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Parish Profile 2020: St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Chestnut Hill

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SAINT PAUL’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH

Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia

2020 Parish Profile


A Prayer In A Time of

Transition

Almighty and ever-living God,

ruler of all things in heaven and

on earth, hear our prayers for St.

Paul’s Church during this season

of transition. Guide the wardens

and members of the vestry,

give to the clergy and staff the

healthful spirit of your grace, and

pour upon all of us the continual

dew of your blessing. Grant

us all things necessary for our

common life, and bring us all to

be of one heart and mind within

your holy Church, through Jesus

Christ our Lord. AMEN

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Table Of Contents

A Prayer in Time

of Transition

Welcome

The Leader We Seek

Who We Are

Worship

Inside Front Cover

4

9

10

14

Finance

Our History

Planning for Our Future

Appendices

Membership and Worship

Services 2009-2019

40

42

45

48

48

Spiritual Formation

19

Financial Figure 2009-2019

50

Music

23

Our Campus

26

Clergy and Staff

30

Vestry

31

Pastoral Care

32

Fellowship

32

Stewardship

35

Outreach

36

3


Welcome

“Ten well-dressed ladies and nine

gentlemen” first gathered in the meeting

room of the newly built Chestnut Hill

Railroad station on June 18, 1855.

They were there to “build a Christian

community.”

That community became St. Paul’s

Episcopal Church Chestnut Hill and was

admitted to the Diocese of Pennsylvania

less than a year later.

St. Paul’s, anchored on the same campus

for the last 160 years, has been the active

spiritual home for hundreds of local

Christians. Its history includes many

successes and, not unexpectedly, some

challenges.

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We have been there for our parishioners and

for the wider community through wars and

financial difficulties. Our clergy and lay leaders

continue to play significant roles in the life

of the parish, the diocese, and our greater

community.

During the current coronavirus pandemic,

our parish has changed along with changes

everywhere. We are confronting a crisis cubed

— that of COVID-19, historic unemployment,

and the protests about racial and police

injustice which have powerfully affected

Philadelphia.

The parish is using this time of physical

distancing to think deeply and creatively about

our role in the community and the world, and

to examine who God is calling us to be. This

has included continuing to serve our neighbors

through a drive-through food drop-off; virtual

services available each Sunday even as limited

in-person services have begun; confirmation

classes and adult education via Zoom; and

maintenance of our connections with each

other through virtual coffee hours.

The pandemic has been very challenging. It

has also revealed the vibrancy of the St. Paul’s

community. Although our Sunday worship

services have traditionally been the heart

of our parish, we have discovered that even

when we cannot gather in person we are a

committed group of fellow travelers.

Our lay leadership has stepped up and been

meeting more often than usual. Our clergy

and staff have been producing meaningful and

spiritually engaging virtual services. Our youth

and music programs have remained healthy.

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We have proven ourselves to be resilient,

adaptive, and creative.

In the midst of trouble, we have walked

together in love, and our connections have

become stronger. As with so many aspects

of our lives, the pandemic is proving to

be a time of unmaking and making, of reforming

and re-shaping, of seeing and reenvisioning,

of thinking and re-thinking.

The following profile will describe who

we’ve been; who we are now; who we

aspire to be; and what challenges we

face, including declining membership

and a change in culture, both within and

outside the parish. We are seeking a rector

who is motivated to join and lead us as

we continue the journey that began in a

railroad station all those years ago.

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8


The Leader We Seek

St. Paul’s is seeking a priest with meaningful

parish leadership experience, a spiritual leader

grounded in faith, who will help us find within

ourselves the inspiration to live into our

baptismal covenant.

We are prepared to welcome and support

whoever is called as she or he nurtures

effective lay leadership, builds and manages

a talented staff, and helps us become better

stewards of our resources and our community.

We are looking for someone strongly

committed to helping us realize what it means

to be a faith community in the post-COVID

world. We look forward to having a leader

who will embrace our multi-generational

congregation, and be a community builder,

pastoral care-giver, and careful listener.

As a leader, our new rector will need to

bring strong interpersonal as well as conflict

resolution and management skills to marry

our treasured traditions with creativity, to

align our ministries with our mission, and

to make difficult decisions about the careful

management of our resources.

We are looking for a leader who is an excellent

communicator from the pulpit, in the meeting

rooms, and in the wider community; someone

whose attributes include compassion, candor,

and humor.

