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ABBEYMAGAZINE

by St. Norbert Abbey

ISSUE 14

900 Years

1121 – 2021


ABBEY MAGAZINE

ABBEY

MAGAZINE

2

ST. NORBERT ABBEY

DE PERE, WISCONSIN

Abbey Magazine

Fall/Winter 2020

Volume 14

Abbey Magazine is a publication of

the St. Norbert Abbey community that

illumines life at the abbey and welcomes

readers into that life, mind, and spirit.

ABBOT

Rt. Rev. Dane Radecki, O. Praem.

PUBLISHER - EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Very Rev. Bradley Vanden

Branden, O. Praem.

MANAGING EDITOR

Gina Sanders Larsen

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

Rev. Michael Brennan, O. Praem.

Rev. Jay Fostner, O. Praem.

Kathie Tilot

CREATIVE AND DESIGN

Montie Chavez, Sherwood Fellows

GUEST AUTHORS

Rosemary Sands, DML

Kathy Tilot

Karen Mand

Rev. Stephen J. Rossey, O. Praem.

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Montie Chavez, Jerry Turba

PLEASE SUBMIT LETTERS,

ARTICLES, AND INQUIRIES TO:

Very Rev. Bradley Vanden

Branden,O. Praem.

St. Norbert Abbey

1016 N. Broadway

De Pere, WI 54115

e-mail: prior@norbertines.org

phone: (920) 337-4311

web: norbertines.org

PRINTED BY

Heyrman & Green Bay Blue


FEATURES

THE MURALS OF

SAINT NORBERT

ABBEY

04.

THIS IS WHY:

NEW LOOK AND

FEEL

08.

NORBERTINE

WOMEN

10.

SAINTS AND

BLESSEDS

12.

FROM THE

ARCHIVES

14.

NEWS & VIEWS

INFORMATION

18.

COMMUNIO

20.


ABBEY MAGAZINE

4






Letter from the Abbot

DEAR FRIENDS OF NORBERT ABBEY,

On Christmas Day 1120, Norbert of Xanten and some of his followers settled in the

valley of Prémontré near Laon, France. A year later, 30 men professed vows, committing

themselves to a life of prayer and ministry as canons, and Norbert selected the

Rule of Saint Augustine to instill discipline and order. Over the past 900 years, the

Norbertine order—also known as the Order of Canons Regular of Prémontré or the

Premonstratensians—grew, flourished, diminished, and then expanded worldwide

with renewed spirit.

This Advent, the entire Norbertine order begins a jubilee year, celebrating the 900th

anniversary since its founding. In the Old Testament, jubilee is an experience of

renewal. In Norbertine spirituality, there is also a sense of rebirth through a commitment

to a life of conversion. Each of us is called to renew ourselves daily.

01

Renewing oneself requires a humble

recognition of one’s own weakness and

sinfulness. But recognition is only the

first step; renewal cannot take place

until a person also acts to convert weakness

into strength, sin into grace. Years

ago, a presenter shared with our Norbertine

community her understanding of

conversion. She explained that each of

us has a “rotten box” next to our heart,

a place where we bury hurts, rejections,

and bad experiences. Sometimes we can

get stuck in our rotten boxes, swimming

around in the negative experiences of

life. She suggested that renewal is about

emptying one’s collection of negativity

through forgiveness and healing.

A jubilee offers us just such an opportunity

to empty our rotten boxes and open

ourselves up to the joyous grace of God.

We Norbertines will mark this jubilee

year with liturgies, lectures, and special

events. We will note the long tradition

of Norbert in the development of abbeys,

convents, and foundations all around the

world. At the same time, I call each of us

to engage in personal renewal and the

renewal of our own local communities. A

conversion of our ways will link us with

the original spirit of Norbert and his followers

in 1120 in the valley of Prémontré.

In Christ through Mary and Norbert,

Rt. Rev. Dane Radecki, O. Praem.

Abbot, St. Norbert Abbey

| Letter from the Abbot


02

ABBEY MAGAZINE






900 th Jubilee Prayer

Of the founding of The Norbertine Order

1121 – 2021

God, Our Father, in your eternal

wisdom and unending mercy you

called Norbert of Xanten to

reform the Church of his time.

Inspired by the example of the

apostles and first Christians,

he gathered others to live a common

life in order to be sent out

to preach and announce the Good

News. Wearing the white habit

as a sign of the Resurrection, he

was led by you to found the

first Norbertine Community

900 years ago in Prémontré.

In gratitude, we celebrate this

Jubilee Year of our presence

and humble service in the

Church. Inspire us with the

zeal of Saint Norbert to be witnesses

of your loving presence

in the world today.

We ask this through Christ,

our Lord,

Amen.

St. Norbert, pray for us.

