12.11.2020 Views

Monkwood DIY Desk Plans BETA version

Here's an 'as is' DIY desk with supplies and dimensions and some instructions. Fill in the blanks creatively and or consult a woodworker to create your own until full version is released. My client building schedule has been very intense and I have less help in the shop these days due to COVID. I aim to keep chipping away at these plans for release3 in the new year. For those who would like to get started I have made these BETA plans available. Thanks for your patience and interest in this project! Sincerely, Monk Please tag you pics with #monkwoodDIYdesk

Here's an 'as is' DIY desk with supplies and dimensions and some instructions. Fill in the blanks creatively and or consult a woodworker to create your own until full version is released.

My client building schedule has been very intense and I have less help in the shop these days due to COVID. I aim to keep chipping away at these plans for release3 in the new year.

For those who would like to get started I have made these BETA plans available.

Thanks for your patience and interest in this project!

Sincerely,
Monk

Please tag you pics with #monkwoodDIYdesk

SHOW MORE
SHOW LESS

Create successful ePaper yourself

Turn your PDF publications into a flip-book with our unique Google optimized e-Paper software.

Monkwood DIY Desk:

Designed by Brandon Monk Muñoz // Built by You

monkwoodstudio.com

(BETA Version)


Table of Contents

3 Why Build a Studio Desk?

4 Style & Method

5 Notes on Safety

6 Tools & Equipment

10 Model A // 61 key - 3 rack bays

11 - dimensions & diagrams

11 - materials & supplies

11 - cutting tops & shelving

12 - cutting under frame parts

13 - bases

14 - finishing

15 - assembly

16 Model B // 88 key - 2 split rack bays

11 - dimensions

11 - materials & supplies

11 - cutting tops & shelving

12 - cutting under frame parts

13 - bases

14 - finishing

15 - assembly

22 Model Z (custom configuration)

23 - notes on hardwood

24 - notes on sit/stand bases

25 - notes on future editions and upgrades

25 Example Photos

26 #MonkwoodDIYdesk Community

@ reddit.com/monkwooddiydesk


Why Build a Studio Desk?

A desk can be much more than a wooden rectangle that holds up your stuff. A well built

studio desk can organize your creative tools and help you focus your skills and ideas

into a unified workflow that unlocks your potential to alter your current reality for the

better. Or, it can simply be a very nice place to shoot some emails.

However you decide to use your studio desk, you’ll soon experience the benefit of

having a versatile space to work on what’s important to you. Now you won’t waste time

setting up your gear whenever you get inspired or start feeling cable chaos fatigue when

10 hours into an all night session. A designated space to create will allow you to pick up

wherever you left off and begin to gain some real traction towards your goals and

aspirations.

I’m not suggesting a studio desk will magically make your life better. Yet, if built and

used with sincere intent, it can definitely help open up many new possibilities for you.

I’ve built over 250 desks for all sorts of creative professionals. Whether they were a full

time composer/producer or a lawyer by day and synth lord by night - each of my clients

has an innate desire to manifest their ideas into material form - no matter what.

If that sounds anything like you, then I believe you have what it takes to make this

DIY desk and then go on to do great things with it...

You got this!

Brandon Monk Muñoz


Style & Method

These plans are intended for the first time woodworker with minimal tools, time,

space and money to work with. If you can build a skate ramp, you can build this. The

building style is inspired by the old school, use what you got in the garage method I

watched my grandfather employ during my childhood. With only a few tools and

some scrap wood he could build a doghouse that could survive the apocalypse.

My aim is to help you create a beautiful and long lasting piece of furniture with

common materials and very simple construction methods. In these plans I combine

strength and accessibility of ‘skateramp joinery’ with the attention to detail I've

learned over 20 years of furniture making.

You are also welcome to seek assistance from an experienced craftsperson in your area

if needed or preferred. Those with more experience and resources can enhance the

design with alternate joinery and hardwood materials to make it even better.

I see the #MonkwoodDIYdesk as a long term and evolving project. I will add more

details and options to the plans in the days to come. I look forward to seeing the

many different versions that will come out of these plans.

Treat it like a flexible recipe which can be adapted to fit your specific taste and needs.

The desk can be made in a weekend, but if you have the time and space, I recommend

giving it about a week so you can hone in and give each step of the process your full

attention and focus. If you only have a small window to work with, just give it your all,

don’t rush or get too mad at mistakes. They are a part of every learning process.


