Waikato Business News December Recap 2020

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Waikato Business News has for a quarter of a century been the voice of the region’s business community, a business community with a very real commitment to innovation and an ethos of co-operation.

RECAP

2020

A wrap up of the year's stories in

the Waikato business community.


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STRONGER TOGETHER

Waikato Business News kicked off 2020 featuring

Gallagher Group’s huge growth in its global security

business and ended the year with a focus on the region’s

best businesses, as Civtec took out top gong at the

Westpac Waikato Business Awards.

Of course, the big story of

the year was what happened

between those

bookends as Covid-19

swept in.

By our second issue of

2020 coronavirus had

found its way to page 15,

with a dire warning from ANZ

chief economist Sharon Zollner,

who told a Waikato business summit

“It’s getting really scary out there”.

And our third and fourth issues were almost

entirely devoted to that “scary” virus as New

Zealand went into lockdown and we collectively

entered the unknown.

Waikato Business News branded our coverage

“Stronger Together” and took a simple editorial

approach - to play a positive role by sharing as

many Waikato stories as possible and contributing

to the flow of information. We sought to

provide a platform for our readers to learn from

others and, in some cases, just to know they

were not alone.

There were shafts of light, with some firms

fortunate to operate in essential industries

and others able to make quick changes to

products or services. Some in the tech sector

even thrived, while those in travel and

hospitality were doing it tough.

The Government played a key role,

and Waikato businesses did everything

they could to support each

other. Cautious optimism became

the watchword unless you were an

economist, in which case you told a

tale of impending doom.

One of the more heartening moments of the

year for me was to be present at the ground

breaking ceremony for Union Square as soon

as Covid levels allowed. It was an important

expression of confidence in the future on the

part of the developers.

And the economists were wrong. No one is

pretending things are as good as they were

pre-pandemic but Waikato business, on the

whole, has bounced back well. The great

strength of our business community is its connectedness,

and long may that last.

This year has been a big one for Waikato

Business News in another way as well - we have

marked our 25th anniversary.

It feels great to be able to do that after riding

out the upheaval not only of Covid but, in the

longer term, of the arrival of the internet, and to

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Business with heart

The Raglan Coconut

Yoghurt story Page 4

Gallagher

securing

high-tech

future

By RICHARD WALKER

Ga lagher Group is eyeing huge growth in its

global security business as it reaps the benefits

of a strategic plan put in place four years ago.

C

ontracts range across

government and enterprise

sectors, and

include the National Grid in

Britain, and Fitbit.

Almost all revenue is

export-driven, with deputy

CEO Kahl Betham saying

America is highly promising,

along with Australia and Britain.

The company is also trialling

a cloud-based security

system for small enterprises

and has embarked on a major

Our statistics tell the story...

$3b

worth of

businesses s sold

future of work project.

The strategic plan was put

in place after what Betham

says was “minimal growth” for

the security division, including

a loss-making year.

Since then, the numbers

have been highly impressive as

the company sees what Betham

describes as a 20 year graph

that is now showing “hockey

stick” growth.

Betham says at the end of

financial year 2015, the security

business revenue was $50

Fresh Opportunities

Next steps for Good

George Page 8

3k+

million, and last year it broke

through $100 million.

“This year, it's 30 percent

growth, and we now have

plans to be $500 million within

five years for security alone.”

Gallagher produces command

and control software,

access control electronics and

also perimeter electronics and

physical fence hardware.

The company is targeting

what Betham calls the high end

of town as it pours resources

into R and D and innovation.

It is certified to the highest

level of national security in

businesses

currently for sale

Kahl Betham lends a hand.

Australia, the US

and New Zealand,

and is aiming for the

same in the UK.

It has nuclear power

plants, prisons, banks,

universities and Parliaments

around the world among a

growing base of clients.

“Everything that's either

got a large number of buildings,

a large amount of access

control, or a large amount of

risk of some kind, so high consequence.

We look after all the

power and gas in National Grid

UK,” he says.

Betham says the high

level of security clearance is

one reason why America as

a region is growing strongly

for the company - more than

80 percent this year, off the

back of a number of years of

40-50 percent growth. “We've

250k+

500+

active buyers on

our

database

$15m Health Centre

Screening plan huge boost

for Māori Page 12

decided that's a real capability

we have: you go from 100

competitors down to under a

handful. It's a really high-consequence,

high-value space.”

He says Gallagher believes

it is the most globally certified

company in its space because

it sees different competitors in

each country where it operates.

That enables it to secure contracts

that span countries, and

Betham says it is starting to

get government to government

referrals.

Providing the combination

of software and electronics

makes for a unique offering,

he says.

“It's really unusual still to

find a security provider that

has the software and the electronics

piece because a lot of

others are focused on either

being a software expert or an

8 Offices Nationwide

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access control controller or

reader expert. And we've kept

that whole ‘end to end’ because

we think it's a better experience.

“We're able to innovate

across the experience by having

control of those pieces.”

Having the factory in Hamilton

is important, he says. “We

are spending more and more

and more on innovation, which

is critical to how we manufacture

here.

“We can't compete on price.

So we have to target areas

where there's high value, and

you sell at high value.

“It's not a price-sensitive

market, but they do expect a

lot and require a lot for their

money. So if we're better, we

can keep manufacturing here.

Continued on page 3

LINK Business brokers

across four countries

know we will continue to tell Waikato business

stories into the future.

Meanwhile, in this issue, we recap and update

stories from 2020. Inevitably, they have a

Covid-19 focus - but are a great deal more optimistic

than appeared possible earlier in the year.

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‘This is where the heart is’

The supreme winner at the Westpac

Waikato Business Awards emphasised

whānau and customer service when

accepting the award on the night.

CBD

AWARDS

Page 6

By RICHARD WALKER

Civtec CEO Pele Tanuvasa

said the infrastructure

company was

privileged as a whānau of 250

across the country to work

on million dollar networks

while also working with

individual householders.

“Customer service and

quality and doing the right

Westpac waikato

business awards

Page 11

thing is in our DNA,” he

told the business audience at

Claudelands Showgrounds.

Founder and group CEO

Renae Smart said the awards

were particularly special to

them as a Waikato business.

“Our roots are deeply

founded in this region.

And while we operate

nationally now, this is

where the heart is.”

An impressive crowd of

550 attended the November

black tie event, which

revealed a business community

in good heart at

the end of a year in which

Covid-19 had struck.

A feature of the night

master

builder awards

Special liftout

Civtec, named Westpac Waikato Business

of the Year. Photo: Barker Photography

was the induction of well

known business leaders

Sir William and John

Gallagher and the late

Arthur Porter into the

Waikato Chamber of

Commerce Hall of Fame.

Continued on page 11

Happy reading and a happy holiday season.

We will be back at the end of January with

our first issue of the new year.

Ngā mihi nui

Richard Walker

Editor

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INSIDE THIS ISSUE

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WAIKATO BUSINESS NEWS - RECAP December 2020

3


GARDENS

ARTS

FESTIVAL

SECURES FUTURE

In one of the good news stories of the year, the

Hamilton Gardens Arts Festival is set to go ahead this

summer after facing uncertainty because of Covid.

JULIA DEANS WILL SING JONI MITCHELL IN ‘BOTH SIDES NOW’ AT THE 2021 FESTIVAL.

BY RICHARD WALKER

Punters can snack on a New Zealand smorgasbord

of performances, from cabaret to

comedy, from Julia Deans singing Joni Mitchell

to the Sunset Symphony.

They can also snack on locally sourced food

and beverages as the festival works with Waikato

Food Inc and the Food Truck League, and

aims to forge further partnerships in future.

In the face of Covid, the festival has been able

to rally and find the support to continue, albeit

with a slightly reduced programme.

The show goes on, from February 20-28, partly

because of a three-year Hamilton City Council

grant, which has helped secure the festival’s

future.

The grant, which at $120,000 per annum represents

about 10 percent of total revenue, is the

first time the city council has offered long-term

assistance, says festival general manager Geoff

Turkington.

He describes the support as a game changer.

“It's visionary on their behalf. Instead of lots of

lurching from one year to the other, we will

know we've got that consistent fund, and having

that support from our own council puts a lot

more weight on other funding applications.”

In a trifecta of achievements, the festival has

also gained crucial support from Creative New

Zealand and from a Domestic Events Fund set

up to support the events industry during Covid.

In each case, Turkington says, the festival got

the full amount it applied for and the Creative

NZ funding is the most the organisation has

ever given the festival.

Two sponsors that came on board last year

with three-year commitments, the University

of Waikato and law firm Harkness Henry, have

also stuck with the festival through Covid, he

says. “Those sort of partnerships are going to

be the future of the festival.”

