Winter 2020

feliciaediblesd

San Diego County's food media company

NO. 60 • WINTER 2020-2021

EDIBLESANDIEGO.COM

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

edible SAN DIEGO®

Perspectives



WINTER 2020-2021 | edible SAN DIEGO 1


Winter 2020-2021

CONTENTS

Issue 60

IN THIS ISSUE

DEPARTMENTS

4 Editor’s Note

EATING WELL

6 Gather: Restoring Native American Foodways

LOCAL ATTRACTIONS

22 Local Markets Guide

PREP (FOR REAL LIFE)

24 Manifesting 101

FEATURES

12 How to Sustainably Farm in the City

17 Building a Better Meat System

WHAT TO LOOK FOR ON EDIBLESANDIEGO.COM

READ

• Ultimate Instant Pot Guide

• The New Vegan Guard at Grossmont Center Food Court

• How to Start a Raised Bed Garden in Seven Steps

• 10-Minute Vegan Soba Salad

• Cooking to Promote Plant-Based Food Options

LISTEN

Living Local Podcast

WATCH

• Thai Cooking School: How to Make

Tom Yum Nam Khon at Home

• How to Make a Savory Superfood Turmeric

Sweet Potato Spread

• How to Make Lemon Pepper Tuna and

White Bean Tartine

• How to Make a Super-Soothing Golden Chai

• How to Make Winter Citrus and Radicchio Salad

ON THE COVER

Food is as diverse as we all are.

THIS IMAGE

We are what we eat. What are you made of?

Thank you to Haley Hazell for interpreting

our need for whimsy this issue.

HALEY HAZELL

2 ediblesandiego.com


Safe Outdoor Dining,

Stunning Coastal Views,

Uniquely California Cuisine

ARValentien.com | (858) 777-6635

LTP ARV_Edible_June2020.indd 1

7/10/2020 7:58:22 AM

WINTER 2020-2021 | edible SAN DIEGO 3


Editor’s Note |

Considering all we’ve been

through in 2020, we want to

outline what it means to us for you to

be part of this community. After more than

a decade in print and hundreds of thousands of

online impressions, let’s see the goals we’ve set out

to achieve, the people we are inspired by, and

the momentum we are building.

So, what does it mean to be part of the

Edible San Diego community? It means

you’re part of a team that invites anyone

who eats food in our county to have a

seat at this table. We strive to connect

you to the people and things that feed all

of us, offer us health, and bring indulgence

and joy. These are the signifiers of a good life:

moments and sensations that make life worth living as

defined by you and your circle.

It also means we are connected to over 80 awardwinning

publications and media licenses across

North America. Each license is independently

owned, and each publisher uniquely focuses on

local people, producers, and businesses, showcasing

the food and varied cultures that exist in our

respective home bases. All publishers tell their local

stories, allowing any of us to travel vicariously,

maintain connections with loved ones and

beloved places far from home in Covid

times, and feel like part of a much larger

community of people who care about

what’s local.

There’s value in knowing we are all

connected. In a climate where newsrooms

were closing at a national average of 100

per year before the pandemic, and now bearing witness to the

harsh impacts Covid-19 has had on our compatriots in the food,

beverage, and hospitality industries—not to mention the current

norm of socializing through masks and screens—let’s not take

that connectedness lightly.

Your eyes reading this right now means the world to us. While

the value of these words and images in print and floating around

on the internet is exponentially subjective, the need for an editorial

voice that is trustworthy, consistent, insightful, and accessible is

stronger than ever. Edible San Diego has reorganized to step up to

this challenge. We seek to grow good food and connections that

inspire action and empower healthier choices to make access to

better nutrition inherent. Good food is not pretentious,

and access to it, like good healthcare, should be universal.

(And if we had more access to better nutrition and

less to government-subsidized commodities like

corn syrup soft drinks and hydrogenated soy

deep-fat frying oil, we might need less sick

care, but maybe that’s the point.)

These qualities have been part

of the mission all along because it’s

what’s best for people,

the planet we live

on, and the many

types of life shared here.

Even Sir David Attenborough

has published a book and

documentary on the topic,

A Life

on Our Planet,

and an Instagram

story campaign to promote

awareness and engagement.

Our collective voices chanting the

sentiments for food equity and improved

production practices are loud enough to hear

because we echo these vital messages together. And

the good news is that it’s making a difference,

even to scale. For example, because of the

people committed to buying pastureraised

eggs, Vital Farms went

public this summer with a $235

million IPO. Because of the people

who choose to eat less meat and

more vegetables, we have more modern

plant-based options than ever.