03

| 900th Jubilee Prayer


ABBEY MAGAZINE

04

Prepared for Every

Good Work of Art

THE MURALS AT ST. NORBERT ABBEY

By Fr. Stephen J. Rossey, O. Praem.

Priest, artist, teacher, and historian

In celebration of 900 years of the Norbertine

Order, the community of St. Norbert Abbey

created and installed nine murals to honor the

life’s work of St. Norbert. In this issue of Abbey

Magazine, we share three of these murals that are

especially illustrative of his powerful conversion

and early vision.

The murals are constructed of layered panels

that combine the background of the Park Abbey

cloister windows (this abbey was established in

1129 near Leuven, Belgium, and the abbot commissioned

the windows in 1635), the engravings

of Cornelius Galle, and details of the St. Norbert

Abbey abbot’s chapel windows designed by

Francis Deck. Galle, born in 1576, was a Flemish

printmaker on whose work the Park Abbey

windows are based. Deck was a designer for the

Frei Associates of St. Louis Missouri and creator

of all of the windows for St. Norbert Abbey.

The large panels contemporize and encapsulate

the Augustinian quotation, “Ever Ancient—Ever

New,” and tell the story from Norbert’s conversion

to his founding of the Norbertine Order in

1120 to his canonization in 1582.

The background of each panel features an

enlargement of one of Galle’s engravings of an

episode from Norbert’s life, printed on maple

wood to match the wood detailing in the recent

St. Norbert Abbey renovation. Superimposed on

this background is an appropriate detail from a

stained glass window from the abbot’s chapel

in his private quarters in St. Norbert Abbey.

Because these windows are seldom seen by the

public, this is a way of sharing them with visitors.

These panels are mounted on acrylic.

Preparados para toda

buena obra de arte

LOS MURALES DE LA ABADÍA DE

SAN NORBERTO

Como parte de la celebración de los 900 años de

la orden de los norbertinos, la comunidad de la

abadíade San Norberto creó e instaló nueve murales

para honrar el trabajo y vida de San Norberto.

En estaedición de la revista Abbey Magazine,

compartimos tres de estos murales que ilustran en

especial su poderosa conversión y su visión inicial.

Los murales están construidos con paneles en

capas que combinan el fondo de las ventanas del

claustro de la abadía del Parque (esta abadía se

estableció en 1129 cerca de Lovaina, Bélgica, y el

abad comisionó las ventanas en 1635), los grabados

de Cornelius Galle y los detalles de las ventanas

de la capilla del abad de la abadía de San Norberto,

diseñadas por Francis Deck. Galle, nacido en 1567,

fue un grabador flamenco en cuyo trabajo se basan

las ventanas de la abadía del Parque. Deck era un

diseñador para Frei Associates de San Luis, Misuri,

y el creador de todas las ventanas de la abadía

de San Norberto. Los grandes paneles contemporizan

y encapsulan la cita agustiniana: "Siempre

antigua, siempre nueva", y cuentan la

historia desde la conversión de Norberto a la

fundación de la orden de los norbertinos en

1120 hasta su canonización en 1582.

El fondo de cada panel muestra una ampliación de

uno de los grabados de Galle que ilustra un episodio

de la vida de Norberto, está impreso en madera

de maple que hace juego con los detalles de madera

de la reciente renovación de la abadía de San

Norberto. Sobre este fondo se superpone un detalle

apropiado de un vitral de los aposentos privados

del abad de la capilla en la abadía de San Norberto.

Ya que el público rara vez puede ver estas ventanas,

es una forma de compartirlas con los visitantes.

Estos paneles están montados sobre acrílico.






Jerry Turba, abbey photographer, photographed

both the Galle engravings and Deck windows.

Laura Treichel, graphic designer at St. Norbert

College, blended these images with aluminum

bronze anodized standoffs. Independent

Printing, of De Pere, Wisconsin, in conjunction

with Hayes Graphics of Mosinee, Wisconsin,

produced and installed the panels.

Jerry Turba, el fotógrafo de la abadía, fotografió

tanto los grabados de Galle como las ventanas

de Deck. Laura Treichel, diseñadora gráfica de

la Universidad de San Norberto, mezcló estás

imágenes con separadores anodizados de bronce

de aluminio. Independent Printing, de De Pere,

Wisconsin, junto con Hayes Graphics de Mosinee,

Wisconsin, produjeron e instalaron los paneles.

05

NORBERT’S CONVERSION

Norbert of Xanten was a beloved and admired

aristocrat on the spring day in 1115

when he rode his horse toward Freden in

the Germanic countryside. A sudden gust

of wind brought roiling dark clouds, a dust

storm, and broken, blowing tree limbs, all

of which terrorized his steed. A flash of

lightning plowed the soil under Norbert’s

horse, and it threw its rider to the ground

and bolted away. As the storm calmed,

Norbert regained consciousness and his

thoughts turned to God. “Lord, what will

you have me do?”

