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WWW.MOTOMEDIA.CO.ZA NOVEMBER 2020

November 2020 RSA R35.00

20011

9 772075 405004

BMW R18

FIRST RIDE

HUSQVARNA

701STYLE

KAWASAKI

Z650

BRITISH

TWINS

BMW’S

S1000RR & XR1000

IN THIS ISSUE - SHORT CIRCUIT RACING - ALL ABOUT ENGINES - MOTO GP NEWS - PETERSON WINS MOTO AMERICA - BUYERS GUIDE


GO

ADVENTURE

KTM 390 ADVENTURE

ADVENTURE MORE

Fuel your restless spirit with a new adventure

every day. Discover KTM’s sporty attitude and

proven performance credentials aboard this new,

compact single-cylinder travel-enduro machine –

the KTM 390 ADVENTURE. Versatile ergonomics,

smooth power delivery, and innovative technology

all come together in a comfortable, lightweight

package – created for those who want to fit more

adventure into their daily lives.

Phone 011 462 7796 for your nearest dealer.

Please make no attempt to imitate the illustrated riding scenes, always wear protective clothing and observe the applicable provisions of the road traffic regulations!

The illustrated vehicles may vary in selected details from the production models and some illustrations feature optional equipment available at additional cost.

Photo: R. Schedl

K&N Style Filters

Available sizes 28, 35, 39, 42, 48,

52, 54 and 60mm R125.00

8000Ma

Jump Starter & Power Bank R1299.00

DESCRIPTION PART NO. SRP Inc. Vat

SMART CHARGER 1 AMP DFC150 R599.00

SMART CHARGER 3.5 AMP DFC530 R899.00

SMART CHARGER 4 AMP PSA004 R999.00

SMART CHARGER 8 AMP PSA008 R1349.00

SMART CHARGER 4 AMP PSD004 R1199.00

SMART CHARGER 8 AMP PSD008 R1499.00

R110.00 R465.00

Tubeless Puncture Kits

License Disc Holders

R168.00

Bar Ends

R100.00

GAUTENG

ZEEMANS GAUTENG MOTORCYCLES 011 435 7177

BIKING ZEEMANS ACCESSORIES MOTORCYCLES 012 011 435 342 7177 7474

FAST BIKING KTM ACCESSORIES 011 012 867 342 0092 7474

GAME FAST KTM MOTOR SERVICES 011 849 867 7000 0092

MOTO-MATE GAME MOTOR RIVONIA SERVICES 011 234 849 5275 7000

MOTO-MATE EDENVALE RIVONIA 011 234 027 5275 0545

MOTO-MATE KCR MOTORCYCLE EDENVALE FANATIX 011 975 027 5405 0545

PRIMROSE JUST BIKING MOTORCYCLES 011 016 828 421 9091 1153

RANDBURG KCR MOTORCYCLE MOTORCYCLES FANATIX 011 792 975 6829 5405

OFF-ROAD CYCLES 012 333 6443

PRIMROSE MOTORCYCLES 011 828 9091

MPUMALANGA

RANDBURG MOTORCYCLES

BIKE CITY

011 792 6829

013 244 2143

MPUMALANGA

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Bike and ATV Covers

Available sizes S - XL

From R270.00

Scooter V Belts

From R110.00

Tyre Levers

From R95.00

18L / min

Ring Globes

H7 150% Power R330.00

H4 150% Power R290.00

Rim Locks Front and Rear

From R48.00

Jerry Cans

From R450.00

Fork Boots

from R120.00

DEALER LIST

PBA DEALER LISTING

PBA DEALER LISTING

NORTHWEST

BIKERS NORTHWEST PARADISE 018 297 4700

INSANE BIKERS PARADISE BIKERS 014 018 594 297 2111 4700

MOTOS INSANE @ BIKERS KLERKSDORP 014 018 594 468 2111 1800

MOTOS WATER RITE @ KLERKSDORP MOTORCYCLES 018 468 771 1800 5050

WATER RITE MOTORCYCLES 018 771 5050

LIMPOPO

K.R.MOTORCYCLES LIMPOPO

015 297 3291

K.R.MOTORCYCLES 015 297 3291

KZN

ROCKET RACING PINETOWN 031 702 2606

PERRY’S M/CYCLES BALITO 031 110 0056

ROCKET RACING MARITZBURG 033 264 3240

ROCKET RACING PINETOWN 031 702 2606

RBS YAMAHA 031 701 1311

ROCKET RACING MARITZBURG 033 264 3240

UMPLEBY SUZUKI 031 303 8323

RBS YAMAHA 031 701 1311

UMPLEBY SUZUKI 031 303 8323

RAC610 Inflator R449.00 RTG5 Gauge R249.00

EMGO Top Box

R990.00

PART NO. DESCRIPTION PRICE

50081406/L CARB CLEANER 400ML 50.00

50201414/L TERMINAL PROTECT RED 50.00

50201415/L TERMINAL PROTECT BLUE 50.00

50320400/L BRK,CLTCH,CHAIN CLEANER 44.00

50500192/L CHAIN LUBE 150ML 34.00

50500193/L CHAIN LUBE 400ML 69.00

50510403/L CHAIN WAX 400ML 71.00

50510404/L CHAIN WAX 150ML 34.00

51528262/L PETROL INJECTOR CLEANER 10.00

53203200/L AIR FILTER SPRAY 55.00

53203500/L AIR FILTER OIL 500ML 55.00

53204005/L BIO FILTER CLEANER 5l 325.00

53204400/L BIO FILTER CLEANER 400ML 47.00

53780300/L SPARK 300ML 44.00

55000314/L TYRE FIX 200ML 45.00

56000001/L FORK OIL SYN 5W 125.00

56000002/L FORK OIL SYN 10W 125.00

56000003/L FORK OIL SYN 2.5W 135.00

56000400/L MOUSSE LUBRICANT 100.00

Hand Guards

THE WORLD’S Various Colours available

LARGEST RANGE OF

ABS Plastic R470.00

Alloy R990.00

MOTORCYCLE AND SCOOTER BRAKES.

British made Aramid Fibre brake pads for sport bikes are now accompanied by a new high tech range of

sintered metal HH rated sport bike pads that will set the trend of sport bike brakes into the next century.

Our new range of British made brake rotors come in flat solid types and fully floating designs complete

with alloy centre hubs at competitive prices.

CAPE PROVINCE

CRAIGS MOTORCYCLE FITMENT 021 939 8916

GAUTENG

BIKERS WAREHOUSE 011 795 4122

NEVES MOTORCYCLE WORLD 021 930 5917 BIKING ACCESSORIES 012 342 7474

TRAC MAC BELLVILLE 021 945 3725 FAST KTM 011 867 0092

TRAC MAC PAARDEN EILAND 021 510 2258 GAME SERVICES 011 425 1081

TRAC MAC WYNBURG 021 761 4220 MOTO MATE EDENVALE 011 027 0545

WICKED CYCLES 021 510 2968 MOTO MATE RIVONIA 011 234 5275

LIMPOPO

PRIMROSE MOTORCYCLES 011 828 9091

KR MOTORCYCLES 015 297 3291 RANDBURG MOTOCYCLES 011 792 6829

MPUMALANGA

SILVERTON MIDAS 012 804 8888

BIKE CITY 013 244 2143 ZEEMANS MOTORCYCLES 011 435 7177

FREE STATE

SALLEYS YAMAHA 051 430 3326

KZN

PERRY MOTORCYCLES CC 031 566 7411

RBS YAMAHA 031 701 1311

RIDE HIGH WITH YAMAHA 035 789 1581

ROCKET RACING PMB 033 264 3240

ROCKET RACING PINETOWN 031 702 2606

UMPLEBY SUZUKI 031 303 8323

NORTHWEST

BIKERS PARADISE 018 297 4700

MOTOS KLERKSDORP 018 468 1800

WATERITE MOTORCYCLES 018 771 5050

RIDE HIGH WITH YAMAHA 035 789 1851

RIDE PERRY HIGH M/CYCLES WITH YAMAHA GLEN ANIL 035 031 789 566 1851 7411

PERRY’S M/CYCLES UMHLANGA 031 566 7411

PERRY’S CAPE PROVINCE M/CYCLES HILLCREST

CRAIGS M/CYCLE FITMENT

031 765 2560

021 939 8944

CAPE TRAC-MAC PROVINCE BELVILLE 021 945 3724

CRAIGS TRAC-MAC M/CYCLE PAARDEN-EILAND FITMENT 021 939 510 8944 2258

TRAC-MAC BELVILLE WYNBURG

021 945 761 3724 4220

NEVES TRAC-MAC MOTORCYCLE PAARDEN-EILAND WORLD CC 021 930 510 5917 2258

TRAC-MAC WICKED CYCLES WYNBURG 021 510 761 2968 4220

MIKE HOPKINS MOTORCYCLES 021 461 5167

NEVES FREESTATE MOTORCYCLE WORLD CC

SALLEYS YAMAHA

FREESTATE

021 930 5917

051 430 3326

SALLEYS YAMAHA 051 430 3326


Intro. Keeping the wheels turning...

November Issue 2020

It’s an unwritten rule that there must

always be an intro to a magazine every

month.

That’s a tough call some months - what

the heck do you get to write pages and

pages about to introduce the months

magazine.

We hope you like it. If you cannot find it let us

know and we will kickstart the distributors.

foleyg@mweb.co.za

If you have missed any issues, please visit

www.motomedia.co.za for a catchup session.

The online magazine goes up as soon as the

printed copies come off shelves.

A comment on our cover shot:

That is not a chequered shirt, it is, in fact a

fully padded CE approved Kickback jacket by

Oxford products, with full body armour and

Kevlar inlays.

Always wear the right gear - because

sometimes... stuff happens.

So far - so good?

A man is riding a motorcycle down Cape

coast, living the dream, when all of a sudden

the clouds start to form...

He pulls over. Out of nowhere he hears a

booming voice from above: “My son, you

have lived a life of virtue, one that I would be

proud of, ask me of anything and I will grant

it.”

Astounded the man thinks for a minute then

says: “Well I wish that I could ride my bike

to Mauritius. I wish there was a bridge from

Durban to Mauritius so I could ride my bike

there.”

There was a pause and then the voice said:

“You know, I could do it. I could quarry the

oceans and build a road that could stretch

across the ocean, I could do it, but is there

anything you could think of that would better

convey my glory, something that would be

worthy of my power?”

The man sat and thought for a minute then

said: “OK I wish to know what my Mrs thinks.

How she thinks. I want to know the inner

workings of her thoughts and what makes her

tick.”

There was a long pause then the voice said:

“Do you want one lane or two?”

have a great riding month.

The team.

Pic of the month:

PUBLISHER:

Glenn Foley

foleyg@mweb.co.za

ADVERTISING AND EDITORIAL:

Sean Hendley

bestbikemagazines

@yahoo.com

071 684 4546

OFFICE &

SUBSCRIPTIONS:

Anette

anette.acc@ mweb.co.za

011 979 5035

ONLINE &

DESIGN LAYOUT:

Kyle Lawrenson

kyle.lawrenson@icloud.com

011 979 5035

PHOTOGRAPHY

Stefan van der Riet

CONTRIBUTORS

Shado Alston

Donovan Fourie

Michelle Leppan

Mieke Oelofse

Kurt Beine

Videos and more

available online...

WWW.MOTOMEDIA.CO.ZA

Copyright © RideFast Magazine: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed,

or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, articles, or other methods, without the prior

written permission of the publisher.


All the NEWS proudly brought to

you by HJC HELMETS

All the NEWS proudly brought to

you by HJC HELMETS

MotoAmerica… Stock 1000

Cameron Petersen Crowned Champ!

SA’s own Cameron Petersen is the 2020 MotoAmerica US

Superstock champion.

Petersen did it with class, taking race 1 at Indianapolis

on a Saturday afternoon, a great victory for the son of SA

motorcycle legend Robbie.

The Altus Motorsports Suzuki rider clinched the 2020 Stock

1000 Championship in a race that he appeared to win, but he

was docked .4 of a second which dropped him from first to

second in the final result.

“I can’t even explain it,” Petersen said when asked to

describe his feelings about winning his first MotoAmerica

Championship. “Even hearing you say that kind of brought a

lump to my throat. It means so much to me. This is my life.

Obviously, my goal is to be a Superbike champ and hopefully

one day get in the World Championship. Just being able to

hold this number one board is pretty special. It’s something

I’ve dreamt of my whole life. It wasn’t easy. It hasn’t been an

easy fight. Every year I’ve been here, I’ve had to get on a

different team, different bike. It seems like every year kind of

halfway through the season I start finding my feet. This year,

I just decided to ride the Stock bike and see if I could find my

feet again a little bit.

I think I lost my way a little bit there a few years ago just kind

of getting caught up in the whole Superbike thing. This year

has probably been the best thing for my career. I’ve had so

much fun riding my bike every single weekend. I look forward

to coming to the track. The vibe in the team, everything is

incredible. I honestly can’t explain the feeling of being a

champion, but hopefully this isn’t the last number-one board

I’ll hold up. Just all off-season going to put my head down, go

to work and hopefully something good comes up for me

next year.

I want to show people that I can do this in the Superbike

class, as well.”

We’ll say it again: For a tiny country South Africans produce

so many talented riders on the world stage…

Cam Petersen and Brad Binder have a Honda CBR 150 in

common:

Whilst the Pittsburgh International Race Complex in

Wampum, Pennsylvania, is far removed from Brno in the

Czech Republic, the tracks were linked by two South Africans

and a Honda CBR150.

How ?

Well, Brad won his first MotoGP in what was just his third

race in the premier motorcycle road racing series in the world

at Brno - and on the other side of the world, Cam won both of

the MotoAmerica Stock 1000 races.

In his blood:

Despite Cams Dad and Uncles being such great road racers,

it was actually the Binder family that helped to take Petersen

from the dirt to the tar.

“Brad picked up his first MotoGP win in his third race ever,

which is something special,” Petersen said. “It’s good for the

whole Binder family because they have has put their lives

into racing. To see him where he is and beating those guys…

it’s pretty damn awesome. I’m proud of that kid and couldn’t

be happier for him.”

But the CBR150?

“My first road race bike was his (Binder’s) Honda CBR150,”

Petersen said. “They are the ones who kind of introduced

me into the whole road racing side of it. I was into the whole

motocross side. I guess you could say they got me into the

whole road racing thing, so that’s pretty cool.”

We see a great future for sure!

ATTENTION


All the NEWS proudly brought to

you by HJC HELMETS

All the NEWS proudly brought to

you by HJC HELMETS

Get a grip in the twisties.

World Supersport

ODENDAAL STARS AT ESTORIL

South African racer, Steven Odendaal crowned a fine debut

world Supersport season aboard his EAB Ten Kate Racing

Yamaha. 5th overall.

If you’re looking for rubber you can trust,

fit a set of HP SERIES II’s, BATT’s super-affordable

high-performance premium Super-Sport tyres.

The dual-compound, steel-belt radial construction

provides exceptional grip, durability and performance in wet or dry conditions,

inspiring confidence at the highest levels of Super-Sport riding.

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• 120/70R-17 & 160/60R-17 Combo- R2,800.00

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• Facebook @BikeTyreWarehouse • Twitter @biketyrewhse • www.biketyrewarehouse.com

* Available exclusively

from Bike Tyre

Warehouse branches:

GRAPHICWERX ADVERTISING & DESIGN CC

Midrand Branch:

073 777 9269

sales@biketyrewarehouse.com

East Rand Branch:

082 878 6091 / 082 878 6089

eastrand@biketyrewarehouse.com

Cape Town Branch:

079 735 2951 / 063 146 0086

cpt@biketyrewarehouse.com

Port Elizabeth Branch:

083 267 2685

pe@biketyrewarehouse.com

Steven Odendaal: “I had a good feeling on Friday already,

we found a good set up and were really close to the front.

I qualified in 9th position (3rd row) in Superpole, which is

still something we need to work on but I knew we had a

good race pace. I had a really good battle for a 4th position

in race 1 on Saturday. We kept swapping positions with

Viñales, Oncu and Gonzalez which allowed the Top3 to pull

a small gap. I finished 5th and moved up to 5th overall in

the championship standings ahead of the last race, which

was our objective for the weekend. I did think, however, that

we needed to find a bit of extra speed for Sunday to fight

for the podium. We tried some changes in warm-up and the

result was our strongest performance of the year in race 2.