And because of restaurants

like Burger Lounge, local

founder of the grass-fed burger

concept, even conglomerates

like McDonald’s are making

a commitment to regenerative

agriculture.

This is because of the choices

people like us—the food people who

have a profound understanding that we are what we

eat—make.

While we can’t put the burden of creating a sustainable

food system solely on consumers, there is no doubt that a food

revolution has been provoked. To the joys that food offers us and

the community we’ve featured in the past, present, and future,

at the beginning of a new decade on the precipice for change,

this 60th issue is a collection of recipes and stories that suggest

we can return to the land and embrace food traditions like our

Indigenous communities. We can help families farm in the inner

city and create futures for their children, the New Americans, by

buying their produce at the farmers’ market. We can advocate

for better meat production across the country. And we can work

together to create a vision for what this dream of a

just and equitable, resilient and renewable,

low-waste, regenerative, and sustainable food

system looks like.

—Maria Hesse

Executive Editor

Edible San Diego

HALEY HAZELL

4 ediblesandiego.com


OLIVIA HAYO, JAMES TRAN

edible Communities

2011 James Beard Foundation

Publication of the Year

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

EDITORIAL

Katie Stokes

Editor in Chief

Maria Hesse

Executive Editor

Dawn Mobley

Copy Editor

Trisha Weinberg

Operations Assistant

DESIGN

Cheryl Angelina Koehler

Designer

PUBLISHER

Katie Stokes

ADVERTISING SALES

Sandy Rodriguez

Katie Stokes

ADVERTISING

For more information about rates and deadlines, contact

info@ediblesandiego.com or 619-756-7292

No part of this publication may be used without written

permission from the publisher. © 2020 All rights reserved.

Every effort is made to avoid errors, misspellings, and

omissions. If an error comes to your attention, please let us

know and accept our sincere apologies.

Thank you for supporting your local food media company.

COVER PHOTO AND STYLING BY HALEY HAZELL

CONTACT

Media Icons

Edible San Diego

ed Social P.O. Box 83549 Media • San Diego, Icons

CA 92138

Social 2017 ediblesandiego.com Media Updated Icons

619-756-7292 • info@ediblesandiego.com

2017 Updated @ediblesd

@ediblesandiego

@ediblesandiego

edible san diego

The Season to

Celebrate Storytelling

Edible San Diego is thrilled to

announce that eight of our

submissions were recognized by

the San Diego Press Club’s 47th

Annual Excellence in Journalism

Awards on October 27.

We congratulate the talented writers,

editors, and photographers who work

to produce content of high quality

and integrity for our readers. Their

dedication, experience, and diverse

perspectives distinguish the content that

we curate for you.

It warms our hearts when judges from

across the country elevate this content

because we make it our business to

connect people through journalism

about local food.

First Place

Magazines:

Multicultural

Asian-ish

Michelle Stansbury,

James Tran

Websites:

General Interest Site

ediblesandiego.com

Katie Stokes

Second Place

Magazines:

Environment

The Path to Climate

Neutrality Is Paved

with Food System

Solutions

Elly Brown, executive

director of the

San Diego Food

System Alliance

Radio/Podcast

Living Local with

Edible San Diego

Katie Stokes,

Allyn Silliman of

Neat Underground

Third Place

Magazines: Feature

Layout

Beyond the Boule

Joni Hargrave,

Min Kim, Olivia Hayo,

Maria Hesse

Magazines: Food

Firehouse Rules

Theo Niekras,

James Tran

Magazine: Front Page

Issue 58, Spring 2020

Olivia Hayo,

Maria Hesse

Photography - Video:

Feature - Light Subject

Tide to Table

Russel Spencer,

James Tran,

Vivi Husted,

Felicia Campbell,

Olivia Hayo

Honorable Mention

Magazines: Food

Into the Open Air/Five

San Diego Chefs Shop

the Farmers’ Market

for Seasonal

Inspiration

Michelle Stansbury

WINTER 2020-2021 | edible SAN DIEGO 5


Eating Well |

Gather

Restoring

Native

American

Foodways

Directed by Sanjay Rawal, Gather

(lllumine Running, 2020) is an

intimate portrait of the growing

movement among the Indigenous

community to reclaim their spiritual,

political, and cultural identities through

food sovereignty while battling the

trauma of centuries of genocide.

The documentary film features the stories of Nephi

Craig, executive chef and founder of the Native

American Culinary Association, through the opening

of an Indigenous café as a nutritional recovery clinic

in the White Mountain Apache Nation (Arizona);

Elsie DuBray, a young scientist from the Cheyenne

River Sioux Nation (South Dakota), conducting

landmark studies on bison and the Ancestral Guard;

and a group of environmental activists from the

Yurok Nation (Northern California), trying to save

the Klamath River.