Add to that, significant support in kind from

local firms such as ACLX and King St Advertising

- support which, Turkington points out,

has value in dollar terms to the contributing

firms who could otherwise charge out for that

time or equipment. “This is how amazing this

community is.”

The total cost of putting on the festival is about

$1.3 million, with Turkington this year needing

to find about $800-900,000 in cash. That

includes ticketing revenue, which he says is a

small part of the total.

“If you'd asked me probably even three months

ago, I would have said no the festival wouldn't

go ahead, but if it didn't go ahead next year we

would have lost it forever,” he says.

“This year was a real challenge. Mind you it's

been a challenge for quite a few years.” Turkington,

who was on the Festival Trust when he

was invited to help deliver the 2019 event, says

there had been an ongoing struggle to raise

enough money, as the festival costs grew but

funding bodies faced increasing demand. It is

an issue, he says, that charitable organisations

face worldwide.

Last year, the trust decided to review its purpose.

“Because the reality is that the money

wasn't there to be able to deliver the festival as

people knew it to be.”

The response, far from cutting back, was to

seek to expand. Turkington says an arts festival

of substance is important in a growing region

and city which seeks to recruit professionals.

“Educated, young urban professionals who

want a cosmopolitan lifestyle are attracted to

places that are rich in arts. Arts drives energy

and drives growth.”

The original mandate of the festival, to drive

awareness of Hamilton Gardens, was no longer

valid, while Turkington says two key documents,

the Hamilton Plan and the Hamilton &

Waikato Tourism plan, were clear on the need

for at least one more major, multi-day, inbound

tourism attraction. “Well, we already had it with

the festival, but no one really thought of it like

that.”

At the same time, the trust recognised the value

in activating the river trail between the Gardens

and the central city and last year included CBD

sites in the festival - which also added the Meteor

as an indoor venue that was not weather

dependent.

If you'd asked me

probably even three

months ago, I would

have said no the

festival wouldn't go

ahead, but if it didn't

go ahead next year

we would have lost it

forever

FLY MY PRETTIES DREW A BIG CROWD TO THE 2020 FESTIVAL.

ZERO WASTE VOLUNTEERS AT THE HAMILTON GARDENS ARTS FESTIVAL.

4 WAIKATO BUSINESS NEWS - RECAP December 2020


“That was quite a dramatic expansion for a

festival that was struggling to be able to deliver

its original purpose.”

Turkington says the organisers hope the

Waikato Regional Theatre, once completed,

will become part of the festival, along with

cafes and alleyways within the CBD.

That should open up other funding channels,

thanks to a combined arts and tourism focus.

BIG MUFFIN SERIOUS BAND MADE THE MOST OF THE SURREALIST GARDEN AT THE 2020 FESTIVAL.

The festival is, he says, arguably the largest

arts festival of its type in regional New Zealand

and is run on a far lower staffing ratio than

others. “You don’t do it for the money, you do

it because you truly believe in what you are

delivering for the community.”

Artists are paid, and this year more than 45,000

attended a live or free event. More than 1400

volunteer hours are required to deliver the

festival each year.

“We want to create a sense of celebration, of

excitement. That's why we have the Hub, which

is now from five o'clock to close - the food

trucks and the bars, live entertainment every

night that's free where everybody can come

down and just enjoy the festival vibe as the sun

sets in Hamilton Gardens.

“This is a very successful community event that

the rest of New Zealand is just discovering”

• For festival details, see HGAF.co.nz

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WAIKATO BUSINESS NEWS - RECAP December 2020

5


Strange chairs

committee

Hamilton East Labour MP Jamie Strange

has been appointed to chair Parliament’s

Economic Development, Science and

Innovation Committee.

The committee includes in its remit

business development, tourism, Crown

minerals, research, science, innovation

and information technology

GOVT FUNDING HELPS

FAST-TRACK

RUAKURA

Food show

changes hands

The Great NZ Food Show has a new

owner after being acquired by Core

Events owner Ammie Hardie from

Classic Events. It will be held on

May 1-2 at Claudelands Event

Centre in Hamilton.

Waikato business

advisor wins

MYOB has announced Waikato

business advisor Jennie Kingma,

owner and director of JK Business

Systems, as the winner of the New

Zealand Certified Consultant of the

Year Award at its industry-leading

partner awards for 2020.

PR agency launches

Hamilton-based PR and communications

specialist Angela March has gone from

solo freelancer to managing director of

her new agency, Brainchild. The agency

launched at the start of December.

DAVE LOVEGROVE

AND CHRIS JOBLIN

4.4 percent rates

rise proposed

Hamilton City Council has confirmed its

draft long-term plan and will seek feedback

from the community next year on a

proposal for a 4.4 percent annual average

general rates rise plus the potential

for a new 4.5 percent targeted rate to

help meet government-imposed costs.

November listings

top year

Lodge Real Estate Managing Director

Jeremy O’Rourke says November saw the

most properties listed on the Hamilton

market of any month in 2020, with 401

Hamilton properties listed for sale on

Realestate.co.nz during the month. The

median price achieved a new record

high of $692,000 for the month according

to REINZ data.

“Huge demand for Hamilton homes continues

to push prices higher. It’s almost

impossible to buy a house in Hamilton

under $400,000 and very difficult to buy

something under $500,000,”

O’Rourke says.

THE STORY THEN

November - Ruakura inland port is set to

open by mid 2022 after a $40 million

Government investment in shovel-ready

projects to help fast-track development

of the Ruakura Superhub, comprising the

port and surrounding logistics and industrial

precinct.

“With this funding confirmed we are now,

jointly with HCC, moving ahead to finalise

contracts and invite tenders from qualified

contractors for construction work on these

upcoming projects in the current earthworks

season,” Tainui Group Holdings chief executive

Chris Joblin says.

The port development joins others by TGH,

the investment arm of Waikato-Tainui. Work

has begun on the $50 million ACC build on the

corner of Collingwood and Tristram Streets in

the city centre, while TGH is also set to build on

the corner of Victoria and Ward Streets. Earlier

this year a 40 room extension of Tainui Novotel

was also opened.

The October announcement of shovel-ready

funding follows June’s PGF announcement

of $16.8 million for the port development.

Together, they unlock $151 million of

development projects by TGH, its Ruakura

development partners and Hamilton City

Council.

The Government’s investment will partially fund

the critical transportation, bulk infrastructure

and environmental protection works such as

the Mangaonua Watercourse and a 10-hectare

wetland.

THE STORY SINCE

The first tenant was been named in December

as TGH notches a further milestone towards

opening the Ruakura inland port and logistics

hub in early 2022.

Freight operator PBT will shift from its Kahikatea

Drive site to take a 10,000sq m section in the

Superhub.

The move will increase capacity by up to 25

percent through increased size and operational

efficiency, PBT chief executive Dave Lovegrove

said.

“For us the important things were that the

Waikato expressway will be fully open,

including the interchange, and the inland port

will be up and running as well,” he said.

“On top of that, it provides an improved health

and safety environment for us to work in. It's an

improvement in the amenities that we provide

to our staff and contractors.”

PBT has leased 10,000 square metres for

an initial period of 10 years, with rights of

renewal. Occupancy will start in September

2022, following the opening of the inland port,

two 800m rail sidings, local link roads and the

Waikato Expressway, all scheduled to open

earlier in 2022.

Lovegrove said PBT had been eying the

development for several years and talks

started seriously about six months ago

as the expressway completion got closer

and government infrastructure funding

announcements were made.

“We see it as a great location for importers

and exporters and distributors of product

around the country. We're excited to be part

of that.”

PBT, which has a head office in Auckland and

21 branches throughout New Zealand, offers

a range of express courier and general freight

services.

TGH chief executive Chris Joblin said further

larger tenants were in the pipeline, with some

expected to occupy up to 50,000 square

metres.

The full Ruakura development includes

industrial, commercial, retail and residential

development areas, anchored by a 30-hectare

inland port.

Joblin described it as a “game changer” not

just for the iwi and city but for the country as

a whole. “The productivity that this unlocks is

massive, and it's unparalleled in terms of our

country.”

He said it had been about 14 years in the

making, with the iwi choosing to keep

control and ownership of the land and

taking a long term view.

“Thinking about the strategic aspects here,

having the Waikato expressway and the East

Coast main trunk line screams out logistics and

industrial, rather than doing what a traditional

developer would do and cut it up into

residential sections.”

The Ruakura Superhub inland port and

adjoining logistics hub is on track to open to

early to mid 2022.

6 WAIKATO BUSINESS NEWS - RECAP December 2020


CHINA

STRONG

FOR BIOTECH FIRM

THE STORY THEN

August - The Chinese market has quickly rebounded

for Hamilton biotechnology company

Quantec, which is on track to meet ambitious

growth targets despite Covid-19.