We were in the leading group from start to finish and only

missed out on a podium by 0.1 seconds. I also finished

only a second behind the race winner for the first time in my

rookie season in World Supersport. Whilst we did not get

onto the podium today despite being so close, it is definitely

encouraging to be heading into the winter break after a

strong performance and with a 5th position in the overall

world championship standings. It also gave me some extra

motivation to work hard during the off season to come back

and continue this momentum. The objective is to fight for

the championship next year and I will do everything I can to

achieve this goal. Finally, I would like to take this opportunity

to say thanks to the whole team, especially Ferry, Kervin,

Kor, Arnold, Remon all my personal sponsors that have

been supporting me even in such challenging times with

the COVID-19 pandemic, my manager Jorge and my whole

family. I am already looking forward to being back on the bike

next season. We are yet to announce our plans for 2021 but I

will keep everyone updated as soon as I can.”

stevenodendaal44.com

Takaaki Nakagami

seals ‘multi-year’ Honda contract for 2021 MotoGP and beyond

Takaaki Nakagami seals ‘multi-year’ Honda contract for 2021

MotoGP and beyond

Takaaki Nakagami will remain in the Honda fold for the 2021

MotoGP World Championship and beyond after signing a

multi-year agreement

The Japanese rider, who made his MotoGP debut with the

satellite Honda squad in 2018, was always expected to retain

his ride over Cal Crutchlow on the strength of his close links

to HRC, with whom his contract is aligned with.

However, a series of impressive results during the 2020

MotoGP season on the year-old Honda RC213V - a best

finish of fourth and a maiden front row start - all-butconfirmed

this.

Having finished 20th in his rookie campaign of 2018 and 13th

overall in an injury-hampered 2019 campaign, Nakagami - as

the only rider to have finished all 10 races inside the top ten

this year - sits fifth in the standings, despite not being any

one of the 15 riders that have stepped on the podium in

2020.

"I’m very happy to be able to continue racing for LCR Honda

IDEMITSU in 2021 and beyond,” he said. “I’m grateful to

Honda for their generous support, allowing me to bring

out my full potential this season. I will be doing my best to

gain solid results for the remaining races, and build on that

momentum next year. I’m aiming higher with Honda. I look

forward to your continued support."


All the NEWS proudly brought to

you by HJC HELMETS

All the NEWS proudly brought to

you by HJC HELMETS

Jonathan Rea

clinches a SIXTH World SBK Championship title…

Not even COVID-19, not even a Superpole crash can stop

Jonathan Rea smashing more records as he wraps up a sixth

WorldSBK title.

Jonathan Rea has consolidated his status as the most

successful WorldSBK Championship rider of all-time by

successfully wrapping his sixth title when sole remaining rival

Scott Redding was unable to finish the first race of the 2020

finale weekend in Estoril.

The Kawasaki rider came into the race needing only three

points - the equivalent of a 13th place finish - regardless of

where his sole remaining rival Scott Redding finished, but while

he gave himself some work to do by starting 15th after a crash

in Superpole, it couldn’t halt the perceived inevitable.

Indeed, though Rea may have been on the back foot after

qualifying, remarkably Redding fared worse after his own crash

in the morning session placed him last. However, while Rea was

quickly making progress up the order to run third by lap four,

Redding's progress was far steadier even before he pulled over

on lap seven with technical issues.

The overall result may have looked familiar but it has been

an anything-but-regular season for Rea and his WorldSBK

counterparts, with five months splitting the opening round in

Australia at the top of the year with the resumption of action in

July.

Indeed, the coronavirus played its part by compacting the

season down from 13 rounds to only eight, while two of those

were held at the same circuit (Motorland Aragon).

In fact, it was there where Rea ultimately began to get the jump

on Redding having been forced to duke it out with this new

pretender to his throne in the early rounds.

An uncharacteristic crash for Rea in Phillip Island left him

playing initial catch up, but while Redding had the edge on

consistency initially to lead Rea after round two in Jerez, the

pendulum of momentum would shift back to the Kawasaki rider.

When Redding’s form began to scatter graph, Rea dug in with

some metronomic consistency to the extent that he has won

at least one race at every round this year. It meant that even

on the days Redding could beat Rea, the Kawasaki man was

usually right behind him nonetheless.

Another marvellous display by Rea as rivals are left scratching

their head to wonder just how they could possibly break his

stronghold, though Redding has at times forced his rival to

discover another level, there is little doubt Rea’s unfailing

adaptability has once again been the bedrock of his success.

There is still more to play for this weekend - Rea’s has already

added 11 wins alone to his tally this year, but one more will see

him hit a full century. While the move to three races a weekend

skews the overall stats, he still stands well clear of the next best

rider - Carl Fogarty - on 59 wins.

Can anyone defeat Rea in 2021? Well, Redding will take a

huge amount of knowledge into next season when - hopefully

- we will be getting a full calendar to play with, while Rea’s

ultra consistency could in theory be harmed by the proposed

introduction of a brand-new Kawasaki ZX-10R, which always

poses a risk when it comes to reliability and performance.

For now though, Rea can celebrate the fact that even

COVID-19 can’t stop his dominance of the modern WorldSBK

era.

Bike Tyre Warehouse

is expanding ... and expanding ... and expanding ...

A few weeks ago our lady in the Cape, Lorna, went off to the

launch of BTW Cape Town, situated in the same building as

Bike Kings Cape Town in Paarden Eiland.

It was a well attended 4 day festival of all things motorcycles,

Starting on the Thursday and ending on the Sunday with some

great opening specials on all brands. They have a symbiotic

relationship with Bike Kings Cape Town with both businesses

benefiting from each other, a win-win situation for everybody

especially the customers.

The set-up is really well thought out with a well laid out

accessories shop for customers to browse around while they

wait for their tyres, brake pads, chains and sprockets to be fitted

and when they finished shopping they can enjoy a great cup of

coffee with a light snack at the in house coffee bar.

Pop down to Unit 1, 46 Marine Drive, Paarden Eiland if you are

in the area. The staff are well trained, professional, enthusiastic

and knowledgeable and always ready with a friendly smile.

Cape Town makes four branches so far for Bike Tyre

Warehouse.

Other branches include the very well established Midrand

branch, essentially the head office which we have brought you

a lot of news about in the past - then a month or two ago, we

told you about Alan Hughes and the Port Elizabeth branch at

Restitution Ave, Fairview, Port Elizabeth, which is growing from

strength to strength.

Then there is Eden Bike & Tyre down in George situated at 23

Cathedral St, George Central who are still getting brought up

to speed with upgrades to their fitment centre and branding

but do run the same specials and pricing and have the same

stock consistency as the rest of the branches with equally well

trained, enthusiastic and friendly staff.

Then, a little bit on the down low because they are still waiting

for all their proper corporate branding and so-on, the East Rand

branch opened its doors in Boksburg and started trading thanks

to the high demand in the area. We will bring you more details

on that as soon as they guys are ready.

Here is a list of all the contact number and addresses if you are

in the market for tyres, brake pads/discs, chains and sprockets:

Midrand - 011 205 0216 - 997 Richards Dr, Halfway House,

Midrand

Cape Town - 079 735 2951 - Unit 1, 46 Marine Drive, Paarden

Eiland, Cape Town

Port Elizabeth - 083 267 2685 - Unit 6, Moffet Business Centre

4, Cnr Restitution & Overbaakens, Fairview, Port Elizabeth

George - 079 981 0377 - 3 Cathedral St, George Central,

George

East Rand - 082 878 6091 - Unit 17, Saligna Park, 3 Saligna St,

Witfield, Boksburg


All the NEWS proudly brought to

you by HJC HELMETS

All the NEWS proudly brought to

you by HJC HELMETS

Aprili RS250SP

HRC Honda Grom

Honda MSX 125 Grom Championship Announced

HRC has built a race-only Honda MSX125 Grom – We LIKE!

Honda has announced that it is to begin a one-make

championship with the Honda MSX125 Grom – and we think

we’re in lust.

THE announcement that the Honda MSX125 Grom was

living on in 2021 was widely welcomed by the global

motorcycle fraternity. But the cute and cuddly Grom has just

been given a shot in the arm, as Honda has just announced

an HRC-spec race only version.

The bike is going to be fielded in a one-make race series

called the HRC Grom Cup in Japan. As you’d expect with a

race-only machine, the little Grom has been given a thorough

going over to improve its on-track prowess.

Gone are all the road-going safety equipment, ABS, lights,

hooter, and so on. Instead, the bike uses a race harness and

ECU, HRC body panels and belly pan, sticky treaded tyres,

and the obligatory high-level race exhaust. We can’t find any

specific details around the output of the machine, although

given the number of changes we’ll put money on the fact that

it will be significantly higher than the stock bike.

The HRC Grom Cup is not a new idea, it’s been running in

Japan for some time now with huge grids filling up venues

like Twin Ring Motegi in Japan. The racing is fast and furious,

with huge groups battling for position as they make the most

of the all-important slipstream effect along the straights.

Sadly we can’t find any information on whether these bikes

will ever make it out of Japan… C’mon Honda – lets go

racing!!!

Aprilia RS660

Launched Overseas

The RS 660 unmistakably sporty with its RSV4-like styling,

sculpted-in wings, racy electronics and tasty chassis parts,

but the good news for road riders is it promises to be

easier to live with than a race replica, thanks to its friendlier

ergonomics, comfier seat and useable power.

The specs sound good – It’s powered by a liquid-cooled

659cc parallel twin cylinder engine with a 270° crank, it’s

essentially the front half of the V4 RSV4 1100 and uses the

same 81mm bore and a 63.9mm stroke. It produces 99bhp,

has 49ftlb of torque and weighs just 183kg ready to go.

Handling should be excellent thanks to the aluminium twin

spar chassis, fully adjustable 41mm Kayaba forks, Brembos

brakes and the chassis know how that brought us the RSV4

1100 Factory and Tuono V4 1100 Factory.

The bike includes a full raft of electronic rider aids including

lean sensitive traction, wheelie control and engine braking

control, and up/down quickshifter, five riding modes, cruise

control and a colour dash. It also has triple LED headlights

with daytime running lights, self-cancelling indicators and

Pirelli Rosso Corsa II tyres.

While the RS660 is designed to be a road bike, it has track

genes… Aprilia has focused on keeping everything as light

as possible. The compact and lightweight parallel-twin engine

forms a stressed member in the forged aluminium frame, and

also acts as the swingarm mount. All of this weight-saving

results in a finished bike weighing just 183kg at the kerb.

That’s 24kg lighter than a Honda CBR650R and 7kg lighter

than a Yamaha R6.

Along with adjustable traction control and cruise control, you

get adjustable wheelie control, adjustable engine braking and

adjustable engine mapping. All this, plus the lean-sensitive

ABS is controlled through a six-axis IMU.

So despite being comfy enough to ride every day on the

road, the RS660 should be great fun out on the track.

More info: www.italianmi.co.za

Africa GP Academy is launched

For ages 11 and up.

The other day RideFast Magazine was invited to a surprise

launch at the Italian Motorcycle Importers premises in

Randburg. We thought that they might have imported a couple

of the new RS660’s, but we were mistaken…

They launched the Africa GP Academy. There is a lot more to it,

but here are the nuts and bolts of the academy:

The objective of the academy is to create a road to international

racing and ultimately to Moto GP. There are some racing

classes around who do a great job – but this series takes it a

step or two further.

The core focus for the academy is to get the riders international

exposure.

1. Gain access to Italian RS cup for exposure.

2. Win wildcard entries (top 3 finishers in SA).

3. Access to Italian Cup on identical machinery at a fraction of

the costs.

4. Guided and facilitated Italian cup experience weekends

where appropriate.

5. Establishment of an SA base in Italy for the long term.

AFRICA GP ACADEMY

For a set fee per annum, competitors can purchase an Aprili

RS250SP. They will compete in the World Of Motorcycles

racing series in the current 300cc class.At the end of the first

year, the bike is yours.

The academy will stick with the international format and rules.

Riders have access to the academys fitness training, social

media training, dietary advice and guidance. They also have

access to trainers like Themba Khumalo, Sheridan Morias and

invited guest coaches with regular rider training days.

Guidance on technicalities by experts like Ricky Morais, Ohvale

and invited coaches.

It all sounds awesome – remember that to create world champs

is a massive investment. This program aims to make it more

affordable – and to give competitors a real shot at being

noticed.

Interested? :

robert@africagpacademy.com

themba@africagpacademy.com

sfiso@africagpacademy.com

sean@africagpacademy.com


All the NEWS proudly brought to

you by HJC HELMETS

All the NEWS proudly brought to

you by HJC HELMETS

The All New

Concept Store

Accessory Hyper at the World of Yamaha...

Bikes, Boats, Power Products and all the gear to match...

23 October 2020 saw the all new revamped Concept Store

Accessory Hyper at The World of Yamaha officially launched

to the public with a massive variety of products, accessories

and gear for avid Motorcycle and Marine enthusiasts.

“The World of Yamaha has always been a place where you

can find almost anything but it was lacking variety”, says

Ben Robertson - Dealer Principal and the man behind the

revamped space. Thus, the idea began to turn the store into

an Accessory Hyper with far more variety from apparel to kit

to accessories from a wide range of well recognized brands.

The revised store has a dedicated section for ladies and

junior riders alike to help inspire the next up and coming

generation of racers and enthusiasts.

“The plan for the store in the long run is to become a onestop

store with everything an avid Motorcycle and Marine

enthusiast could need with events taking place more

frequently, once restrictions have been lifted,” says Ben

Robertson.

It was a great launch weekend - complete with a PW track for

the kiddies.

Go and pay them a visit... It is mighty impressive!

www.yamaha.co.za/world_of_yamaha

HRC Announces

Leon Haslam

Contract Extension with SBK Team HRC...

HRC Announces Leon Haslam Contract Extension with SBK

Team HRC:

HRC has announced that it has renewed its agreement

with British rider Leon Haslam who will continue to wear

Team HRC colours during the 2021 FIM Superbike World

Championship (SBK). Haslam joined the Team HRC factory

team at the end of 2019, making an important contribution to

the positive development of Honda's SBK project and fighting

hard on track to achieve the best possible results during a

season that has been significantly affected by the global

Covid-19 pandemic. The one-year contract extension will

therefore see the Brit continue to race on "CBR 1000RR-RW

FIREBLADE SP" factory bike, alongside Spanish rider Alvaro

Bautista during the 2021 SBK.

Leon Haslam | Team HRC: "To say I'm pleased about

renewing my contract with Team HRC would be an

understatement. This year has been difficult, with Covid-19

and limited test sessions, but I knew right from the start that

this project has great potential and so to have a second year

in which to continue developing the FIREBLADE and working

with the team is very important to me. I'm really confident that

we can be fighting for the top steps of the podium in SBK and

that's my ultimate goal, so to work towards this with Honda

and Team HRC is fantastic. I'm excited and can't wait for the

2021 season to get underway."

Motomate Boksburg

Moves to new premises

And you are not going to have to look too far to find them,

they have literally moved out of Bikeshop Boksburg into the

shop next door. The ever effervescent Mpho has put together

a really well stocked and beautiful store that is light and airy

and well laid out.

She has to divide her time between her two hot shot shops in

Edenvale, but her two right hand men, Mandi and Tyler are

incredibly knowledgeable, service oriented and run a very

tight ship. Anything and everything you can imagine should

be in stock and your size or colour and if not they can get it

for you very quickly.

122 North Rand Rd, Bardene, Boksburg. 011 025 8272.

Oxford Cliqr

Smartphone Holders from DMD:

So here is something that we all wish we had at some point

or the other, especially when using apps like Google maps,

waze and etc. How the heck do you hold your phone to

follow directions to a new destination while hanging onto the

bars and using the controls to keep your bike pointing in the

correct direction... Admit it, we've all done that.

