility in Zheleznogorsk

on the basis of the existing RBMK storage facility, delivery of cassettes with AMB SFA there and a long-term storage. This

technology has a number of significant drawbacks such as:

• complicated development of a safe method of cassette transportation relative to justification of nuclear and radiation safety

as well as limits on hydrogen build-up;

• taking into account that AMB SFAs are 14 m long, dimensions of the facility would increase drastically;

• the problem of nuclear and radiation safety as well as accumulation of hydrogen in storage is not easier than that in transportation;

• technology does not provide a final solution of AMB SFA management;

• AMB fuel contains chemically active ingredients; so it is desirable to make them safer, for example, by fuel processing.

7) AN OVERVIEW ON THE NATIONAL RADWASTES MANAGEMENT STRATEGY

INTO THE CONTEXT OF THE NUCLEAR PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT - 16356

Maria RADU, CENTER OF TECHNOLOGY AND ENGINEERING FOR NUCLEAR OBJECTIVES (CITON),

MAGURELE, ILFOV,Romania, Adrian PANAIT, CENTER OF TECHNOLOGY AND ENGINEERING FOR NUCLEAR

OBJECTIVES (CITON), Magurele,,Romania, Gheorghe Negut, National Agency for Radioactive Waste (ANDRAD)

ROMANIA, MIVENI, ARGES,Romania, Cristian Litescu, National Agency for Nuclear Waste (ANDRAD) Romania,

MIOVENI, ARGES,Romania

At present the main radwaste generator is Cernavoda NPP with 2 x 700 MW units in operation. For the year 2016, the Plant is

predicted to have 4 units in operation.

ong>Theong> National Strategy for radioactive waste management was drafted by National Agency for Radioactive Waste (ANDRAD),

the jurisdictional authority for coordinating spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste management in Romania.

Last year, the Government of Romania established that a new nuclear power plant would be build, so, with this future operational

NPP, the quantity of waste will increase from the today evaluations.

ong>Theong>refore the national strategy for radioactive waste management should be reviewed accordingly.

ong>Theong> paper presents some preliminary results obtained upon the R&D Programs related to the radioactive waste disposal facilities.

SESSION 17 - HLW CHARACTERIZATION / RECENT ADVANCES IN HLW TREATMENT SYSTEMS

1) SEPARATION OF FISSION PRODUCTS AND ACTINIDES FROM SAVANNAH

RIVER SITE HIGH-LEVEL NUCLEAR WASTES - 16174

David T. Hobbs, Thomas B. Peters, Michael R. Poirier, Fernando F. Fondeur, Charles A. Nash, Samuel D. Fink,

Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC,United States

Separation methods for the pretreatment of the liquid fraction of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site

(SRS) include solvent extraction for the separation of cesium and adsorption/ion exchange for the removal of strontium and alphaemitting

actinides. ong>Theong> solvent extraction process, referred to as Caustic Side Solvent Extraction or CSSX, uses a calixarene extractant

in combination with phase modifiers in a hydrocarbon diluent. Monosodium titanate (MST), a hydrous metal oxide, is the baseline

material for the removal of strontium and alpha-emitting radionuclides (principally 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu and 237Np). Two

pretreatment facilities, the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) and the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) facility

began radioactive operations at SRS in 2008. Together these facilities can treat approximately 4 million liters of waste per year.

ong>Theong> same separation processes are also planned for the much larger Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). ong>Theong> SWPF, which has

a design throughput of about 27 million liters per year, is scheduled to begin radioactive operations in 2013.

This paper presents an overview of the separation processes as well as recent research and development activities aimed at

improving separation performance in the pretreatment facilities.

2) SAFETY ASSESSMENT OF GEOLOGICAL DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE

WASTE IN BOOM CLAY: RELATION WITH THE RADIONUCLIDE INVENTORY - 16418

Pierre Van Iseghem, SCK.CEN, Mol,Belgium

This paper discusses the impact of the parameter values used for the transport of radionuclides from the radioactive waste to

the far-field on the Safety Assessment study for the proposed geological disposal in a Boom Clay formation in Belgium. ong>Theong>

methodology of the Safety Assessment is explained, and the results of the Safety Assessment for vitrified high-level waste and spent

fuel are presented. ong>Theong> radionuclides having the strongest impact on the dose-to-man for both HLW glass and spent fuel are 79Se,

129I, 126Sn, 36Cl, and 99Tc. Some of them are volatile, and for many of them there is no accurate information on their inventory

in the waste form. We therefore recommend to spend attention to obtain a more accurate inventory of these critical radionuclides

in the HLW forms. ong>Theong> hypotheses in the selection of the main parameter values are further discussed, together with the status of

the R&D on one of the major critical radionuclides (79Se).

74


Abstracts Session 17

3) DESIGN OF PYROPROCESS DIGITAL MOCKUP AND WORKSPACE ANALYSIS OF DEVICES - 16140

Hee Seoung Park, Chang-Hwan Choi, Sung-Hyun Kim, Byung-Seok Park, Ki-Ho Kim,

Ho-Dong Kim, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea)

Pyroprocessing is an alternative technology that entails certain advantages in regard to reduce the quantity of the disposable

spent fuel and to realize a more efficient and effective spent fuel management. ong>Theong> Korea Atomic Energy Research

Institute(KAERI) has been carried out various types of experiments in order to demonstrate pyroprocessing which can achieve a

more efficient and effective spent fuel management at the Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process Facility(ACPF). Pyroprocessing

which can deal with a spent fuel requires a high manipulator skillfulness of a human operator. A remote manipulation environment

that a human operator has to observe is the inner side of a hotcell through a lead grass window which has many obstacles due

to many existing ‘blind-spots’ where are several cameras installed. ong>Theong> lack of visual information when operating in a cluttered

environment makes manoeuvering a manipulator very difficult and when this situation is exacerbated by strict time limits for a task

completion, then a manipulator and environmental collisions and resultant damage can occur. This article introduces a system that

can model nuclear facilities and devices with a low cost and can simulate a deployment analysis, a remote accessibility, and a

remote interchangeability effectively and proposes a scheme to enable an operator to improve a remote manipulation by using a

haptic device. For implementing a system which is composed of various modules, we have been built a new Graphic User Interface(GUI)

which enables a user to access the system easily and to obtain results concisely. In order for a virtual manipulator to

access the devices in a virtual environment, we describe the mathematical background in relation to the forward and inverse kinematics.

To establish if a virtual manipulator can be processed normally with a remote accessibility and operability, a case study for

interface between a human operator and the haptic device was carried out. This paper describes an experiment for the deployment

analysis of the MSM, which has five revolute joints and one prismatic joint with joint limitations by referring to a manipulator

workspace boundary generation algorithm.

4) DESIGNING A NEW HIGHLY ACTIVE LIQUOR EVAPORATOR - 16075

Paul Robson, Emma Candy, Sellafield Limited, Seascale, Cumbria,United Kingdom

ong>Theong> Highly Active Liquid Effluent Storage (HALES) plant stores, concentrates and conditions Highly Active Liquor (HAL) in

evaporators for buffer storage in Highly Active Storage Tanks (HAST). Highly Active (HA) evaporators play a pivotal role in the

delivery of reprocessing, historic clean up and hazard reduction missions across the Sellafield site. In addition to the engineering

projects implemented to extend the life expectation of the current evaporator fleet, the UK Nuclear Decommissioning Agency

(NDA) is sponsoring the construction of a new HA evaporator (Evaporator D) on the Sellafield site.

ong>Theong> design and operation of the new HA evaporator is based on existing/recent HA evaporator technology but learning from

past operational experience. Operational experience has been a key area where the existing plant operators have influenced both

the new design itself and the requirements for commissioning and training. Many of the learning experiences require relatively simple

engineering design modifications such as a new internal washing provision and transfer line blockage recovery systems, they

are never-the-less expected to significantly improve the flexibility and operational capability of the new evaporator.

Issues that the project delivery team has addressed as part of the development of the design and construction have included:

• Minimising interruptions and/or changes to the normal operations of interfacing plants during construction, commissioning

and operation of the new facility.

• Modularisation of the plant, enabling fabrication of the majority of the plant equipment off-site within a workshop (as

opposed to on-site) environment improving Quality Assurance and reducing on-Site testing needs

• Drawing out the balance between operational and corrosion resistance improvements with actual design and delivery needs

• Provision of a new facility reliant on the infrastructure of an existing and ageing facility and the competing demands of

the related safety cases

5) THE HYDROLYSIS OF HYDROXAMIC ACID COMPLEXANTS

IN THE PRESENCE OF NON-OXIDIZING METAL IONS - 16230

Fabrice Andrieux, University of Central Lancashire (UK); Colin Boxall, Lancaster University (UK);

Iain May, Los Alamos National laboratory (UK); Robin J Taylor, National Nuclear Laboratory (UK)

Hydroxamic acids are salt free, organic compounds with affinities for cations such as Fe3+ , Np4+ and Pu4+ , and have been identified

as suitable reagents for the control of Pu and Np in advanced nuclear fuel reprocessing. Acid catalyzed hydrolysis of free

XHAs is well known and may impact negatively on reprocessing applications. ong>Theong> hydrolysis of metal-bound XHAs within metal

ion-XHA complexes is less understood.