It has appointed a general manager of marketing

and sales, John Dawson, and has a new

range of supplements set for launch.

Quantec manufactures IDP, a bioactive protein

complex with anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial

functionality derived from cows’ milk which

is used by customers as an active ingredient for

products such as dietary health supplements

and skincare.

Chief executive Raewyn McPhillips says there

is growing awareness in China of the health

benefits of milk, where consumers are looking

for natural products that support digestive and

immune health. “And globally, we’re seeing

a big increase in awareness and interest in

immune and wellness products.”

Demand “was strong” when Covid-19 hit

China at the start of the year, she says.

While that tailed off during China’s lockdown,

she says since then Quantec has seen

increased interest in IDP as an ingredient. New

customers include a manufacturer planning a

range of pet supplements in Southeast Asia.

“ If time travel is possible,

where are the tourists

from the future?”

No this isn’t some untapped market

helping the fortunes of our struggling

tourism industry, it’s a question Stephen

Hawking posed when discussing the

possibility of time travel. It’s also a segue

taking you back to January 2020 and the

burning issue for employers. “Where are

the skilled workers?

In my view and somewhat

ironically, considering the

year that has been, I think

that it will be the same conversation

that we will have in

January 2021.

I’m always up for a conversation,

and especially if it

involves coffee, and many of

those recent conversations all

share similar themes. We are

busy…. our forward orders are

firm…. we have come through

this year in much better shape

than we expected…. The big

issue we have apart from some

challenges with logistics and

supply chain is getting the right

staff!

Supporting this local commentary

is the Director Sentiment

Survey 2020 from the

Institute of Directors (NZ).

They reported recently that their

members ranked labour quality

and capability as the third biggest

issue behind COVID and

global growth. You can also

look at MBIEs quarterly online

job numbers; the Waikato, along

with Northland, Gisborne -

Hawkes Bay, and Wellington are

all starting to pick up after the

falls of the previous six months.

While there is understandable

caution, there are also those who

are not just reviewing their People

Plans but also starting to act.

Skilled people are in demand

and if you’re assuming that your

people will stay because “we

did the right thing by them over

COVID” you could very much

be in the lurch in 2021.

It is just basic economics -

the laws of demand and supply,

a closed border policy protecting

the health of Kiwis but also

limiting the numbers of migrant

workers into the country coupled

with a limited pool of domestic

skilled workers. If you think the

housing market is hot now the

market for skilled works next

year maybe even hotter!

Then consider for a moment,

the other certainties that 2021

will bring, a trans-Tasman

travel bubble with Australia and

COVID vaccines. In addition

William Durning

to the many Kiwis finally getting

their long-overdue travel

urges sated there will be lines

of skilled Kiwi’s heading off

to seek their fortunes in Australia.

Already we have seen

the A$2000 incentive for Kiwi

harvest workers to make a move

over the ditch and as Australia

implements its well-funded

economic rebuild, make no mistake,

they will be working hard

to have our skilled workers singing

Advance Australia Fair. And

with the COVID vaccines, New

Zealand’s safe-haven status will

no longer be the drawcard it has

been.

For New Zealanders, travelling

the world is a part of

our national physique, as is our

hard-working, outgoing reputation.

Given the chance and the

opportunity those with the skills

in demand will be off to Australia

(at least), then our businesses

run the risk of being caught well

and truly short and wishing for

more than a few workers to

urgently join those time-travelling

tourists.

GENERAL MANAGER OF MARKETING

AND SALES JOHN DAWSON AND

RAEWYN MCPHILLIPS.

THE STORY SINCE

Research commissioned by Quantec, and

completed by an independent US laboratory,

has found that its patented milk-derived

ingredient IDP is effective against influenza

virus species, the company says.

Quantec commissioned the independent in

vitro study to see if IDP had antiviral activity,

and if so whether its formulation, which

contains over 50 bioactive proteins, provides

greater antiviral activity than a singular

protein.

The antiviral activity of IDP was tested against

two viral species, influenza A H1N1/Puerto

Rico/8/34 and herpes simplex HSV-1

MacIntyre, and compared against purified

(95 percent) lactoferrin. Lactoferrin has

been shown in numerous studies to have

antiviral activity.

Influenza A is a virus commonly implicated

with flu occurrences, and herpes simplex is

implicated in cold sores.

The testing found that the antiviral activity

of IDP was 120 percent more effective

against Influenza A than lactoferrin, and

similar in terms of its efficacy against the

herpes simplex virus.

Quantec founder Dr Rod Claycomb says

these results suggest that IDP could play

an important role in protecting cells from

influenza or herpes infections. “These are

exciting results for IDP and they support

our ongoing development of new

products.”

Level 2

586 Victoria Street

Hamilton 3204

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50 Manners Street

Wellington 6011

07 834 9222

enquiries@pathwaysnz.com

pathwaysnz.com

WAIKATO BUSINESS NEWS - RECAP December 2020

7


CONVERSATIONS WITH MIKE NEALE

OF NAI HARCOURTS HAMILTON

Commercial Property -

What does 2021 have in

store for us?

As I write this article, we have just

had our last commercial and industrial

auction for the year, with eight

properties up. The only true test of the state

of the market is where properties have been

marketed widely and there is open transparent

competition, on a cash unconditional

basis – as we had on December 10. There

is always trepidation on auction morning,

usually after a restless night’s sleep wondering

about the outcomes and ensuring all

interested parties turn up.

This week we also had two deadline private

treaty sales end, both being sold at yields

or anticipated yields in the 5.0-5.5 percent

range – one being a childcare and office

building in Cambridge and the other being

a new industrial and office building at Ossie

James Drive at the Hamilton Airport. Totalling

over $4 million, this was a strong result,

but nothing prepared us for the eight auctions

that were about to take place (one of the largest

Hamilton has seen in recent times).

“The future starts today, not

tomorrow” - Pope Jean Paul II

The Outcome (in a little over an hour):

• More than 30 separate bidders over the

eight properties

• Over 130 combined bids were taken

from the floor

• 100 percent clearance rate, with all eight

properties selling under the hammer,

totalling in excess of $12 million worth

of sales on an unconditional basis (from

$585,000 to $3,332,000).

Mike Neale - Managing Director,

NAI Harcourts Hamilton.

The keys to this success?

• Our vendors entrusting us with in excess

of $35,000 in paid advertising

• A team of professionals who are

focussed, fully committed, understand

auctions and the obligations to

our vendors

• Where everyone contributes, whether

they assisted in listing the property,

had a buyer or one of the many under

bidders in the room. Every agent in

the office contributed and accordingly

every agent received a pay day prior to

Christmas

• One of the best, if not the best commercial

auctioneer in the game, John Abbott

(our thanks do go to him)

Anyone who attended the auction will attest

to the flurry of bidding that took place and

the fact that Hamilton is indeed now a place

of serious attraction for both investors and

owner occupiers. Yields ranged from 4.8

percent through to 6.9 percent

So what should we expect in 2021?

While both bank deposit and mortgage

interest rates are likely to remain at all

time historic lows for some time, it seems

reasonable to expect that we will see continued

strong demand for yielding assets –

this should inevitably lead to further asset

price inflation for those that own property

or other yielding assets.

VOCATIONAL

TRAINING

GATHERS PACE WITH NAMING

THE STORY THEN

October - The 35th largest tertiary organisation

in the world was officially named in

Hamilton on September 29.

Te Pūkenga was announced as the name for

the newly formed national vocational training

institute by Education Minister Chris Hipkins

on 29 September.

The name refers to the gaining and mastery

of valuable skills through passing knowledge

down from person to person.

Speaking at an event later the same day, institute

chair Murray Strong said the organisation,

which is based at Wintec House, will have a

lean HQ.

“But its scale and scope of this organisation is

probably not visible to most,” he said at the

gathering hosted by Waikato Chamber of

Commerce.

“There will be 240,000 learners for Te Pūkenga

around the country, there will be 10½ to

11½ thousand staff around the country and it

will be the 35th largest tertiary

organisation on the planet.”

Welcoming the development, Hamilton Mayor

Paula Southgate said the pitch made for Te

Pūkenga to be headquartered in the city was a

team effort.

“Hamilton City Council, Te Waka, the Chamber

of Commerce, Waikato-Tainui, Wintec, and

many other stakeholders - we did do something,

we made a conscious and deliberate

decision to make sure Te Pūkenga came here.

We worked on behalf of our city to make it

happen. And that's something that Hamilton

does very well.”

She expected Te Pūkenga to quickly become

well known as change came at pace.