St. Paul’s is a strong parish that faces some

challenges. We look forward to having a leader

who will help us continue our faithful journey.

9


Who We Are

St. Paul’s strives to be a welcoming,

inclusive, diverse, multi-generational

parish. In 2019 we counted 376

communicants in good standing. The

average attendance on Sundays was 176.

Our campus is located in Chestnut Hill,

what local historian David Contosta has

described as “A Suburb in the City.” We

are in northwestern Philadelphia, adjacent

to Montgomery County, and draw our

parishioners from a wide geographic area.

Our outreach efforts support Philadelphiabased

programs.

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St. Paul’s Core Values, 2020

• Living our Anglican heritage of scripture,

reason & tradition

• Maintaining parish traditions and honoring

our history

• Enhancing our worship through music

• Fostering a “big tent” where all are welcome

• Supporting one another in hard times

• Serving the community through outreach

• Nurturing the faith of children

• Building & honoring relationships

• Animating our buildings and sacred spaces

• Practicing fellowship and hospitality

• Living into our baptismal covenant and the

Book of Common Prayer

• Loving God with our minds and hearts

We aspire to be a more welcoming and inclusive

faith community and to achieve greater

transparency and accountability in our ministries.

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We are easily reached by public transportation:

several bus lines run right by the parish and

two SEPTA train lines have their terminals

within a five-minute walk from our campus.

While we describe ourselves as a welcoming

community, in our recent congregational

conversations some questioned how

welcoming St. Paul’s really is. Comments from

people who have experienced us as a more

closed culture suggest that this is an area that

is, perhaps, more aspirational than actual and

that deserves attention as we move ahead.

recently in becoming more racially diverse.

We aspire to continue to make progress in this

area and seek a rector who is also committed

to this aim.

St. Paul’s needs to expand its membership. We

aspire to attract new members who will feel at

home and loved in a parish that welcomes all

who walk through our doors. Our new rector

will play a large part in helping us be the parish

we seek to be.

Many recognize St. Paul’s as a church that has

been welcoming to LGBTQ folks for over two

decades. Our parish is predominantly white,

although we have made moderate progress

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Worship

Our mission is to be “a sanctuary for

worship and a wellspring of spiritual

nourishment, enabling us to grow in our

relationship with Christ so that we may live

Christ’s teaching in our lives and use our

God-given talents in service to the world.”

Sunday morning is the heart of life at St.

Paul’s. Three services offer a variety of

worship experiences. At their center is

the Book of Common Prayer. Rite II Holy

Eucharists are the standard liturgy for all

Sunday morning services except during lent

when Rite I has often been used.

The three regular Sunday services before

the pandemic changed our lives include:

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An 8 a.m. Eucharist with a sermon and no

music is valued as an opportunity for quiet

contemplation. It is attended by an average of

25 parishioners.

A 9 a.m. family service is designed to attract

more families to St. Paul’s, as well as those

seeking a different worship experience. This

highly participatory service is attended by an

average of 55 parishioners and is characterized

by a less formal liturgy. While this service

is structured to meet the spiritual needs of

families with young children, it draws people

of all ages.

An 11 a.m. service is a liturgy of more

traditional sights and sounds. Music plays its

largest role in this service, with our 40-person

choir offering anthems and providing

leadership for congregational singing. The

11 a.m. service is attended by about 75

parishioners in addition to the choir, clergy,

and lay ministers.

More than 75 parishioners participate in

creating our worship and serve as members of

the altar and flower guilds; ushers; acolytes;

lay readers; bread bakers; and lay eucharistic

ministers. After receiving Communion,

parishioners may receive a laying-on-of-hands

and a personal prayer from a healing minister

in the chapel. A team of lay Eucharistic visitors

brings communion and companionship to

home-bound parishioners.

In addition to the three Sunday services, St.

Paul’s offers the Holy Eucharist with healing

at noon on Wednesdays. Evensongs with the

adult choir, choristers, or both choirs, are held

monthly between October and May. Evensong

is a popular service averaging, in addition to

the choir, 80 attendees, many of whom are

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people who do not attend St. Paul’s’ other

services.

The Christmas pageant, featuring scores of

parishioners from across generations, takes

place on Christmas Eve and is a very popular

community tradition. Our 10 p.m. Christmas

Eve Eucharist features the music of our

magnificent choir.