With the aid of speciation diagrams, we have modelled UV-visible spectrophotometric kinetic studies of the acid-catalyzed

hydrolysis of acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) bound to the model ion Fe(III). ong>Theong>se studies have yielded the following information

for the hydrolysis of AHA in the Fe(AHA)2+ complex at 293 K: (i) the order with respect to [H+] during the rate determining step,

m=0.97, is the same as for the free ligand, indicating a similarity of mechanisms; and (ii) the kinetic rate parameter, k1=1.02×10?4

dm3?mol?1?s?1, is greater than that for the free ligand, a result that is consistent with a Hammett analysis of the system.

ong>Theong> results of a UV-visible, near-IR spectrophotometric study of the 1:1 and 2:1 complexes formed between formo- and acetohydroxamic

acids (FHA, AHA) and Np(IV) ions are interpreted using speciation diagrams and the previously obtained kinetic

model. Consequently, the complexation constant for formation of the 1:1 Np(IV)-FHA complex in nitric acid is estimated at and

indications are that complexation protects the ligand against hydrolysis.

75


Session 17-18 Abstracts

6) DEVELOPING CERAMIC BASED TECHNOLOGY FOR THE

IMMOBILISATION OF WASTE ON THE SELLAFIELD SITE - 16049

Martin Stewart, Sam Moricca, Tina Eddowes, Yingjie Zhang,Eric Vance, Gregory Lumpkin,

Melody Carter, ANSTO(Australia); Mike James, Mark Dowson, Sellafield (UK)

National Nuclear Laboratory, in collaboration with the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, is developing

hot isostatic press (HIP) based ceramic technology for the immobilisation of a diverse range of wastes arising from nuclear fuel

processing activities on the Sellafield site. Wasteform compositions have been identified and validated for the immobilisation of

these plutonium containing wastes and residues in glass-ceramic and ceramic forms. A full scale inactive facility has been constructed

at NNLs Workington Laboratory to support the demonstration of the technology. Validation of the inactive wasteform development

using plutonium has been carried out at ANSTOs Lucas Heights facility. A feasibility study has been conducted to evaluate

the construction and operation of a plutonium active pilot facility which would demonstrate the immobilisation of actual residues

in the NNL Central Lab. This could form the basis of a facility to treat the plutonium wastes and residues in their entirety. ong>Theong> technology

is being explored for the immobilisation of additional wastes arising on the Sellafield site taking advantage of the investment

already made in skills and facilities.

7) THE USE OF HOT-ISOSTATIC PRESSING TO PROCESS NUCLEAR WASTE FORMS - 16253

Martin Stewart, Sam Moricca, Tina Eddowes, Yingjie Zhang,Eric Vance, Gregory Lumpkin,

Melody Carter, ANSTO (Australia); Mike James, Mark Dowson, Sellafield (UK)

ANSTO has developed a combination of tailored nuclear wasteform chemistries coupled with the use of flexible hot-isostatic

pressing processing technology to enable the successful incorporation of problematic nuclear wastes into dense, durable monoliths.

This combined package also enables the design of wasteforms with waste loadings well in excess of those achievable via baseline

melting routes using borosilicate glass as hot-isostatic pressing is not constrained by factors such as glass viscosity, crystallisation

and electrical conductivity. In this paper we will discuss some of our experiences with problematic wastes e.g.: plutonium wastes,

sludges and HLW such as the Idaho calcines.

8) DESIGN INNOVATIONS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF ALPHA

CONTAMINATED UNSERVICEABLE GLOVE BOXES - 16224

R.K. Gupta, D.S Sandhanshive, S.R. Shendge, A.K. Singh, M.N.B. Pillai,

Arun Kumar, PP Mazumdar, Bhabha Atomic Research Centr (India)

With the maturing of nuclear industry, there is an added burden on the Back End of fuel cycle. Radioactive facilities and radiological

laboratories, commissioned decades ago, are in the need for refurbishment or shutting down. This has kept the waste managers,

the world over, busier than ever in finding out solutions towards safe handling and disposal of different types and categories

of radioactive wastes as an essentiality for environmental remediation. In the Indian context, several Pu-contaminated Glove Boxes

were occupying premium storage space in radiological laboratories pending a safe and viable solution for their final management.

This paper describes the steps adopted for managing such unserviceable Glove Boxes.

ong>Theong> first step consisted of in-situ encasement of individual Glove Boxes, encountering the challenges of low head room and

space congestion in these laboratories with cognizance to regulatory requirement related to radiation safety. ong>Theong> second step was

removal, transfer and placement of encased Glove Boxes in a dedicated facility under continuous surveillance. ong>Theong> glove boxes

will remain stored in this facility until arrangements are completed for dismantling and volume reduction in another facility which

is under design. ong>Theong> final step is the development of an appropriate technique for dismantling/cutting of Glove Boxes in an alphatight

facility constructed to prevent airborne activity, collection of cut pieces and storage in manageable containers. First two steps

in the overall management of glove boxes have already been successfully completed and the third, comprising of the development

and design of a dedicated cutting facility is underway. While the design and in-situ handling of Glove Boxes and the engineering

efforts of the first two steps have been adequately detailed in this treatise, the contents of the paper are largely devoted to describing

the possible options for cutting/dismantling/remote-handling of the Glove Boxes. ong>Theong> description also includes hands on evaluation

of tools and gadgets in a full-scale pilot set-up with a view to incorporating the most credible choice in an upcoming active

facility.

SESSION 18 - D&D OF POWER REACTORS AND RESEARCH REACTORS

1) TRANSPORT OF THE REACTOR PRESSURE VESSELS IN THE

GREIFSWALD NUCLEAR POWER PLANT - 16012

Ralf Borchardt, Energiewerke Nord GmbH (Germany)

Five WWER-440 reactors are being dismantled on the Greifswald Nuclear Power Plant (KGR) site.ong>Theong> strategy for the dismantling

of the reactor units 1 to 4 (operation time 12 - 17 years) was to cut and pack the components remotely. For this purpose

dry and wet cutting areas were installed. ong>Theong> remote cutting and packing of the reactor pressure vessel and its internals was successfully

tested with non-activated original reactor components of units 7 and 8 from October 1999 until July 2003. From August

2004 until July 2007 the internals from reactor units 1 and 2 were cut, packed and transported to the on-site Interim Store North

(ISN).

For the reactor 5 it was planned to transport the RPV in one piece and the reactor internals in shielding and transport containers

to the interim store for decay storage.

In December 2003 the RPV of unit 5 was lifted and transported to the interim store. From April 2006 up to July 2006 the reactor

internals of unit 5 were packed and transported to the interim store.

76


Abstracts Session 18

After the evaluation of the experience made during the transport and the radiological measurements and samplings taken from

the RPV unit 1, the strategy for the dismantling of the reactors was changed. ong>Theong> reactor pressure vessels of the units 1 to 4 and

the reactor internals of the units 3 and 4 should be removed as complete parts and stored as shielded large components in the ISN.

In summer 2005 EWN applied for the new strategy at the responsible licensing authority and in August 2007 this license was granted.

In November 2007 the reactor pressure vessels of the units 1 and 2 were transported into the ISN. ong>Theong> transport of the reactor

pressure vessels and the internals from units 3 and 4 is planned in the period from March till September 2009.

ong>Theong>se transports of the reactor pressure vessels and internals show that the dismantling of the reactors with dismantling and

interim storage of large components could not only be an alternative for cutting but could also be favored from the economical and

radiological point of view.

2) TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR DECOMMISSIONING IN FUGEN AND CURRENT STATUS - 16108

Koichi Kitamura, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan);Kazuya Sano, Yasuyuki Nakamura,

Akira Matsushima, Masahiro Ishiyama, Hidehiko Matsuo, Masashi Tezuka, Takahiro

Haneda,Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan)Reginald Coomans, Tecnubel (Belgium)

ong>Theong> decommissioning program of proto-type Advanced ong>Theong>rmal Reactor (ATR) FUGEN has started in 2008 as first decommissioning

of the commercial-scale water reactor. It consists of four periods, considering the transportation of spent fuels and the

radioactive decrease of highly activated materials. It is expected that the whole program of decommissioning will be completed

until 2028.

Now, the decommissioning is under the first period, spent fuels and heavy water has been carrying out from FUGEN, and a

part of the turbine system with relatively low radioactive contamination has been dismantled.

FUGEN has a complicated core structure consisting 224 fuel channels with pressure tubes and calandria tank, etc. and used

heavy water as moderator, unlike other light water reactor (LWR). ong>Theong> materials of the core structure were highly activated due to

a long term operation, tritium and C-14 were generated, and the facilities were contaminated by them. Thus, it is important to study

the dismantling technology of the reactor core and the decontamination technology, considering characteristics of FUGEN such as

core structure and radioactive inventory in advance.

In this presentation, the contents of the decommissioning program and its current status such as dismantling work of a part of

the turbine system, the studying situation of dismantling technology of reactor core using Abrasive Water Jet (AWJ) which is a candidate

of cutting technologies, the examination of tritium decontamination in heavy water system, the study of decontamination

technology for C-14 will be presented mainly.