He heard the answer, “Cease from evil and

do good.”

LA CONVERSIÓN DE NORBERTO

Norberto de Xanten era un amado y admirado

aristócrata que en un día de primavera

de 1115 montaba su caballo hacia Freden

en la campiña germánica. Una súbita ráfaga

de viento trajo nubes oscuras, una tormenta

de polvo, y ramas rotas de árboles que

aterrorizaron a su corcel. Un rayo golpeó la

tierra bajo el caballo de Norberto el cual arrojó

a su jinete al suelo y se dió a la fuga. A

medida que la tormenta amainaba, Norberto

recobró la conciencia y sus pensamientos

se tornaron hacia Dios. "Señor, ¿qué

quieres que haga?"

Él escuchó la respuesta: "Apártate del mal y

haz el bien."

| Preparados para toda buena obra de arte


ABBEY MAGAZINE

06

THE FOUNDATION OF THE

NORBERTINE ORDER

Pope Calixtus II knew Norbert was a strong

itinerant preacher yet wanted to found a

religious order so that its members could inherit

Norbert’s apostolic zeal. Norbert and the

Bishop of Laon in present-day France sought

a place to erect a monastery. When Norbert

arrived in the valley of Prémontré, he spent

the night in a chapel dedicated to St. John

the Baptist and awoke certain it was God’s

chosen place, having also had a vision of men

clothed in white. Soon after, seven of his followers

became his disciples and the Bishop

of Laon gave them the white habit, which

tradition holds was indicated to Norbert by

the Virgin Mary in a vision. The habit came

to represent an external mark of the Norbertines’

internal piety and devotion to Mary.

LA FUNDACIÓN DE LA OR-

DEN DE LOS NORBERTINOS

El Papa Calixto II, sabía que Norberto era un

fuerte predicador itinerante, pero que deseaba

una orden religiosa para que sus miembros

heredaran el fervor apostólico de Norberto.

Norberto y el obispo de Laon, en la actual

Francia, buscaron un lugar para erigir un monasterio.

Cuando Norberto llegó al valle

de Prémontré, pasó la noche en la capilla

dedicada a San Juan Bautista y, después

de tener una visión de hombres vestidos de

blanco, despertó con la certeza de que Dios

había elegido el lugar. Poco después, siete de

sus seguidores se volvieron sus discípulos y el

obispo de Laon les dio un hábito blanco, que la

tradición sostiene que la virgen María se lo indicó

a Norberto en una visión. El hábito llegó

a representar una marca externa de la piedad

interna y devoción a María de los norbertinos.

EVER ANCIENT, EVER NEW

1121 – Norbert of Xanten founds the Norbertine Order

Today: The Norbertines honor the history of our founder in the new Murals of

St. Norbert, installed November 2020 at St. Norbert Abbey.






A TEACHER OF DISCIPLINE

UN MAESTRO DE DISCIPLINA

Norbert wished to unite the practices of

piety and penance with the care of souls.

He became an exemplary model of both c

ontemplative and active forms of religious

life. In a vision, St. Augustine of Hippo

appeared to Norbert and offered him a copy

of his rule, The Rule of St. Augustine, which

met Norbert’s requirements for his clerics to

live together in common and under a

common rule according to vows of poverty,

chastity, and obedience. Norbert urged his

followers to labor at their personal sanctification

so they could succeed at their labors

and fulfill their sacred ministries. Norbert

took from St. Augustine his Rule of Life that,

“with one mind and heart in God,” in love

we might be bound.

WANT TO LEARN MORE?

We invite you to visit St. Norbert Abbey

to view the mural installation when

COVID-19 restrictions are lifted. In the

meantime, please visit www.norbertines.org

for more history and images.

Stephen J. Rossey, O. Praem.

Priest, artist, teacher, and historian of Norbertine

art and architecture, was instrumental in

the conception and creation of the Murals at St.

Norbert Abbey.

Norberto deseó unir las prácticas de devoción

y penitencia con el cuidado de las almas. Se

volvió un modelo ejemplar de las formas contemplativas

y activas de la vida religiosa. En

una visión, San Agustín de Hipona se le apareció

a Norberto y le ofreció una copia de su

Regla, la Regla de San Agustín, que cumplía

con los requisitos que Norberto tenía para sus

clérigos que consistían en vivir juntos en

comunidad y bajo una Regla común de votos

de pobreza, castidad y obediencia. Norberto

urgió a sus seguidores a trabajar en su santificación

personal para que pudieran tener

éxito en sus labores y cumplir con sus ministerios

sagrados. Norberto tomó de la Regla de

vida de San Agustín que, "con una sola mente

y corazón en Dios," en el amor podremos

estar unidos.

¿QUIERE SABER MÁS?