“And I think that's good for the community,

because the sooner that we adjust to the new

model, and the sooner people have certainty

and can get stuck into building themselves

careers, the better in my view.”

The institute’s full name is Te Pūkenga - NZ

Institute of Skills and Technology.

The latest occupancy surveys for Industrial,

Office and Retail that we conduct

with CBRE Research, are about to be completed.

Indications are that they are likely to

show that the Hamilton and Waikato economies

have responded strongly since the

Covid lockdown.

While New Zealand is experiencing

strong permanent migration, the Waikato

seems to be disproportionately benefitting

from this immigration flow, from within

New Zealand and overseas. It’s been a tiring

year for many and while economists

predicted doom and gloom in late March,

the outcome has been almost the complete

opposite. As ANZ chief economist Sharon

Zollner said recently, economists’ role this

year has been to make the weather forecasters

look really good. There is likely to

be some pain to come yet, but it’s unlikely

to be anywhere near as bad as was initially

expected. It’s hard to see commercial

property values go anywhere but upwards,

although both purchasers and tenants are

likely to become more discerning in the

short term. On that basis, enjoy your time

with friends and family over the Christmas

and New Year’s break, and be thankful for

what we have.

Take stock of where you are at and

make plans for 2021 - then put those

plans into action, whatever they are.

NAI Harcourts Hamilton

Monarch Commercial Ltd MREINZ Licensed

Agent REAA 2008

Cnr Victoria & London Streets, HAMILTON

07 850 5252 | hamilton@naiharcourts.co.nz

www.naiharcourts.co.nz

204369AE

THE STORY SINCE

Since the official naming, Te Pūkenga chief

executive Stephen Town has welcomed on

board his executive leadership team and

selected a partner to co-design its operating

model to reimagine vocational education and

training.

He has also launched Te Pae Tawhiti – the

Institute’s Te Tiriti Excellence Framework; and

engaged ākonga/learners in a national research

project to understanding their needs.

Six new members of the executive leadership

team were officially welcomed into Te

Pūkenga on 2 November at Te Kōpū Mānia o

Kirikiriroa marae on the Wintec campus.

Based in Hamilton with Town are deputy chief

executives Dr Angela Beaton, responsible for

Delivery and Academic; Merran Davis, leading

Transformation and Transition; Tania Winslade,

leading Learner Journey and Experience; and

Vaughan Payne, who heads up Operations.

THE TE PŪKENGA LEADERSHIP TEAM,

FROM LEFT, DR ANGELA BEATON,

MERRAN DAVIS, STEPHEN TOWN,

WARWICK QUINN, TANIA WINSLADE,

VAUGHAN PAYNE AND ANA MORRISON.

Ana Morrison, who leads Partnerships and

Equity, will split her time between Hamilton

and Rotorua, and Warwick Quinn leads Employ

Journey and Experience from Wellington.

In November Te Pūkenga announced its

partnership with EY and EY (Tahi), who will work

with the Institute to facilitate the co-design of

its operating model.

Employers will soon have opportunities to

share their challenges with the vocational

education system as Quinn establishes his

programme of work.

8 WAIKATO BUSINESS NEWS - RECAP December 2020


JEREMY JOHNSON AND FEI GUO

FIRMS FRUSTRATED

AS MIGRANT WORKERS STUCK IN LIMBO

ANDY MARSDEN

Jeremy Johnson says Rocketspark, as her

employer, can focus on growing the business.

THE STORY THEN

August - Frustrated Waikato business owners

say opportunities are slipping away and staff

are under huge emotional strain because of

Immigration New Zealand’s opaque communication

and slow response to applications.

They say rules keep changing and appear

unfriendly to small businesses, which face a

compliance burden every time they support a

worker for a visa or residence application.

Rocketspark co-founder Jeremy Johnson complained

to Immigration NZ after a key staffer

had her application for residency stalled in the

bureaucracy for 17 months – after which time

she is yet to be assigned a case manager.

Meanwhile, Automatic Door Services (ADS)

director Andy Marsden has gone around the

agencies in a desperate attempt to get an

exemption for a skilled staff member stuck in

India during Covid-19 restrictions.

Covid-19 is making the situation worse, but

Rocketspark director Grant Johnson points out

customer marketing manager Fei Guo’s problems

began well before the pandemic.

The Cambridge-based software firm was confident

she cleared the threshold to be given

residency when they started the process two

years ago, with the expectation of a decision

within six months, based on information on

Immigration NZ’s website. She had flourished at

the web-building firm, after joining three years

ago, and had been promoted to her current

position managing a team of five.

The founders say people with her skill set are

difficult to attract to Cambridge, and point out

her performance in the role has enabled the

hiring of further New Zealand residents. She

has made Cambridge home, following a short

stint in Auckland after she gained a Masters in

Management Studies majoring in marketing at

Waikato University. She is, Grant Johnson says,

“a good citizen and a good team member”.

However, with no certainty, she faces the possibility

of returning to China.

In the case of ADS, Marsden was able to renew

one staff member’s skilled migrant worker visa

just before Covid-19 hit, but says the administrative

load is daunting, time consuming and

costly.

Even worse for Marsden, another key worker,

Harwinder (Harry) Singh, is stranded in India,

where he had returned home for a visit, with no

indication of when he might be able to return.

Marsden says Singh, who he describes as his

“right-hand man”, was expecting to submit his

application for residency in September, and

his skilled migrant work visa comes up for renewal

in January. “So we’re in a bit of a worried

position now, given the timeframes that we’re

seeing.”

Marsden says when Singh phoned Immigration

NZ, he was told they could find nothing in relation

to his exemption application. Marsden has

even offered to pay for quarantine. “Imagine

how isolating it is overseas.

Everything you have has been moved to New

Zealand, it’s in a house in New Zealand, you

don’t even know when you can go back to that

country to go and get it, let alone go back and

start your life again.”

THE STORY SINCE

ADS is still without Harry Singh, Andy Marsden

says. “Even though we have illustrated his pivotal

role within ADS, Immigration NZ still hold

all the cards. Harry still has every shred of his life

over here whilst he is shut out of the country.

“When the last border restrictions were

changed to allow workers that had still retained

their jobs and were on a skilled migrant category

(SMC) visa etc, Harry fulfilled all aspects

apart from the SMC visa.”

Marsden says they have now made one final

attempt to get Singh back, applying an expression

of interest as a critical worker.

If refused, they will have no further recourse

until the borders reopen, he says.

Meanwhile, Fei has been told by her immigration

adviser that her residency visa application

has been approved. Fei says it is “a big relief”

for her and her family that she can finally move

on and get on with her life.

“Instead of pouring hundreds of hours into

the residency process we can divert that time

into marketing the business for growth, so the

handbrake feels like it’s been taken off. It also

removes uncertainty for us about whether we

are going to be blindsided by Fei having to

leave the country.”

Grant Johnson says Fei was also instrumental

in the running of Rocketspark’s digital popup

shop at the Smart Space in Hamiton in November.

“The feedback from those that came has

been so supportive and many are asking us

to do it again. It’s nice that Fei didn’t have the

weight of the Visa application on her shoulders

and was able to throw herself fully into a project

that really made a difference for businesses

in the Waikato.”

Experience care as it

should be, experience

the Braemar way.

Wishing you a

safe and happy

Christmas and

a prosperous

New Year.

From the Asset team.

Your recruitment asset in Waikato.

Braemar Hospital is one of the largest

private surgical hospitals in New Zealand,

and it’s here in Hamilton.

With more than 100 world class specialists,

10 state-of-the-art operating rooms, 84 beds

including 32 private rooms, at Braemar

you’ll receive the highest level of care.

Choose the very best.

Choose Braemar.

Temporary

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07 839 3685 | www.assetrec.co.nz

braemarhospital.co.nz

WAIKATO BUSINESS NEWS - RECAP December 2020

9


THE SLEEPYHEAD

DEVELOPMENT

THERE ARE TIMES YOU DO not

look a gift horse in the mouth to

check its age and value.

The Turner family’s Ohinewai development

project should be the first of many

attracted to the Waikato. It will provide

employment to 1500 or more people.

Some will relocate from Auckland, but

many will be employed locally by Comfort

Group, the owners of Sleepyhead.

Moreover, it will provide a substantial

number of projects for local subcontractors

and their staff to bid for and complete.

Another 1100 homes in a tasteful greenfields

development is just what our Waikato

economy needs right now. A 100,000

square metre factory, which will take a lot

of work and workers to create, is a perfect

tonic to aid our recovery from Covid-19.

With MSD having over 30,000 looking for

work on their books in the Waikato this is

a great opportunity to make a permanent

reduction in that number, bring some

purpose, opportunity and wage packets

to our people.