3) SEEKING THE OPTIMUM SOLUTION FOR REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING WASTE – 16391

Lisa Hughes, NDA (UK)

ong>Theong> current baseline plan for reactor decommissioning waste in the UK is to package the waste in to approved containers pending

geological disposal. ong>Theong> waste arising from reactor decommissioning currently accounts for 35% by volume of the total waste

destined for geological disposal in the UK. ong>Theong> majority of this waste (approximately 30% by volume of the UK total) is graphite

from reactor cores.

ong>Theong> NDA Strategy published in March 2006 and the current NDA business plan both made a commitment to explore management

and treatment options for reactor graphite waste. Since this commitment NDA has carried out a work programme on graphite

options. CoRWM’s recommendation on reactor decommissioning wastes in 2006 and Governments response also recognised the

need for alternative solutions for all wastes arising from reactor decommissioning.

Since the publication of these reports NDA has initiated the Reactor Decommissioning Wastes project. This project will examine

the hazard reduction and potential cost benefit of options of alternative management of reactor decommissioning waste. This

will focus on Magnox reactors in the NDA estate, but in considering the position with regard to the large waste graphite liability,

will also take account of the eventual decommissioning of graphite moderated AGR reactors owned by British Energy.

This paper will provide an overview of the project, the proposed approach, options under consideration and timescales for

development.

4) MODELLING OF RADIATION FIELDS AND ESTIMATION OF DOSES DURING

DISMANTLING OF RBMK-1500 REACTOR EMERGENCY CORE COOLING SYSTEM - 16247

Povilas Poskas, Audrius Simonis, Lithuanian Energy Institute(Lithuania)

ong>Theong>re is only one nuclear power plant in Lithuania Ignalina NPP. ong>Theong> INPP operated two similar units with installed capacity

of 1500 MW (each). RBMK-1500 were commissioned in 12/1983 and 08/1987, and the original design lifetime was projected out

to 2010 and 2015 respectively. But the first Unit of Ignalina NPP was shutdown December 31, 2004, and second Unit will be closed

down in 2009.

In relation with this, implementation of new technologies for treatment and conditioning of radioactive waste, construction of

the interim dry storage facility for spent nuclear fuel and preparation of the licensing documents for decommissioning of the Unit

1, and some other projects were implemented or are under implementation at Ignalina NPP. Implementation of dismantling activities

requires detailed knowledge of the radiological situation at the Unit 1. General Radiological Characterization Program for

Ignalina NPP Unit 1 based on NUREG-1575 was prepared in 2005-2006 and approved by Regulatory Bodies.

In 2008 development of the dismantling projects at Ignalina NPP Unit 1 has been started. Dismantling project of the emergency

core cooling system (Building 117/1) is the first project in this field. Based on the radiological surveys data, detailed modeling of

the radiation fields has been performed using VISIPLAN 3D ALARA Planning tool computer program (SCK CEN, Belgium). So,

in this paper detailed information on radiation fields modelling, proposals for optimization of the radiation doses to the personnel,

and emergency core cooling system equipment dismantling is presented.

77


Session 18 Abstracts

5) DISMANTLING THE REACTOR CONTAINMENT OF GERMANY´S FIRST NPP - 16272

Ludger Eickelpasch, NUKEM Technologies GmbH (Germany)

Decommissioning and dismantling of a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) is a challenging task with very long duration. Coming to

the very end of a dismantling project it is still worth to think about optimization possibilities such as parallel work. Some additional

constrains generated by parallel activities may raise but it can still be effective due to reduction of the overall project schedule

5) USE OF REMOTE EQUIPMENT IN REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING - 16326

Scott Martin, Matt Cole, Scott Adams, S.A.Robotics (USA)

Nuclear reactor decommissioning continues to remain at the forefront of the energy and defence industries as many reactors

built from the 1940s to the 1970s are reaching the end of their life cycles. As demand for decommissioning increases, the focus on

workers health and safety has become paramount. This focus on worker safety, coupled with the unique challenges faced in reactor

decommissioning, continues to promote the use of remote equipment in the decommissioning process. New technologies available

in the market today have also created new opportunities for the implementation and application of remote equipment for reactor

decommissioning. ong>Theong>se technologies include: carbon fibre, high pressure liquid cutting, and advanced control packages. Also,

the methods for remote deployment of existing decommissioning technologies such as flame cutting, shearing, and heavy equipment

continue to evolve.

This paper will focus on the use of this technology at the following facilities: the decommissioning of the Rancho Seco reactor

in California, the Brookhaven graphite research reactor in New York, the Windscale Pile 1 Reactor in the United Kingdom, and

the Fort St. Vrain HTG Reactor in Colorado. ong>Theong>se have all used remote equipment and emerging technologies to solve complex

problems in nuclear reactor decommissioning.

ong>Theong> purpose is this paper is to outline some of the challenges associated with reactor decommissioning, describe new technologies

and deployment techniques being used in the decommissioning field, and to provide an overview of projects using these new

technologies.

7) EXPERIENCE IN CHEMICAL DECONTAMINATION OF PWR SYSTEMS AND COMPONENTS - 16274

Claude Steinkuhler, DDR Consult (Belgium); KoenLenie, Reginald Coomans, Tecnubel (Belgium)

Tecnubel has recently performed various chemical decontamination of French and Belgian Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR)

systems and components. ong>Theong> purpose of this paper is to present and compare these experiences. ong>Theong> objectives of these operation

were the reduction of the general surface contamination together with the elimination of hot spots in Residual Heat Removal Systems

(RHRS), Chemical and Volume Control Systems (CVCS) and Reactor Coolant Pumps (RCP). This reduction of contamination

leads to the reduction of dosimetry to the maintenance personnel and allows the works on critical equipment. An additional

challenge for three of these projects lay in the execution of a complicated operation on the critical path of a reactor refueling shutdown.

ong>Theong> chemical decontamination were performed by circulating an adequate fluid in the systems or around the components.

Since the contamination was generated at hot conditions during power operation, a redox attack on the surface was necessary. ong>Theong>

EDF systems and components were decontaminated using a qualified EDF process of the EMMAC family. ong>Theong> Reactor Coolant

Pump from the Belgian PWR was treated with the NITROX process, qualified by Westinghouse. ong>Theong> functions required by the

decontamination system were very diverse and therefore an existing decontamination loop, which was previous developed for the

decontamination of small circuits, was re-developed and adapted for bigger volumes by DDR Consult and Tecnubel. ong>Theong> results of

five decontamination are presented and detailed in terms of efficiency and waste production. ong>Theong>se projects were: the chemical

decontamination of the RHRS of Flamanville 1 NPP, of the CVCS non regenerative heat exchanger at St Laurent des Eaux NPP,

of the RHRS and CVCS of Bugey 2 NPP and of two RCP at the Westinghouse Belgian Service Center.

8) ASSESSMENT OF DECOMMISSIONING WASTE FOR KOREAN STANDARD NUCLEAR POWER PLANT - 16126

Jai-Hoon Jung, Han-Jung Na, Jung-Su Park, Byung-Sik Lee,Jong-Hyuck Lee, KOPEC (Korea)

Decommissioning Waste for Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant (KSNP) was assessed. ong>Theong> reference plant is Yonggwang

Unit 1 (YGN1), Westinghouse 950 MWe Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). YGN1 is located in Yonggwang site, east-south coast

of Korean peninsula, where totally 6 units are in operation. YGN1 started commercial operation in 1986 and is expected to be

decommissioned in the year 2026 after the lifetime of 40 years. YGN1 shares some buildings such as radwaste building with YGN2.

ong>Theong>refore, the decommissioning waste from common buildings was redued to half of assessed waste for one unit. According to

Korean regulation, waste is classified into 2 groups; one is high level waste (HLW) and the other is intermediate and low level waste

(ILLW). By engineering judgment, waste disposal criteria are classified into 4 groups; i.e., HLW, ILLW (GTDC: greater than disposal

criteria), ILLW and EW (exempted waste). Waste type is classified by 11 groups; i.e., spent fuel, metal-small, metal-large,

concreted-scabbled, concrete-debris, soil, resin-primary loop decontamination, resin & filter, dry active waste, Asbestos containing

material, and hazard material. In order to reduce waste volume, all wastes should be processed by melting, abrasive blasting, chemical

decontamination, steam reforming, soil assay, incineration, supercompaction, etc.

* This paper will review and present detailed results of assessed waste for KSNP

78


Abstracts Session 19

SESSION 19 - GLOBAL PARTNERING IN INTERNATIONAL CLEAN-UP PROGRAMS

1) DECOMMISSIONING AND DISMANTLING SOLUTION DEVELOPMENT FOR VOLODARSKY CIVIL

NUCLEAR FLEET SUPPORT SHIP - 16386

Konstantin N. Koulikov, Rinat A. Nisamutdinov, NIPTB ONEGA OAO (Russia);

Andrey N. Abramov, Atomflot FGUP (Russia), Anatoly I. Tsubanikov, Aspect-Conversion ANO(Russia)

Having about 200 tons of solid radioactive waste aboard, the Volodarskiy Floating Technical Base (FTB) is a potential radiation

pollution source for the Murmansk region and Kola Bay, as her long-term berthing negatively affects the hull structures. ong>Theong>reby,

FSUE Atomflot collaborated with ANO Aspect-Konversia and JSC NIPTB Onega within the frameworks of Federal Specialpurpose

Program Assurance of Nuclear and Radiation Safety for 2008 and for the period up to 2015 and developed the Volodarskiy

FTB dismantling concept.