Lo invitamos a visitar la abadía San Norberto,

para ver la instalación del mural una vez que

se levanten las restricciones por el COVID-19.

Mientras tanto, lo invitamos a visitar www.

norbertines.org para conocer más sobre la historia

y ver más imágenes.

Stephen J. Rossey, O. Praem.

sacerdote, artista, profesor e historiador del arte

y arquitectura norbetina, fue instrumental en la

concepción y creación de los murales de la abadía

de San Norberto.

07

| Preparados para toda buena obra de arte


ABBEY MAGAZINE

This Is

Why:

New

Look

and Feel

This past year, the Communications Office at St. Norbert Abbey has

been working to revamp our communication efforts at the abbey, especially

to promote prospect vocations.

In Fall 2019, the abbey partnered with Sherwood Fellows, a creative

agency based in Dallas, Texas to consider redoing the abbey website.

Through this exciting and new partnership, we are happy to share with

you the fruit of this year long process! The following are some of the

major changes to take place with the launch of our new brand.

1.The first major change for this rebrand, is the new logo. It will

be used on our website and other external communications. The

modern looking fleur-de-lis is both a new, fresh and modern take

on the traditional Marian symbol. Within the logo itself, there are

numerous symbols that are pertinent to the Norbertine tradition

and St. Norbert himself.

2. In addition to the new brand, the abbey’s website has a brand

new and improved look and feel that incorporates a consistent color

palette, icons, and photography. This new site is up to date with

modern design, with complimentary photography and video.

08

3. The last part of our newly redone pieces, is the piece you are

holding, the Abbey Magazine. The magazine has been published for

10 years, and as part of the overall rebranding, it was

decided to redesign the magazine that complements the newly

redesigned website.

01. THE VESICA PISCIS

02. THE CROSIERS

03. THE CROSS OF LORRAINE

04. THE CRESCENT MOON






01. Represents the womb of

Mary, and the coming together

of heaven and earth in the body

of Jesus. It is also a doorway

or portal between worlds, and

symbolizes the intersection

between the heavens and

the earth. This symbol also

resembles a chapel candle flame

and represents the commitment

of the Norbertines to the life of

prayer.

02. The crosier, curved at

the top to enable animals to

be hooked. This relates to the

many metaphorical references

to bishops and abbots as

the shepherds of their flock,

following the metaphor of

Christ as the Good Shepherd.

The Norbertines are shepherds

that follow the good shepherd.

03. St. Norbert was related

to the house of Lorraine and is

often depicted with the Cross

of Lorraine. This is a symbol of

the history of the Norbertines,

of their French roots, and of the

constant dying to self that must

take place in order to bring

about peace.

04. Patristic times saw in

the symbol of the moon a valid

representation of the Church.

Ecclesia is virginal and “dying”

in the encounter with Christ,

the bridegroom; she is maternal

and life-giving in her spousal

relation with the redeemer, and

resplendent in her grace-filled

existence. Fthe crescent moon

represents both the process of

ongoing conversion and also

their strong marian devotion.

09

EVER ANCIENT, EVER NEW

1121 – Norbert of Xanten

founds the Norbertine Order

Today: St. Norbert Abbey

honors his mission and

tradition with a vibrant

refreshed logo.

| This Is Why: New Look and Feel


ABBEY MAGAZINE

10

Norbertine

Women in

the U.S.

CLOISTERED OR

ACTIVE, YOUNG

NORBERTINE

CONVENTS IN

CALIFORNIA

ARE GROWING

Norbertine convents are branches on the family tree of the Norbertine

Order that live according to the inspiration of St. Norbert (1080-1134)

and the Rule of St. Augustine. Until 1997, Norbertine sisters and nuns

(also known as canonesses) only had convents in Europe. Fortunately,

since founding two houses in California, American female Norbertine

communities continue to grow in numbers, faith, and spirit..

01. NORBERTINE CANONESSES OF THE BETHLEHEM PRIORY

OF ST. JOSEPH – A Cloistered Community in

Tehachapi , California

Founded in 1997 by St. Michael’s Abbey in Orange, California,

the Bethlehem Priory of St. Joseph is the first community of

Norbertine Canonesses in the United States. It began with five

women, who initially lived together near the abbey where they

helped on a daily basis. They were given permission to start a

Norbertine community of cloistered nuns and now number more

than 40 canonesses. They have outgrown their living quarters

twice and are raising funds for an expansion project that will

include a new chapel and additional cells for the sisters. The

community devotes itself to prayer and manual labor. The sisters

raise chickens, cows, goats and sheep, make their own cheese (not

yet for sale to the public), and a variety of baked goods (macaroons,

biscotti, granola), jams, and apothecary items (lip balm, lotions and

soap), which they sell through their gift shop, in person and online.

They also have a very successful dog breeding program, “Priory

Puppies,” raising and training Labrador retrievers, Anatolian

Shepherd Dogs and purebred McNabs.