Oxford has come up with this easy to use CLIQR system that

simply mounts to your handle bars, mirror stems or onto your

dashboard. CLIQR uses a dual locking, fail-safe mechanism

to mount almost any device in the most convenient position

for you. Simply stick the CLIQR Device Adaptor onto the

back of your device and CLIQR it into the mount in the

orientation that suits you. Installation of the mount is quick

and easy and slotting your smart device onto the CLIQR is

natural and instinctive and very secure. Look up the system

that best suits your application and your nearest stockist on

www.dmd.co.za.


BLACK Arrow

Styling on a Black Arrow …

Words: Kyle Lawrenson & Séan Hendley

Pics: Stefan van der Riet (Black_Rock Creative Studios)

So, I’m going to start off with some possibly shocking and maybe

even insulting comments, not to be controversial, shocking or insulting

but more as a ‘Wake up’ call. If you’re easily offended please page

past this article.

The South African biking public does frustrate me to no end with its narrow

mindedness, one dimensional-ness and over compensating egotistical

approach to motorcycling. Purely because some really brilliant motorcycles

are overlooked, sneered at or ignored and thus eventually dropped from

the importers/distributors line up, thereby depriving the select few of us the

pleasure and joy of owning and riding these great bikes.

Unfortunately all markets are driven by cash flow and supply and demand of

the masses dictates what we are, and are not allowed to experience. And,

sadly in this country in particular, it would appear that all bikes either have

to be wrapped in Tupperware with mostly unusable horsepower by at least

50% of the said masses.


The other half want bigger and faster

without considering the important factors

like ease of use – and out and out FUN.

As a result, people often fail to notice, or

even consider bikes like this one.

No, seriously, you need to ride the Pilen

lineup to understand.

Let’s dissect this one, the ‘Svartpilen 701

Style’, a bike all of us in the office are

completely enamored with.

Like all of Husqvarna’s road range, the

bikes styling is fresh, eye catching and

completely out of the box.

She is shod with Pirelli MT60RS tyre

which means that it can be ridden down a

dirt road. If you need to.

But we stuck to the tar and spent most

of the time during this feature scratching

through the corners.

Kyle will tell you more about that.

The 701 comes with a lot of very nice

accessories already bolted on, like the

Akarapovic silencer which really accentuates

the sexy little bark when using the

power shifter between gears. Standard

rear view mirrors are replaced with billet

bar end mirrors, really showing off it’s

Café Racer looks, which everybody is

currently spending crazy money customising

old clangers.

The stock foot pegs are really slick billet

jobs, and the front and rear indicators

tuck away neatly becoming almost invisible

until you use them.

Power:

Husqvarna had made use of their famous

701 engine.

The Svartpilen is powered by a 693cc mill

that kicks out 55kilowatts or 75 horses with

72Nm of torque at around 6,750 rpm.

You need to ride it to understand. It is hilarious

fun, especially when you hang hard on

the gas and use that powershifter to bark

through the 6 speed box.

It easily gets to the double ton on the

speedo and happily whips along all day

- way north of 160kmh. I used it on my

rounds for a few days and purposefully

wore an open face helmet, not to look cool

but to keep myself reigned in, because

every time I straddle one of these beauties

I get stupid and generally drain the 12 litres

at least twice a day just running around

JHB & PTA.

Needless to say that might be foolish, but

you just can’t help yourself!

This Pilen is just so willing and – at the risk

of repetition, so much fun to ride…

Ergonomics:

I’m 2m’s tall and fit perfectly on what seems

to be quite a petite sized motorcycle, but

the ergonomics, the relationship between

the seat, foot pegs and handle bars is absolutely

ideal, something that a lot of much

bigger bikes seem to get completely wrong.

You get wide-ish bars on a skinny bike

with amazing power delivery, superb handling

and a throaty exhaust that propel

you through traffic, diving in and out gaps

that barely exist and tearing off into the

distance.

I had to do a freeway run in busy traffic

from the West Rand out to Centurion,

about 80kays or so. I pulled the strap

down tight on my open lid and cleared

the 80 odd kays in under 20 minutes. Try

that on a bigger bike – or in a car.

I will say this though … dust storms,

rain, brommers, miggies and road debris

are not fun in an open face lid, but “Hey

Ho …” My beard looked cool whipping

around in the breeze and I love the wind

and bugs in my teeth, the true essence of

freedom on a bike,

fairings and full face helmets can take

away that joy.

While out in the Wild West Rand I

bumped into a mate of mine who is

great fan of those car badged bikes with

the knobblies, (to be fair, so am I), who

smirked at my mount for the day. After

some growled persuasions I managed

to get him to take the 701 Style for a

burn - he came back a convert … He is

seriously looking at adding a ‘Pilen’ to his

garage.

You NEED to ride it to understand.

We haven’t been able to coax the Svartpilen

701 Style away from our Kyle for

more than a couple of hours at a time,

usually only when he is in front of his

computer busy with magazines can we

sneak it out for a ride. He rides it every

single day and had done for a week or

two already and is sometimes the best

rider in the office, here is what he has to

say ….

Kyle says:

If I had the shekels in my bank account

right now – this very bike would make its

way into my garage. And there are a few

reasons for this.

It’s a blend of stuff-you attitude that you

can RideFast every day – or you can

chill and just enjoy the scenery. It’s got

so much personality with such unexpected

performance that it begs to be ridden

every day.

More than one fast looking guy pulled up

next to me while I was out and about. It

looks like a gentlemans machine – but

when I blitzed them robot to robot, they

sat up and paid attention.

For the performance nuts out there – yes

she gets up onto the back wheel without

any fuss. I found that it’s better to use

manual clutch rather than the quickshifter.Railing

through the corners, this bike

is just so compact and well balanced –

you scrape the pegs rather than run out

of lean angle. And this is without proper

road tyres.

A quickshifter is such a lekker addition to

this bike – and this one works better the

faster you go.

I like the Akarapovic pipe – but this bike

needs a bit more noise to match the

attitude.

Build quality is really right there. No

rattles and shakes – just smooth, gutsy,

organic performance everywhere we

went. And I absolutely LOVE the flattracker

styling.

A ladies viewpoint – Mercia Jansen.

“I’ve ridden both the Svartpilen and

Vitpilen 401’s as well as the Vitpilen

701. So was very excited to be given the

Svartpilen 701 Style for a month to ride.

Not only does this bike look the part but

it didn’t disappoint on riding experience.

It’s very comfortable whilst still having a

very controlled ride feel. I am a fan of

the neo-retro flat track design and riding

position. I rode it to work, I rode through

town, I went for breakfast rides out of

town. It’s ideal for urban exploration and

everyday use, yet powerful enough to

stretch its legs on the open road which

makes it a great all-rounder.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again.

This bike is a smile inducing machine.

With its low weight and low-down torque

it springs off the line. Add to that a quick

shifter and great suspension every ride is

guaranteed fun”

You really need to go and ride one.

At your Husqvarna Dealer –

www.husqvarna-motorcycles.com

Specs.

ENGINE:

TRANSMISSION/FINAL DRIVE:

CLAIMED HORSEPOWER:

CLAIMED TORQUE:

FUEL SYSTEM:

CLUTCH:

ENGINE MANAGEMENT/IGNITION:

FRAME:

FRONT SUSPENSION:

REAR SUSPENSION:

FRONT BRAKE:

REAR BRAKE:

TIRES, FRONT/REAR:

GROUND CLEARANCE:

SEAT HEIGHT:

FUEL CAPACITY:

CLAIMED DRY WEIGHT:

692.7cc, liquid-cooled, SOHC single

6-speed/chain

75 hp @ 8,500 rpm

53 lb.-ft. @ 6,750 rpm

50mm Keihin throttle body w/ RBW

PASC slipper clutch, hydraulic operation

Keihin EMS, double ignition

Chromium-molybdenum steel trellis

43mm WP-USD fork fully adjustable

WP monoshock

4-piston radial caliper, single 320mm discs

1-piston floating caliper, 240mm disc

110/80R-18 / 160/60R-17

164mm

835mm

12L

158.5kg

Richard Harper (@ridemotostakephotos)

The Svartpilen is so comfortable. Well

made – and well – an absolute hoot

every time you take it for a spin.

Last but not least, Mercia Jansen, she

of Motul oil and lubricants fame had the

bike for almost a month. She did not

want to return it…


Blitskrieg!

Two reprobates on two of BMW’s very fastest machines,

the S1000RR and XR1000…

“Chaps.”

“Oi! Yes you! Focus! How would you like to borrow our

S1000RR.”

“Yes Please and we can…”

“No. Wait we haven’t finished yet.” “We want you to take it on

a breakfast run. You are not to go near a track – just go and

enjoy the bike like 99 percent of South African riders do.”

That was the request made by the friendly lot at Fourways

Motorrad.

Great idea! We can RideFast. Get it? Ok no we can Ride

Very, Very Fast.

But how to keep our photographer up for decent shots?

BMW Motorrad West got wind of our plan – and offered us

their XR1000 to join the fun.

Problem solved.


The engine produces 205 horsepower

at 13,500 rpm, and 83 ft/lbs of torque

@11,000 rpm. BMW reports that the engine

has at least 73 ft/lbs of torque from

5500 to 14,500 rpm.

A standard feature on the 2020 RR is the

powershifter and autoblip, which provides

for clutchless upshifts and downshifts.

This one has BMW’s latest generation

electronic suspension or Dynamic

Damping Control (DDC). The suspension

itself is manufactured by Marzocchi to

BMW specifications. Up front is a 45 mm,

inverted telescopic fork, and in the rear

is the new Full Floater Pro shock, both

with electronic compression and rebound

damping adjustment and manual adjustment

for spring preload.

The braking system is manufactured with

components from Nissin, Hayes, and

Brembo. The front master cylinder is a

Nissin unit attached to two radial-mounted,

four-piston Hayes calipers that bite

onto on 320 mm steel rotors. The rotors

are each 4.5 mm thick and together they

weigh less than their predecessors. At

the rear there is a single-piston Brembo

caliper and a 220 mm disc.

On any Sunday you’ll see hundreds

of motorcycles of all shapes and sizes

making their way to favorite breakfast

run spots all over SA. In the JHB area,

Harties has always been popular, the

route out to Bronkhorstspruit is always

full – Cullinan, Vaal dam and so-on. One

of our favourites is out through the Cradle

and onto the Hekpoort pass and then a

blitz down the satellite road – and there

are a few reasons for this. The roads

are generally in great condition. We

can laugh at all the cyclists toiling away,

great eateries dot the landscape – and

the roads are twisty and fun to ride with

lots of places where you can really open

up. If you don’t ride a bike – you’ll never

understand.

Bikes were collected and promises made

that we would not be mad hooligans.

We turned the bikes towards Mulderdrift

– and those promises were very soon

forgotten you see – it was a Wednesday

– and the roads were just sooo quiet…

That year, the Bavarian motorcycle

manufacturer built 1000 units to satisfy

World Superbike homologation rules. The

following year the first-gen S 1000 RR went

into full production, changing the supersport

landscape with its superior electronics

and its nearly 200-horsepower engine. Unheard

of - and, to be frank, they caught the

Japanese manufacturers with their pants

down in the horsepower department.

For 2020, BMW had two main goals for the

S 1000 RR’s ground-up redesign: To put

the customer first and to beat the competition.

The plan was to make the bike more

approachable and friendlier to use. We are

not going to run through all of it coz there

is a lot, but here are some of the main

features…

The bodywork has been redesigned and

while it retains the shark gills on the right

side of the engine, the asymmetrical

headlights are gone. The gills were retained

not for styling purposes, but rather

because it allowed the engineers to

reduce overall engine heat by 10 percent.

The bike includes BMW’s very latest

cutting edge technology with more

electronic aids than Battlestar Galactica.

Razor Sharp with oodles of very useable

horsepower on tap.

The engine was revamped, and features

BMW ShiftCam Technology (variable

valve timing) for more linear power

across the low- to mid-rpm range, along

with more power on top.

The XR. A big, comfortable mile eater.

Fully loaded with all of BMW’s High End

Tech.

The XR was designed to fill a void for the

rider who didn’t want an all-out adventure

tourer like the GS, or the sportsbike

positioning of the S 1000 RR or roadster

models. For 2020, BMW revised the bodywork

and ergonomics for more wind protection

and comfort. The riding position

is upright and relaxed, there’s no weight

on your palms, and you have excellent

leverage on the handlebar. Built for hours

in the saddle. The seat is sculpted and

firm… it takes a bit if getting used to…

The Bikes:

The bikes share so many tech innovations

and components. We appreciate

that you probably know just about

everything about them. Both have been

ridden and written about in great depth –

but we’ll run a quick re-cap, just so you

know what the bikes are about.

The RR – Race, Sports. Fast.

The S 1000 RR, was first launched in 2009.


The XR is fitted with a same 999cc inline

four-cylinder engine as the RR with a

more linear torque curve. The engine produces

“Just” 165 horsepower at 11,000

rpm and 84 ft/lbs of torque at 9250 rpm.

For XR duty features taller fourth, fifth and

sixth gear ratios for more relaxed cruising.

The complexity and cost of the RR’s

Shift Cam technology — which boosts the

superbike’s power at high rpm — wasn’t

deemed necessary here.

Instead, the XR has its own camshafts

and an exhaust manifold that focuses

power in the midrange for better street

performance.

The bike features BMW’s new engine

drag torque control, what the Germans

call “MSR.” The technology prevents the

rear wheel from slipping under abrupt

throttle inputs or downshifting.

The bike also boasts BMW’s electronic

suspension – Dynamic ESA (Electronic

Suspension Adjustment) – as standard.

The suspension has two modes: Road

and dynamic.

This years bike gets Dynamic Brake Control

which means basically, that the brakes

work in conjunction with the engine to

help control any unwanted acceleration.

BMW says “By means of intervention in

the engine control, drive torque is reduced

during braking so as to make full use of

the braking power at the rear wheel.

This keeps the motorcycle stable and

shortens the braking distance.”

It has a six-axis Inertia Measurement

Unit (IMU) that drives the function of the

high-tech electronics found on the S 1000

XR: Traction control, wheelie control and

cornering ABS.

In a nutshell – big, bold, comfortable and

fast with every bell and whistle known to

the clever guys in Bavaria.

The Ride:

Being the racer boy he is, Kyle opted to

give the RR the first ride, with Glenn and

Stefan doubled up on the XR. We wound

our way out looking for twisty roads and

corners so that we could get the shots.

Surprisingly, The XR never really felt

out of its depth keeping up with the Red

Rocket. Although on paper it is significantly

down on power – it is still one hell of a

machine to ride.

All torque, speed and mighty power with

longer legs than Claudia Schiffer.

A photo shoot, goes something like this:

Find the perfect spot. Drop the camera

man off. Ride down the road – and

ride back, all the while trying to look as

professional as possible. Usually each

shot takes six or seven attempts – you

know how fussy these arty guys are – so

you tear through, stop, U-Turn, back.

Stop, U-Turn… you get the idea. In the 40

million degree sunshine Kyle was soon

sweating and swearing away in his leathers

after every turn…

The XR rider, on the other hand was all

grins, riding jeans, airflow jacket, comfortable

seating – easier to maneuver for

stuff like this. On every shoot we do, we

try to get the pics out the way early on so

that we can just enjoy the ride – but young

Stefan – bless him - see’s a photo, there

is a tap on the shoulder – and we stop

again…

To keep tempers even, we stopped in at

the Neck And Deck restaurant at the famous

Rhino and Lion Park in Kromdraai.

It’s great to see them open again – a lekker

spot, great food and fair prices. Bikes

can’t go in to the reserve, but you can stop

for a great nibble and chill session.

The Ice Cold softies went down a treat…

From there it was game on!

We needed to see how these puppies run

in the real world. The RR is not made for

stopping and starting and messing about.

It’s a weapon that needs to have the ear

twisted – and that exactly what we did.

The Hekpoort pass was blitzed in a blur

– and we were having so much fun – that

we missed the turnoff to the Satellite

road. Not a problem – you tuck down with

eyes just above the screen and the smile

just gets bigger. Handling is absolutely

sublime through the long corners heading

down the pass. It’s one of those roads

that just flows so beautifully – the ride is

natural and intuitive. Although the bike

is infinitely sporty, it is not ridiculously

uncomfortable. Shifting through the box is

just so smooth and that autoblip is subtle.