In 2008 in the course of development of the Volodarskiy FTB dismantling concept the following works were carried out:

1) vessel condition survey, including SRW radiological analysis;

2) feasibility study of the Volodarskiy FTB dismantling alternatives (options). In this regard the following options were analyzed:

• formation of the package assembly in the form of vessels undivided hull for durable storage in the Saida long-term

storage facility (LTSF);

• formation of individual SRW package assemblies for durable storage in the Saida LTSF;

• comprehensive recycling of all solid radioactive waste by disposal in protective containers.

3) selection and approval of the dismantling option. ong>Theong> option of formation of individual SRW package assemblies for

durable storage in the Saida LTSF was selected by the Rosatom State Corporation. In this case the works will be performed

on a step-by-step basis at the Atomflot enterprise and SRE Nerpa. ong>Theong> conceptual dismantling technology was developed

for the selected Volodarskiy FTB dismantling option.

ong>Theong> proceedings contain description of alternatives, analysis procedure and proposal for further study of mentioned challenge.

2) DISMANTLEMENT OF NUCLEAR POWERED SUBMARINES IN RUSSIA - 16414

Alexey Maltsev, JSC SC Zvyozdochka (Russia)

ong>Theong> report represents an experience and an overview of the present-day situation at the Shiprepairing Center JSC SC ZVYOZ-

DOCHKA. ong>Theong> report describes the dismantling process of nuclear powered submarines (NPS) at the shipyard as well as the complex

for dismantlement. ong>Theong>res also an overview of opportunities, problems and perspectives of their solving as regards the leading

shipyard in the sphere of NPS dismantlement.

3) ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENTS OF NUCLEAR SUBMARINE

DECOMMISSIONING IN THE RUSSIAN FAR EAST - 16360

Michael Washer, Department of Foreign Affairs and ong>Internationalong> Trade (Canada); Mark Gerchikov, AMEC NSS

(Canada); Michael Cull, Teledyne Brown Engineering (USA) Konstantin Koulikov, NIPTB Onega (Russia)

Pursuant to the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act (CEAA) and the Projects Outside Canada (POC) Regulations, the

NPS project in the Russian Far East was subject to Environmental Assessment.

Environmental impacts were assessed for the following activities:

• Transportation of two NPS from a naval base in Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky to the Zvezda shipyard in Bolshoi Kamen

using Heavy Lift Vessel.

• Implementation of all activity required for de-fuelling and dismantling six NPS including reactor de-fuelling, radioactive

and hazardous waste management, and spent nuclear fuel management.

• Related infrastructure activities such as upgrading the local Bolshoi Kamen railway to ensure safe transportation of spent

nuclear fuel out of the region.

Detailed assessments encompassed analysis of impacts of radioactivity, impacts on atmosphere, surface water resources, aquatic

and terrestrial environment, geology and hydrogeology and analysis of socio-economic, health and cultural considerations. As

part of the process, a consultation strategy was developed and implemented which included public consultation meetings in Bolshoi

Kamen where the Zvezda shipyard is located.

ong>Theong> paper will describe the assessment, public consultation and recommended mitigation measures for the Canadian NPS dismantlement

program in the Russian Far East.e optimization leading to the lowest radiation exposure of personnel handling the filled

fibre-reinforced containers is discussed.

4) REMEDIATION OF GREMIKHA COASTAL MAINTENANCE BASE IN NORTH-WEST RUSSIA - 16279

Boris S. Stepennov, Kurtchatov Institution (Russia); Alexandre Gorbatchev,

CEA (France); Lucien Pillette-Cousin, AREVA TA (France)

ong>Theong> former coastal base in Gremikha is located in the Kola Peninsula, along the Barents Sea, 270 km from Murmansk. It was

constructed in 1961-1966 for providing operation of Russian nuclear submarines, particularly for receipt and temporary storageof

spent nuclear fuel (SNF) unloaded from reactors and for storage of solid and liquid radioactive waste (SRW and LRW). Remediation

of the coastal base in Gremikha (TSF) is one of the main priorities of Rosatom in order to evacuate all spent fuel, the eight

spent cores from Alfa-class submarines, SRW and LRW, and eventually to perform site remediation. In the framework of the Global

Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction, launched at the G8 Kananaskis summit in June

2002, France has funded a comprehensive survey of the site, pre-design studies, some detailed studies for SNF evacuation and work

on infrastructures to prepare safe evacuation of nuclear materials. On behalf of Rosatom, the Kurtchatov Institute ensures a role of

coordination of the Gremikha Remediation Project. France is represented by the Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), with the technical

assistance of AREVA TA.

79


Session 20-21 Abstracts

SESSION 20 - PANEL: GLOBAL PARTNERING IN INTERNATIONAL WASTE AND CLEANUP PROGRAMS

ABSTRACTS NOT REQUIRED

SESSION 21 - ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT HEALTH AND SAFETY ISSUES

1) DOSE ASSESMENT OF PERSONNEL HANDLING CONDITIONED RADIOACTIVE WASTE - 16149

Michal Panik, Matej Zachar, Vladimir Necas, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava (Slovakia)

Radioactive waste may arise throughout the lifetime of any type of nuclear facility. This waste has to be isolated from the environment

using the engineered and natural barriers of near surface or deep geological radioactive waste repository. Before final disposal,

the waste volume is reduced in the treatment process and then it is immobilized into the stable matrix.

In Slovakia, the treated radioactive waste is conditioned into fibre-reinforced concrete containers using a cementation technology.

ong>Theong>se containers are the only overpacks approved for near surface disposal in the National Radioactive Waste Repository located

at Mochovce nuclearsite (Slovakia). Every filled container has to fulfill the defined limits and conditions for safe transport and

disposal. ong>Theong> dose parameters, determining the safety of personnel handling a container, are one of them. Basically, the doses are

measured on the container walls` outer surfaces and on the lid of the container. ong>Theong> dose monitoring in 1 meter distance from the

container walls and from the lid of the container is performed before transportation as well.

ong>Theong> calculation code VISIPLAN 3D ALARA is a planning tool and it calculates dose parameters also for the above mentioned

positions concerning the fibre-reinforced concrete container which contains waste with different physical or radiological characteristics.

In the paper, calculated data are compared with in-situ measurements. Using VISIPLAN 3D ALARA planning tool, various

scenarios are evaluated. Finally, the Under the Global Partnership Initiative and in response to a Russian government request, the

Federal Government of Canada launched a program to dismantle Russian Federation Nuclear-Powered Submarines (NPS). In July

2004, Canada initiated a bilateral program for the dismantlement of 12 general purpose NPS in the Zvyozdochka shipyard in

Severodvinsk. Following successful completion of this program in March 2008, Canada initiated a second NPS dismantling program

at the Zvezda shipyard in the Russian Far East.

2) RISK ANALYSIS AND COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF REMEDIAL ACTIONS

IN THE CENTRAL ASIA: AMYDARYA AND SYRDARYA RIVERS BASINS

TRANSBOUNDARY POLLUTION DUE TO URANIUM-MINING INDUSTRY - 16187

Vladimir Georgievskiy, Russian Research Center “Kurchatov Iinsitute” (Russia)

In this Report are considered some aspects of the analysis of consequences of uranium-mining industry in the Central Asia.

1. ong>Theong> risk analysis is considered in terms of collective effective commitment dose.

2. It is proposed the general estimation of risk (collective effective commitment dose) for the Central Asia from tailings piles

as a result of uranium mining in Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Kirghizia, and Tajikistan. This risk is the approximate estimate

of risk for Amydarya and Syrdarya Rivers Basins.

3. It is proposed the methodical approach to the analysis of risk dynamics (dose dynamic) for the talling piles accidents.

4. It is proposed theIt is proposed the analysis of the tailing piles remediation to carry out in terms cost-benefit analysis as

function of time

3) PARAMETRIC STUDIES FOR NUCLEAR CRITICALITY SAFETY USING MICROSOFT EXCEL - 16404

Michael Crouse, URS - Washington Division (USA)

An important piece of performing calculations for new or revised Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluations often includes parametric

studies on one or more parameters of importance, e.g. mass or moderation level. Multiple input files may be generated quickly

for use in SCALE and potentially MCNP utilizing the Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) that is embedded within the Microsoft

Office — Excel program.

4) PROCESSING AND CONDITIONNING OF RADIOACTIVE SLUDGE - 16417

Olivier Lemaire, Bouygues Construction Services Nucléaires (France); Bertrand Lantes, EDF, (France);

Christophe LENagard,Bouygues Construction Services Nucléaires (France)

ong>Theong> EDF nuclear plants in operation include 58 pressurized water reactors, consisting of 34 units of 900 MWe, 20 of 1300

MWe and 4 of 1450 MWe.

In 2008, arisings of low and intermediate level waste, short live activity, packages amounted to 84.5 m3 /reactor. During the

same year, the plants in operation shipped 4,901m3 packs to the Aube repository centre, this volume included 108 m3 of concrete

containers containing intermediate level activity sludge.

ong>Theong> annual gross sludge volume produced per reactor ranges between about 1 and 2 m3 . This type of waste was not predicted

at the design stage of the reactors since it was assumed that the number of low porosity filtering steps in the water circuits would

be sufficient to trap any particles in suspension. ong>Theong> presence of sludge was verified after a few years of operation at the bottom of

sumps or tanks. Furthermore, allowance was not then made for the slow erosion of the concrete sumps nor for the fact that the tanks

collecting waste overflow could behave as chemical reactor enhancing co-precipitation phenomena.