All services are combined into one to celebrate

St. Paul’s Day in January. and on the parish’s

annual meeting in May.

At times of crisis, St. Paul’s has regularly

opened its doors to the community. We have

held vigils and services incorporating healing

ministries.

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Our three Sunday morning services present

as three distinct communities. In recent

congregational conversations, concern was

expressed that this has fragmented the parish.

Others see it as a strength. We see ourselves

as a large, diverse, strong-willed, multigenerational

spiritual family. We fret about

whether we are one cohesive community or a

collection of sub-communities. Some worry

that our services welcome each to worship as

they see fit yet separate us from one another.

A challenge for our next rector will be to help

us continue our own worship preferences

while truly becoming one united community.

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Spiritual Formation

Spiritual formation for Children and

Families

Children are a vital part of St Paul’s. The

mission of the St. Paul’s Church School

is twofold: to help students develop

an understanding of God, others, and

themselves; and to discern how the

Episcopal tradition effects and shapes their

lives.

On Sunday mornings we have three

opportunities for the parish’s children and

youth.

• A staffed nursery serves our youngest

children.

• A robust Godly Play Program designed for

early childhood- and elementary schoolaged

children connects them to concrete

symbols and stories and gives them space

to ask questions about God in a way that

is appropriate to their ages. Pre-pandemic

there were 34 children registered for the

three age-related Godly Play classes. Godly

Play will be offered virtually while the

pandemic lasts.

• A St. Paul’s Youth program for middle and

high school students is designed to develop

a spiritual identity and set of values. While

18 middle schoolers and 19 high schoolers

are on the books, one of the challenges

we face is that attendance is usually

significantly lower than that.

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Confirmation serves as a rite of passage and

the launching-pad for a lifetime of ministry

in the church. We have 15 confirmands in our

2020 class, the first held at St. Paul’s in several

years.

Our Parents’ Exchange program meets weekly,

providing an opportunity for parents to

support one another through the challenges

and blessings of parenthood.

A Children, Youth, and Family Resource

Ministry has been established to provide

additional support to our parents and

children’s programming. Our goals for the

year ahead include developing an increased

children, youth, and family presence at

worship; developing a stewardship plan

for families; developing clear channels of

communication; helping families navigate

the current crisis; and developing a volunteer

policy that consolidates SafeChurch, antiracism,

COVID-19, and the unique context of

St. Paul’s.

Spiritual Formation for Adults

The Adult Education Committee plans the

programs that nourish lifelong Christian

formation for adults in the congregation and

the wider community.

• Sunday morning adult forums, averaging

15 attendees, meet at 9:45 a.m., except in

the summer. The broad range of subjects

includes Scripture, church history, ethics

and morals, and pressing social issues.

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• Bible study meets Wednesdays at 10:30 a.m.

Tuesday evening series on special topics

are offered for four- or five-week sessions

in October and Eastertide. A film series is

offered on Wednesday evenings in July.

• Education for Ministry (EFM) is a special

four-year program of the national church

for advanced lay instruction. EFM has been

held virtually since April.

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Music

Beginning in the mid-1940s and continuing

today, the St. Paul’s music program is one of

the ways we celebrate our faith. It also makes

us visible in the wider community.

Our music ministries are intergenerational,

involving about 60 musicians of all ages and

abilities. Our volunteer singers are dedicated

parishioners. Many play key roles in the parish.

An adult choir of nearly 40 singers, consisting

mostly of volunteers supported by eight

professional singers, provides music at our

11 a.m. services, at Evensongs, and at other

special services.

In addition to the professional singers, the

choir includes choral scholars, high school

students (accepted through audition) who

receive a small stipend.

Repertoire for our choir draws on the

rich Anglican musical tradition. The choir

has performed at the Kimmel Center, the

Philadelphia Orchestra’s home. Recently it was

a choir-in-residence at the National Cathedral

in Washington, D.C., and, in 2017, at St. Paul’s

Cathedral in London.

Our Chorister Program supports young singers

ages eight and up. The program, which follows

the Royal School of Church Music curriculum,

provides strong musical and faith formation

opportunities for the choristers who sing once

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or twice a month. The Cherub Choir, made up

of children ages four to seven provides music

once a month at the 9 a.m. family service.