Huntly has long been affected in its

development by the river, the railway,

Taupiri mountain, the constant traffic and

the coalmines, turning it into one of the

longest ribbon developments in the

country and reducing its ability to flourish.

By revitalising Ohinewai, some 7km to the

north, you get into more open land that

can be developed, which would give

both Huntly and Ohinewai a chance to

grow, attract more businesses and people.

You could use the old, bypassed state

highway as a quick commute from Huntly

to Ohinewai, thus avoiding getting on and

off the expressway.

That Ohinewai SH1 interchange is the

most underutilised grade separation intersection

in the country. Some smart traffic

planners, when designing the expressway,

looked into the future and on a traffic

plan somewhere in the archives must have

realised it would be the perfect place for

Huntly to grow into.

This is a chance to revitalise an area and

give business an opportunity to relocate or

set up there to build a vibrant community.

Here is the link to the Sleepyhead

BY DON GOOD, WAIKATO CHAMBER

OF COMMERCE CHIEF EXECUTIVE.

proposal www.sleepyheadestate.co.nz so

you can get an idea of the scope of their

venture.

The Waikato is the natural logistics centre

of the North Island, sitting smack in the

centre of the Golden Triangle. Other major

Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch and

even overseas firms will see this development

and if they are restricted by issues in

their towns, will start factoring a shift to the

Waikato as a possible future option.

It is great to see the major three Waikato

councils busy with significant developments.

Waipā has the fabulous APL glass

factory development at Hautapu and

multiple residential developments on the

north and south western sides of Cambridge;

Hamilton has the mighty Peacocke

development, the inland port at Ruakura,

multiple builds close to the CBD as well as

the Waikato eastern expressway bypass

and its attendant roading connectivity

getting closer to conclusion; and Waikato

District Council is looking to make this

Ohinewai venture a reality.

This project is good for the country. It offers

employment opportunities for many

affected by the Covid-19 downturn. With

the use of the interchange it leverages an

asset created long ago by the Government

for its citizens. It builds hundreds

of homes at a time when we really need

them. In a small way it reduces Auckland

congestion. It revitalises both Ohinewai

and Huntly. It substantially boosts the

Waikato district’s economy with little or no

downside.

WORKING OUT THE COLLECTIVE UPSIDE WAY

EXERCISE ENTREPRENEUR

KEEPING WOMEN

CONNECTED

THE STORY THEN

September - A fitness and wellness programme

that connects women online has

launched in the Waikato – and it may be a

world first.

When Hamilton woman Dairne Burns came up

with the idea, she assumed the offering probably

already existed. She had started a workout

to pick herself up after giving birth, and had

invited a few friends to join her. A few became

many and she ended up with 120 women coming

to her garage.

Around then, seeing how well the social side

was working and the good it was doing for

women, she realised the approach might also

work in an online environment.

One of the first steps was to see who else was

doing it. The answer was, no one.

Not here, and not overseas as far as she could

tell.

She wrote to Sports Minister Grant Robertson,

he connected her to the Callaghan Institute

and a business was born.

DAIRNE BURNS AND

DAUGHTER TESSA.

Both Callaghan and Hamilton tech firm

Enlighten Designs did further digging and

reached the same conclusion – that the field

was clear.

On 22 June, with a lockdown intervening

along the way, Burns soft-launched Hey

Mama.

Collective Upside has activated its B2B strategy

and sold its first bulk subscriptions to Microsoft

New Zealand, which has purchased

subscriptions for its staff to access the platform

as part of its focus on wellness for its team.

SLEEPYHEAD ESTATE, VIEW MORE ON:

SLEEPYHEADESTATE.CO.NZ

Business Floor, Wintec House Cnr Nisbet and Anglesea Street, HAMILTON

07 839 5895 | help@waikatochamber.co.nz

www.waikatochamber.co.nz

204512AB

The premise is simple enough: an online

environment with recorded workouts for small

groups of women to join in to. The key is that it

also allows those women to interact with each

other during and after the workout.

Burns’ earlier experience showed while

women came for the workout and to get fit,

the real benefit came from the sharing and the

sense of connection. That’s why she put the

social element front and centre of the virtual

workouts.

THE STORY SINCE

“We have rebranded to Collective Upside to

make sure it is clear as day that we are for all

women, that we are open to everyone, no

exceptions,” says Burns. “We believe women’s

wellness is a team sport and that movement

with friends is life-changing and powerful.”

Collective Upside has also hired a sales and

marketing specialist, Abby Camp, and digital

growth specialist, Cory Watt.

And Burns says Hamilton firm Enlighten

Designs, which built their digital wellness platform,

submitted the project and was a finalist

for the Transforming Product Award at the

Microsoft New Zealand’s Partner Awards.

“We have received a great deal of interest

with regards to our capital raise and we have

secured funding from Anglesea Gynaecology,

a great local company who truly care about

outcomes for women,” Burns says. “Based on

our current responses and interest level, we

are anticipating to close this round in February

2021. Our next round of capital raise will be

in 12 months and the valuation for our next

round will likely be $6m should we achieve

the milestones we set.”

10 WAIKATO BUSINESS NEWS - RECAP December 2020


BRING ON THE

TRANS-TASMAN BUBBLE

THE STORY THEN

June - Hamilton inbound tour operator Leisure

Time Group went from a busy tourism season

to abruptly having no income at all when

Covid-19 struck. Managing director Scott

Mehrtens and marketing manager Vicki Annison

say they worked alongside the industry associations

and bodies to campaign the Government

to ensure support was offered to tourism

businesses across the sector.

“Unfortunately it seems that the inbound tour

operators are one of those sectors that the

Minister of Tourism says he is unable to save.

With no clarity around how long international

borders will remain closed, and very negative

messaging around this, we have already started

to see cancellations of tours from our overseas

travel agents that had clients booked to visit

New Zealand next year.”

They are focusing on what they can offer to the

New Zealand market, which sees them working

on adding more tours to their schedule of trips,

as well as adding a new section to their website

offering holiday packages to independent

travellers.

“We have also been in touch with a lot of New

Zealand travel agent offices who are also keen

to sell our New Zealand travel offerings to their

clientele.”

They have re-opened their Hamilton and Auckland

offices, and have added some flexibility

to their cancellations policy and new Covid-19

related terms and conditions.

“Our business will look substantially different for

a long time to come – as long as the international

borders are closed, and/or quarantine

restrictions are in place, then no-one will be

able to visit New Zealand for a holiday or for an

international conference/business event. The

long-term impact of this, to the whole economy

not only the tourism and events sector,

is enormous. We hope that the Trans-Tasman

travel bubble is established promptly and

efficiently; this will then enable us to work with

our Australian agents to facilitate New Zealand

travel for their clients.”

THE STORY SINCE

Leisure Time Travel “pivoted” during lockdown

to introduce new revenue lines including an

acquisition of Auckland-based event management

company Lime and Soda, which was also

initially severely impacted by the lockdown but

has since rebounded. Leisure Time also spent

a lot of time creating its largest ever domestic

touring programme, which has been offered to

the New Zealand public to purchase throughout

the travel trade, thereby supporting as

much of the tourism industry as possible from

key suppliers to retail travel agents who have

also been doing it tough, managing director

Scott Mehrtens says.

“It’s not just about us – the travel, tourism and

hospitality industries are all doing it tough. With

borders closed we are all effectively sacrificing

our businesses for the whole of New Zealand’s

benefit, so we have to look after each other to

get through.

“The strategy seems to be working with more

and more agents coming on board to sell our

tours and packages, so we have now put out

a beautiful New Zealand holiday brochure

which showcases a wide range of Coach Tours,

Small Boat Cruising, Special interest Tours, Small

Group Tours and a range of various Holiday

Packages – hopefully something for everyone.

“I am incredibly proud of our team who have

shown real dedication and determination and

we are making fantastic progress – so much so

that we have been able to bring everyone back

to full time hours and have also been able to

bring back some staff that we reluctantly let go

earlier this year as well.

“Many of our coaches which I thought would

be mothballed for a few years have been back

out on the road touring around New Zealand

again – it is so exciting seeing the coaches

leave the yard to go out on a tour or even

a day charter.”

SCOTT MEHRTENS

He says the business is set up for a much larger

operation, so despite the progress they need

borders to re-open to return to profit. In the

meantime, he says, what they have achieved

so far has given them the ability to retain skilled

staff who are also able to stay in contact with

their international agents so when borders do

re-open Leisure Time Travel can immediately

assist them with their bookings.

“For the short term we are now looking forward

to a well-earned break for a few weeks over

Christmas and we are all really looking forward

to 2021 and beyond.”