EDF finalized in the eighties a sludge cementation process similar to the one utilised for conditioning evaporator concentrates

within concrete containers (processing of boric overflow). All the plants, according to their number of reactors, are equipped with

one or more facilities for waste encapsulation within a cementation matrix, but only the 900 MWe plants are able to condition both

evaporator concentrates and sludge.

80


Abstracts Session 22

SESSION 22 - POSTER SESSION - FACILITY DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING

A) BUILDING 18: OPERATING FEEDBACK FROM CLEANING AND DISMANTLING

OF GLOVE BOXES AND SHIELDING LINES - 16046

Michel Jeanjacques, Marie Pierre Bremond, Laurent Gautier,Guy Viellard,

Eric Pichereau, David Estivié, Commissariat l’Energie Atomique (France)

This summary presents the clean-up and dismantling works on glove boxes and shielded lines in building 18. ong>Theong> Atomic Energy

Commission’s centre at Fontenay Aux Roses (CEAFAR) was created in 1946. A radiochemical laboratory devoted to R&D programs

focused on studies of irradiated fuel reprocessing processes, waste treatment processes and studies and production of

transuranic elements was built in the early 1960s. ong>Theong> R&D program was finally halted on 30 June 1995. ong>Theong> purpose of the building

18 clean-up program is to minimise the nuclear and traditional hazards and to reduce as much as possible the production of

high- and medium-level waste during subsequent dismantling work. ong>Theong> paper will deal with a short description of the operations

as well as the lessons learned and the feedback experience which could be of any help in on going or planned DD&R projects

B) AUTOMATED VEHICLE AND WASTE PACKAGE SURVEY SYSTEM - 16223

Arthur Desrosiers, Phillip Mann, Safety and EcologyCorporation (USA)

SEC provides radiological control services for the D&D of the K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Oak Ridge TN. ong>Theong> demolition

of the structure of the building has been initiated. Building debris will be disposed in a waste management facility on the Oak

Ridge Reservation. This will require an estimated 70,000 truck shipments and each truck shipment must be inspected for radiological

contamination. ong>Theong> inspection process includes measurements with hand held survey instruments and preparation of a clearance

ticket.We developed a system for automatically generating the clearance ticket in order to reduce costs. ong>Theong> system automates

data collection and report preparation by using a programmable handheld data terminal (HDT) that acquires the instrument readings

and prints a preformatted clearance ticket. We estimate that the number of labor hours required to perform these truck inspections

will be reduced by 33% compared to previous methods.

ong>Theong> key to success for this project was developing a simple software interface that provides a graphic diagram of the truck and

the survey points, provides step-by-step directions and status during the inspection, and enters data onto a preformatted report that

can be printed directly from the HDT. Symbols differentiate the contact and smear measurements. ong>Theong> inspector simply positions

the instrument probe and presses a button on the HDT to acquire data. ong>Theong> HDT software evaluates each measurement and instructs

the inspector to continue taking measurements or respond to elevated levels of contamination. When the survey is completed, the

HDT provides a clearance message on the LCD screen and the inspector may proceed to the next truck survey. At the end of the

work turn, the stored results are printed for review and signature. Although the time required to complete the measurements is not

reduced, the time required to prepare documentation is drastically condensed. Although the initial implementation is limited to surveying

large trucks, the process may be extended to any repetitive waste management survey, such as inspections of shipping packages.

Future versions of the software may also be expanded to minimize the time required for each measurement.

C) TECHNICAL PERFORMANCE CHARACTERIZATION OF FOURIER TRANSFORM PROFILOMETRY FOR

QUANTIATIVE WASTE VOLUME DETERMINATION UNDER HANFORD WASTE TANK CONDITIONS - 16281

David Monts, Ping-Rey Jang, Zhiling Long, Olin Norton,

Walter Okhuysen, Yi Su, Charles Waggoner, Mississippi State University (USA)

ong>Theong> Hanford Site in western Washington state is currently in the process of an extensive effort to empty and close its radioactive

single-shell and double-shell waste storage tanks. Before this can be accomplished, it is necessary to know how much residual

material is left in a given waste tank and the chemical makeup of the residue.

ong>Theong> Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET) at Mississippi State University is currently developing an quantitative intank

inspection system based on Fourier Transform Profilometry, FTP. FTP is a non-contact, 3-D shape measurement technique. By

projecting a fringe pattern onto a target surface and observing its deformation due to surface irregularities from a different view

angle, FTP is capable of determining the height (depth) distribution (and hence volume distribution) of the target surface, thus

reproducing the profile of the target accurately under a wide variety of conditions. Hence FTP has the potential to be utilized for

quantitative determination of residual wastes within Hanford waste tanks. We report the results of a technical feasibility study to

document the accuracy and precision of quantitative volume determination using the Fourier transform profilometry technique

under simulated Hanford waste tank conditions.

D) THE EMERGENCE OF SUSTAINABLE PRACTICE WITHIN DECOMMISSIONING - 16059

David Adamson, Sellafield Limited (UK); Jonathan Francis,University of Central Lancashire (UK)

Despite the advance of sustainable practice and energy efficient techniques outside of the nuclear industry, at the start of the

21st Century there was a lack of published guidance aimed at their adoption at specifically nuclear facilities. Even with the establishment

of the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority, there is very little guidance published on how to adopt sustainable practices

during decommissioning.

ong>Theong>re have been instances where energy efficiency had affected design and operations decisions. Projects aimed at responsible

housekeeping, switching off lights, and changes to the nuclear ventilation design philosophy illustrate a desire for action, but

these activities were championed by interested and motivated employees. Sustainable practice had not at that time received a strategic

lead that resulted in a management structure to enable a coordinated and concerted effort in sustainable practice. This paper

traces the progress during the 20th and early 21st Centuries, whereby sustainable practice is now established within a much firmer

foundation of case study, guidance and organisational structure; to embed sustainable practice within the United Kingdoms current

decommissioning programme. It looks at the development of relevant literature and, through interviews with key managers and

external stakeholders, demonstrates (i) the degree to which two essential guidance documents (the NiCOP and CIRIA SD:SPUR)

are permeating the industry, (ii) how the current work of the Characterisation and Clearance Group has evolved to influence the

decontamination and dismantling planning procedures and (iii) the transition from identifying free-release materials to actually

releasing them for re-use in the community.

81


Session 22 Abstracts

E) CFD STUDIES OF VORTEX AMPLIFIER DESIGN IN THE

CONTEXT OF SELLAFIELD NUCLEAR OPERATIONS - 16061

Martin J Birch, John Tyndall Institute for Nuclear Research (UK); Darren Parker, Land Securities Trillium (UK);

Jonathan Francis, University of Central Lancashire (UK); Raymond Doig, Sellafield Limited

ong>Theong> use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has had a substantial impact on the cost and nature of design studies involving

both external flows (e.g. aerofoils) and internal flowsthrough components (e.g. valve design); CFD packages are now used

extensively throughout the engineering community. ong>Theong> commercial software 'CFX' was used to conduct design studies of vortex

amplifier geometry. ong>Theong> use of the code has been validated by comparing the results of the simulations with experimental data. ong>Theong>

code is now being used to study changes to the geometry of the vortex amplifier that could not be reproduced experimentally at an

equivalent cost.

This paper reports on progress and current developments. ong>Theong> anomalous reverse flow in the supply ports of the mini-VXA

has been captured and the mixing in both the chamber and the precessing vortex core also appears to have been successfully reproduced.

F) DECOMMISSIONING OF A URANIUM CONVERSION PLANT AND

A LOW LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE FOR A LONG TERM DISPOSAL - 16071

Yun D. Choi, D.S. Hwang, U.S. Chung, Korea Atomic EnergyResearch Institute (Korea)

In the middle of 2004, a decommissioning program for a conversion plant, which was constructed in 1982, and treated about

300 tons of natural uranium until it was shut down in 1992, obtained its approval of the regulatory body. Actual dismantling and

decontaminating activities have been performed since the July 2004 and will be terminated in December 2009.

ong>Theong> decommissioning works were mainly divided into two parts, for the inside of the building containing the process equipments

and for the lagoon sludges generated during the plant operation. ong>Theong> decommissioning for the inside of the building was carried

out by dismantling the process equipments, which were firstly segmented and decotaminated by a polishing and a washing with

steam and chemicals or a melting, and then a decontamination for the surfaces inside the building by scrabbling or grinding the

concrete walls. ong>Theong> decontamination goals were below 0.2Bq/g for the matallic segments and below 0.4Bq/g for the concrete walls.

A decontamination methods were selected according to the degree of contamination and a minimization of the low level radioactive

wastes was conducted throught the decommissioning works.

Lagoon sludge wastes had two types, one was an various inorganic nitrate salt mixture containing a very low concentration of

uranium, about 200~300ppm, in Lgoon-II and the other was an inorganic nitrate salt mixture containing a few percent of uranium

in Lagoon-I. To treat these sludge wastes a thermal decomposition facility was constructed and operated to produce stable sludge

wastes contained triuranium octoxides which are stable in the air. ong>Theong> final sludge wastes after a thermal treating for the sludge

waste of lagoon-I could be reused.

ong>Theong> final residual radioactivities for the inside of the building will be measured to cofirm a complete decontamination of the

uranium to back ground level and then the building will be considered for an other use.