02. CONGREGATION OF NORBERTINE SISTERS – An Active

Community in Wilmington/Costa Mesa, California

n 2006 during the General Chapter meeting, Fr. Thomas Nelson

from St. Michael’s Abbey in California met with two sisters who

were at the meeting as representatives of the Congregation of

Norbertines in the Slovak and Czech Republic. Fr. Thomas asked

if the sisters would consider establishing a community of active

Norbertine sisters in the U.S. The sisters visited California in 2009

for the first time and agreed to Fr. Nelson’s request, but first they

had to learn English.






As guests of St. Norbert Abbey in De Pere, Wisconsin,

three sisters from the community of Vrbové

in Slovakia (Sr. Adriana, Sr. Benedikta, and

Sr. Magdalena) studied in the English as a Second

Language program at St. Norbert College during

the 2010 fall semester. They lived in the campus

priory during the week and at St. Norbert Abbey

on the weekends.

In 2011, Sr. Adriana, Sr. Benedikta, and Sr.

Roberta moved to California to start the first

community of active Norbertine sisters in the

U.S. They started out at Ss. Peter & Paul Parish

in Wilmington, and then expanded to St. John the

Baptist Parish in Costa Mesa, also. There are now

12 members; some are still in formation. The sisters

help in the parish schools, the parish bookstore,

and serve the poor in Wilmington through

their more than 700-family Poverty Program.

Rosemary Sands, DML is the Director of the Center for Norbertine Studies at St. Norbert College.

Previously, she was she was an adjunct and visiting instructor in modern foreign languages and literature

(Spanish and Italian), and later served as director of study abroad from 2002 until 2015.She earned her

doctorate in Spanish and Italian from Middlebury College and has a special interest in the history of

Norbertines in Spain (1143-1835).

11

DID YOU KNOW?

There are 225 female

Norbertines in the world.

They have been in existence

since the Norbertine order

was founded in 1121.

Communities of female

Norbertines can be found in 15

houses in 9 countries; 13 are in

Europe and two are in the U.S.

They are known as

canonesses, sisters, or nuns.

Some live in cloistered

communities and others have

active ministries outside the

walls of the convent.

All communities are expected

to be self-sufficient.

| Norbertine Women in the U.S.


ABBEY MAGAZINE

Saints & Blesseds

BLESSED HUGH OF FOSSE – NORBERT’S FIRST DISCIPLE

By Kathie Tilot, Communications Assistant at St. Norbert Abbey

12

If it is true that teamwork makes

the dream work, then Norbert of

Xanten and Hugh of Fosse

were destined for great things.

Norbert’s first disciple was born

in Fosses-la-Ville in present day

Belgium in 1093.

While Norbert possessed the

vision and the ability to inspire

others to an apostolic way of

life, it was Hugh of Fosse who

helped create the structure that

allowed the Premonstratensian

Order to flourish. He was the

detail person of the team, Norbert’s

right-hand man. He was a

source of unity in the Order and

under his leadership the number

of Norbertine foundations grew.

Hugh was the first prior of

Prémontré and later was elected

its first abbot. He built the first

medieval abbey church and

monastery there, helped develop

the statutes of the Order,

compiled the first book of ceremonies

with liturgical directives,

and may have contributed

to the earliest biographies of

Norbert's life.

Hugh of Fosse played a crucial

role in the founding of the Norbertine

Order. Hugh died on

February 10, 1164, and was

buried in the abbey church

at Prémontré. After the suppression

of the abbey during

the French Revolution, Hugh’s

remains were eventually laid to

rest at the abbey of Bois-Seigneur-Isaac

in Belgium.

Kathie Tilot is a spiritual director,

spiritual direction coordinator, and

communications assistant at the

Norbertine Center for Spirituality

at St. Norbert Abbey. She is a

graduate of St. Norbert College.






13

| Saints & Blesseds


ABBEY MAGAZINE

From the Abbey Archives

By Karen Mand, St. Norbert Abbey Librarian and Archivist

14

The first Belgian farmers

settled in the Town of Union

in Door County, Wisconsin,

in 1856 and built the first

church in 1860. In 1893 Bishop

Messmer of the Green Bay

Diocese wrote to the Abbey of

Berne in Holland and arranged

for Norbertine priests to take

control of these Door County

Belgian churches, in part to

combat the influence of Joseph

Rene Vilatte, who was drawing

people away from the Catholic

Church to his “Old Catholic

Church.”

The abbot sent Fr. Bernard

H. Pennings, Fr. Lambert J.

Broens, and a lay brother,

Brother Servatius, all of whom

departed Holland on November

1, 1893. Fr. Pennings was at St.

Mary of the Snows (Delwiche)

until 1898. That same year, the

Norbertines took over St. Joseph

Parish in West De Pere to

rescue it from financial trouble.