In a heartbeat you are well above the national

speed limit, but the bike handles rider

input absolutely seamlessly.

When we eventually turned around, bikes

were swapped and we headed back up

the pass. The XR is bigger and bolder with

so much power on tap. It certainly does

not feel like it has any less power than its

sports cousin – but the red bike soon had

the edge and started to pull away through

the twisties. The XR requires more input

and it has a raw edge to it that we really

enjoy. Same thing – gearing through the

quickshifter is seamless and all the while

you sit comfortably on top, well protected

from the elements by a comprehensive

screen.

This time we remembered to stop on the

satellite road off-ramp. The grins said it

all – these are exciting bikes – make no

mistake.

Experiment time.

Chaps – time for a bit of a drag race

(Stefans eyes open wide – Umm… you

are dropping me off first hey?). We have a

friendly guy in the traffic department who

agreed to close the road off just for this

purpose.

We had a 10 minute window while the road

was closed while we abused all the laws

known to man. We took a pre run along the

road just to check it out and to make sure

that there were no unexpected surprises.

Turned around, GO!!!!

We fully expected the RR to make mincemeat

of the XR but the XR held its own

admirably. Initial pull off saw the RR nudge

about 4 or 5 bike lengths into the lead –

the numbers on the display start rising

very rapidly and the world starts to blur a

bit. On the XR, there’s power everywhere

in the second half of the rev range, but

from about 8,500 rpm to the 12,000 rpm

redline the XR’s acceleration is brilliant

and she howls like the superbike that she

is. At around the 270 mark, the RR started

to walk away – when we hit 280 – there

was quite a big gap forming and the riders

chickened out. And here’s the thing…

Whilst we ran these mad speeds –

everything stayed absolutely stable and

well planted. The great chassis, brakes and

handling deliver bikes that inspire confidence.

There was never a moment when

either rider felt that things were getting

silly. These bikes are so fast – but they are

packaged so, so well.

Conclusions:

This was a great day to be on a motorcycle.

The smiles and laughs and bench

racing that went on around the table when

we got back is testament to just how much

fun these bikes are to ride. If you are a

racer, then there is very little to match the

thrill that a superbike like the RR delivers. –

BMW 1000RR

Bike Specs...

Engine Four Stroke Transverse four Cylinder, DOHC

Capacity 999cc

Max Power 207hp / 152 kw @ 13500 rpm

Max Torque 113Nm / 83 lb-ft @ 10500 rpm

Transmission Constant-Mesh 6 Speed

Final Drive X Ring Chain

Frame Aluminium Composite bridge frame, self supporting

Seat Hight 824mm

Wet Weight 193.5kg

Fuel Capacity 16.5 Litres

BMW XR1000RR

Engine Four Stroke Transverse four Cylinder, DOHC,

Valve actuation vis single rocker arms

Capacity 999cc

Max Power 165hp / 121kw @ 11000 rpm

Max Torque 114Nm / 84 lb-ft @ 9250 rpm

Transmission Constant-Mesh 6 Speed

Final Drive X Ring Chain

Frame Construction type aluminium perimeter frame,

Self supporting

Seat Hight 840mm

Wet Weight 226kg

Fuel Capacity 20 Litres


Twins

Meet the

Sometimes you just have a really lekker day on a

bike – and this was one of them. Triumph South

Africa loaned us two of their twins for a coupla

days – and we made full use of them.

They might not look like twins – but the name

refers to the fuel injected 1200cc parallel twin mill

that power two very different motorcycles. We’ve

said it before – and we’ll say it again –Triumph

really has a knack of building bikes for every type

of rider


C

M

Y

Present for duty:

The fared version of the Truxton R and

the new Speed Twin…

Both models share the new Bonnie

engine:

• High power 1200cc Bonneville

engine.

• Low inertia, high performance,

six-speed, 8-valve, liquid-cooled

SOHC 270° crank angle parallel

twin.

• Peak power 97PS at 6,750rpm.

• High torque across the rev

range (peak: 112Nm @

4,950rpm).

The Triumph Thruxton R.

Now you’d be excused for mistaking this

bike for something that you might have

seen Tiny Mariner or someone similar

roaring around the track on days long

gone by. This is of course, a deliberate

nod by Triumph to the company’s rich

racing heritage. They even painted it

British Racing green.

Under the Skin:

Triumph has no fewer than three café

racer models for 2020, not surprising for

one of the key players in the original retro-café

racer movement. Looking at this

bike from the ground up – a lot of thought

went into the manufacture…

Pirelli Diablo Corsa tyres are mounted on

32 inch spoke 17 inch aluminium rims.

These are suspended out back by fully

adjustable Ohlins shocks – up front you’ll

find fully adjustable USD forks by Showa.

Nothing like Grandads old scoot!

Attached to those svelte wheels are big

brake discs – twin floaters up front and a

single on the rear.

Here’s something strange – up front, you’ll

find 4-piston Brembo calipers – while out

back, they have optes for Nissin.

Strange that the brakes would not be

uniform. ABS is switchable.

Ride By Wire enabled Triumph to give the

Thruxton Rider modes – Road, Rain and

Sport. The bike also has traction control

that can be switched off via the

instrument menu. The Thruxton R’s

switchgear is pretty intuitive – a simple

fingertip scroll button gives access to the

main features on the digital display.

Speaking of display, these ones acknowledge

old school tech with updated, uber

modern tech. We are pretty glad that TFT

tech has not found its way onto bikes like

these. Yet. The bike features twin clocks

– a speedo and a rev counter with cool

3d dial interfaces that incorporate the

digital menu. These include cool bits like

the gear position indicator, range to

empty,

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

But take it from us. This bike is about 15

sqillion light years ahead of those old

boneshakers – and this is one thoroughly

modern sports machine.

Sure! It’s absolutely not everyone’s cup

of tea, but we’ll place bets on the fact that

it will draw more admiring glances than

most of the Tupperware torpedoes on the

market.


The fuel level and what your average

consumption is doing. Nothing old school

about this lot.

Moving to the electrical equipment you’ll

find LED lights all round with a Daytime

Running Light built into the headlight,

which is mounted into a beautifully crafted

Rickman styled faring.

Rider position is quite racey with the

old-school clubmans positioned quite low

– not as aggressive as some superbikes,

but over time you do feel your weight on

your wrists. Triumph put some thought

into the rider triangle and the relationship

from pegs to ground to bum to bars

is quite comfortable. Your knees nestle

comfortably into shallow recesses in the

tank – even that gets old-school treatment

with an offset fuel cap and a wrapover

tank clip.

Very cool!

The Triumph Speed Twin: the Moder

Classic Custom Roadster.

Here’s a bike that looks old school

chilled. The kind of bike that you can use

for cruising the burbs or hitting your favorite

breakfast run route every weekend.

It is distinctly different to the Thruxton

but by no means any less fun to ride.

A few years ago, you’d hand out plenty

of ammo to build a bike like this – now

you can buy it just like this – and take it

further.

Under the skin:

It shares a lot of tech with the thruxton,

like the clocks, electronics package and,

of course that sweet 1200cc mill. But

there are lots of differences that set this

bike apart.

Rather than spokes, the Speed Twin has

alloy rims fitted. Also 17 inch, shod in the

same rubber.

This bike does not boast such high end

suspension either – opting rather for

some KYB fare, KYB forks with cartridge

damping and Twin KYB rear suspension

units with adjustable spring pre-load

- rather than full sports units. Nothing

wrong with KYB.

Brakes are the same – we are going to

have to find out why they use Brembo in

front and Nissin out back.

Styling is different too – no less pretty –

just different. They have packed the bike

with brushed alluminium finishes – like

the front & rear mini mudguards, throttle

body covers, side panel finishers, and

heel guards. Man it looks too cool.

Twin upswept matt black finished silencers

deliver a meaty roar and add to the

bikes overall classic appeal.

Rider position is chilled – anyway you

look at it. The bars are sensibly upswept

and natural, pegs are well placed and

the well padded seat is not overly tall. In

fact on both bikes, its really easy to keep

your feet flat on the ground. Triumph has

a knack for cool little finishes like the bar

end mirrors and that Monza flip up fuel

cap.

Really great little touches.

We were quite surprised when during

some impromptu drag races, the

Street Twin actually drilled the Thruxton.

There was a fair bit of mumbling

about skinny younger riders and all

that – but with the correct gearing

– the bikes are really quite evenly

matched in the outright speed and

power department.

Where the Thruxton does shine in in

the tight stuff – the suspension really

takes control with a firmer more hooligan

inspiring kind of racey feel. The

R’s handling is really excellent thanks

to great brakes, suspension and chassis

balance. The electronics marry the

whole package together. Run it down

to your closest track and in the right

hands it will happily hold its own.

That’s not to say that the Street Twin

is lacking in any way – it’s just a different

kind of ride. The increase in bore,

10 extra BHP (The previous rendition

was a 54 BHP 900) and specifically,

bottom end grunt makes this bike far

more exciting than the old one. And all

the while you sit upright with a great

big grin on your kisser.

www.triumph-motorcycles.co.za

Bike Specs...

The Ride:

Take off your manic superbike warp

speed hat and just enjoy the ride. That’s

what these bikes are both about. Don’t

think boring by any means of the word –

when you lash them with a bit of anger –

both bikes induce torque inspired grins as

that big 1200 grabs you by the ass and

thrusts you along through the gears.

Our route included everything from fast

flowing freeways to some really tight,

twisty mountain passes and quite a bit of

suburban sprawl. We even took a wrong

turn on our way back to the Triumph

dealership in Kramerville – and ended up

taking a little trip through the outskirts of

Alex. It was awesome to see the people

there gawping at the “Mlungus” on their

old school Scootas. More than one luxury

sedan hooted enthusiastically with lots of

thumbs ups hanging out of the windows.

SA can be such a cool place.

Both bikes are fast and powerful as you

would expect from a big bore 1200. Both

are really smooth and easy to ride – even

slowly. And both have their own, distinct,

massive personalities.

Thruxton R 1200 Speed Twin 1200

Engine Four Stroke Parallel Twin, SOHC

Capacity 1200cc

Max Power 97hp / 71.5 kw @ 6750 rpm

Max Torque 112.5Nm / 83 lb-ft @ 4950 rpm

Transmission 6 Speed

Final Drive X Ring Chain

Frame Tubular Steel Cradle, Aluminum Swing Arm

Rear Suspension Ohlins Twin Shocks, Piggy Back reservior

Seat Hight 810mm

Wet Weight 203kg

Fuel Capacity 12.5 Litres

Engine Four Stroke Parallel Twin, SOHC

Capacity 1200cc

Max Power 97hp / 71.5 kw @ 6750 rpm

Max Torque 112.5Nm / 83 lb-ft @ 4950 rpm

Transmission 6 Speed

Final Drive X Ring Chain

Frame Steel Tubular Frame with Aluminum cradle

Rear Suspension Twin Shocks with Adjustable preload

Seat Hight 807mm

Wet Weight 215kg

Fuel Capacity 14.5 Litres

We won’t lie – at low speeds wending your

way through traffic in the Joburg sunshine,

you do get a fair amount of heat from the

engine. But that disappears as you hit the

more open roads and twist some ears...

And when you do twist, these bikes haul

ass - quickly up to the 190KPH mark and

then the Thruxton starts walking away.


Dozzy Loreiro

Frerichs Leads the pack

Little Man Mofokate leads on his Pw50

Getting into RACING

The Superbike Magacazine Short Circuit Series

The other day, when we heard that the short Circuit Series

was happening at the Benoni Karting track just down the road

from our offices. We decided to hop on a bike and head on

down for a looksee. Mighty glad we did. Entry level racing is

alive and kicking in SA – and we were very impressed to see

so many people from all walks of life having great dices…

Pocket bikes have been around for many years with this series

taking on different forms over the years. Clifford Redfern had it

for a few years and then a whole committee ran it for another

few. That’s when Clinton Pienaar together with Michaela Voster

took it over and over the last few years with the ever increasing

popularity of the Motards class has made it what it is today.

They push the idea of families that race together stay together

and they try and encourage braai’s and lots of family interaction.

Prize Giving is once a year at Silverstar Casino and this is a

black tie event with all the kids hiring tuxedos and doing quite a

dress up, a 5 star affair.

There are 13 different classes.

• Pocket bikes Novice from 4 years of age. The littlest

guys. All together now – AWWWWW CEUTE!

• Yamaha PW50 Class also for Novice riders from 4

years of age. Everyone learned to ride on a PW. Its awesome to

see the kids tyearing around the track!

• Pocket bikes stock, same age but only when the kids

get too fast for Novice class.

• Pocket Bikes, Production and Super production classes

are based on 6 and 9 HP Pocket bikes. Kids aged 6 and up.

• Honda NSF100 SAMRA 3Bore bikes – run by Neil Harran,

for kids from the year in which their 8th birthday happens.

This is a fantasic class – Honda South Africa has really stepped

in to get entry level racers up and running – and Neil seems to

have boundless energy when it comes to looking after the kids.

Many of our national and international racers have come up

through this class – and they all stay involved to give the new

generation pointers. There is a camp coming up soon – and the

junior Foleys will be attending – so we’ll run a full feature soon.

NSF100 Class


Parents pay R15k first year, R12k for the 2nd and R10k third

year. Bikes get transported to tracks and back and there are

normally two training camps every year where the top racers of

SA racing abroad and nationally help out.

• Cre8Work 50/65/85 Junior Motards, duplicates the MX

ages for the classes here.

• Honda CBR 150 Class. The “professional” class for

the kids, it’s a good stepping stone for kids wanting to take their

racing further.

• Clubman’s Class – This is for anything with 2 wheels

and that does not fit into any other class. It’s a great place for

new riders wanting to find their feet for their first race.

• Motards SM2 – New to Motards, this is for you, as soon

as you get too fast (within 5% of fastest SM1 time of the day) you

get a big cheap skin coloured PEP store Big Girl panty and you

have to move up.

• SM1/ SM1X - This is the big boy class, SM1 for fast

guys coming through the ranks. SM1X is for The National Racers

who want to dice!.

Something unique – They have Live Streaming for all theclasses

and a 26 minute program on Ignition TV and Open View.

More info – superbikemag.co.za

Go and have a look – you won’t be sorry!

Beau Levy with his son

Donovan and Steve commentators for the day

Tristan Pienaar

Mia Pienaar leads the pack

Matteo Armoed and his dad


Joan Mir

Mr Consistancy

Photo:www.suzuki-racing.com


How a 2-stroke works

All About

ENGINES

A typical inline 4

cylinder engine

Turning Fuel Into Smiles:

We ran a feature similar to this about

5 years ago – and we figured that it’s

time for a refresher course. We are

often asked about the differences

between all of the engine types and

configurations. This should shed

some light on the topic… Specifically

for motorcycles…

The engine on a motorcycle has always

been a central feature.

Unlike a car’s engine that is hidden

beneath the bonnet, it is a feature slapbang

in the centre and sometimes even a

part of the frame that demands attention.

Think Triumph, you think Triple. Think

KTM – V-Twin. Harley – a different kind

of V, Japanese – inline four. Beemer –

Boxer, Ducati – also Twin…

Although this is changing as engine tech

evolves and emission control laws get

tighter, many manufacturers have made

their engine configuration – a kind of

trade mark or manufacture feature.

Manufacturers have always made

their engines look good…with chrome,

anodizing, polished alloy, shiny black

covers and so-on.

The Japanese, of course have always

produced everything they can think of

to build sales and establish themselves.

They have had two and four-stroke

versions of everything possible except,

ironically the BMW style opposed twin.

They had one or two attempts at it in the

60’s and they left it to the Bavarians to

thunder on with the concept.

The Japanese have, and continue, to

produce everything from single-cylinder

bread and butter bikes right up to Vee

Fours, parallel twins, three cylinders,

as well as in line four cylinders. In the

recent past they flirted with a rotary

engine, as well as a couple of exotic six

cylinder offerings.

Honda once even sold an oval 4 cylinder

engine that pretended to be a V-eight!

In a world where enthusiasts strive to

have a unique machine, we are really

spoiled for choice.

Will this continue?