Our Aeolian-Skinner organ, installed in 1956

and updated and enlarged since, supports all

these ministries. While our director of music

has primary responsibility for playing our

organ, he is assisted by an organ scholar who is

a student at Curtis Institute of Music.

Restoration of the organ, made possible by

an anonymous parishioner’s donation, is

currently underway and will help support our

music program for years to come.

In addition to their central role in worship,

our music ministries play an important role in

the parish’s outreach work through the Five

Fridays concert series. This series includes five

Friday evening concerts each program year.

All proceeds from tickets support our major

outreach partners.

When we speak of music we refer to the

11 a.m. service, Evensong, and special

services. Using music to enhance the worship

experience at the 9 a.m. service deserves

consideration, as does introducing a wider

diversity of music to attract new members.

This ministry has drawn people to St. Paul’s

and anchors a very devoted, energized

following. Many COVID-19 related questions

affect how our music ministries can operate in

the foreseeable future.

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Our music program has been a core

strength of St. Paul’s for decades, yet

our parish survey and subsequent

community conversations reveal that

some parishioners question the cost of this

ministry relative to others. Our next rector

should understand the prominence of this

ministry in the past and the challenges of

sustaining it as we evolve.

We invite you to listen to our choirs and

organ on our website, as well as to explore

our 2020 Easter season’s virtual services,

available on YouTube.

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Our Campus

The land where St. Paul’s is located has

been its home since 1860. In 1928, the

cornerstone was laid for the present

church. Completed in 1929 and dedicated

in 1942, this building remains the chief

tangible treasure of our parish, a Gothic

Revival church of locally quarried stone,

carved oak, and stained glass. Our church is

the center of life at St. Paul’s.

The main building includes a Parish

Hall (located where the church’s 1860s

sanctuary stood), meeting rooms, and

office spaces. It is bridged to the church

by a wing of Sunday School rooms. The

Parish Hall is used for parish meetings,

church social events, and receptions after

weddings and funerals. It is also available

for rent to non-parish groups.

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Dixon House, directly across the driveway

from the church, has a large meeting room/

library, bathrooms, and a kitchenette on the

first floor. The second-floor space is available

to rent.

The rectory, a large 19th century home, sits on

the property next to the church and currently

houses the parish administrative offices

(which will eventually be relocated to the

Parish Hall). Additionally, the parish also owns

and maintains a small park across the street

from the church campus.

The historic nature of the buildings that make

up St. Paul’s are both a source of pride and a

financial burden. In 2018 St. Paul’s raised $1.9

million in a capital campaign to address critical

repairs and restoration. These monies will

fund the connection of the church to the city

sewer system, the restoration and upgrade of

the Parish Hall and kitchen, and the addition

of outdoor lighting.

The annual cost to operate our buildings

is about $220,000. The space planning

committee seeks partnerships in the

community to share our space and increase

our income to support and maintain the

campus and buildings used by thousands of

people each year.

One challenge before us and for our next

rector is not only to maintain but to identify

creative additional uses for these extraordinary

spaces.

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Clergy and Staff

St. Paul’s currently has paid full-time staff

positions including a rector, an assistant

rector, a director of music, a parish

administrator, and a sexton who lives on

campus. Part-time staff includes a parish

bookkeeper, an associate for communications,

an organ scholar, a musician, and eight

paid singers. Clergy responsibilities have

historically been divided between the rector

and the assistant clergy.

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Vestry

The St. Paul’s Vestry’s primary responsibility

is the stewardship of the physical and financial

assets of the church. It works in partnership

with the clergy to manage the parish’s affairs.

The Vestry’s authority is exercised largely

through committees, which usually include

both Vestry and non-Vestry members.

The Vestry currently has 13 members, who

serve staggered three-year terms and are

limited to two consecutive terms. (We are

in the process of reducing its size from 16

to 12.). In addition to the rector’s warden,

who is appointed by the rector, other Vestry

officers, elected from its membership, include

a parishioners’ warden, an accounting warden,

and a secretary.

The Coordinating Committee consists

of the rector and six Vestry members, It

serves as a support body for the rector and

the Vestry. It also serves as the parish’s

personnel committee.

Currently the Vestry is leading the

change process through this interim

period and in response to the challenges

of the COVID-19 pandemic. Meeting

several times a month, we are engaged

in reaffirming the parish’s core values,

exploring our identity as one church,

and planning strategically for the careful

stewardship of our resources.