From there was laid the foundation

for the present abbey, St.

Norbert High School, St.

Norbert College, Archmere

Academy, and the other schools

and daughter abbeys (Daylesford

, Pennsylvania; and Albuquerque,

New Mexico) in the

U.S.

In 1902, the group of priests

became known as the Priory of

West De Pere. Fr. Pennings was

officially named abbot in 1925

and St. Norbert Priory became

an abbey independent of Berne

Abbey. The priests outgrew

the abbey at St. Norbert College

and broke ground on the

present-day St. Norbert Abbey

in East De Pere in 1956.

It was said of Abbot Pennings

that:

“… whoever has observed him,

especially of late, acknowledges

that he is a prudent, adroit and

resolute man” (Fr. Van Heertum,

circa 1900).

He had a democratic way of

governing, always consulting

with confreres in making a

decision. He kept meticulous

records of all expenses, as

evidenced by the number of

ledgers that exist in the abbey

archives. He was firmly rooted

in his faith and had a special

devotion to St. Joseph.

Karen Mand is the St. Norbert

Abbey librarian and archivist.

Previously, she worked in the

library at St. Norbert College for

more than 40 years. Mand holds

a degree in library science from

Holy Family College in Manitowoc,

Wisconsin.






15

↑ Delwiche, Door County 1898.

Fr. Pennings is second from the right.

← Fr. Pennings’ certificate of U.S. citizenship

EVER ANCIENT, EVER NEW

1121 – Norbert of Xanten

founds the Norbertine Order

Today: St. Norbert Abbey

remains faithful to his

message in the creation of

our updated web site at

www.norbertines.org.

| From the Abbey Archives


ABBEY MAGAZINE

16

Fr. Pennings, Brother Servatius, and

Fr. Broens (the original three who

came from Holland in 1893)






Early Letters Home

from Holland

In 1996 the early correspondence between

Wisconsin Norbertines and their families

and confrères at the Berne Abbey in Holland

was collected and translated from

Dutch to English in Letters Written in Good

Faith, a book by Dr. Walter Lagerway, Ph.D.,

published to mark the 100 years since

Norbertines first arrived in Wisconsin. It is

a compelling read for anyone who marvels

at the tenacity of early settlers. Norbertine

novices also study the text during their

first year of priestly formation. An excerpt

follows from a letter written by Fr. Pennings

to his family and friends in Holland

from his new home in Delwiche, Wisconsin,

on Dec 15, 1893:

(The cabin) is quite small, but big enough for

this winter, now that there are just the two of

us. We do not have our own kitchen as yet, as it

is not at all that easy to set up a new housekeeping.

We are short of nothing buy everything,

says Brother Servatius, and so it is. Still

we already have something: namely a tin pail

and a shaving dish, (that is our silverware); a

wash basin with a soap dish and a glass; we

also had a bottle for drinking water, but alas,

already on the first night [the water] froze

shattering it, because our stove had gone out

too soon; in addition [we have] one bed, two

chairs from the church, a table and a lamp,

plus a small chest, a hat and clothes stand and

a broom, that’s it, I think.…

Next Saturday we are having our first wedding.

It is the practice here to marry on

Saturday. I am told that after the Mass a

bunch of farmers stand at the door of

the church to salute the bride and groom by

firing all the guns they can gather for

the occasion. The bridegroom is the son of my

neighbor and would have married

before, if there had been a priest, [and] that is

why, with the permission of the

Bishop, it is now taking place in Advent.

17

| Early Letters Home from Holland


ABBEY MAGAZINE

18

InFormation

MEET AQUINAS AND VINCENT – NORBERTINE

NOVICES NOW TAKE RELIGIOUS NAMES

By Michael Brennan, O. Praem

Director of Vocations at St. Norbert Abbey

In our Judeo-Christian

tradition, the taking of a new

name is symbolic of entering a

new stage of life. In Scripture,

Abram becomes Abraham; and

Sarai, Sarah. Jesus called Simon

to follow him and renamed him

Peter. When a person is baptized

or confirmed, he or she receives

a new name symbolizing a deeper

commitment to Christ.

After being elected the seventh

abbot of St. Norbert Abbey, Abbot

Dane Radecki, O. Praem.,

decided to bring back the

abbey’s religious naming tradition,

which had fallen out of

practice. Together with the formation

committee, the abbot

also considered some more

practical factors: sometimes a

young man entering religious life

does not have a Christian first

name; there can be confusion

when a community has multiple

members with the same name;

and the young men currently in

formation are enthusiastic about

reviving the tradition.

Now each candidate for the

novitiate submits a list of three

religious names along with

his reasons for choosing each.

Names of Norbertine saints or

blesseds are encouraged but

not required. The abbot then

selects one name from the list

and announces it at the candidate’s

vestition.