Notes on Safety

(post in a visible area as you build)

__________________________________________________________________________

• Build Sober

• Don’t Rush

• Wear Eye Protection + Dust Mask

• Measure Twice, Cut Once

• Don’t Make Cuts in Awkward Positions

• Let Blades Spin Fully Before Cutting

• Don’t Video Yourself While Making Cuts

• Organize Your Power Cables

• Unplug Your Tools When Not in Use

• Put Oily rags in Water Bucket After Use

• Clean Work Area Frequently

• Don’t Get Too Mad at Your Mistakes


Tools & Equipment:

Use all tools with care and respect. If borrowing any from neighbors or friends please return

them promptly, cleaned and in good condition. I also recommend requesting the help of those

with building experience for any part of the process you may need assistance with.

__________________________________________________________________________

Essential//

• miter saw or handsaw with miter box

• #2 pencil / silver color pencil / sharpie

• tape measure

• combination square

• hammer

• power drill

• stubby phillips screwdriver

• #2 phillips / 1/8” pilot bit / counter sink bit

• worktable on sawhorses or 4 x 8 - 3/4 ply or

insulation foam on ground

• extension chord

• 3” paint brush

• water bucket or large quart cup

• cloth rags

• first aid kit (place in plain sight to help stay alert)

• sanding stick*

Recommended//

• circular saw ‘skil saw’ (if cutting

your own ply)

• orbital sander or regular square

• 48” metal T-square or straight edge

• router with 1/4” round over bit

• small hand plane

• nail gun with 2” and 2.5” nails**

• Kreg pocket hole system**

* Instructions how to make in finishing section

** You can substitute wood screw and hammered finish

nails with these tools


Model A // 61 key Studio Desk


Model A // Materials & Supplies:

This shopping list is based on readily available and cost effective construction materials. You are

welcome to substitute certain items for others, such as hardwood tops instead of ply. However,

you will need to adapt the plans to suite your material preferences.

This list also includes additional pieces of wood for a possible mistake cuts and scrap wood to

use for assembly and finish purposes. If using Kreg Jig or nail gun you’ll need to get the

equivalent screws/nails needed.

__________________________________________________________________________

Wood//

1 4 x 8 ft sheet 3/4” (18mm) plywood (construction or furniture grade)

1 4 x 8 ft sheet of 3/4” (18mm) ply or insulation foam (for cutting assembly work top)

3 2 x 6 - 8ft (245cm)

3 2 x 4 - 10ft (305cm) - or 4 @ 8ft long

3 1 x 2 - 8ft (245cm) fir, pine or poplar

Building Supplies//

Choose the driest and straightest pieces you can find!

2 14” (356mm) or 16” metal drawer slides

(Accuride 3832 or equivalent - regular not soft close or push!)

4 A35z Simpson Strong Tie mounting brackets

(or large door hinges)

25 box of #6 - 2” (50mm) coarse drywall or wood screws

25 box of #8 - 2.5” (64mm) coarse drywall or wood

screws

50 box of #8 - 5/8” (16mm) pan head screws

25 box of 2” (50mm) finish nails

1 small bottle of wood glue (ex: Titebond 2)

Finish Supplies//

3 sheets each of 80/120/220 grit sandpaper

5 80 grit paper for sander

1 quart (946ml) clear top coat finish

(water based recommended on ply)

1 quart (946ml) wood stain or paint

1 beeswax and or orange oil

4 felt pads for bases

1 small wood filler

1 plastic or fabric drop cloth


Cutting Tops and Shelving:

You can cut the main panels with a circular saw or even a handsaw if needed. You can also

show this page to someone who can operate the sheet cutting panel saw which can be found at

many large supply stores like Home Depot or B&Q. They can make the main cross cuts for

you if you ask them nicely. Tips help too.

__________________________________________________________________________

Before cutting ply, look and see which side looks the

best and use that for your desk top and top shelf

1. Measure and mark ply from left edge at 66”

2. Measure and mark ply from left edge at 81”

3. Measure and mark ply from left edge at 91”

4. Use T-square or straight edge to draw a line

across the whole sheet with a sharpie

5. Cut on the line at 91”

6. Cut on the line at 81”

7. Cut on the line at 66”

8. Measure and mark a line at 33” lengthwise

across the large 66” x 48 piece

9. Cut across the line


Cutting Parts:

Use the straightest and driest pieces of wood you can find for the under-frame and bases to

avoid any assembly issues from warped wood. Cut rack shelf partitions from the same piece

of wood to insure it is the same width as it can vary slightly from piece to piece.

Always keep your holding hand AWAY from the cutting area.

1. Cut 2 pieces of 2x6 at 31.5” (main side frame panels)

2. Cut 10 degree angles on both ends of each. (make cure

they face correctly like a v.