A BEGA REASON TO REGISTER YOUR

TRADE MARK YOU MAY NOT FIND

Trade mark rights are assigned – transferred –

from one owner to another all the time.

How many trade mark owners know, though,

that if they assign an unregistered trade mark

to another owner, then not only do they have

to assign the goodwill in that trade mark, they

also, as a matter of law, have to assign the

underlying goodwill in their business, too? If

they don’t, the assignment is likely to be invalid.

This issue was at the heart of litigation over

the ditch between Kraft Foods Group Brands

LLC and Bega Cheese Limited which was

recently brought to a conclusion by Australia’s

highest court, the High Court of Australia,

when it denied Kraft Foods the opportunity to

appeal the decision of the Full Federal Court

of Australia which upheld the above legal

principle. Although an Aussie decision, it is

likely to be followed in New Zealand.

What’s the logic? Well, according to the

Federal Court, unregistered trade marks are

not recognised under Australian common law

as “a species of property” – unlike registered

trade marks which are. What is recognised, and

therefore protected under Australian law, is the

goodwill or reputation in an unregistered trade

mark that has been generated by the use of

that unregistered trade mark.

According to the Federal Court, however,

the goodwill in an unregistered trade mark

“is inseparable from the business to which it

adds value”; consequently, the goodwill in

an unregistered trade mark “cannot be dealt

with except in conjunction with the sale of that

business”.

In other words, you cannot sell/transfer the

goodwill in your unregistered trade mark

without also selling/transferring the underlying

goodwill in your business – the goodwill in

the unregistered trade mark and the business

cannot be divided. That can change things

dramatically, especially the purchase price of

the trade mark.

How does that work though if your company

carries on several discrete businesses under

different unregistered trade marks?

Where a company carries on several discrete

businesses (as in the Kraft Foods case), the

principle will apply to each separate business,

such that an unregistered trade mark may be

assigned together with the goodwill of the

related business, rather than the company’s

business as a whole.

On a practical level, assigning the underlying

goodwill in a business together with the

goodwill in an unregistered trade mark is in

most instances unlikely to be an issue, as the

whole of the business is being sold anyway.

The issue becomes problematic when

the seller wants to carry on the same business

(for example, manufacturing and selling peanut

butter) after market has sold its unregistered

trade mark for that business.

According to the Federal Court, the

seller will do so without any goodwill

in its business – i.e. the only assets

the seller may have are its plant,

equipment, property and staff.

All the goodwill the seller had in

its business must be re-built from

scratch.

The goods news is you can prevent

the issue from arising – by registering

your trade mark. Under the Trade

Marks Act 2002, the owner of a registered

trade mark has the exclusive right to assign

or transfer a registered trade mark either in

connection with the goodwill of a

business or not.

You can therefore assign your registered

trade mark to a purchaser without losing the

underlying goodwill in the business generated

by your use of that trade mark.

Registering your trade mark is a no brainer

then, really – isn’t it?

* Kraft Foods Group Brands LLC v Bega Cheese

Limited [2020] FCAFC 65

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY ISSUES

> BY BEN CAIN

Ben Cain is a Senior Associate at James & Wells and a Resolution

Institute-accredited mediator. He can be contacted at 07 928 4470

(Tauranga), 07 957 5660 (Hamilton), and benc@jaws.co.nz.

WAIKATO BUSINESS NEWS - RECAP December 2020

11


WORKING

TOGETHER

AS A TEAM

THE STORY THEN

June - Raglan Food Co’s Tesh Randall saw a loss

of sales under lockdown, but not enough to

qualify for using the wage subsidy.

That saw her and partner Seb Walter dip into

savings and pay ‘special leave’ to team members

who had reduced hours during Level 4 to

help top up their hours.

They restructured the team into separate crews

to minimise interactions and create work

bubbles, and held all meetings over Zoom with

no-one working from the office.

She says there was a challenge in managing

their own stress and anxiety levels and

working with their other leaders on setting a

positive tone for the team.

Also challenging was their new factory build

being put on hold for six weeks. And with

cafes closing, she says they got stuck with

food service tubs they could no longer sell,

all of which got donated to charity. However,

there were upsides. “There has been more

closeness than we had before in many ways,

CUTTING THE 6 YEAR BIRTHDAY CAKE.

more frequent catch-ups and communication,”

she says.

Level 2 came as a relief. “It’s so much nicer, it

almost feels back to normal! It’s nice greeting

people on the streets of Raglan again, being

able to pop in and out of the office, and have

TIKI TAANE PERFORMING.

team meetings in person. We’re back to doing

team birthday cakes and after-work drinks

on a Friday.”

They have decided to maintain the two-crew

model so that staff don’t overwork. “We have

put a new standard work week of 30-35 hours

in place for everyone – the maximum anyone

can work now is 40 hours. Pre-Covid we had

some very busy weeks with some team members

working 50-60 hours – and even though

they enjoyed the higher income levels, we

think it’s best for everyone’s long-term wellbeing

to limit the amount of available shifts.”

12 WAIKATO BUSINESS NEWS - RECAP December 2020


THE STORY SINCE

Raglan Food Co opened its new factory and

celebrated its sixth birthday on December 6,

with a party featuring music by Tiki Taane.

Randall says it was an “amazing” night of

celebrating with their team, local community,

suppliers, the tradespeople who helped with

the build, family and friends who have all

played a part in helping them get from their

home kitchen six years ago to where they are

now. Local food and drinks came from the likes

of Raglan Workshop Brewery, Ulo's Eatery, and

Raglan Grazing Platters, and there was a vegan

chocolate ganache birthday cake. Guests

were also treated to a live performance from

music legend Tiki Taane, followed by sets from

local DJs until midnight. “We had an outdoor

firepit set-up as a chill out space and lights and

smoke machine inside the factory for dancing,”

Randall says. “It was great to groove away the

stresses of a very intense 2020!”

They have been operating out of the new site

at Naumai business park for a month. Randall

says there have been plenty of teething issues

but it's getting smoother every day. “The team

have been very patient in dealing with all the

challenges presented by new processes, new

equipment, new systems to learn etc. We're

excited about the year ahead as we have so

much more space to grow and launch new

products.”

RAGLAN WORKSHOP BREWERY

SERVING UP THE BEERS.

Commercial Property

Management & Valuation

At Bayleys, we believe relationships are what businesses are built on and how they succeed.

We understand that to maximise the return on your property you need:

Professional property management

Expert valuation advice

A business partner that understands your views and goals

James Harvey

Commercial Facilities Manager

P 07 839 0700 M 027 425 4231

james.harvey@bayleys.co.nz

Mike Gascoigne

Branch Manager

P 07 834 6690 M 027 430 8311

mike.gascoigne@bayleys.co.nz

Curtis Bones

Senior Commercial Property Manager

P 07 834 3826 M 027 231 3401

curtis.bones@bayleys.co.nz

Matt Straka

Registered Valuer

P 07 834 3232 M 021 112 4778

matt.straka@bayleys.co.nz

Joe Healy

Valuer

P 07 834 3232 M 027

223 8069

joe.healy@bayleys.co.nz

SUCCESS REALTY LTD, BAYLEYS, LICENSED UNDER THE REA ACT 2008

A LT O G ETHER B E TTER

Residential / Commercial / Rural / Property Services

WAIKATO BUSINESS NEWS - RECAP December 2020

13


Seasons

Greetings

FROM BUSINESS TO BUSINESS

The Waikato Business News

office will be closed from :

Wednesday December 16, 2020

until Monday January 18, 2021

For urgent inquiries

please call

Deidre Morris

027 228 8442

The team at Waikato Business News wishes

you all a safe and happy festive season!

14 WAIKATO BUSINESS NEWS - RECAP December 2020


FULL STEAM AHEAD

FOR CBD CONSTRUCTION

HILLS APARTMENTS

TRISTRAM PRECINCT

THE STORY THEN

June - Local developers are making the running

amid a surge of commercial development

in central Hamilton.

Stark Properties is extending Panama Square on

Garden Place while also progressing Tristram

Precinct and, across the river, Hills Apartments.

Tristram Precinct, which will hold Waikato Regional

Council and WSP (formerly Opus), is set

for completion in February. Hills Apartments are

currently under construction and director Matt

Stark is reporting strong buyer interest with 70

percent of the first stage sold.

THE STORY SINCE

Construction is well underway on both Tristram

Precinct and Hills Apartments. The glass install

on the exterior of the building at Tristram

Precinct is on track to be completed before

Christmas with the full project completion set

for the second quarter of 2021.

The Hills Village project is ramping up with

construction well under way on the Hills

Apartments and over 80 percent sold.