FRATER AQUINAS DANNY ALLEN

FRATER VINCENT MICHAEL TAFACORY

AGE: 26 AGE: 31

HOMETOWN: Benson, North Carolina

HOMETOWN: Egg Harbor, Wisconsin

HOME PARISH: Holy Name of Jesus Cathedral

DEGREE: B.A in Piano Pedagogy from

Campbell University

DATE OF VESTITION: Aug. 28, 2020

I first learned of St. Norbert Abbey from

my spiritual director. The community life

and its emphasis on contemplation, liturgy,

and the higher education apostolate resonated

with my vocational call.

MY THREE NAMES

St. Thomas Aquinas is my favorite saint,

and I consider him a friend and important

intercessor. I speak with him in prayer

every single day.

St. John Henry Newman and I are both

converts to Catholicism. His hymn “Lead,

Kindly Light” was a great prayer for me

during my discernment.

St. Augustine is an excellent intercessor,

because he is an example of how God can

make a great sinner into a great saint!

HOME PARISH: Stella Maris

DEGREE: Business Administration

and Marketing

DATE OF VESTITION: Aug. 28, 2020

I chose St. Norbert Abbey because

communio is so important to the Norbertines;

I also appreciate their beautiful educational

apostolates. I feel at home among

the confreres and know this way of life is a

gift from God.

MY THREE NAMES

St. Vincent De Paul and I share a passion

for working and praying with people who

are experiencing homelessness and other

hardships.

Our spiritual father, St. Joseph, is the

patron saint of the universal church and a

man who for me represents family, leadership,

and Jesus himself.

St. Adrian of Middleburg is a Norbertine

saint who was a martyr for the faith. He

had an especially strong devotion to the

Eucharist and the papacy.

19

| InFormation


ABBEY MAGAZINE

Events and Celebrations

JOIN IN THE JUBILEE

From Advent 2020 through January 2022, the Norbertines of St. Norbert

Abbey are planning special events to honor and celebrate our 900th

Jubilee. You and your family are invited to join us. Please take care to

confirm these functions in advance of your arrival and learn more about

our complete schedule of jubilee events at www.norbertines.org/900.

MUSICAL PERFORMANCES

01. Norbertine Composers Concert

20

Music has always been an integral part of the history of the

Norbertine Order, especially the De Pere Canonry. In celebration

of the 900th anniversary of the Norbertine Order, this concert is

presented to help honor that tradition. All of the music used in

this concert was composed by Norbertines, such as Dobbelsteen,

Vanden Elsen, and Srmovsky. Please join for an afternoon of

motets, hymns, and instrumental works.

WHEN:

Sunday, March 7, 2021 at 2 pm

WHERE:

St. Norbert Abbey Church

02. Mass with St. Norbert College Chamber Singers

WHEN:

Sunday, May 2, 2021 at 10 am

WHERE:

St. Norbert Abbey Church

IN OUR COMMUNITIES

01. Habitat for Humanity House Build

WHEN:

April-June 2021

ALL EVENTS ARE SUBJECT TO

CHANGE OR CANCELLATION DUE TO

THE CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19).

EVER ANCIENT, EVER NEW

1121 –

Norbert of Xanten founds the

Norbertine Order

Today: St. Norbert Abbey

renews his call for vocations

with a heartfelt and authentic

video invitation.






02. Jubilee Masses at Norbertine Parishes

St. Norbert College Parish 900th Jubilee Mass

& Archway Blessing

WHEN:

Sunday, March 7, 2021 at 10 am

WHERE:

123 Grant St., De Pere, WI

Holy Cross Church 900th Jubilee Mass

& Parish Picnic

WHEN:

TBA, June 2021

WHERE:

3009 Bay Settlement Road, Green Bay, WI

Our Lady of Lourdes Parish 900th Jubilee Masses

WHEN:

Sat., Apr. 17 at 4:30 pm;

Sun., Apr. 18, 2021 at 8:15 & 10:15 am

21

WHERE:

1307 Lourdes Avenue, De Pere, WI

St. Willebrord Parish 900th Jubilee Mass

& St. Willy’s Jam

WHEN:

Sunday, June 13, 2021 at 10:45 am

WHERE:

209 S Adams St., Green Bay, WI

03. Tour the Abbey

NO PUBLIC LITURGIES OR VISITORS

UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE INTO 2021

Please contact (Michael Poradek, Special Assistant to the Abbot)

at MICHAEL.PORADEK@NORBERTINES.ORG with questions

about Jubilee events.

| Events and Celebrations


ABBEY MAGAZINE

In Memoriam

22

FATHER ROWLAND CHARLES DEPEAUX, O. PRAEM

Father Rowland Charles

De Peaux, O. Praem., 94, of St.