The Vestry looks forward to a strong

partnership with our next rector.

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Pastoral Care

St. Paul’s parishioners are blessed by pastoral

care in times of need. Our clergy regularly

visit the sick, the dying, and those in need of

counsel. They also help prepare parishioners

for baptisms, confirmation, and weddings.

Pastoral care is not solely the province of the

clergy. St. Paul’s has a group of dedicated lay

Eucharistic visitors who take communion and

comfort to shut-ins and others who can’t make

it to church.

For people desiring additional support, healing

ministers offer a laying-on-of-hands and a

personal prayer in the St. Paul’s chapel for

those attending the 11 a.m. service.

Fellowship

St. Paul’s parishioners love to socialize and

have fun. Over the course of the year there are

many opportunities to meet informally.

Six breakfast teams serve breakfast for 30-

60 people on Sunday mornings during the

program year. Newcomers are welcomed

at our coffee hour after the 11 a.m. service.

Receptions after Evensong bring together

parishioners and music-lovers from outside

the parish. Our Parents’ Exchange provides

fellowship among families.

There are parish-wide get-togethers on the

first Sunday of the church school year in

September. The first Sunday in Advent is

honored by Sunday Advent Night. Pre-Lenten

fun for all ages has become a tradition at the

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Shrove Tuesday pancake supper. Full parish

meals help us celebrate St. Paul’s Day in

January and the parish’s annual meeting in

May.

Special occasions, like the 2018 kickoff of the

capital campaign (with a visit from the Phillie

Phanatic) and Rector Cliff Cutler’s 2019

retirement, bring the parish together to enjoy

each other’s company.

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Stewardship

Christian stewardship calls each of us to give

of our time, talents, and treasure in gratitude

for and celebration of all that God has given

us. We at St. Paul’s discharge our stewardship

obligation in many ways, including through

our mission ministries and through Christian

service outside the St. Paul’s community.

The 2020 pledged amount is strong, although

the overall total did not increase. Both the

number of pledging units and the total income

from pledges have been declining over the past

two decades.

This year, the Stewardship Committee is

working to encourage parishioners to maintain

or increase their giving, despite the challenging

combination of parish leadership transition

and the global pandemic, and to contribute to

a strong foundation for our next rector. The

committee is also reintroducing individual

solicitations, hoping that the more personal

approach will appeal to those who don’t

currently pledge and encourage those who do

to increase their gifts.

In addition, we are exploring other ways for

parishioners to support the parish financially,

most notably by participating in our planned

giving program, “In the Company of Angels.”

Managing stewardship is a major challenge

for our lay leaders—and will be for our next

rector.

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Outreach

Outreach ministries are the heart of the

church’s mission. At St. Paul’s, dozens of

parishioners work to give time, talent, and

treasure to organizations that help the

hungry and others facing challenges. We

collaborate with many community partners

to do God’s work in the world. Our parish

survey affirmed the tradition of caring

for others as one of our most important

strengths and at the core of our identity.

For more than 60 years St. Paul’s’ annual

rummage sale has given its proceeds, which

approached $40,000 the past few years, to

further our outreach to organizations that

address homelessness and hunger. The sale

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currently provides the vast majority of funding

for our outreach ministries.

The rummage sale was not held in 2020

because of the pandemic and the capital

improvements to the Parish Hall and the

adjacent kitchen currently underway. Its future

is uncertain. This shines a spotlight on the

challenges of creating enough resources for

future outreach ministries, ministries that are

important to the parish and to Philadelphia,

one of the country’s cities experiencing the

greatest poverty.

Ideally, our new rector will help us discover

new ways to honor this tradition and

rediscover how God is calling us to be His

hands in the world.

Our closest partner is Face to Face

Germantown, an organization that supplies

food, medical care, and other services to those

in need. More than 50 St. Paulites volunteer

there. IHN hosts families in transition for two

or three weeks each year. St. Paul’s houses the

families while two neighboring parishes join

with us to meet the needs of our guests.

St. Paul’s also gives its time, money, and

energy to Rise Against Hunger (formerly Stop

Hunger Now), the annual Martin Luther King

Jr. weekend program that involves 60 to 70

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people packing more than 10,000 meals for

people in countries ravaged by natural disaster.