We hope so. Whilst there is a push for

electric tech – nothing, in our humble

opinion will replace the sheer emotion

delivered by an internal combustion

engine. And electric technology is still

rather expensive…

With computer aided design, it is

reasonably quick, cheap and reliable to

design a virtual engine and produce it in

small numbers, so perhaps we will still

be able to buy motorcycles with exotic

hearts for a long time to come. 4 stroke,

2-stroke, Diesel, Rotary…

Here is the skinny:

What is a four stroke engine?

A four-stroke engine (also known as fourcycle)

is an internal combustion engine in

which the piston completes four separate

strokes per combustion which comprise

a single operational cycle. A stroke

refers to the full travel of the piston along

the cylinder, in either direction. While

risqué slang among some automotive

enthusiasts names these respectively

the “suck,” “squeeze,” “bang” and “blow”

strokes as they are more commonly

termed.

1. INTAKE: The stroke of the piston

begins at top dead centre. The piston

descends from the top of the cylinder to

the bottom of the cylinder, increasing the

volume of the cylinder. A mixture of fuel

and air is forced by outside atmospheric

(or greater) pressure into the cylinder

through the intake port.

2. COMPRESSION: With both intake and

exhaust valves closed, the piston returns

to the top of the cylinder compressing

the air or fuel-air mixture into the cylinder

head.

3. POWER: This is the start of the

second revolution of the cycle. While the

piston is close to Top Dead Centre, the

compressed air–fuel mixture in a petrol

engine is ignited, by a spark plug - or

ignites due to the heat generated by

compression in a diesel engine. The

resulting pressure from the combustion

of the compressed fuel-air mixture forces

the piston back down toward bottom

dead centre.

4. EXHAUST: During the exhaust stroke,

the piston once again returns to top dead

centre while the exhaust valve is open.

This action expels the spent fuel-air

mixture through the exhaust valve(s).

What is a 2-stroke engine?

Single, twin, triple, crank and piston

only no valves or camshafts and rather

use what is commonly referred to as

reed valves in a rad block… usually

found in dirt bikes although quite a few

manufacturers made 2-stroke powered

road bikes.

Because it can be made to be light,

powerful and compact, the very simple

two stroke engine is a big favourite with

dirt bike manufacturers…

A two-stroke or two-cycle engine is

a type of internal combustion engine

which completes a power cycle in only

one crankshaft revolution and with two

strokes, or up and down movements, of

the piston in comparison to a “four-stroke

engine”, which uses four strokes.

This is accomplished by the end of the

combustion stroke and the beginning

Diesel:

Because of their power characteristics

and bulky size and weight, Diesel

engines are not a huge line for

motorcycle manufacturers. Bikes are

mostly about excitement – and small,

normally aspirated Diesels provide more

torque than top-end, thus, manufacturers

tend to fit them into workhorses like Side

By Sides and some of the Utility ATV’s.

The basic difference between a diesel

engine and a petrol engine is that in a

diesel engine there are NO spark plugs.

The fuel is sprayed into the combustion

chambers through fuel injector nozzles

just when the air in each chamber

has been placed under such great

pressure that it’s hot enough to ignite

the fuel spontaneously. A diesel does

not run with traditional spark plugs

because they do not need fire to burn -

combustion happens under pressure.

They do, however, have glow plugs to

heat the fuel for starting purposes.

of the compression stroke happening

simultaneously and performing the intake

and exhaust (or scavenging) functions

at the same time. It does not have a

camshaft or valves, and fuel enters the

engine through a hole, or “port” in one

side of the cylinder wall, and the exhaust

gas blows out another hole (port) in the

opposite cylinder wall.

As the piston moves up and down it

uncovers these “Ports” in sequence.

This all happens in “two strokes “of the

conrod, one crankshaft rotation. Once to

suck fuel in, compress and burn it, and

the second time to expel the burned gas

through the port into the exhaust pipe.

During each firing stroke, where the

power is generated, a two stroke makes

roughly only 60% of the power a four

stroke makes. However, it has twice as

many power-strokes as a four-stroke.

Diesel powered Bikes include the likes of

Royal Enfields bullet that sells reasonably

well the world over, but the big market

for SA are machines like the Polaris

Diesel UTV’s, Kawasaki’s Mule

UTV’s, both aimed at the mining

and agricultural markets.

The U.S. military also developed

and successfully ran a fleet of

Kawasaki KLR 650’s that ran on

diesel and paraffin … and basically any

crude fuel they could find out on the

battlefields of the world.

It has as a better power to weight ratio

but is heavier on fuel as well.

Therefore, a 250 two stroke single will

generally generate more power than a

250 four-stroke single.

A two stroke engine also has a dry crank,

where most other engines have cranks

that run in oil baths or sumps. So, how

is the crank shaft lubricated on a two

stroke? Lubrication is derived from the

two stroke oil you mix in with your petrol

which atomises on combustion and the

vapour then provides lubrication to the

crank, also another reason two stroke

engines develop better power more

quickly than a four stroke equivalent. The

oil bath creates drag on the four stroke

crank where the two stroke crank spins

more easily in a cloud of vapour.

A diesel engine.


The Rotary engine: Not common at all

in the bike industry.

A rotary engine, like the ordinary

reciprocating engine (where the piston

goes up and down, both two and fourstrokes)

gets its driving power from the

same compression of fuel being

compressed, burned and exhausted.

However, where the normal engine

must convert the power generated

forcing the piston down the

cylinder into a circular motion

through the crankshaft, the rotary engine

has a rotor spinning inside a chamber

performing the same function.

Engine configurations:

Whenever you read a bike test – you’ll see that

we often refer to what kind of engine powers

the machine – ie – parallel twin, Vee twin, single

cylinder and so-on. Some people confess that

they often have no idea what we are talking

about. There are plenty of non-technical people

out there, so maybe, this will help. Please bear

in mind that we are not boffins - we rely on our

wives to tell us everything...

But here’s what we do know…

Here are some of the engine configurations on

the market at the moment, or which have been

produced in the recent past.

Different configurations make power in different

ways - IE: and inline four is generally smooth

and is fairly predictable – while a V-Twin… well

- ride one. You’ll get the gist of it.

As the rotor spins in one direction

only, and does not have to stop at the

beginning and end of each cycle (four

times per power cycle in a 4 stroke, and

twice in a two stroke), it is continuously

sucking in fuel, compressing and

burning it as well as expelling the

exhaust.

The power shaft is being

driven continuously. This

makes for a very

smooth and

powerful engine.

It produces

more than

double the

power of

either a two

or four-stroke

engine and

has similar

characteristics

to a jet turbine engine.

High power but woefully inefficient and

very heavy on fuel, and it also produces an

unacceptable amount of toxic emissions.

Single Cylinder 2 Stroke

It is also very complex and expensive to

manufacture and maintain. Having said

all of this it might still make a comeback as

technology progresses because it has the

advantage of small size, and it can run on

almost any type of combustible fuel.

Suzuki and DKW both bought licenses

from Wankel in the mid 70’s, and whilst

DKW brought out a lightweight rotary

engine dirt bike,

Suzuki produced the incredibly heavy

and complex RE5. Nice bikes to ride,

but thirsty and unwieldy, they were

overshadowed by the excellent GS 750

and soon both the DKW and the RE5

faded away into history.

Norton, in its first re-incarnation in

the UK developed quite a successful

800cc rotary, which they again raced

very successfully and ended up with a

reasonably successful production rotary,

which included a very reliable police

version.

Single Cylinder 4 Stroke

Single cylinder: 1 piston that moves

up and down.

The piston and barrel can basically fave

in any direction or be slightly inclined.

Four stroke or two stroke.

The vast majority of dirt bikes have these

engines fitted, in various sizes. Most

manufacturers offer a single of capacities

from 50 cc up to around 700 cc.

Water cooling, fuel-injection, electronics

and balance shafts make them

sophisticated and reliable.

Popular Examples: Honda CRF450,

Husqvarna Svartpilen, KTM690, Yamaha

Grizzly 700.

Parallel twins: Two pistons going up

and down next to each other in a straight

line. Four and two stroke.

Once again most manufacturers have

one or more parallel twins in their

catalogue, ranging from 250 to 1200

cc, in both air-cooled and water cooled

versions.

Popular examples: Yamaha’s T7 and

MT07 . BMW F850GS and XR900.

Kawasaki Z650. Polaris RZR. Triumph

Thruxton. Yamaha RD350.

Triple parallel engines: Three pistons

going up and down next to each other in

a straight line. Four and two strokes.

MV Agusta made the 3cylinder engine

famous in their grand prix bikes, and the

configuration is well-known for producing

a very exotic exhaust note. While the

Italian company was in one of the many

limbo periods it has gone through over

the years, Triumph brought out a 750

version which kept them going and

helped to developed the current triple

which has revived the company and

made into a wonderful success.

Yamaha, in typical Japanese style, have

produced a brilliant triple cylinder bike the

MT09, aimed at the market looking for

something unique. We hope to see this

engine in an adventure bike soon.

Triumph also produced the monster

Rocket - three cylinders fitted

longitudinally in a huge cruiser frame

which is surprisingly effective and

popular.

Popular examples:

Triumph 800XC, Yamaha MT09.

Significant is the fact that Suzuki

and Kawasaki put themselves on the

Superbike map with a selection of very

nice two stroke triple-cylinder bikes.

All of them were well known for great

performance, reliability and smoothness.

Only the move away from emissionemitting

two strokes saw them being

discontinued.

In Line four cylinders: Four pistons

going up and down next to each other.

Every Japanese factory followed Honda’s

lead with their original CB750 four that

was based (copied) on the earlier Benelli

4 and 6 Cyl bikes.

This is the engine that changed the world

of Superbiking forever. Honda made

history, but they only beat Kawasaki to

the punch by a very short time, as the big

K had their incredible (for the time) Z900

almost ready to launch. Had they brought

it out first, the motorcycle industry may

have looked a little different today.

So popular is the in-line four that it has

earned the tag of UJM….Universal

Japanese Motor, and it is still one of

the most popular big cylinder road bike

engine to this day. It took BMW a while

to make an inline four with their RR, but

when they did, they were the first to give

it just more than 200 BHP – unheard of

back then.

Inline fours are generallytoo wide to fit

into adventure and dirt bikes, where you

always look for a more compact design..

Inline Six cylinders: Six pistons going up

and down next to each other.

Big, wide, in your face… probably quite

impractical due to the sheer size…

In the early sixties Honda put themselves

on the map with a wailing six cylinder

four-stroke grand prix racer which

dominated the 250 GP class at the time.

Just the sound alone of this engine

which peaked at 22000rpm in a field

of thumping singles and some twin

cylinder two strokes made everyone

sit up and take notice of the Japanese

manufacturer, and sent enthusiastic

buyers into Honda showrooms worldwide.

A classic case of how racing can

sell product!

When the other

Japanese and the odd European brand

brought out their competitors to the

mighty Honda 750-4 and started to ease

customers away from the big H they

dropped another bombshell.

The in-line 6 cylinder Honda CBX

1000 road bike. Honda proved their

engineering skill and marketing savvy

once again. Kawasaki soon followed suit

with their Z1300… Due to the sheer size,

weight and girth of these girls, neither

bike handled very well…

These days the only production inline six

cylinder is the monstrous BMW touring

bike, a machine big enough to need a

reverse gear to get it out of a parking bay.

Popular examples: Honda CBX1000.

Kawasaki Z1300.

Parrallel Twin

Z650

Triple Cylinder

Mv Agusta

Inline 4 Cylinder Honda

CBR1000

Inline 6 Cylinder

BMW k1600 GT

Single Cylinder

Svartpilen 701


KTM LC8 V Twin

TOLEDO 2.0 AIR

R2,850

The Vee’s:

Vee twins: Two pistons going up and

down at an angle, usually 60 or 90

degrees.

There are many, many Vee twins on the

market, from 250cc right up to monster

2000cc versions. They also feature

balance shafts, electronics, fuel injection,

and trick mounting systems to protect the

rest of the bike and rider from vibration

and sheer strength.

There are also air-cooled and water

cooled versions. They also vary

in the way they are mounted with

Ducati (Transverse), Harley Davidson

(Transverse), all of the Japanese and

other manufacturers mounting them in

line, that is with one cylinder behind the

other. Then there are a few companies,

like Moto Guzzi (Opposed) and Honda,

who have turned them sideways, with a

cylinder poking out at an angle sideways.

Honda even sold one like this with a

turbo…a classic quite sought after these

days. In the off-road world, Can-Am has

made the Rotax V-Twin engine their

weapon of choice. Interesting is the fact

that Aprilia fitted their RXV dirtbikes with

a V-Twin. Fun to ride, and something very

unique…

Popular examples: KTM 990/ 1190R.

Suzuki V-Strom. Harley Davidson. Can

Am Renegade. Moto Guzzi. Ducati

Multistrada.

V- Four cylinder: Like a V- twin engine

but with two pistons on each side.

You got it – four cylinders in a V

formation. This creates a fairly unique

form of power delivery – like the Tuono

that we rode in last months issue…

Manufacturers like Ducati are romancing

these designs again.

Air-cooled Twin

Guzzi

Popular example: Aprilia Tuono,

Honda’s VFR lineup.

V8: Four Pistons on each side moving in

a V-pattern.

Yup – the V8 found its way into some

bikes…There has been a factory made

V8 in the Moto Guzzi 500 V8 GP bike of

the 60’s, but the size and complexity of

this engine makes it just too impractical

for a regular road bike. There are a few

custom V8’s around using car engines in

cruiser type frames, but they are few and

far between.

Popular example: The Boss Hoss.

Other V-s

Hondas GP bike was a V5… and you

could argue that radial engines found

on the old aircraft also classify as a V-

configuration.

Flat twins: Two pistons going side to

side in opposite directions.

Everyone knows the BMW-style

opposed, or flat twin. They have

developed it into a very sophisticated

power unit, and have managed to

squeeze a surprising amount of power

out of it. Interestingly,

the technology has never really caught

on with other manufacturers, Honda

made a Goldwing with a flat four, Ural

uses BMW’s design from WW2 for

their machines, but to our knowledge

(and there is not much of that), this

is just about the exclusive domain of

BMW. However you can still buy a new

URAL which is based on BMW’s WW2

designs…

Popular example: BMW GS1250.

So what’s next?

With the world going greener, engineers

around the world are looking for cleaner,

more efficient technology. Who knows

what the future holds. Frankly, even

motorcycle manufacturers are not entirely

sure. KTM made giant strides with the

introduction of the TPI range of two

stroke machines – but is that enough?

What’s next? The sky is the limit for the

boffs out there – we look forward to lots

more different kinds of horsepower in the

future…

BMW Boxer

flat twin cut

away

ADVENTURE

TOURING

The Toledo 2.0 Adventure-Touring

jacket has been given a significant

update ensuring it is perfect for

summer riding and high-mileage

riders who want maximum

performance but with massive

air-flow through the jacket.

WET WEATHER

The polyester mesh jacket now

features tough nylon overlays on

the shoulder and elbows, creating

a very durable jacket for summer

use. It also has a removable

waterproof liner just in case of

inclement weather which also

can be used as an over-jacket,

meaning you don’t have to

refit the liner to the inside of the

jacket if you’re caught out in wet

weather.

It has a fully adjustable rolled

Neoprene collar and soft-edged

cuffs for maximum comfort and

features handwarmer pockets

and an outside Napoleon pocket

plus adjustment points on arms

and hips. A Mandarin collar

keeps the rider cool around

the neck.

Subtle black reflective elements

give the rider full visibility when

riding in low light conditions,

giving the rider a full humanoid

shape to other road users,

ensuring the Rider is fully

registered.

The Toledo 2.0 Air has CE

Level 1 protectors to shoulders

and elbows as standard and

provision for Oxford level 1 or 2

back protectors.

Contact DMD on 011 792 7691 or visit www.dmd.co.za for a dealer near you. Prices shown are recommended retail pricing including VAT. E&OE.

TRUST BIG BOY TO DELIVER- AFFORDABLY

Big Boy’s commercial range offer affordability, reliability and convenience for all your business and fast food delivery requirements.

Join the brand that’s ahead of the commercial pack by calling one of our 80 dealers nationwide today or visit www.bigboy.co.za

Velocity 200 R19,499.00

FOR ROAD LEGAL MODELS

Velocity 150

R15,999.00

USED FOR DELIVERIES

FOR MANY OF SOUTH AFRICA’S

POPULAR BRANDS.