3. Cut 4 pieces of 2x6 at 14” (rack shelf)

4. Cut 1 piece of 2x4 at 48” (support beam)

5. Cut 2 pieces of 1x2 at 48’ (hidden shelf rails)

6. Cut 1 piece of 1x2 at 47 7/8” (sliding shelf front rail)

7. Cut 1 piece of 1x2 at 47” (sliding shelf back rail)


Sanding and Finishing:

I recommend pre-finishing the pieces before assembly as it it easier to work on in pieces +

way less messy. It also allows for different tones for the parts and tops as shown in the

example pieces. Always use adequate floor covering as to not anger your landlord. Things

splatter no matter how careful you are.

The Sanding Stick:

A useful shaping and sanding tool for this project and beyond.

I recommend making at least a couple.

1. Cut 1x2 off cut at 11”

2. Fold and cut 1 sheet of sandpaper in half lengthwise

3. Apply spray adhesive or school glue to back of sandpaper

4. Line up edge of paper with long edge of wood and wrap around

5. Use hands to press on sandpaper until fully adhered

Shaping and Sanding:

Rough to smooth. Don’t rush or skip paper grits. It’ll all shows up in the end...

1. Use router or sanding stick around to round the

top edge of your desktop and top shelf piece.

2. Use router or sanding stick to round the front and

back edges of rack shelf partitions.

3. Use router or sanding stick to round the front/

back and bottom edge of the underframe side panels

4. Use sanding stick to tame any remaining sharp -

fresh cut edges and corners of the plywood shelving

and underframe parts.

5. Use sander or hand with 120/150 grit to smooth

out the edges you just sanded with 80grit.

6. Use sander or hand with 120/150 grit to smooth all

flat surfaces of the panels and parts


Finishing:

A million ways to chase a cat. Here’s just a few...

Paint Sample Wood Stain:

A cheap way to get wood to look any color you want.

1. Mix one 8oz (237ml) sample per quart (1L) of water

2. Stir well

3. test on off cuts till you get the right ratio for you

4. add more water if too dark/opaque

Brushing on Finish:

Use brush to apply water based paint or stain. Use rag or small bristle brush to apply oil

stain. Always put oily rags in water bucker after use for fire safety.

1. Paint or stain top panels desired color with brush

2. Paint or stain underframe parts desired color

3. Paint or stain 2x4’s for bases desired color (can

do this before or after making cuts - see Base

section for more info)

4. Lightly sand with 220

5. Apply clear water based finish

6. Sand with used 220 and add another coat if

desired. I recommend 2 or 3 coats of clear for the

desktop.

7. Add second coat on tops


Cutting Bases:

2x4 material for bases can be pre finished before cutting or afterward. I pre-finished them

in the example desks as its easier to brush upon the whole plank. Either way, I recommend

cutting the 4 parts from a single 10ft - 2x4 for wood consistency. I cut pieces in order like I

would a grain wrapped box. Make a smaller practice piece if you have extra wood.

You can also make these a simpler rectangle if your miter saw or box doesn’t go past 45 deg.

__________________________________________________________________________

1. Set your miter saw to 0 deg and cut following

pieces from long 8-10ft 2x4 starting from the right.

2. Cut 1st piece at 29.5” then label 1a w/ pencil

3. Cut 2nd piece at 30” then label 1b (bottom)

4. Cut 3rd piece at 29.5” then label 1c (side)

5. Cut 4th piece at 20.5” then label 1d (top)

6. Repeat above cuts for for other base,

labeling 2a - 2b - 2c - 2d in the same manner.

7. Arrange Base 1 on your worktop next to you in

the way with will be assembled (fig 3.)

8. Draw a mark on each end indicating which

direction the cut will be made. Then draw a 40 to the

top cuts and a 50 to the bottom ones. This will help

you keep track of each cut.

On the following cuts I recommend making 2 cuts per

miter. One to get close to the edge and the second to

go right up to the the edge. If using a handsaw miter

box just make one cut on the edge.

9. Set miter saw to 40deg and make the 4 cuts on

the top miters you labeled accordingly.

10. Set miter saw to 50deg and make the 4 cuts on

the top miters you labeled accordingly.

11. Check cuts with measuring tape and dry

assemble on worktop to see if they fit together well.

12. Repeat the above steps with Base 2


Assembling Bases:

Use the tape trick method for gluing up the base parts and reinforcing with screws after glue dries.

_________________________________________________________________________

1. Layout 4 pieces for left Base 1 on long work top

or foam board. Place them in consecutive order from

end to end with outside facing up.