Parishioners also participate in a monthly food

preparation and delivery service called Caring

for Friends. The food is given to Face to Face,

The Whosoever Gospel Mission, and St. Luke’s

Episcopal Church in Germantown.

Room at the Inn is a refugee resettlement

project at St Paul’s. On January 17, 2017 we

welcomed a family of five that had fled the

Democratic Republic of Congo 10 years ago.

The project continues to provide educational

support.

At Christmas parishioners choose cards from

the Giving Tree and purchase gifts for those in

need. In recent years about 150 gifts have been

bought and given at Christmas time.

Our next rector will inherit an active outreach

program. We hope that he or she will help

us focus our efforts and align them with our

mission so we can do the most good.

During the holidays, St. Paul’s collects turkeys

for Thanksgiving, giving away more than 50

each year, most of them to St. Luke’s.

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Finance

St. Paul’s is blessed with substantial financial

resources and many generous parishioners but

faces many challenges going forward.

The church’s primary endowment is currently

valued at $4.3 million. St. Paul’s also has a

separate endowment dedicated to music

programs and currently valued at $627,000.

It was evident from the parish survey results

that many parishioners were generally

unaware of our financial challenges and lacked

an understanding about how St. Paul’s finances

are generated and managed. As a result, a

series of Zoom financial education sessions

was held for the parish. The document for

those get-togethers can be accessed on our

website or by visiting

http://bit.ly/stpfinanceinfo.

The primary financial challenges facing

St. Paul’s are declining membership and

increasing reliance on a relatively small

number of generous donors. Nearly twothirds

of the total amount pledged in 2020

was pledged by 20% of all pledging units.

In the future St. Paul’s will need to increase

membership, pledges, and other sources of

income to maintain current ministries and

programs.

Our dream is to align the budget with our

highest ethical and spiritual values.

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Our new rector will play an active part in

the budgeting process. He or she will be

instrumental in working with our lay leaders

to set the parish’s priorities. We seek someone

who will help us identify new ways to use our

financial resources to live out our Christian

mission here in Philadelphia and in the world

while ensuring sustainability for the future.

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Our History

St. Paul’s Chestnut Hill was born June 18,

1855 when 19 local Episcopalians met to

“build a Christian community” for “the

increasing number of those who are attached

to the Protestant Episcopal Church.”

Throughout its history St. Paul’s has been

served by remarkable priests and laypersons,

people who made contributions to the

community, to the diocese, and to the national

church. Many St. Paulites have served the

diocese actively as members of Standing

Committee, at Episcopal Community Services,

and on many other diocesan committees.

Two members of the parish have served as the

diocese’s chancellor. Three of our rectors and

one former assistant have been elected bishop.

During its history, St. Paul’s has been a leader

in and responsive to the church’s changes

as they occurred. We have a long history of

including women in important leadership

roles.

In the early 1970s the parish used the

experimental liturgies that led to the

development and passage of the 1979 Book of

Common Prayer.

In June 2014, almost immediately after the

Commonwealth of Pennsylvania approved

same-sex marriage, St. Paul’s became one of

the first, if not the first, parish in the diocese

to perform a same-sex wedding.

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With the help and leadership of our new

rector, we look forward to continuing the

exciting, faithful journey begun in the

meeting room of a railroad station 165

years ago.

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Planning for Our Future

We began our discernment process seeking a

broad spectrum of input from the parish and

committed to using a variety of approaches

to achieve this goal. Central to this process

was the production of our parish profile, and

work on that began with outlining the path

we wished to follow. The principal steps have

included:

• Two focus groups met with a cross section

of parishioners in December 2019 to

identify broad themes and hear the language

they used to describe St. Paul’s strengths,

areas where improvements might be made,

and the kind of rector they were hoping to

attract.

• The creation of a survey both on line or

on paper was sent to the entire parish in

February 2020. It was built on the results

of the focus groups. It included both

structured questions and opportunities

for parishioners to add comments. Two

hundred and ten parishioners responded.

• Two teams analyzed the survey data: one

focusing on the quantitative results and the

other focusing on the written, or qualitative,

results.

• A writing team to pull together the various

threads and weave them into the profile was

established

• In an effort to increase general

understanding of our finances, an overview

of the parish’s finances was distributed to

the parish prior to, and formally presented

at, the Annual Meeting in May.