OTHER

SCOOTER

MODELS ALSO

AVAILABLE

SuperLight 200

R19,499.00

Revival 150 R18,999.00

* MOTORCYCLE TOP BOXES EXCLUDED

** Prices include VAT, excludes On-The-Road costs & Govt. Levy.

Aprilia V4

engine

Cutaway

V-Twin

engine.

For the full scooter, motorcycle, ATV and commercial range visit: www.samotorcycles.co.za

IMPORTED AND DISTRIBUTED BY

Join Big Boy on

GraphicWerx Advertising & Design cc


TYRE TECH TALK

by Bruce de Kock, owner of Bike Tyre Warehouse Group

ALL THE PREMIUM BRANDS

THAT COUNT UNDER ONE ROOF

Motorcycle Tyre Basics

Hi Peeps

Wow November edition already and pushing as deadline is

today, Sean is on my case anyway here goes with the second

part of the 4 part series on Motorcycle Tyre basics.

Well this is number 2 of our 4 part Tyre Basics Series, I hope

you are taking in the basics so when we move to the more

advanced tyre technology you at least have the basics under

THE TYRE OUTSIDE

Part 2

your belt and are able to discern very quickly if the advice you

are receiving next time you venture out to a dealer to purchase

your next set of hoops.

From the Bike Tyre Warehouse Team take care out there on

the roads and make sure your tyres are geared for the wet

season contact any of our BTW branches for the #bestadvice

#bestservice & #bestprice

Sidewall

• Support the shoulder at full lean

• Protect casing plies

• Bear sidewall legal markings

SIDEWALL

PRODUCT

NAME

LEGAL

CERTIFICATIONS

Tread pattern (center)

Shoulder (or side)

• Road holding at full lean

THE TYRE INSIDE

BRAND

SIZE

SHOULDER (SIDE)

Its main function is to ensure grip, stability

and line holding when riding at lean.

SHOULDER (SIDE)

The slicker this area,

Its main function is to ensure grip, stability

the sportier behavoiur we may expect

and line holding when riding at lean.

from the tyre.

The slicker this area,

The more grooves this area contains, the

the sportier behavoiur we may expect

more efficient the water evacuation

from the tyre.

results.

The more grooves this area contains, the

more efficient the water evacuation

results.

MULTI COMPOUND

TREAD PATTERN

TREAD PATTERN

Side

Side

Center

16

Center

17

17

Sidewall

• Support the shoulder at full leaning

• Protect casing plies

• Host sidewall legal markings

Side

Side

CENTER

It is the section of the tire that comes in

contact with the road surface.

CENTER

It is made of a thick rubber, or

It is the section of the tire that comes in

rubber/composite compound formulated to

contact with the road surface.

provide an appropriate level of traction that

does not wear away too quickly.

It is made of a thick rubber, or

rubber/composite compound formulated to

It is characterized by the presence of

provide an appropriate level of traction that

geometrical shapes made out of grooves,

does not wear away too quickly.

blocks and in some cases sipes

It is characterized by the presence of

geometrical shapes made out of grooves,

blocks and in some cases sipes

TREAD PATTERN COMPOUND

It consists in the usage of two or more tread

compounds in different areas of the tyre, i.e.

center and shoulders.

Conventional Structure

(X-Ply)

The cords of the plies face

diagonally the rolling direction

Conventional Structure

(X-Ply)

Load

Structure is very resistant and

resilient to deformations even

when:

• the load increases

• is used in Offroad

24

28

STRUCTURE

Radial Structure

The cords of the plies face perpendicularly*

the rolling direction

* or nearly

Radial Structure

Speed

The tyre preserves its

shape also at high speed

From a technical point of view, the aim is to

create tailored performance outputs in

different areas of the tyre.

A harder compound

in the center

provides mileage

and stability.

A soft compound on

the shoulders will

increase grip in lean.

Best use:

a. Heavy weights

b. Low speed (


BUYER’S GUIDE

SELLING

YOURBIKE?

FIRE IT UP IS THE MOST TRUSTED PURCHASER IN SA!

WE PAY INSTANTLY, WE COLLECT, WE COME TO YOU!

www.fireitup.co.za

MODEL PRICE MODEL PRICE MODEL

PRICE

RSV4 RR 1000 R325,000 Monster 797

R151,900 Street 750

R109,000

RSV4 RR 1100 Factory R479,311 Monster 821

R189,900

Tuono V4 1100

Tuono V4 1100 Factory

RSV4 1100 FACTORY

G 310 R

G 310 GS

C 400 X Scooter

C 400 GT Scooter

F 750 GS

F 850 GS

F 850 GS Adventure

R 1250 GS

R 1250 GS Adventure

R 1250 R

R 1250 RS

R 1250 RT

R NineT Pure

R NineT

R NineT Scrambler

R NineT Urban GS

R NineT Racer

K 1600 GT

K 1600 GTL

K 1600 B

S 1000 R

S 1000 RR Red

S 1000 RR M Sport

HP4 Race

APRILIA

DUCATI

HARLEY-DAVIDSON

BMW

S1000RR M SPORT

S1000XR

R289,000 Monster 821 Stealth R202,900

R315,000 Monster 1200

R224,900

Monster 1200 S

R262,900

Monster 1200 R

Monster 1200 Black

R257,900

R248,600

Hypermotard 950

R203,900

Hypermotard 950 SP R241,900

Supersport

Supersport S

R204,900

R226,900

Multistrada 950

R217,900

R69,300 Multistrada 950 S

R243,900

R80,400 Multistrada 1260

R243,900

R125,000 Multistrada 1260 S

R298,900

R136,000 Multistrada 1260 Enduro R297,900

R190,500 Multistrada Pikes Peak R362,900

R202,500 Multistrada Grand Tour R328,900

R223,300 Diavel 1260

R313,900

R269,300

R288,900

Diavel 1260 S

X Diavel

R352,900

R331,900

R212,000 X Diavel S

R381,900

R227,000 959 Panigale

R229,900

R252,400

R175,300

959 Panigale Corse

Panigale V2

R264,900

R267,900

R196,700 Panigale V4 base

R351,900

R204,000 Panigale V4 S

R418,900

R180,350 Panigale V4 Speciale R669,900

R180,200 Panigale V4 R (2019) R712,900

R288,700 Panigale V4 25° 916 R755,900

R311,900 Panigale Superleggera R1,774m

R348,100 1299 Panigale R FE

R669,900

R213,600

R311,400

Streetfighter V4

Streetfighter V4 S

R307,900

R359,900

R352,400

R1,3m

Sixty 2 Scrambler

Icon Scrambler

R128,900

R155,900

Full Throttle Scrambler R184,900

Classic Scrambler

R164,900

Desert Sled Scrambler R200,900

Cafe Racer

R2000,900

1100 Scrambler

R199,900

1100 Scrambler Special R216,900

1100 Scrambler Sport R251,900

STREETFIGHTER V4

Street Rod

R120,000

Iron 1200

R153,000

Superlow

R147,500

Iron 833

1200 Custom

R151,500

R163,900

Superlow 1200T

R169,000

FortyEight Special

R163,000

FortyEight

Roadster

R163,000

R171,500

StreetBob

R191,000

LowRider

R218,500

Deluxe

Sport Glide

R276,900

R234,500

Fat Bob

R229,500

Fat Bob 114

R263,000

Soft Tail Slim

R249,900

Fat Boy

R280,500

Fat Boy 114

R316,500

Brak Out 114

R316,000

Break Out

Heritage Classic 114

R281,000

R319,500

Heritage Classic

R286,900

Ultra Limited Low

R385,000

Road King

R323,500

Road King Classic

R281,000

Road King Classic

R323,500

Road King Special

R344,500

Street Glide

R354,000

Street Glide Special R371,000

Road Glide Special

R375,000

Road Glide

R355,000

Road Glide Ultra

R379,000

Ultra Limited

R385,000

CVO Street Glide

R510,000

CVO Limited

R544,000

Free Wheeler

R407,000

TRI Glide Ultra

R514,000

FXDR114

R299,900

HUSQVARNA

FS 450

R150,699

701 Enduro

R169,699

701 Supermotard

R169,699

Vitpilen 401

R84,699

MODEL PRICE

MODEL

PRICE MODEL

PRICE

HONDA

KAWASAKI

KYMCO

ACE 125

R24,300

Z300

Elite 125 Scooter

R23,399

Z400 ABS

NC750X

R114,480

Ninja 400 ABS

NC750X DCT

R123,120

Z650

Africa Twin 1100

R210,000

Z900 ABS

Africa Twin 1100 DCT R222,499

Z900 RS

Africa Twin 1100 AS Man R236,000

Z900 Cafe Racer

Africa Twin 1100 AS ES R269,000

Z1000R

XR190

R49,620

Z1000SX

XR150L

R32,960

Ninja 650

XR125L

R30,000

Versys X300

CRF250L

R74,999

Versys 650

CRF250 Rally

R85,000

Versys 1000

CBR 1000 RR 2019

R209,999

ZX10R WSB 2018

CBR 1000 RR-R 2020 TBA

ZX10R WSB 2019

CBR 1000 RR-R SP 2020 TBA

Z H2

GL1800 Goldwing M R367,000

H2 SX SE

GL 1800 Goldwinh DCT R432,200

ZZR1400 Ohlins

INDIAN

FTR 1200

R209,900

FTR 1200 Race Replica R269,900

Scout Sixty

R169,900

Scout 1133

R199,900

Scout Bobber

R199,900

Chief Dark Horse

R299,900

Chief Classic

R419,900

Chief Vintage

R379,900

Springfield

R389,900

Springfield Darkhorse R369,900

Chieftan Dark Horse R399,900

Chieftan

R399,900

Roadmaster

R449,900

HUSQVARNA SVATPILEN 701

KTM

125 DUKE

R63,999

RC 125

R66,999

390 DUKE

R79,999

RC 390

R84,999

390 Adventure

R93,999

790 DUKE

R159,999

790 Adventure

R195,999

790 Adventure R

R209,999

690 Enduro R

R168,999

890 DUKE R

R189,999

1290 Super Adventure S R259,999

1290 Super Adventure R R269,999

1290 Super Duke R R265,999

1290 Super Duke GT R269,999

R61,995 Agility RS 125

R22,950

R72,995 Like 125l ABS

R44,950

R99,995 G-Dink 300l

R59,950

R122,995 Xciting 400l

R119,950

R155,995 AK550

R159,950

R175,995

R168,995

R179,995

R179,995

R124,995

R85,995

R115,995

R159,995

R229,995

R259,995

R329,888

R310,995

R259,995

GIXXER SF 250

1290 SUPER DUKE R

MOTO GUZZI

V85 TT Evocative E5 R234,850

V85 TT Travel Pack

R249,850

Audace Carbon E4

R430,895

MGX 21 Flying Fortress E4 R575,296

V7 III Carbon E4

R210,750

V7 III Racer ABS E4

R224,750

V7 III Stone S

R228,420

V7 III Milano E4

R220,460

Dragster Pirelli LE

R329,900

Dragster 800RR

Z H2 Hypernaked

Dragster 800 RC Limited

Super Veloce 800RR

Brutale 1000RR 208HP

RUSH 1000RR 212hp

Turismo Veloce 800 160HP

UR110

UB125

GSX150

GSX150F

GIXXER 250SF

DL650XA

DL1050XA

SV650A

GSXR750

GSXR1000 A

GSXS1000 R A

GSXS1000 A

GSXS1000 ZA

Katana

VZR1800

VZR1800BZL9

MV AGUSTA

SUZUKI

R299,900

R359,900

R379,900

R479,900

R549,900

R299,900

R19,100

R21,300

R31,250

R33,850

R49,900

R131,500

R221,950

R101,900

R161,950

R237,500

R273,900

R163,500

R175,500

R188,900

R199,900

R204,900

MODEL

XS125 K Delivery

NH125

XS200 Blaze

XS200 Trail Blaze

Citycom 300l

GTS 300l EV

Max Sym 600l ABS

Crox 125

Fiddle ll 150

Jet14 200

Orbit ii 125

Symphony 150

X-Pro 125

SYM

Street Triple RS

Speed Triple RS

Street Twin

Bonneville T100

Bonneville T120

Bonneville Bobber

Bonneville Bobber Black

Bonneville Speed Master

Street Scrambler

Thruxton 1200 R

Tiger 800 XCX

Tiger 800 XCA

Tiger 1200 XCX

Tiger 1200 XCA

Tiger 900

Tiger 900 Rally Pro

Rocket R

Rocket GT

XTZ125

YBR125G

TW200

XT250

XT1200Z

XT1200ZE

MT07 ABS

MT09 ABS

MT07 Tracer

MT09 Tracer

MT09 Tracer GT

TRIUMPH

YAMAHA

PRICE

R18,995

R29,995

R18,495

R10,995

R59,995

R63,995

R121,995

R19,995

R20,495

R26,995

R16,995

R19,995

R21,995

R170,000

R219,000

R144,000

R145,000

R169,000

R169,000

R184,000

R179,000

R169,000

R192,000

R186,000

R205,000

R226,000

R260,000

R192,000

R215,000

R299,000

R315,000

R43,950

R31,950

R74,950

R77,950

R224,950

R249,950

R134,950

R169,950

R144,950

R179,950

R199,950

MODEL

FJR1300

XMax 300 Scooter

YZF R3

YZF R6

YZF R1 2020

YZF R1M 2020

Niken 3-wheeler

NIKEN 3-WHEELER

ZT250 R

ZT310R

ZT310X

ZT310T

ZONTES

PRICE

R229,950

R94,950

R84,950

R219,950

R349,950

R424,950

R275,000

R44,900

R63,900

R68,900

R74,900

DEALERS CONTACTS WHO

ADVERTISE WITH US

BMW West Rand Tel: 011 761 3500

BMW Fourways Tel: 011 367 1600

Honda West : 011 675 3222

Honda East Tel: 011 826 4444

Holeshot Husqvarna Tel: 011 823 5830

Fire it Up Kawasaki Tel: 011 467 0737

RAD KTM Tel: 011 234 5007

TRAX KTM Tel: 012 111 0190

Fire it Up MV Agusta Tel: 011 467 0737

Triumph South Africa Tel: 011 444 4444

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YAMAHA R1

Svartpilen 401

R84,699

Vitpilen 701

R146,699

Svartpilen 701

R146,699

All pricing correct as at time of publishing, but may vary due to exchange rates etc.

All pricing correct as at time of publishing, but may vary due to exchange rates etc.

All pricing correct as at time of publishing, but may vary due to exchange rates etc.


BUYING

USED BIKES

Used bikes are a great option for entering the motorcycle

market. This month, Donovan found a real little gem…

Fire It Up Ride: 2014 Honda CBR500R – R59,888

Story: Donovan Fourie

Pics: Glenn Foley

Next month, we are doing a feature showing just how

damn cheap it is to purchase and own a decent motorcycle

compared to the equivalent crap-box eco-car, and that

is purely on a monetary basis excluding such priceless

commodities as happiness.

We have another motorcycle in mind for that, but this one

would a be grand candidate too. It’s a Honda CBR500R, sold

by Fire It Up’s own Berto Santos to a customer in 2014 when

he was trading under a Honda dealership flag. That customer

did 24,807 happy kilometres over the next six years, and now

it has returned to Berto and his hallowed Fire It Up floor.


The CBR500R was built around Europe’s

learner market where to gain a full motorcycle

licence, riders need to spend time

with a learner’s licence and a motorcycle

that the authorities believe will not overwhelm

their poor, underdeveloped skillset

and therefore cannot push more than

47hp. So Honda simply produced a bike

with a dyno graph that peaks at 47hp

and enough charisma to send the stifling

Eurocrats into a turkey rage.

The cubic-centimetres are supplied by

two parallel, 250cc cylinders fed generously

by fuel injectors. The exterior

is sculpted out of superbike lines while

the cockpit has been proportioned more

for luxury than wrist-bending fury. A bike

designed for comfort should speak volumes

by itself, but when it’s a Honda that

phrase carries even more weight.

As one motorcycle designer, when asked

how he had achieved such great ergonomics,

admitted: “I took a tape measure,

went down to a Honda dealership and

just copied them.”