G) REHABILITATION PROJECT FOR PODOLSK NONFERROUS METALS PLANT - 16136

Alexander V. Chesnokov, Victor G. Volkov, Anatoly Volkovich,Alexey Lemus,

Vitaly Pavlenko, Sergey Semenov, Russian Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”(Russia);

Maxim Gizay, Sergey Krahotkin, FSUE Federal Property Management Center (Russia)

Radioactive contamination of the site and facilities of Podolsk Nonferrous Metals Plant (PNMP) caused by unauthorized delivery

of a radioactive source among scrap metal to the plants melt shop refinery has occurred in 1989. As a result, the refinery premises

and adjacent territory, department of construction activity warehouse, internal railway branch, scrap metal site and two open

slag collectors were contaminated with 137Cs radionuclides.

Between 1989 and 2001, after site decontamination works, the waste belonging to MLW category was removed from the plants

operating zones and sent to MosNPO Radon for long-term storage. Waste belonging to LLW category was accumulated on several

dedicated sites and in the melt shop department. Secondary contamination of the internal railway branch and department of construction

activity warehouse took place as a result of decontamination activities.

It should be noted that no comprehensive engineering and radiation survey of contaminated facilities and site of PNMP has

ever been performed. Though the contaminated area is situated in the immediate vicinity of the Petritsa River, and there is a risk of

its contamination with radionuclides, no comprehensive study of radionuclide contents in subsurface and ground waters, as well as

no radionuclide migration study, has been performed.

In 1992-1993, Federal State Unitary Enterprise State Specialized Design Institute(FSUE SSDI) has developed a work project

entitled Elimination of radioactive contamination consequences and interim radwaste repository construction at PNMP. ong>Theong> project

was updated in 1997, 2001 and 2005. It provided for constructing a regional on-site interim radwaste repository at the PNMP

site.

H) REMOTE RADIATION SENSOR BASED ON EPOXY RESIN AND OPTICAL

FIBER FOR MONITORING OF HIGH-LEVEL DECOMMISSIONING FACILITIES - 16160

Bum-Kyoung Seo, Chan-Hee Park, Dong-Gyu Lee, Kune-Woo Lee, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea)

It’s important to survey the radiation level in the nuclear facilities to be decommissioned. In some facilities such as hot-cell the

radiation level is very high. So it is difficult to approach for monitoring the radioactive contamination. In this case the detector system

is preferable to separate the sensor and electronics, which have to locate in the facility outside to avoid the electric noise and

worker’s exposure.

In this study the remote radiation sensor for radiation and contamination monitoring of the decommissioning facility was developed.

ong>Theong> radiation sensor was prepared using a transparent epoxy resin and a scintillator. ong>Theong> used scintillators were an organic

for gamma-rays and inorganic one for alpha particles.

82


Abstracts Session 22

ong>Theong> powder type organic scintillator was mixed with the optically transparent epoxy resin until the powder was completely wet

and uniformly distributed throughout the liquid. ong>Theong> mixture was then poured into a polyethylene mold and cure into a bulk type.

ong>Theong> used organic scintillator was 2,5-diphenyloxazde (PPO) as a first solute and 1,4-bis[5-phenyl-2-oxazol]benzene (POPOP) as a

second solute which was a wave shifter. Also, the inorganic scintillator ZnS(Ag) was used for measuring the alpha particles. ong>Theong>

powder type ZnS(Ag) was mixed with the epoxy resin, and then solidified.

For remote measurement the optical fiber was used. ong>Theong> scintillation light produced by interaction with the radiation and scintillator

was transmitted through an optical fiber to the photon counter that is placed in the high-level radiation area outside. ong>Theong>

optical fiber was inserted into the radiation sensor before solidification of the epoxy resin, and then solidified. ong>Theong> remote radiation

sensor was the one-body type with the scintillation detector and the optical fiber. ong>Theong> ability of the radiation detection and the

signal transmission were tested.

I) ALGORITHMISATION OF DISMANTLING TECHNIQUES IN

STANDARDISED DECOMMISSIONING COSTING - 16201

Peter Bezak, DECOM, a.s. (Slovakia); Vladimír Daniaka,Deconta, a.s.(Slovakia);

Ivan Rehak, Decom, a.s. (Slovakia); Vladimir Necas, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava(Slovakia)

Recently developed computer code OMEGA for evaluation and optimisation of decommissioning options implements the standardised

cost structure (IAEA, OECD/NEA, EC, 1999) as the universal structure [PSL] for calculation and optimisation of decommissioning

scenarios. One of the groups of decommissioning activities is the dismantling of systems and structures. ong>Theong>se activities

variously depend on the complexity of dismantled systems, e.g. reactors, equipment of the primary systems or standard components

like pipes, valves, motors, tanks etc. Type and extent of decommissioning activities depends also on local conditions for

dismantling like dose rate, decommissioning equipment category, local working conditions, etc. ong>Theong>se factors determine the selection

of techniques for dismantling, depending on material and radiological status of the equipment (type of technique and their manual

or remote application). This approach enables proper planning and performing of individual decommissioning phases.

J) THERMAL CUTTING TECHNOLOGIES FOR DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR FACILITIES - 16297

Harald Bienia, NUKEM Technologies GmbH (Germany)

Remote disassembly of radiologically burdened large components is among the most sophisticated and complex activities in

the dismantling of nuclear installations. High local dose rates and contamination levels, combined with complicated designs and

geometries of the object to be dismantled, plus insufficient accessibility, imply major challenges in the dismantling of nuclear facilities.

Usually the shielding effect of water is used during the dismantling period. Other dismantling activities require dry ambiences.

ong>Theong> required space for the technical equipment during the dismantling operations, especially for the removal of larger components

(e.g. reactor pressure vessel, heat exchanger, etc.) is often an additional problem. Conventional cutting technologies like sawing

with a disk saw or band saw require large and heavy frameworks as well as guiding systems with high rigidity. ong>Theong>se solutions

are expensive and sometimes not applicable.

Additionally these technical questions, the estimated costs of the used dismantling technologies are important for choosing the

best cutting technology. ong>Theong> three cutting technologies Autogenous Flame Cutting, Plasma Arc Cutting and Contact Arc Metal Cutting

are proven tools for dismantling tasks and will be introduced.

K) INVOLVEMENT OF ANDRAD IN ENDORSEMENT OF DECOMMISSIONING

DOCUMENTATION OF NUCLEAR FACILITIES IN ROMANIA - 16315

Marin Dinca, National Agency for Radioactive Waste (Romania)

National Agency for Radioactive Waste ANDRAD is in Romania, by law, the competent authority for the disposal administration

of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste and for the coordination of the predisposal management of spent nuclear fuel and

radioactive waste, inclusive decommissioning of nuclear facilities.

Government Ordinance (GO) No. 11/January 30, 2003 and Government Decision (GD) No. 1601/December 23, 2003 established

the ANDRAD’s foundation and organization.

In accordance with GO No. 11/2003, republished, on the safe management of the radioactive waste, ANDRAD has the responsibility

to endorse the decommissioning documentation issued by the main radioactive waste generators (nuclear installations and

other major radiological installations: radioactive waste treatment plants, radioactive waste storage facilities, post irradiation examination

laboratories, centres for radioisotopes production etc.).

ANDRAD receives for endorsement some of the documentation for decommissioning that is provided by enforced norms for

each type of nuclear facility.

ong>Theong>re are presented the nuclear facilities that must have decommissioning documentation endorsed by ANDRAD, the type of

documents submitted by license holder to ANDRAD and the procedure of endorsement in relation with the regulatory body

(CNCAN) approval of the decommissioning documents.

L) VISUALIZATION OF RADIOACTIVE SOURCES WITHOUT

GAMMA-RADIATION WITH UV IMAGING SYSTEMS - 16145

Oleg Ivanov, Alexey Danilovich, Vyacheslav Stepanov, SergeySmirnov, RRC Kurchatov Institute (Russia);

Anatoly Volkovich, Russian Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, (Russia)

New UV cameras are suitable for imaging of α-contamination by fluorescence of atmospheric air the near ultraviolet (wavelength

– 280 – 390 nm) region.ong>Theong>ir parameters are: FOV for detecting in UV spectral region is 8” x 6”. ong>Theong> optical FOV is about

48” x 36” . DayCor SUPERB UV camera has sensitivity 3x10-18 W/cm2 enables detection and displaying corona emission as weak

as 1.5 pC at distance 8 m, and capture moving targets without smearing the output image. Instruments sensitivity for alpha contamination

registration in terms of minimum measurable activities (MMA) have been estimated as, 40 – 100 Bq/cm2 (measurement

time is 3600 – 600 sec correspondently).

83


Session 22-24 Abstracts

M) OXIPROBE — A NON DESTRUCTIVE TOOL FOR DETERMINING STEAM

GENERATOR OXIDE CHARACTERISTICS - 16250

John P., Krasznai, Kinectrics Inc. (Canada)

CANDU Stations are designed with significant amounts of carbon steel piping in the primary circuit. Although the primary

coolant chemistry is such that carbon steel corrosion is minimized, nevertheless magnetite transport from the carbon steel surfaces

to the steam generators is a significant issue leading to potential reduction in heat transfer efficiency in the steam generator. ong>Theong>re

are other contributors to the reduction of heat transfer efficiency such as divider plate leakage whereby some of the coolant short

circuits the steam generator tubes and secondary side steam generator tube fouling.