Norbert Abbey, De Pere, Wisconsin,

and a Norbertine priest,

passed into God’s eternal kingdom

on September 16, 2020.

Fr. De Peaux was born on July

4, 1926, in Green Bay, Wisconsin,

to the late Louis and Helen

(Paral) De Peaux. His home parish

was Annunciation in Green

Bay. He entered St. Norbert Abbey

and was vested as a novice

on August 28, 1944; professed

Simple Vows on August 28,

1946; Solemn Vows on August

28, 1949; and was ordained a

priest on May 19, 1951. Fr. De

Peaux celebrated his 65th jubilee

in 2016. Fr. De Peaux was

a graduate of Central Catholic

High School in Green Bay,

class of 1944, and St. Norbert

College, 1948, with a bachelor’s

degree in in philosophy. He then

taught French and Spanish at

Southeast Catholic (Bishop Neumann)

High School in Philadelphia

in 1952. Upon returning to

Wisconsin, he earned his master’s

degree in French at the University

of Wisconsin in 1956. He

began teaching French and Spanish

at Premontre High School

in Green Bay in 1957 and at St.

Norbert College in 1960. In 1970,

Fr. De Peaux earned his doctorate

in French and Spanish from the

University of Wisconsin.

In 1978, Fr. De Peaux joined the

board of education for Abbot

Pennings High School, De Pere,

Wisconsin, while working at St.

Norbert College. In 1985 he was

named to the board of Catholic

Social Services for the Diocese

of Green Bay. In retirement, Fr.

De Peaux served as advisor to a

national fraternity and as chaplain

to the St. Norbert College

Alumni Association.

He is survived by the Norbertine

Community; one sister,

Emerine Rondeau; one brother,

Lloyd De Peaux; a sister-inlaw;

and several nieces and

nephews. Fr. De Peaux was preceded

in death by his parents

and one brother-in-law.






FATHER ALFRED ALOYSIUS

MCBRIDE, O. PRAEM.

Father Alfred Aloysius McBride,

O. Praem., 91, a member of the

Norbertine Community of St.

Norbert Abbey, De Pere, Wisconsin,

and a Norbertine priest,

passed into God’s eternal kingdom

on October 23, 2020.

Fr. McBride was born in Philadelphia

on December 12, 1928, to

the late Charles and Mary (Shannon)

McBride and was raised by

his Aunt Mary Courtney, whom

he regarded as his mother. He felt

a call to the priesthood early in

his life at his home parish of St.

Patrick’s in central Philadelphia.

He entered St. Norbert Abbey

and was vested as a novice on

August 28, 1946; professed Simple

Vows on August 28, 1948;

Solemn Vows on August 28, 1951;

and was ordained a priest on

June 20, 1953.

Fr. McBride began teaching English

and Latin at St. Norbert

High School in De Pere, Wisconsin,

in 1948. In 1950 he received

a bachelor’s degree in philosophy

from St. Norbert College after

which he was appointed associate

pastor of St. Joseph Church

in De Pere while continuing to

teach at the high school.

Fr. McBride was the celebrant

of the Mass on WBAY AM/FM

radio for seven years, starting in

1958. When the new St. Norbert

Abbey was built in 1959, Fr. Mc-

Bride became the first novice

master. He was sent to Brussels,

Belgium, in June 1963 where he

earned a diploma in catechetics

from the Lumen Vitae Institute.

He earned a doctorate in

religious education from the

Catholic University of America

in Washington, D.C., in 1972. Fr.

McBride was the founder and

executive director of the Department

of Religious Education at

the National Catholic Educational

Association (NCEA) from 1972-

1979, from which he received the

NCEA Board Award for Distinguished

Service.

Fr. McBride was appointed the

ecclesiastical assistant for the

United States in 1989. He served

as consultant to the Archdiocese

of Boston for the implementation

of the Catechism of

the Catholic Church and was a

professor of homiletics and catechetics

at Pope St. John XXIII

National Seminary in Weston,

Massachusetts. In 1992 Fr.

McBride was named the

spiritual director for the U.S.

branch of the worldwide mission,

Aid to the Church in Need.

In 2003 Fr. McBride celebrated

his Golden Jubilee and returned

home to St. Norbert Abbey. He

was awarded an honorary doctorate

by both St. Norbert College

and Belmont Abbey College

in Belmont, NC. He lectured

and wrote widely, publishing 68

books and more than 200 articles.

Fr. McBride was listed as a

most influential educator in the

database of Christian Educators

of the 20th Century. He was a

humble man, always thankful to

God for his remarkable gift of

writing.

Fr. McBride is survived by the

Norbertine Community and

cousins Edward Dougherty and

Therese Dougherty and their

families. He was preceded in

death by his parents and aunt,

Mary Courtney.

23

| In Memoriam


1016 N. Broadway, De Pere, WI 54115

NORBERTINES.ORG

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