The roof structure has been lifted onto the

existing Hills Laboratories building and work

continues on the underground car park. The

next stage of apartments is now for sale.

‘MUCH

NEEDED

HOUSING’

FOR CITY CENTRE’S

DOORSTEP

THE STORY THEN

September - With residential land at

a premium in central Hamilton, a rare

development will see more than 100 homes

built on a site close to the city centre.

Three well known Hamilton builders are

combining forces to create a mixed community

beside Innes Common and just 2.5km

from the centre of the city.

The 4 ha site will feature two, three and four

bedroom homes, with a set proportion selling

below Hamilton’s average house price.

The 110 house development, achieved

under the now defunct special housing

area legislation, brings together Anthem

Homes, Golden Homes and Holah

Homes.

They are the joint shareholders of Quentin

Residential, which is buying the Quentin Drive

site off Jack House Transit.

Dubbed Jack’s Landing in honour of the longestablished

house moving business, earthworks

will begin in November, with building to start

in April and stage one completed by the start

of 2022.

Jack’s Landing is unusual in central Hamilton as

a large tract of land zoned residential. Featuring

cycle and pedestrian access to Rotoroa

(Hamilton Lake), the development is set to help

achieve the city council’s goal of denser living

in the city.

Blake Richardson, of Golden Homes, says

they want the development to contribute to

the council’s aspiration for Hamilton to be a

compact, livable city.

THE STORY SINCE

Members of local iwi group Te Haa o te

whenua o Kirikiriroa (THaWK) joined the

Jack’s Landing development team, Jack’s

House Transit representatives and contractors

from Camex Civil on December 9 to bless the

site and turn the first sod for the residential

housing development.

A karakia performed by THaWK (managed

by Rawiri Bidois) was followed by Des Jack,

a director in the Jack House Transit business

and third generation of the family, digging

up the first sod. Afterwards, he noted it was

fantastic to look out at the 4ha site and what

will be more than 100 houses within a couple

of years’ time.

Leonard Gardner, CEO of Fosters

Construction, part owner of Anthem Homes

MEMBERS OF TE HAA O TE WHENUA

O KIRIKIRIROA (THAWK) WATCH AS

DES JACK BREAKS THE FIRST SOD.

and partner in the Jack’s Landing development

group, said it’s exciting to get the development

underway.

“We’re pleased to have THaWK here today to

bless the site, which will offer homes to help

satisfy the high housing demand Hamilton is

currently experiencing, and give the site a new

purpose for years to come.

“We’ve also worked closely with the Jack

House Transit Ltd team since the development’s

conception, so it’s great to have Des and Aaron

Jack here today to honour the site’s history.”

WAIKATO BUSINESS NEWS - RECAP December 2020

15


TIMING

RIGHT

FOR RURAL OFFERING

THE STORY THEN

July - A lightbulb moment while watching an

episode of Country Calendar is reaping dividends

for a Waikato business under Covid-19.

As Kiwis are urged to explore their own

backyard with borders effectively closed for

tourism, a farm-stay website is primed to meet

the demand.

Domestic travellers can book in for rural breaks

throughout New Zealand using Off the Beaten

Track, a website started 18 months ago by

Classic Events director Michele Connell and her

dairy farmer husband Roy.

Their timing has proved impeccable as New

Zealanders look to shrug off Covid-19 cabin

fever.

Lockdown became a time of development for

Connell and her team as events were cancelled

or postponed. A truncated Balloons over Waikato

sneaked in under the wire as lockdown was

looming, but the Great NZ Food Show had to

be cancelled and the Christchurch Motorhome

Caravan and Leisure Show has been put back till

October, with the Mystery Creek version due to

go ahead in September.

They used the time to work on the website, and

contacting all those they currently work with as

well going back to potential landowners, which

Connell says resulted in more than 80 more

listings.

Connell remembers clearly when she and husband

Roy had the idea, watching an episode of

Country Calendar featuring a stunning Canterbury

farm with a river and beautiful bush.

At the time, dairying was facing a difficult

couple of years, and they thought about how

different farming sectors can struggle at different

times.

“That got us thinking: we wonder how many

other landowners or farmers own these beautiful

pieces of paradise that they could share and

diversify their income?”

THE STORY SINCE

Connell says the last few months have seen a

growth in both landowner listings and holidaymakers

choosing to take a break and get Off the

Beaten Track.

“We were lucky enough to work with a couple

of high profile influencers who holidayed Off

the Beaten Track and posted their whole

ROY AND MICHELE CONNELL.

experience on social media, engaging their fans

and creating interest,” she says.

“This flow on effect saw a huge increase in followers

and helped grow our tribe of Kiwi lovers.

“We were fortunate to be invited to appear

on the TV3 AM Breakfast Show, where I was

interviewed and we also provided an on air

giveaway for a weekend Off the Beaten Track.

The resulting website traffic saw our website

momentarily crash - an annoying, yet heartening

problem!”

They qualified for some Te Waka funding

through the Regional Business Partnership and

have worked with advisors looking at their

strategy for growth and sustainability. Connell

says they were able to create and measure some

new online marketing tactics and spent some

time further refining the website to provide a

better user experience.

“While the way Kiwis travel has changed to

embrace local, this has created further challenges.

Enticing Kiwis to explore the very best of our

own backyard, in the privately owned, spectacular

places we have listed is what we are striving

to promote.

GLAMPING - PART OF THE OFF

THE BEATEN TRACK OFFERING.

“Equally we also believe seeing New Zealand

from a different perspective and getting Off

the Beaten Track will be really appealing to the

international market, but like the rest of the tourism

industry, will just have to bide our time until

tourists return. We do not want to be forgotten

or overlooked when the tourism industry opens

up again so are working on low-cost options to

market overseas, beginning with Australia.”

BEWARE OF FOREIGN IMITATIONS.

There’s no shortage of great ideas in New Zealand.

But for an innovative bunch, we’re not the best at

realising the full potential of our innovations, particularly

when exporting them.

At James & Wells, we can identify your competitive

edge, offer business strategies for specific markets and

help you own and leverage your intellectual property to

ensure no one steals the fruit of your labour.

www.jaws.co.nz | +64 7 957 5660

16 WAIKATO BUSINESS NEWS - RECAP December 2020


TRAINING

COURSE

OPENS

GATE FOR

TOWNIES

THE STORY THEN

August - A Cambridge firm has come up with

an innovative response to the looming shortfall

of workers confronting agricultural contractors.

PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE OUT IN THE FIELD

With harvesting season close and borders

largely closed to the migrant workforce, Ag

Drive has started a training programme for

Waikato people wanting a start in the industry.

They are taking on trainees who have lost

jobs or been disrupted by Covid-19, with the

students funded on short courses by the Social

Development Ministry.

Ag Drive is also offering private training courses

after contractors expressed a high level of

interest in the scheme, which may be a first for

New Zealand.

In the past, the industry has largely brought in

migrants, particularly from Ireland, Europe and

Australia, to deal with seasonal harvesting, but

with Covid-19 border disruptions Ag Drive’s

offering is timely.

“All the contractors we go and speak to

say this should have been out there a long

time ago.”

It also represents an elegant solution for

Ag Technology Group, which established

Ag Drive during lockdown when its supply

of work from German manufacturer Claas

slowed. Ag Technology tests and does R&D

on Claas agricultural machinery including

tractors.

THE STORY SINCE

Since the creation of Ag Drive in the middle

of lockdown 2020, it has had had 10 intakes,

securing employment for over half of its

students, Vinette Wilken says.

more practice backing trailers, which the

organisation now includes, she says.

“One of our students, who we have recently

placed with a big Contracting Operator had

this to say about our course: ‘Even though I still

have a lot to learn, the course helped me to

kind of keep up with the more experienced

guys. If I hadn’t done the Ag Drive course and

I was offered this job, it would’ve been too big

a challenge for me. I would’ve given up after

two days. While I was still coming across new

things, I had a good ground,

base of knowledge to apply that to.’”

In 2021, AgDrive will be rolling its new farming

course to address the current shortage of farm

workers in New Zealand.

It will be offering a quad/LUV course, and

encouraging New Zealanders to retrain into

the sector. “We will also be offering NZQA

approved unit standards for some of our

courses in the New Year, and are working on

being able to provide an indoor training facility

to enable us to train in all weather conditions.”

“There’s a massive gap in that industry at the

moment,” business development manager

Vinette Wilken says.

Feedback from both contractors and students

has been very positive, and has included

some useful suggestions such as including

Dance - American Jazz, American Tap, Classical

Ballet, Hip Hop, Contemporary, K-Pop dance, and

Musical Theatre. Ages: 3 years to adult.

Learn in a caring, positive, joyful, inclusive and successful studio culture.