CANDU station operators have utilized a number of mitigating measures such as primary and secondary side mechanical and

chemical tube cleaning, and divider plate refurbishment to counter these problems but these are all expensive and dose intensive,

It is therefore very important to establish the relative contribution of each source to the overall heat transfer degradation problem

so the most effective results are obtained. Tube removal and laboratory assessment of the oxide loading is possible and has been

utilized but at best it provides an incomplete picture since typically only short lengths of tubes are removed most often from the

hot leg and the tube removal process adversely impacts the primary side oxide integrity. Kinectrics Inc. has developed, qualified

and deployed Oxiprobe, a highly mobile non destructive technology cable to remove and quantify the deposited oxide loading on

the primary surfaces of steam generator tubes. ong>Theong> technology is deployed during shutdown and provides valuable, direct information

on:

• Primary oxide distribution within the steam generator

• Oxide loading (thickness of oxide) on the primary surfaces of steam generator tubes

• Oxide composition and radiochemical characterization

N) METHODS OF CONTROL OF INACCURACY IN CALCULATION OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANT

DECOMMISSIONING PARAMETERS - 16383

Frantisek Ondra, DECOM, a.s.,(Slovakia); Vladimír Daniaka, Deconta, a.s.,(Slovakia) Ivan Rehak, Decom, a.s.,

(Slovakia);Vladimir Necas, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava(Slovakia)

ong>Theong> aim of the article is a development of analytical methodology for evaluation of input data inaccuracies impact on calculation

of cost and other output decommissioning parameters. This methodology is based on analytical model calculations using the

OMEGA code and taking into account the probability of input data inaccuracies occurrence also.

SESSION 23 - PANEL: CURRENT IAEA ACTIVITIES IN PREDISPOSAL

MANAGEMENT OF L/ILRADIOACTIVE WASTE

ABSTRACTS NOT REQUIRED

SESSION 24 - NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL D&D PROGRAMS

1) DECOMMISSIONING IN THE UNITED STATES - PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE - 16318

Jas S. Devgun, Sargent & Lundy (USA)

ong>Theong> experience related to decommissioning of nuclear facilities in the United States is very substantial and covers power reactors,

research reactors, and many facilities in the Department of Energy complex. ong>Theong> focus of this paper however is on the commercial

power plants.

With 104 operating reactors, the U.S. fleet of civilian reactors is still the largest in the world. Nuclear power industry in the

United States has undergone a dramatic upturn after decades of stalemate. One effect of this nuclear renaissance has been that the

plans have changed for several reactors that were initially destined for decommissioning. Instead, the focus now is on relicensing

of the reactors and on power uprates. In fact, after the peak period between 1987 and 1998, no additional power reactors have been

shutdown. On the contrary, power uprates in the past twenty years have added a cumulative capacity equivalent to five new reactors.

Almost all the operating reactors plan to have license extensions, thus postponing the eventual decommissioning.

Nevertheless, in addition to the 9 reactors where licenses have been terminated following decommissioning, 12 power and

early demonstration reactors and 14 test & research reactors are permanently shutdown and are in decommissioning phase. Substantial

experience and lessons learned are available from the U.S. projects that are of value to the international decommissioning

projects, especially where such projects are in early stages. ong>Theong>se lessons cover a wide array of areas from decommissioning plans,

technology applications, large component removal, regulatory and public interface, decommissioning funding and costs, clean up

criteria, surveys of the decommissioned site, and license termination. Additionally, because of the unavailability of a national spent

fuel disposition facility, most decommissioning sites are constructing above ground interim storage facilities for the spent nuclear

fuel.

2) DECOMMISSIONING STRATEGIES WORLDWIDE: A RE-VISITED OVERVIEW

OF RELEVANT FACTORS - 16016

Michele Laraia, ong>Internationalong> Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) (Austria)

This paper highlights current trends and developments in selecting decommissioning strategies worldwide. Radiological conditions,

spent fuel and radioactive waste management, funding, economics and the development of suitable technology are some

common factors for taking decisions on the timing and circumstances of decommissioning. Although safe enclosure is the selected

option for many shut down facilities typically due to lack of ready cash, delay in dismantling may have serious disadvantages

such as loss of expertise and long term uncertainties.

84


Abstracts Session 24

Currently, of the many large nuclear installations permanently shut down, only a fraction have been or will be in the near term

totally dismantled and decommissioned to unrestricted release state. A trend towards immediate dismantling seems to emerge in

some countries, and is supported by IAEA positions, but this appears to be due to country-, site- or plant-specific conditions of limited

generic applicability.

In recent years, and often as the result of international efforts, the situation is evolving and provisions and infrastructures

including funding are being established to cope with decommissioning challenges. This factor seems in principle to encourage

immediate, total dismantling. However, the worldwide overview of decommissioning strategies does not offer a clear pattern. New

factors have come into being, such as stakeholder opinions, in particular those of local communities, and now play a significant

role in decision-making. ong>Theong> conditions of the nuclear industry at large (e.g. the nuclear renaissance) have considerably changed

over the last few years and are going to affect decommissioning. Strategies such as restricted release (brownfields), incremental

decommissioning or entombment seem to offer new prospects. ong>Theong> author reviewed the worldwide situation around the year 2000,

and offers in this paper some reflections about changed worlds conditions and how these affect the decommissioning scenarios.

3) A NATIONWIDE MODELLING APPROACH TO DECOMMISSIONING - 16182

Bernard Kelly, University of Manchester (UK); Paul E Mort,Sellafield Ltd. (UK);

Andrew J Lowe, University of Manchester (UK)

In this paper we describe a proposed UK national approach to modelling decommissioning. For the first time, we shall have

an insight into optimizing the safety and efficiency of a national decommissioning strategy. To do this we use the General Case

Integrated Waste Algorithm (GIA), a universal model of decommissioning nuclear plant, power plant, waste arisings and the associated

knowledge capture. ong>Theong> model scales from individual items of plant through cells, groups of cells, buildings, whole sites and

then on up to a national scale. We describe the national vision for GIA which can be broken down into three levels:

1) the capture of the chronological order of activities that an experienced decommissioner would use to decommission any

nuclear facility anywhere in the world this is Level 1 of GIA;

2) the construction of an Operational Research (OR) model based on Level 1 to allow rapid what if scenarios to be tested

quickly (Level 2);

3) the construction of a state of the art knowledge capture capability that allows future generations to learn from our current

decommissioning experience (Level 3).

We show the progress to date in developing GIA in levels 1 & 2. As part of level 1, GIA has assisted in the development of an

IMechE professional decommissioning qualification. Furthermore, we describe GIA as the basis of a UK-Owned database of

decommissioning norms for such things as costs, productivity, durations etc. From level 2, we report on a pilot study that has successfully

tested the basic principles for the OR numerical simulation of the algorithm. We then highlight the advantages of applying

the OR modelling approach nationally. In essence, a series of what if&scenarios can be tested that will improve the safety and

efficiency of decommissioning.

4) IMPLEMENTATION AND ONGOING DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPREHENSIVE PROGRAM

TO DEAL WITH CANADAS NUCLEAR LEGACY LIABILITIES - 16039

Douglas Metcalfe, Pui Wai Yuen, David McCauley, Natural Resources Canada (Canada);

Sheila Brooks, Joan Miller, Michael Stephens, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (Canada)

Nuclear legacy liabilities have resulted from 60 years of nuclear research and development carried out on behalf of Canada by

the National Research Council (1944 to 1952) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL, 1952 to present). ong>Theong>se liabilities

are located at AECL research and prototype reactor sites, and consist of shutdown reactors, research facilities and associated infrastructure,

a wide variety of buried and stored waste, and contaminated lands.

In 2006, the Government of Canada adopted a new long-term strategy to deal with the nuclear legacy liabilities and initiated

a five-year, $520 million (Canadian dollars) start-up phase, thereby creating the Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP). ong>Theong>

objective of the long-term strategy is to safely and cost-effectively reduce risks and liabilities based on sound waste management

and environmental principles in the best interests of Canadians. ong>Theong> five-year plan is directed at addressing health, safety and environmental

priorities, accelerating the decontamination and demolition of shutdown buildings, and laying the groundwork for future

phases of the strategy. It also includes public consultation to inform the further development of the strategy and provides for continued

care and maintenance activities at the sites.

ong>Theong> NLLP is being implemented through a Memorandum of Understanding between Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) and

AECL whereby NRCan is responsible for policy direction and oversight, including control of funding, and AECL is responsible for

carrying out the work and holding and administering all licences, facilities and lands.

5) THE SWEDISH PROGRAM FOR FUTURE D&D OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS - 16143

Jan Carlsson, Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB) (Sweden)

According to Swedish law anyone who has a license for a business in which radioactive waste is arising also has the responsibility

to make sure the waste is safely handled and disposed of. ong>Theong> major radioactive waste producers in Sweden are the Nuclear

Power Plants. ong>Theong> owners of the NPPs have jointly formed the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company, SKB, to

take care of their radioactive waste in a safe and economical way. In the facilities and systems built and operated by SKB also

radioactive waste from other, small, waste producers are accepted.

ong>Theong> 12 Swedish Nuclear Power Reactors are located at four sites. ong>Theong> reactors at one site, Barsebäck, have been shut down for

political reasons after about 25 years of operation while reactors at the other three sites are planned for 50 to 60 years of operation.

ong>Theong> basic decommissioning strategy is an early dismantling after the final shut down. One request is that a final repository for short

lived decommissioning waste shall be available before any major dismantling begins. A project for extension of the existing SFR

repository is in progress and the extension is expected to be in operation the year 2020. ong>Theong> first reactors to be dismantled are the

reactors at Barsebäck. Also already shut down and ready for dismantling are two small reactors, Ågesta in Stockholm and a research

reactor at the Studsvik site. ong>Theong> other reactors will be decommissioned from around the year 2030.