2. Use painters tape or duct tape to connect ends

3. Flip over carefully

4. Add glue to miters and spread evenly

5. Gently lift up parts to meet together

6. Attach tape to remaining end

7. Wipe and let dry for 2-3hours

8. Drill 2 pilot holes on each miter angle. entering

from top and bottom of base. Use optional

countersink after for cleaner screw entry.

9. Use #8 x 2in screws in each pilot hole. 2 per

angle - 8 per base.

10. Drill 8 evenly spaced pilot holes to to trapezoid

piece of the bases. Then Countersink.

11. Sand and touch up finish on miter angles and

ends

12. Repeat the above steps with right Base 2


Assembling Underframe:

We employ a simple skate ramp style method with screws or nail gun.

You can adapt to dowels, pocket holes or dominoes if preferred.

_________________________________________________________________________

1. Designate which side frame pieces are left and

right and mark them on the top side. L and R

2. Lay side frames on worktop with inside facing up.

3. Use measuring tape and combo square to mark

layout points and pilot hole marking accorning to

digram above. (Will include more specific instructions

in version 1.0)

4. Drill pilot holes for support beam and hidden shelf.

add countersink on outside

5. Set combo square to 7/8” (22ml) and mark a line

on the bottom inside front of side piece for aligning

the drawer slides. front of slide should be 2” from

front and 29.5” from back for both left and right

slides.

6. Take out shelf piece of drawer slide by pulling

plastic tab. (see slides instructions for more details)

7. Attach frame portion of slide to the left and right

side frames.

8. Place left and right side frames upside down on

worktop with insides facing eachother.

9. Attach 2x4 support beam angle using 2 - #8 x

2.5” screws though pilot holes on each side.


10. cut 2 pieces of 2x6 @ 4.5” long for assembly

supports for hidden shelf. (cut them off of a scrap

piece no shorter than 14” for safety!)

11. Lay 4.5” cut off on each side where the hidden

shelf will be.

12. Place hidden shelf on top of scrap supports

and line up to markings.

13. Screws into side frame using #8 x 2.5” wood

screws. (3 screws pers side - 6 total). Use a clamp

if needed to hold in place.

14. Attach front and back 1x2 rails onto hidden

shelf using nail gun or 1.5” brad finish nails.

15. Take out shelf piece of drawer slide by pulling

plastic tab. (see slides instructions for more details)

16. Attach frame portion of slide to the left and

right side frames.

17. Place left and right side frames upside down

on worktop with insides facing eachother.

18. Attach 2x4 support beam angle using 2 - #8 x

2.5” screws though pilot holes on each side.

19. Drill 8 evenly spaced pilot holes to to trapezoid

piece of the bases. Then Countersink.

11. Sand and touch up finish on miter angles and

ends


Model B - 88key // Materials & Supplies:

This shopping list is based on readily available and cost effective construction materials. You are

welcome to substitute certain items for others, such as hardwood tops instead of ply. However,

you will need to adapt the plans to suite your material preferences.

This list also includes additional pieces of wood for a possible mistake cuts and scrap wood to

use for assembly and finish purposes. If using Kreg Jig or nail gun you’ll need to get the

equivalent screws/nails needed.

__________________________________________________________________________

Wood//

1 4 x 8 ft sheet 3/4” (18mm) plywood (construction or furniture grade)

1 4 x 8 ft sheet of 3/4” (18mm) ply or insulation foam (for cutting assembly work top)

2 2 x 8 - 8ft (245cm)

2 2 x 6 - 8ft (245cm)

3 2 x 4 - 10ft (305cm) - or 4 @ 8ft long (245cm)

3 1 x 2 - 8ft (245cm) fir, pine or poplar

Building Supplies//

Choose the driest and straightest pieces you can find!

2 14” (356mm) or 16” metal drawer slides

(Accuride 3832 or equivalent - regular not soft close or push!)

4 A35z Simpson Strong Tie mounting brackets

(or large 3” door hinges)

25 box of #6 - 2” (50mm) coarse drywall or wood screws

25 box of #8 - 2.5” (64mm) coarse drywall or wood

screws

50 box of #8 - 5/8” (16mm) pan head screws

25 box of 2” (50mm) finish nails

1 small bottle of wood glue (ex: Titebond 2)

Finish Supplies//

3 sheets each of 80/120/220 grit sandpaper

5 80 grit paper for sander

1 quart (946ml) clear top coat finish

(water based recommended on ply)

1 quart (946ml) wood stain or paint

1 beeswax and or orange oil

4 felt pads for bases

1 small wood filler

1 plastic or fabric drop cloth


Model B // 88 key Studio Desk

Hooray! Your file is uploaded and ready to be published.

Saved successfully!

Ooh no, something went wrong!