45


• Opportunities after the Annual Meeting

for parishioners to raise questions about

or simply discuss parish finances in

more detail occurred at a series of four

Zoom meetings held in late May and

early June. Those meetings drew about

85 participants.

• Community Conversations to discuss

the results of the parish survey in a

series of four Zoom meetings were held

in July. Close to 100 people took part in

these conversations.

The process we have followed in

conducting our self-study has been

inclusive of the diversity that is St.

Paul’s and reflects our commitment to

thoroughness, openness and engagement.

46


47


Appendix A

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Total Members

734

735

766

638

455

468

468

387

291

247

247

Pledging Units

204

189

208

214

234

210

208

184

173

168

164

Baptized Persons

Communicants in Good Standing

735

594

514 + 80 youth

638

789

699 + 90 youth

766

335

243 + 92 youth

445

528

433 + 95 youth

468

577

409 + 168 youth

387

461

306 + 155 youth

387

349

216 + 133 youth

310

269

184 + 85 youth

310

302

247 + 55 youth

265

325

255 + 70 youth

245

327

245 + 83 youth

Baptisms

8

12

12

16

12

10

8

8

5

12

5

Confirmation/Recieved

0

6

4

8

2

5

0

2

2

2

0

No. of Worship Services

Weekday Eucharist’s

54

46

48

64

58

58

43

41

41

45

58

Private Eucharist’s

14

13

0

3

14

3

6

3

3

0

50

Daily Offices on Sundays

8

7

9

8

13

10

8

11

11

11

9

Daily Offices on Weekdays

1

5

0

2

2

3

1

0

0

0

7

Marriages

8

5

4

8

10

4

2

4

4

4

3

Burials

7

5

12

10

9

6

11

10

10

12

9

Worship Attendance

Average Sunday Attendance

201

215

213

221

235

237

227

241

241

220

176

Easter Day

533

662

637

597

787

554

589

642

642

642

563

Children in Church School

80

90

92

95

65

80

85

85

55

70

83

48


49


Appendix B

Assets

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Cash

306,239

251,978

571,067

607,584

329,204

330,733

499,744

574,910

1,273,317

532,036

Trust and Endowment

3,488,122

3,234,465

3,546,604

4,047,996

4,185,573

3,986,740

4,133,691

4,589,008

4,189,343

4,664,834

Other (stookey/cap camp investments)

46,735

47,634

49,789

25,713

349,341

481,218

515,765

580,705

562,169

1,712,753

Property *

5,700,150

5,700,150

5,700,150

5,700,150

5,700,150

5,700,150

5,700,150

-

-

-

Total Assets

9,541,246

9,234,227

9,867,610

10,381,443

10,564,268

10,498,841

10,849,350

5,744,623

6,024,829

6,909,623

Liabilities

8,645

16,812

57,976

53,393

10,876

5,365

3,593

6,437

9,242

3,074

Revenues

Pledges and Offerings

660,474

612,961

687,975

610,870

696,737

754,074

681,317

694,615

720,429

644,454

Endowment Income

139,653

177,901

171,309

303,407

263,691

196,629

201,312

204,500

207,533

207,291

Other Operating Income

20,304

15,108

24,289

28,167

38,412

39,059

51,541

53,631

47,373

34,608

Total Revenues

820,431

805,970

883,573

942,444

998,840

989,762

934,171

952,746

975,335

886,353

Expenses

Clergy

193,991

187,801

230,357

222,399

249,457

247,294

252,921

232,162

217,701

271,935

Parish Administration

160,945

160,588

168,935

157,948

173,419

184,202

171,076

174,184

174,430

192,262

Worship and Music

140,071

151,021

143,402

168,387

171,837

180,108

185,405

197,744

195,501

255,052

Property

190,575

228,963

202,107

213,727

225,147

202,352

206,795

217,155

239,029

257,256

Education-Parish Life

13,446

18,847

10,215

17,845

31,285

31,016

24,533

30,762

77,358

32,211

Outreach and Diocesan Grants

41,431

41,927

44,299

54,647

88,192

93,007

101,960

99,520

105,252

90,711

Other

-

-

-

-

3,847

787

-

-

-

-

Total Expenses

740,458

789,147

799,313

834,952

943,185

938,766

942,691

951,527

1,009,273

1,099,427

* In 2017, the property was removed from the balance sheet.

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