85


Session 24-25 Abstracts

6) AREVA DECOMMISSIONING STRATEGY AND PROGRAMME - 16036

Guy Decobert, AREVA (France) Arnaud Gay, AREVA NC (France)

This article is about AREVAs nuclear site dismantling strategy and the presentation of the recent Nuclear Site Value Development

Business Unit main tasks and its projects Created beginning of 2008, this business unit is aimed at the dismantling of the back

end fuel cycle installations. It gathers four main projects : a reprocessing plant UP2 400 on AREVA La Hague site, an other reprocessing

plant UP1 on CEA Marcoule site, a MOX fuel plant on Cadarache and two GCR fuel fabrication plants located on Veurey

and Annecy sites.

ong>Theong> main objectives of this business unit are to enhance the feed-back, to contribute to performance improvements, to value

professionals and to put innovation forward.ong>Theong>se emerging activities constitute a major know-how for AREVA and will increase

overtime.

7) NUCLEAR POWER PLANT DECOMMISSIONING IN GERMANY -

PROJECTS, REGULATION AND EXPERIENCE - 16359

Leopold Weil, Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) (Germany);

Bernd Rehs, Federal Office for Radiation Protection (Germany)

In Germany, altogether 19 nuclear power plants (NPPs) and prototype reactors have been permanently shut down. For 15 NPPs

the dismantling is in progress with green-field conditionsas planning target. Two units were completely dismantled and two are in

safe enclosure.

ong>Theong> main legal provision for all aspects of the peaceful use of nuclear energy in Germany is the Atomic Energy Act (AtG),

which also contains the basic legal conditions for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. It stipulates that decommissioning is

subject to a licence by the regulatory body of the respective Federal State (Land).

An emerging decommissioning practice in Germany is the removal of complete undismantled large components and their transport

to interim storage facilities. During the period of storage, the radionuclide inventory of the components will decrease due to

radioactive decay and the subsequent segmentation of the components can be done with less radiation protection effort.

ong>Theong> commissioning of the Konrad repository in the near future might have consequences on planning of decommissioning,

regarding the selection of a decommissioning strategy and the waste management.

6) VARIATION OF LIGHT WATER REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING STRATEGIES IN JAPAN - 16113

Takeshi Ishikura, Shigenbu Hirusawa, ong>Theong> Institute of Applied Energy (Japan);

Yoshihiko Horikawa, ong>Theong> Kansai Electric Power Company (Japan)

ong>Theong>re are 55 light water reactors (LWRs) in operation in Japan. Nuclear reactor decommissioning has already started with

Tokai GCR and Fugen heavy water cooled reactor. It is assumed in 2030s that numbers of LWRs start decommissioning year after

year in Japan, supposing that LWRs plant life is 60 years. We should, however, early prepare LWR decommissioning because its

schedule can be accelerated, as exampled by Hamaoka 1&2 BWR which was announced in December 2008 to permanently shut

down.

Japan has carefully prepared for reactor decommissioning in policy, regulation and technology since 1980s. A basic view

including a standard decommissioning process on commercial nuclear power plants was initially proposed by a committee of Ministry

of ong>Internationalong> Trade and Industry (MITI, currently Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, METI) in 1985, in which short

safe storage scenario with early dismantling was recommended in consideration of future site reuse. In 1990, a law on nuclear

power plant dismantling cost reservation was established based on the IAEs cost estimation. In 1987-2004, the former NUPEC had

implemented comprehensive decommissioning technology development. In 2001, a METI committee recommended that the safe

storage period should be flexible depending on site specific condition. In 2005, the law for the regulation of nuclear source material,

nuclear fuel material and reactors (LRNR) was amended to regulate concrete decommissioning procedure including decommissioning

plan to be submitted for regulatory permit. Now it is time for related parties to prepare actual decommissioning strategy

for LWRs.

SESSION 25 - TREATMENT, MANAGEMENT AND RECYCLE OF D&D MATERIALS

1) WASTE REDUCTION BY RE-USE OF LOW ACTIVATED MATERIAL - 16035

Ulrich Ehrlicher, Heinz Pauli, Paul Scherrer Institut (Switzerland)

A multidisciplinary institute, equipped with research reactors and accelerator-driven research installations produces and, in the

case of PSI, collects radioactive waste on one hand and requires material, especially for shielding purpose, on the other hand. ong>Theong>

legislative framework for radiation protection, financial reasons and limited storage capacity strongly force Paul Scherrer Institute

and comparable facilities to minimize radioactive waste. Besides free release of inactive components, recycling and re-use of lowlevel

radioactive material in controlled areas are the best means for waste minimization. ong>Theong> re-use of slightly activated steel plates

as a shielding material and the recycling of irradiated reactor graphite as a filling material embedded in mortar may give examples

and encouragement for similar activities. Besides the advantages for radiation protection, the financial benefit can be measured in

millions of dollars.

2) ANALYTICAL METHODOLOGY FOR OPTIMIZATION OF WASTE MANAGEMENT SCENARIOS

IN NUCLEAR INSTALLATION DECOMMISSIONING PROCESS - 16148

Matej Zachar, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava (Slovakia);

Vladimir Daniska, Deconta, a.s. (Slovakia); Ivan Rehak, Marek Vasko, Decom, a.s.(Slovakia);

Vladimir Necas, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava (Slovakia)

ong>Theong> nuclear installation decommissioning process is characterized by production of large amount of various radioactive and

non-radioactive waste that have to be managed, taking into account their physical, chemical, toxic and radiological properties.

Waste management is considered to be one of the key issues in the frame of the decommissioning process.

86


Abstracts Session 25-26

During the decommissioning planning period, the scenarios covering possible routes of materials release into the environment

and radioactive waste disposal, should be discussed and evaluated. Unconditional and conditional release to the environment, longterm

storage at the nuclear site, near surface or deep geological disposal and relevant material management techniques for achieving

the final status should be taken into account in the analysed scenarios. At the level of the final decommissioning plan, it is

desired to have the waste management scenario optimised for local specific facility conditions taking into account a national decommissioning

background.

ong>Theong> analytical methodology for decommissioning waste management scenarios evaluation, presented in the paper, is based on

the materials and radioactivity flow modelling which starts from waste generation activities like pre-dismantling decontamination,

selected methods of dismantling, waste treatment and conditioning, up to materials release or conditioned radioactive waste disposal.

Necessary input data for scenarios, e.g. nuclear installation inventory database (physical and radiological data), waste processing

technologies parameters or material release and waste disposal limits, has to be considered. ong>Theong> analytical methodology principles

are implemented into the standardised decommissioning parameters calculation code OMEGA, developed in the DECOM

company. In the paper the examples of the methodology for the scenarios optimization are presented and discussed.

3) CHARACTERISATION OF RACTOR GRAPHITE TO INFORM STRATEGIES FOR

DISPOSAL OF REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING WASTE - 16389

Andrew Hetherington, Phil Davies, NDA (UK)

Graphite has been used extensively as a neutron moderator and reflector in reactors in the UK since the 1950s. ong>Theong> UK nuclear

decommissioning programme will result in some 90,000 tonnes of waste graphite being removed. A number of other countries also

have graphite reactors scheduled for decommissioning, but UK has the largest graphite waste liability of any.

ong>Theong> current UK baseline strategy, which is to package graphite waste and then consign it to geological disposal is considered

feasible, but it has not yet been shown to represent the optimum solution in terms of cost, safety and protection of the environment.

ong>Theong> NDA is currently engaged in investigating alternative solutions for reactor graphite. A review of worldwide developments has

enabled a decision chart to be compiled for managing graphite waste showing, at a high level, the strategic options and processes

needed to take the graphite from a shut?down reactor, to the point where it is finally disposed of.

Physical characterisation is needed to provide a detailed radionuclide inventory for the graphite to supplement theoretical calculations.

Such an inventory, together with information about the physical and chemical characteristics of the material is a prerequisite

for making decisions about its interim management as well as final disposition. ong>Theong>re is a need to progress understanding of

uncertainties in the activity of the long?lived radionuclides in graphite and of particular significance is precise characterisation in

relation to Carbon?14 and Chlorine?36. Using information about the impurity levels in graphite at the various sites along with irradiation

history, modelling tools will be used to assess the profile of key radionuclides within the graphite with a view to optimising

the disposal route.

4) DEMONSTRATION OF UK ILW TREATMENT BY GEOMELT VITRIFICATION - 16105

Keith Witwer, Kevin Finucane, Eric Dysland, AMEC, GeoMelt Division (USA)

Experiments for airborne dispersion ratio of radionuclides during plasma arc cutting were carried out in a contamination control

enclosure, using stored radioactive metal wastes arising from the decommissioning activities of Japan Power Demonstration

Reactor, which was a boiling water type reactor. Neutron induced-activated piping and surface contaminated piping were segmented

into pieces using air plasma arc cutting, using a current power was 100A. In addition, similar experiments for contaminated piping

of the Advanced ong>Theong>rmal Reactor, Fugen were carried out.