You are welcome to visit our upmarket facility and see the culture in action.

We have highly trained teachers, superb exam results, the biggest range of

top-quality syllabi, and fabulous Shows. Teaching standards are extremely

high, and exams are moderated by external experts. It’s a great place to be.

We also have dance creativity classes which provide regular opportunities for

students to learn to choreograph their own work and perform it.

We have the best facilities in the region - a near-new, custom-designed,

4-studio complex, with sprung floors (and rubber underlay), commercial

air con, ventilation system, wall-length safety mirrors, double ballet barres,

the latest health and safety features, viewing areas, and free parking.

We’ve been in Hamilton for 30 years. Weekend classes are available.

Class sizes are limited.

VINETTE WILKEN

Enrol now for 2021. Spaces may be limited.

Please pre-register by email

Jazz Unlimited: Email: jazzunlimited@xtra.co.nz | Phone: 838-0096

www.jazzunlimited.co.nz

205168AA

WAIKATO BUSINESS NEWS - RECAP December 2020

17


CAMBRIDGE PROPERTY MARKET

BOOMING

THE STORY THEN

October - Cambridge’s popularity as a place

to live and invest has scarcely been dented by

Covid-19, and the property market is booming

post-lockdown.

That was the message given to the audience at

a Cambridge Chamber of Commerce Leaders

Lunch held at Henley Hotel on 29 September.

Like the other presenters, Antanas Procuta,

principal architect of PAUA Architects, has seen

a surprisingly buoyant market in the past two

or three months.

He said during lockdown he soaked up as

much as he could from the experts, including

economists and health specialists, and is

applying that to the firm’s response.

HUKANUI ENVIROCLASSROOM

“When Covid-19 happened I was determined

that we weren’t going to lay anyone off. Keeping

the hope going, that was really important,”

he said.

tects as business development manager.

“We’re very delighted and proud to have

Phil joining us after Labour Weekend.”

When it comes to planning, he said he is looking

18 to 24 months ahead. He also stressed

the importance of marketing. “If you take your

eye off marketing, your business suffers.”

But in the last two months, he said things

have changed remarkably. “I think people

have been saying ‘if we do nothing, nothing’s

going to happen’ so we’ve seen a lot of

activation, a lot of people have been coming

to us saying ‘right, we want to be doing these

things’.”

He also told the audience that Cambridge

Chamber chair Phil Mackay, who has a background

in hospitality, was to join PAUA Archi-

KITCHEN CLASSROOM

The event concluded with a presentation

to Procuta, marking his 25 year involvement

with the Chamber.

THE STORY SINCE

PAUA Architects is delighted that the

Hukanui Primary School ‘Garden to Table’

Enviroclassroom has won a Learning Environments

New Zealand (LENZ) Award.

PAUA Architects worked with the students

of the school’s enviro-elective and their

teacher, Michelle White, to develop a brief

and a design for the new building, called

the ‘Living Room Kitchen’.

The award citation reads: “This project reveals

the worth in pursuing solid student engagement

throughout an entire design, research and

build phase. The breadth and depth of student

involvement is comprehensive, valuable and

not tokenistic. The outcome is a showpiece of

the Enviroschools principles, and clearly meets

the holistic approach of the school’s philosophy

whilst ensuring a high level of educational

value. The project is an excellent example of

innovation, including waste reduction, water

conservation, ventilation, lighting, and heating

solutions, all integrated into the educational

value of the design.”

The ‘Garden to Table’ kitchen classroom

provides students of Hukanui Primary School

a learning space for preparation, cooking, and

sharing of food grown by the students. The

kitchen classroom complements the ‘Living

Room’, constructed in 2009 as a dedicated

space for the Enviroschools elective. The kitchen

classroom provides six kitchen workstations for

groups of students to prepare produce grown

in the fruit and vegetable gardens adjacent.

The students participated in both the design

and construction of the kitchen classroom.

An existing freestanding pizza oven was incorporated

in the design of the kitchen. Existing

rakau ti kouka/cabbage trees were retained

and will become part of perimeter gardens.

The exposed macrocarpa trusses provide for

a generous interior space with colour scheme

selected by the students. The resilient non-slip

flooring, complete with glitter flake, appealed

to the design team and children alike.

Rainwater is collected for use in the garden

and kitchen waste water is disposed of on site.

Louvres at both high and low levels provide

for passive ventilation, assisted by mechanical

extraction as required.

Learning Environments New Zealand promotes

quality design of learning spaces and professional

development amongst a community of

educators, designers and decision-makers.

QUALITY STRUCTURE PERFORMANCE

CONSTRUCT RESIDENTIAL

18 WAIKATO BUSINESS NEWS - RECAP December 2020


The 25 year edition of

Waikato Business News

1995 - 2020 • PUBLISHED BY DP MEDIA LTD

Out Now

www.dpmedia.co.nz

www.wbn.co.nz

Is now a

good time

to sell? Yes!

Smart Connection Technology

SOLD

Waikato

· Established 20yrs+; impressive sales & prots

· Highly experienced team of staff & contractors

· Large project & forward work orders

· Excellent vendor assistance included in sale

· 98 expressions of interest

Peddle Your Own Way $165,000

Hamilton

· Electric bike revolution is here

· B2C importing & distribution

· Highly effective marketing strategy

· Scalable, fun reliable products

$800,000

linkbusiness.co.nz/BPW00911

Rick Johnson 021 991 485

rick.johnson@linkbusiness.co.nz

Managed Beauty Business $520,000

SOLD

Hamilton

· Enjoy lifestyle, independence & good returns

· Owner earning $200K+ in 2020FY

· Well established, fantastic reputation

· Jump in full time or continue to manage

· 27 expressions of interest

linkbusiness.co.nz/WK00096

Alanah Eagle 021 606 345

alanah.eagle@linkbusiness.co.nz

Portable Cabins $3,500,000

Waikato

· Marketing/sales/operational skills?

· Well-established & highly protable

· Knowledgeable staff

· Vendor will provide a solid transition

The demand for businesses to buy is still

strong.

SOLD

· 26 expressions of interest

linkbusiness.co.nz/WK00113

Andrew Whyte 022 097 0065

andrew.whyte@linkbusiness.co.nz

SOLD

· 32 expressions of interest

linkbusiness.co.nz/WK00026

Rick Johnson 021 991 485

rick.johnson@linkbusiness.co.nz

What the last couple of months has told

us is that a few months of bad trading is

unlikely to affect your sale price.

LINK offer no-obligation business

appraisals to understand how your

business would present to the market

and what may be required to prepare

your business for sale.

If selling your business is on the radar

now or in the near future, call us today for

a condential chat.

Winning Auto Service Centre $195,000

SOLD

Waikato

· Very well positioned, lots of trafc

· Long successful history

· Solid team with plenty of experience

· Reliable and consistent revenue

· 25 expressions of interest

linkbusiness.co.nz/BPW01084

Therese Bailey 021 707 641

therese.bailey@linkbusiness.co.nz

Be Your Own Boss Make $$ $445,000

SOLD

Waikato

· “Paint-by-numbers” simplicity

· Low over heads and fantastic systems

· Over $200K cash surplus to 2 working owners

· Orders busier than ever since opening in level 3

· 28 expressions of interest

linkbusiness.co.nz/WK00090

Alanah Eagle 021 606 345

alanah.eagle@linkbusiness.co.nz

Largest Building Wash Company $85,000

SOLD

Waikato

· Successful franchise in wider Cambridge area

· House, commercial, roof, concrete, rural

· Mix of regular clients & one off cleans

· Raft of good equipment and systems

· 12 expressions of interest

linkbusiness.co.nz/WK00085

Reuben Haddon-Silby 021 133 0624

reuben.haddonsilby@linkbusiness.co.nz

FMCG. Money Grows on Trees $425,000

SOLD

Waikato

· B2B supply and distribution business

· Great turnover and prots

· Good plant and equipment

· New lease or relocate

· 31 expressions of interest

linkbusiness.co.nz/WK00029

Andrew Whyte 022 097 0065

andrew.whyte@linkbusiness.co.nz

All LINK NZ ofces are licensed REAA08

22 Naylor Street

Hamilton

0800 225 999

LINKBUSINESS.CO.NZ

WAIKATO BUSINESS NEWS - RECAP December 2020

19


THE CHOICE IS

EASY, WE WALK

THE WALK

Many businesses talk about sustainability, we walk the walk.

Fosters is proud to be the only construction company in NZ to hold

both Toitū carbonzero and enviromark diamond certifications.

Trust Fosters to deliver sustainable outcomes for our communities

and for your commercial property projects.

FOSTERS.CO.NZ . 07 849 3849

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