The 47hp is not enough to cause the

earth to shift on its axis, but it is enough

to shift your world, especially when

accompanied by a flurry of four-stroke,

parallel-twin roar. Top speed is limited

to 200km/h so that the Eurocrats won’t

throw a wobbly, but places in Jo’burg

where anyone could achieve more are

few so this is not an issue.

The rear seat on this specific bike has

two little tears, and beyond that, the motorcycle

looks pristine. It feels pristine too

because clearly, the previous owner was

a person of great care, but also because

it is a Honda. The Japanese giant does

not do half-measure.

What a cool little bike to run around on.

Comfortable, economical and probably as

reliable as an anvil. If you cannot afford a

new motorcycle – look around at the used

bikes on the market. There are some real

gems out there….

more confidence, in wet

and dry conditions, even

after 5000 KM *

even after 5 000

KM, experience

braking in the

wet*

Even after 5 000 KM, a MICHELIN Road tyre

stops as short as a brand new MICHELIN

Pilot Road 4 tyre* thanks to the evolutionary

MICHELIN XST Evo sipes.

With its dry grip, stability and best handling versus

its main competitors, thanks to MICHELIN’s

patented ACT+ casing technology, it offers even

more riding pleasure.***

* According to internal studies at Ladoux, the Michelin centre of excellence, under the supervision of an independent

witness, comparing MICHELIN Road 5 tyres used for 5 636 km with new and unworn MICHELIN Pilot Road 4 tyres.

** According to internal studies at Fontange, a Michelin test track, under the supervision of an independent witness,

comparing MICHELIN Road 5 tyres with METZELER Roadtec 01, DUNLOP Road Smart 3, CONTINENTAL Road

Attack 3, PIRELLI Angel GT and BRIDGESTONE T30 EVO tyres, in dimensions 120/70 ZR17 (front) and 180/55 ZR17

(rear) on Suzuki Bandit 1250

*** External tests conducted by the MTE Test Centre invoked by Michelin, comparing MICHELIN Road 5 tyres with MI

*** External tests conducted by the MTE Test Centre invoked by Michelin, comparing MICHELIN Road 5 tyres with MI-

CHELIN Pilot Road 4, METZELER Roadtec 01, DUNLOP Road Smart 3, CONTINENTAL Road Attack 3, PIRELLI

Angel GT and BRIDGESTONE T30 EVO tyres, in dimensions 120/70 ZR17 (front) and 180/55 ZR17 (rear) on a Kawasaki

Z900 giving best dry performance globally and #1 for Handling, #2 for Stability, #2 for Dry grip


Darth

MotoGP

more machine now than man

At the first Aragon race, MotoGP saw its eighth winner in 2020 when

Alex Rins crossed the line for his first win of the year. It also means

that Suzuki has joined Yamaha, KTM and Ducati in the list of winning

manufacturers in a year that is genuinely unprecedented for variety.

The racing year has been remarkably unpredictable, creating more

of a saga than a championship. The outcome for us mere mortals

at home with our noses pressed against the TV screens in enduring

intrigue may be glorious, but it is also causing a somewhat less desirable

effect.

It’s making it less about the rider and more about the machine.

In Formula One, Hamilton is mystifyingly described as the greatest of

all time even though it’s unlikely that he would still be able to win if he

wasn’t in anything besides a Mercedes.

Machine above human is the done thing.

Photo: www.suzuki-racing.com


Traditionally, in MotoGP, not so much,

and that’s the way we like it, however,

that seems to be the case these days – if

you’re on a Ducati or a KTM on a cold

Aragon Circuit, unlucky.

If you’re on a Suzuki, a Yamaha or Alex

Marquez’s Honda, you might stand a

chance.

Alex Marquez was the stand-out rider at

LeMans where he took his first podium.

However, critics pointed out that it was

raining and didn’t quite count, so he did it

again in the dry at Aragon a week later.

Many have praised him for gaining

confidence, learning the Honda that was

previously unrideable by anyone except

his older brother Marc and showing the

talent that he is.

Much of that might be accurate, but then it

might be complete garbage too.

It might be more down to machine than

man, in this case, the rejuvenated Honda.

Since Marc’s exit from the championship

because of injury, Crutchlow has been told

he has no job from January, and Stefan

Bradl is merely a seat-filler. Full attention

has therefore be given to Alex, the only

rider that will remain with Honda next year

and continue its evolution.

The biggest problem plaguing the 2020

bike was severe understeer caused by a

heavy crank that lifts the front wheel when

the rider opens the throttle.

For Marc Marquez, this was not a problem

because of his manic, late braking style

that pushed well into the depths of the

corner, then squared the machine up and

rodeo’d it out again under hard acceleration.

For everyone else, the bike merely understeered.

What changed for Alex during the LeMans

and Aragon GPs? At Catalunya, two

weeks before, he was languishing in his

usual spot out of the top ten. Actually, his

finish statistics for the year are: Jerez 1

– 12th, Jerez 2 –8th with eight riders not

finishing, Brno – 15th, Red Bull1 – 14th,

Red Bull 2 – 16th, Misano 1 – 17th, Misano

2 – 7th, Catalunya – 13th.

All of these finishes were well beyond ten

seconds behind the leader.

Then LeMans and Aragon 1 happen, and

Alex Marquez is on the podium challenging

for a win in both. Did confidence hit

suddenly and unexpectedly during the

week between Catalunya and LeMans?

What wizardry was being performed within

the workings of his machine will remain

a guarded secret, but what they were

unable to hide was a brand new Ohlins

rear shock.

It was offered to all the Ohlins machines,

and yet only the two Suzukis and Alex

Marquez took it seriously, the same three

motorcycles that stood upon the podium

at Aragon 1.

The signs that the Honda of Alex Marquez

had changed were all too obvious during

Aragon 1. The younger Marquez was not

emulating his brother’s crazed, late-braking

style, but looked more attuned to the

smoother styles of the Suzukis with whom

he shared a podium. During the final turn,

he was clearly able to run more mid-corner

speed, something that was previously

unheard of on a Honda.

It makes sense because the rear shock

plays a massive role in the behaviour of

the front. If the rear doesn’t squat suddenly

when the throttle is opened, it keeps

more weight on the front tyre helping it

grip better and letting the rider hold a line

more easily.

It’s a good bet that other Ohlins teams

will also begin looking into the new Ohlins

rear shock, a situation that is worrying for

non-Ohlins users such as Brad Binder

who’s KTM is very much WP-shod.

KTM showed immense promise at the

beginning of the season when the teams

were riding in the depth of the European

summer and conditions were hotter than

when they usually visit such circuits. This

played into the KTM’s hands, and more

so Binder who is used to wayward tyres

on hot days.

At that stage, KTM was the bike to be on.

Of course, the three weeks of European

summer ended, and winter struck…

Usually, at this time of year, the MotoGP

circus is in Asia and Australia playing in

tropical climates, not in Europe where the

track temperature dips to as low as 3º C

on race weekends.

All this would be fine if Michelin had

created tyres with such chills in mind, but

clearly, they have not. Thus, teams are

forced to use only the soft options, and

now it is no longer a case of best rider

wins - but which bike happens to be

the best at getting tyres up to temperature

and not causing cold tears.

We say “happens” because the

teams prepared their bikes for an

ordinary year and ordinary temperatures.

By the time they realised that

the calendar would be moving into

the winter chill, Dorna had already

put a hold on most development.

At Aragon 1, the KTMs were stuck

between two evils – a medium front

tyre that could not generate enough

heat to work effectively and a soft

that would collapse under hard

braking causing the bike to lock the

front wheel and struggle to turn into

corners.

With a cold front tyre, the front will

lock up with no warning, meaning

the rider would be braking as usual

and suddenly find himself crashing

into the tarmac. With the soft, the

front will also lock up but will at least

give the rider some warning, making

it the lesser of the two evils.

This was particularly bad news for

Binder who relies on his unnatural

ability to brake later and harder than

anyone else, and it is the reason he

took so long to pass Pol Espargo

during the race.

Nonetheless, he was the top KTM

at Aragon 1, a feat that should be

rejoiced even though it meant him

finishing in 11th.

In conditions such as these, it is

not the best man winning but more

the machine that happens to be the

best, so essentially Binder is racing

only the other KTMs. And he’s doing

jolly well.


At Aragon 2, just one week after

Aragon 1, the track temperatures

were far less frigid, and we saw

more riders and fewer machines

in the finishing order. Morbidelli

won when no other Yamaha had

a say, the Suzukis were fast again

but not so dominant, and Zarco

put on a good show despite working

with a second hand Ducati.

Of course, every South African

had that sickening feeling in their

stomachs as they saw Binder

plough into the rear of Jack Miller

on just Corner Two of the race.

Of course, we love the guy, and

his response to the incident reminded

us why:

“All I can say is ‘sorry bud’.

There’s not so much you can say

after an incident like that. I mean

it was clear as daylight it was my

mistake, and unfortunately, it cost

someone else a race as well. I

don’t know if it’s a good thing or

bad thing, but both times this year

I’ve wiped out friends. It always

makes it a lot less easy to say

sorry because you’re mates, but

at the same time it really, really

sucks. It was nice of Jack to be

super chilled about it,

but I hope I never do that

again.”Going into Aragon 2, Alex

Marquez had tied with Binder for

Rookie of the Year, a tense situation

for South Africans who were

seeing the dreams of home glory

diminishing every week, made

even more heart-breaking when

Binder went down.

Our nerves were shattered

Marquez began progressing

through the field to perhaps even

take top honours and extend his

points tally over Binder to 25.

We are not supposed to celebrate

a rider falling – it is a treacherous

notion that calls for the justified

social execution of whichever

despicable miscreant had the

nerve to even think of such a

thing.

That’s all completely good and

true, yet South Africans throughout

the country struggled to

hide their delight at seeing Alex

Marquez standing in the gravel

trap next to his crashed motorcycle,

signifying that the Rookie

Championship is still on.

We are terrible human beings….


BMW’s R18

Hits The Cape.

BMW R18 Press launch

Words: Sean Hendley

Pics: Rob Till (Official BMW SA photographer)

Any opportunity to scratch a bike around the amazing passes of the Western Cape is a great thing, and

being the Cruiser man in the office, I jumped at the invitation from BMW to abuse their latest offering to

the cruiser market. The fact that we were to be accommodated at the Lanzerac Wine Estate just sweetened

the deal and helped override some misgivings I had about flying and all that.


To ride a ‘big’, (in apostrophes for reasons

I will discuss shortly), cruiser on some of

the best riding roads in the world is my

weak spot. mountains, rivers, waterfalls,

forests, blue skies, beards in the breeze,

sun warming my cheeks always gets the

bearded trio going in my head. Billy twanging

away on his guitar and smokey voice

singing about how good life on the road

is, Dusty rocking away on the Bass and

Frank beating on the skins, their music

hardwired into my soul. I don’t need archaic

technology to hear their sweet music,

I just need some powerful iron under my

butt, wind in my beard and a beautiful road

for my spirit to switch on ZZ Top music

hardwired into my soul.

‘Big’ is a relative term. An 1800cc boxer

twin is a relatively big motor. Definitely the

biggest boxer twin I know of… but then

again I don’t know a whole lot. 2,440mm

long is a big wheel base. 345kg’s is a big

weight. R360k odd is a big price tag. However,

a 690mm seat … not so much. But

not an issue unless your feet are tucked

up a few centimetre away from said seat

without the option to stick them out in front

of you because of the two pots blocking

the way forward.

If you are anything over 1.7m’s tall at the

very most you are going to battle fitting

onto the R18 comfortably. A couple of

the riders ranging close to 2m’s tall were

resorting to yoga stretching next to the

road to sort out some cramping issues in

their hips and lower backs after about a

hundred and fifty kays or so,

(with comfort breaks along the way). The

weird No.2 squat seating position negates

any continent crossing aspirations

taller folks might have on the R18.

Now this is not a problem exclusively to

the R18, it would seem that most ‘big’

cruisers are designed and built for and by

the vertically challenged. I have personally

ridden a lot of the ‘big’ cruiser available

on the market over the years and have

only found a very select few that fit my

chassis and an even shorter list of those

that I would actually like to own, but the

ZZ top hardwired into my soul dictates

that I must continue the search for my

motorcycle nirvana.

Now, let’s quickly clear a few other minor

niggles out of the way before I get down

to the essence of the R18.

R360k odd is a big price tag and I would

have liked to have seen cruise control

and a power shifter on the R18. I understand

trying to remain true to the 1930’s

original style and feel, but guys this is the

age of resto-mods, taking to gorgeous

old styling and organic feel and mating it

with modern technology to enhance the

experience.

At one stage, gear changing under hard

acceleration I hit a false neutral and it

sounded like the gearbox exploded as it

reengaged.

And one might expect some sort of

adjustment on the suspension which is

really very firm even under my 115kg ass.

And “Range to empty” on the fuel.

All these factors really do contribute to

the ride experience and enjoyment …

anyway, that’s my griping over.

The R18 truly looks the part with its old

hard tail look, old school black paint with

white pin striping. Everything, including

the indicator stalks, are made of some

form of metal or other making it a true

‘Iron Horse’. Then there is all the chrome,

right down to the naked shaft, which

spins and glistens in the sunlight as you

roll along behind the big, chromed fish tail

exhaust pipes. 1930’s is truly alive in the

R18 styling and BMW have certainly got

that properly right.

I love the styling.

Squatting down onto the seat, a mere

690mm off the ground - and grabbing a

handful of those wide bars does create

quite a bit of anticipation in the rider.

Hitting the start button and feeling that

big 1800cc boxer motor erupt into life

is really an experience and sitting on it

while it rocks and rolls under idle giving

off a very familiar ‘potato, potato’ exhaust

note moves your soul to the very primal

core. The pipes are so long that you can’t

really hear it properly under load while

riding, but ride behind an R18 and your

very soul will rumble along with it. At one

point there were 10 of us bunched up at a

traffic light in front of traffic.

We all dragged off the line when the

lights went green and the sight and sound

of 10 heavy metal beasts thundering off

the line with tyres wailing as they lost the

fight between traction and torque left a

mark etched into the psyche of all the on

lookers for all eternity.

As mentioned earlier, the suspension is

quite firm and where this really worked

well was scratching down along Franschoek

Pass. The pegs are really low

and deck out very easily, but once we got

used to that, some riders used them like

knee sliders and the race was on.

Watching a fleet of cruisers cranking over

in corners, sparks flying off the pegs and

the big 1800cc boxer twin rumbling off the

kloofs, mountains and valleys is proper

fuel for your soul. Then it was on to Clarens

drive from Kleinemond to Gordons

Bay, possibly the sexiest road in all the

world. Pristine ocean and beaches to

our left, sometimes we got so close that

we got splashed in the face from waves

breaking on the rocks below.

Stunning cliffs and rolling mountains,

gorgeous homes and scenery that is

heart achingly beautiful with the smoothest

most perfect snake of tar twisting and

turning as it wends its way along next

to the ocean, sun gleaming off every

surface, seals waving at you from the water…

life really really doesn’t get better.

And that was only day 1.

The next day we headed up towards

Worcester, Wellington and Ceres via

Bains Kloof pass and back to Stellenbosch

along Slanghoek and Du Toits

Koof pass. Bains Kloof is very bumpy,


incredibly tight and twisty really

highlighting how firm the suspension

is on the big Beemer. Although

beautiful, I found the ride to be

more of a chore than a joy through

here and slowed right down to a

crawl to enjoy the scenery, especially

after we stopped where

a car had gone over the edge a

few weeks earlier and dropped 80

metres to the ravine floor...

Miraculously all three occupants

survived according to a report I

read up later on the internet. Into

Ceres town we had some long

winding open roads where we

could really test the limits of the

1800cc boxer, hooking feet over the

pillion footpegs, tucking down over

the tank behind those wide bars

and hanging on the gas gets you

up around 195km’s ph.

The limiter is quite interesting. It

doesn’t cut out or sound like a

valve bounce like most limiters. It

just reaches max revs and stays

there …amazingly smoothly.

HONDA CRF1100 D

2020

0 KM’S

R240 300

HONDA CRF1100 D4

2020

2 900 KM’S

R269 900

HONDA CRF1000

2019

12 000 KM’S

R159 900

HONDA ELITE 125

2020

0 KM’S

R25 900

CUSTOM

HONDA CRF1000

2018

7 900 KM’S

R129 900

HONDA NC750x

2019

3 800 KM’S

R95 000

HONDA CBR215R

2013

8 400 KM’S

R26 900

BMW F850 GS

2019

5 800 KM’S

R169 900

KAWASAKI ER6N

2016

3 400 KM’S

R64 900

In my final analysis of the R18;

Is it I bike I would own?

Well … yes, but not from new I’d

wait for a tidy used one to come

onto the market.

Would I ride it every day? … probably

not, but it would be ridden often

and hard.

Would I ride it long distance?

NO! it would be for a Friday

evening trot down to the local Boho

Chic bistro serving frilly pink drinks

in frilly pink glasses so I can just

sit and stare at it in all its beauty

shimmering under the pretty purple

lights emanating said establishment

while I sip on my frilly pink drink

and watch people crowd around it

before finding an interesting route

home to destroy the foot pegs.

With some serious individualisation

to suit my chassis it could be that

Soul Fuel bike that I have been

yearning for.

In its current set up it would be my

“Charlie Watts” bike. The Rolling

Stones drummer can’t drive, but is

an avid car collector and he collects

cars just to have them so he can

have custom suits tailor made and

just sit in the cars on his sprawling

estate.

I would buy all the fancy kit, get

dressed up and just go out for a

pose to stroke my ego a bit.

Get down to your local Motorrad

dealer and ride one for yourself …

and for all the tech boffs out there

here are the spec’s:

BMW R18

Engine Four Stroke, two cylinder horizontally opposed

boxer, push rod-actuated OHV w/ camshafts

Capacity 1802cc

Max Power 91hp / 67kw @ 47500 rpm

Max Torque 158Nm / 116 lb-ft @ 3000 rpm

Transmission Constant-Mesh 6 Speed

Final Drive Shaft Drive

Frame Construction type Double tube frame

Seat Hight 690mm

Wet Weight 345kg

Fuel Capacity 16 Litres


Rare Bikes

YAMAHA XSR900

Triple Amazake

The Vintage monochrome inspired XSR900 build by Gareth Davidson from Linex Yamaha.

Words and pics by Gareth Davidson

Ever heard of Amazake? Me neither, until I started searching for a name for this article.

Amazake is a traditional sweet, low-alcohol Japanese energy drink made from fermented

rice. It sounds wrong but it does perfectly describe the way this bike makes you feel after

having ridden it. I knew it had to be Japanese inspired and have something to do with a

burst of energy while staying authentic…


Other general accessories

• Oxford Horizon Bar End mirrors

• Puig R12 frame sliders

• XSR Billet brake master cylinder

caps

• FX CNC Racing steering damper

• XSR top plate accents

• R&G Radiator guard

• XSR Billet oil filler cap

One thing I haven’t mentioned is the fact

that this is the actual bike I tested back

in 2016 for Superbike Magazine which

makes it a lot more special. I found this

out when doing the registration and saw

the same original Yamaha demo registration

number featured on the paper as one

of its previous registrations.

When it comes to motorcycles in general,

there aren’t many that I haven’t ridden

before. Coming from a background where

I’ve raced some of the most powerful

superbikes at National level, to testing

some of the greatest bikes as a journalist

– deciding what to buy for yourself is one

of the hardest decisions to make!

I know what you’re thinking, I sound like

a spoilt brat, but the reality is, riding too

many bikes forces a dose of analogy

paralysis. 2020 became the year where

I purchased my first large capacity motorcycle,

and this is what led up to this

moment for me.

In 2016, Yamaha released a “Faster

Sons” neo-retro styled motorcycle that fell

into their “Sport Heritage” range and they

called it the XSR900. The base platform

of this bike is identical to the Yamaha

MT-09 and was pretty-much re-dressed

in classic attire.

Man! Did I have a lot of fun on this bike,

and it was one of the only bikes at the

time that I truly fell in love with – but,

just like a lot of the newer generation

bike enthusiasts, I fell into the statistical

demographic of not being able to afford it.

One year after its release in SA, Yamaha

stopped importing this model due to the

lack of sales, so this bike quickly became

‘THE ONE THAT GOT AWAY’.

I forced myself to quickly forget about the

bike.

Once it was in my grubby paws, I had

a very clear image in my head of what I

wanted it to look like.

There is absolutely nothing wrong with

the original blue colour, in fact I did

have a moment of doubt as to whether I

should change it or not? I’ve always had

a taste for classic or older generation

motorcycles, so I wanted to produce my

own interpretation of the original Yamaha

Racing look.

I just got the bike and it was taken away

from me again for a respray. That was a

bittersweet moment.

The Tank:

Plans changed ever so slightly, and

as any custom builder will tell you,

some things are done in the heat of the

moment. I found out that the side tank

covers are in fact made from aluminium

(the actual fuel tank sits underneath

these covers).

My silver paint idea quickly changed to a

brushed aluminium finish with the black

racing blocks and Yamaha lettering painted

in a custom midnight diamond black.

The black tank cover that runs up the

center of the bike was done in the same

custom black but near the handlebars.

I hid an XSR logo in a shade lighter which

can only be seen from certain angles.

Something very small and discreet put in

place for the viewer with a great attention

to detail eye.

The Engine Cover:

The right side of the motor has a plastic

engine cover as standard but had a

massive silver round piece which I did

not like. We had this painted in the same

fashion as the XSR logo but this time with

the round Yamaha Tuning Fork emblem

also only seen from certain angles.

Another small attention to detail item that

only true aficionado’s will appreciate.

Blacked out bits:

I wanted the tank to be the hero in the

picture, so all silver parts barring the rear

sets were blacked out. I think it was the

right move, because the tank does stand

out quite a lot and the black bits don’t

look too ‘kak’ either.

Tail light:

The rear section of the bike has had the

taillight removed and replaced with a

New Rage LED Fender Eliminator with

integrated indicators. This finishes off the

rear of the bike so nicely and shortens

the length making the bike appear more

muscle bike.

Performance:

An Akarapovic Racing steel & carbon

pipe is fitted. You can only get full systems

for these bikes as the exhaust is

a once-piece. This has opened up the

lungs of the bike and there’s nothing

quite like the sound of a screaming triple

Yamaha motor.

Pretty cool!

I have a few more plans left on this build

to make it super unique, but I think I’ll

enjoy the bike in the way it is now for a

little while.

If this is something that interests you, we

do offer this type of customizing at Linex

Yamaha Randburg.

Get hold of me personally to chat about

us doing something special on your bike

on 011 251 4015 or email

garethd@yamaha.co.za.

In 2018 I joined the Tuning Fork brand

(Yamaha) and the desire to own this machine

was re-introduced by a still-brandnew

model on the World of Yamaha

showroom floor. It was tough to casually

walk past this bike daily as I still could

not afford to own it. Staring at this bike

almost every day paved the way for what

I’d do to it if it were mine.

Fast-forward two years, and I found one!

A lot of superstitious people would agree

that all my lucky stars aligned, and I finally

had the finances available to purchase.


Parallel Universe

When we popped in to Kawasaki’s headquarters the other day,

Andrew the friendly dude in the workshop offered us a week on the

naked Z650. Great opportunity, we were in the throes of delivering

the latest issue to dealers in Gauteng… what could be better?

We grabbed it and rode it – a lot and we kept asking ourselves why

more people don’t ride bikes like these…


Sure – it’s no ZX6 – but that parallel

engine is plenty grunty and willing and

accelerates hard when you want to

have some fun. The engine delivers

a brilliantly linear power curve that

comes alive around four grand and

pulls evenly all the way to the top for

pretty exciting acceleration. It’s no big

1000 but for a 650 it is HEAPS of fun

to ride.

It will comfortably cruise along at the

150 KPH mark with a top speed close

to 200. Handling is excellent – the bike

is small and it feels tremendously nippy

through traffic and the curves.

Naked:

Nakeds are brilliant! Aggressive lines,

uncomplicated, easy to ride, every day

bikes – and they tend to bring out that

little guy on your shoulder who taps you

on the lid and encourages you to do

hooligan stuff. True story! That wheelie

shot is our publisher who also happens

to be one of the most conservative (Read

ninny), road riders on the planet…

If you read our feature last month on

the Z900, you’ll appreciate how much

we luvvem! And this little Zed absolutely

carries the genes. Modern styling, striking

colours, futuristic head, tail and indicator

lights. Transformers have got nothing on

Kawasaki’s range, proper head turners

for sure!

Comfort:

Spot on. Relaxed, you sit in the bike

rather than on it. The only small grumbles

came from tall Sean who is… well taller

than a Wookie. But even he did not moan

too much. Normal sized big Saffers were

completely happy – and our smallest rider

and photo man could not stop gushing

about how comfortable it is.

The relation between pegs, bars and bum

is perfect for a commute or -even for a

longer weekend in the saddle – and when

we popped a passenger on the back to

go and watch the racing at the Kart track

– he had no complaints….

Electronic Features:

Honestly not too much to talk about. This

is a simple, easy to ride motorcycle – and

the only electronic feature that you get

is ABS. No power modes, no lean angle

sensors – but you do also get a beautiful

little TFT display that transmits all of the

info that you need to know.

The heart of the matter:

Parralel twin: The reason that so many

manufacturers are using parallel twins

rather than inline fours is because:

A: They have managed to make them

produce real world power and

B: Parallel twins are compact and allow

manufacturers to build more compact

motorcycles.

The beating heart of this bike is a liquid-cooled,

parallel-twin engine that runs

a 180-degree crank with balancers to

provide smooth power delivery throughout

the range. Bore and stroke measure

out at 83 mm and 60 mm, respectively,

which adds up to a total displacement

of 649 cc. Compression ratio is warm at

10.8-to-1, just enough to put you at the

mid-grade pump, and that contributes to

the 48.5 pound-feet of grunt you get out

of this bike.

Dual over-head cams time the four-valve

head, and they come ground with minimal

overlap to improve low- to mid-range

torque and to as Kawasaki says - “Reduce

free hydrocarbons in the exhaust

stream”.

The factory added the Kawasaki Air Management

System that uses a fan to direct

hot air down and away from the rider and

passenger, so even in urban clutter you

don’t get any uncomfortable heat from the

mill. A six-speed, cassette-type transmission

sends power through the chain final

drive and a slipper clutch makes for easy

lever pulls and some wheel-hop prevention

to help maintain control while hauling

it down using compression braking.

Ride impressions:

Man this thing is fun! We always say, that

no matter what bike you ride, it needs to

make your heart beat a bit faster – and

as far as mid-range bikes go this one will

do it! It is so much fun – especially when

you cane it with a bit of anger.

Possibly this bikes best attribute, like

most nakeds is its uncomplicated, fun

to ride nature. It’s a use every day, go

anywhere bike that feels built for fun,

whilst also serving as a practical dayto-day

work tool…

Sean says:

My first impression of the Kawasaki

Z650 is of a mean and muscular looking

streetfighter. Aggressive headlights,

an almost non-existent wind

shield, a sexy stubby tailpiece and a

little shorty exhaust tucked away under

the bottom of the bike coupled with an

original white, green and black livery

makes it a real looker from any angle.

The taillight is still one of our favourite

features, as with the Z900 we reviewed

a few months ago, it lights up as a ‘Z’


Swinging a leg over and dropping in

the saddle had me a little concerned

at first, I am around 115kg’s at 2

metres tall and the Z650 feels really

small. The handle bars are narrow,

the seat very low and the whole bike

is quite compact and light, so I had

some reservations about cramming

my mass into the saddle for the entire

day on my rounds, especially lugging

around a tog bag jammed full with

around 60kg’s of the current issues

of the magazines, only to be proved

wrong again. 8 hours in the saddle

was a breeze, you sit quite low in the

bike,

so immediately the bars feel a bit higher

and naturally put your shoulders in a

more relaxed position with no pressure

on your wrists or lower back, yet the

riding position is still sporty enough for

some enthusiastic cornering.

The compact dimensions of the Little ‘Z’

do make it brilliant in traffic.

I found myself ducking in and out of

gaps I would never have considered on

a bigger bike, with the low-ish bars and

mirrors you can easily sneak under or

between the rear view mirrors of most

other traffic queueing at intersections

and traffic lights and then you can


GO

blast off the line and into the

distance using the impressive low

down torque from the little 650cc twin

motor. Redline is at 10,000rpm and

you might expect a twin revving that hard

would be something akin to jackhammer

on a rock, but you would be sorely

ADVENTURE

mistaken. The motor rev’s cleanly and

smoothly all the way to redline, somewhere

around 7 or 8 thousand RPM it

gets a small buzz through the seat.

Banging the accelerator hard off the line

then double clutching into 2nd just before

red line gets the front wheel pointing

heavenwards. Maintaining said enthusiasm

through the ultra- smooth gearbox

soon has you zipping past the national

speed limit postings in 3rd gear and I

managed to see 196kmh in top gear

on a bit of a downhill before I ran out of

tarmac, so it is definitely not slow…

However, at these kind of speeds it does

drain its fuel tank quite quickly as one

might expect, but ridden within the speed

limits it is reasonably economical and

should get around 300 kays on a tank of

fuel we suspect.

What a great, practical, comfortable fun

to ride little road bike!

www.kawasaki.co.za for your nearest

dealer.

Specs

Engine:

4-stroke, 2-cylinder, DOHC, liquid-cooled

Displacement:

649 cc

Maximum Torque:

48.5 lb-ft @ 6,500 rpm

Fuel System:

DFI® with Keihin 36 mm Keihin throttle bodies

Transmission:

6-speed, return shift

Frame Type:

Trellis, high tensile steel

Front Suspension / Wheel Travel: Telescopic fork/4.9 in

Rear Suspension / Wheel Travel: Horizontal back-link with adjustable preload, swingarm/5.1 in

Front Tyre: 120/70 ZR17 Dunlop Sportmax Roadsport 2

Rear Tyre: 160/60 ZR17 Dunlop Sportmax Roadsport 2

Front Brakes:

Dual 300 mm petal-type rotors with four-piston calipers, ABS

Rear Brakes:

Single 220 mm petal-style disc w/ABS

Overall Length:

206.4 cm

Overall Width:

76.4cm

Overall Height:

106.4 Kg

Ground Clearance:

13cm

KTM 390 ADVENTURE

Seat Height:

79cm

Curb Weight:

187 Kg

Fuel Capacity:

15.14 litres

Top Speed (claimed):

209 KPH

ADVENTURE MORE

Tech:

Engine Management Technology: Assist &

Slipper Clutch, Dual Throttle Valves, Economical

Fuel your restless spirit with a new adventure

Riding Indicator, Smartphone Connectivity

Chassis every day. Management Discover KTM’s Technology: sporty attitude ABS and

(Anti-lock proven performance Brake System), credentials Horizontal aboard Back-link this new,

Rear compact Suspension single-cylinder travel-enduro machine –

the KTM 390 ADVENTURE. Versatile ergonomics,

smooth power delivery, and innovative technology

all come together in a comfortable, lightweight

package – created for those who want to fit more

adventure into their daily lives.

Phone 011 462 7796 for your nearest dealer.

Please make no attempt to imitate the illustrated riding scenes, always wear protective clothing and observe the applicable provisions of the road traffic regulations!

The illustrated vehicles may vary in selected details from the production models and some illustrations feature optional equipment available at additional cost.

Photo: R. Schedl

GET IT.

READ IT.

LOVE IT!

SA’S MOST OFFROAD

AND ADVENTURE

MAGAZINE.

READ IT AT

www.motomedia.co.za


ROAD

TRACK

DIRT

GET A GRIP ON 2020!

///RACE

///TRACK

KR451

D213 PRO

///TRACK

///ROAD

GPR 300

ROADSMART 3 ROADSPORT 2

Q3+ Q4

S594/A

///OFFROAD

///TRAIL

AT81 & AT81EX

MX33 MX53 EN91 TRAILMAX MISSION

50/50

DUNLOPTYRESSA

Get a Grip on 2020! Email Nicole Swanepoel at

nicole.swanepoel@srigroup.co.za or contact our call centre on 011 418 3088.

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