The movie is available on iTunes and Amazon.

gather.film

The following selection of wholesome, healthy recipes

created by Craig, and Donna LaChapelle and Patricia

Chandler from the First Nations Development

Institute, highlight Indigenous ingredients,

preparation techniques, and dishes from the film.

RENAN OZTURK / GATHER

6 ediblesandiego.com


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WINTER 2020-2021 | edible SAN DIEGO 7


WESTERN APACHE

SEED MIX

Recipe by Nephi Craig

This recipe is a critical piece of our

identity and speaks to our history

and resiliency as we develop

culinary pathways toward solutions

in health and wellness in Western

Apacheria.

There are many variations of this

seed mix across the Americas,

but this one is distinctly Western

Apache because of the acorns. This

recipe is basic and easy to replicate

with seeds readily available in

markets. An independent study will

allow the eater to discover more

combinations of this protein-packed

combination of seeds that revitalize

ancestral taste and health.

As you snack on this seed mix,

think about pre-reservation

Indigenous health and regional

dominant flavors. Although this

mix can be made year-round,

historically, spring, summer, and

autumn were spent gathering

and cultivating these seeds to be

consumed in the wintertime while

telling stories and playing string

games with the family at home.

1 cup dried white corn

1 cup acorns

1 cup sunflower seeds

1 cup pine nuts or pinons

1 cup pumpkin seeds

1 cup dried wild currants

Kosher salt to taste

Each ingredient must be prepared

separately and combined.

Parch the corn in a heavy skillet

over high heat, stirring constantly

until the corn cracks and is golden

brown. Do not burn.

Acorns should be shelled and very

lightly toasted.

Toast the sunflower seeds for 10

minutes at 350° or until golden

brown.

Toast the pine nuts in a 350° oven

for 10 minutes or until golden

brown. Do not burn.

Toast pumpkin seeds in a 350°

oven for 10 minutes or until golden

brown.

Remove and allow the seeds

to cool. Combine all seeds and

currants and season with salt to

taste, if desired. Place the cooled

mixture in a tall Mason jar and put

in a high place of honor to display.

THREE SISTERS SOUP

Recipe by Donna LaChapelle and Patricia Chandler

3 tablespoons butter

1 cup diced onion

1 clove garlic, minced

1 teaspoon curry powder

½ teaspoon salt

⅛ teaspoon red pepper flakes

4 cups chicken or vegetable stock

½ cup yellow corn kernels

½ cup cooked hominy

1 cup cooked white beans

1 butternut or acorn squash,

prebaked and puréed

¼ teaspoon ground coriander

Chives and plain yogurt, to serve

Melt butter in a large saucepan

over medium-high heat. Add

onion and garlic and cook until

tender, 3 to 5 minutes. Stir in

spices and cook for 1 minute.

Add stock, corn, hominy, and

beans and bring to a boil.

Reduce heat to low and cook,

stirring occasionally, for 15 to 20

minutes to develop flavors.

Stir in squash and cook until

heated through, about 5

minutes.

Serve warm with chives and

plain yogurt as a garnish.

FOREST WOODWARD / GATHER

8 ediblesandiego.com


INDIGENOUS CULTIVARS:

ROASTED BUTTERNUT

SQUASH AND QUINOA

Recipe by Nephi Craig

2 whole butternut squash

Olive oil

Pinch smoked paprika

Kosher salt and pepper

Honey

4 ounces cooked white quinoa

2 ounces cooked red quinoa

¼ cup diced Roma tomatoes

¼ cup chopped flat-leaf parsley

leaves

¼ cup scallions, bias cut

2 lemons

Fresh herbs and pumpkin seeds for

garnish

Preheat oven to 400°.

Cut butternut squash horizontally

at the point where the cavity of the

squash begins, separating the neck

of the squash from the tip of the

cavity. Peel and set necks aside.

Split and deseed butternut squash

cavity. Cut into roughly 6 pieces to

produce a sort of bowl shape. In a

large mixing bowl, drizzle squash

with olive oil, smoked paprika, salt,

and pepper. Place skin side down

on a sheet pan and roast in oven

for 15 to 20 minutes to get a good

roasted color. When roasted and

soft, remove from oven, lightly

drizzle with honey, and set aside.

In a bowl, mix together both colors

of quinoa, tomatoes, parsley, and

scallions. Season with olive oil and

lemon juice to taste; it should be

clean, cool, and bright.

To serve, heat butternut squash

briefly, then spoon 3 to 4 ounces

cool quinoa salad over warm

butternut squash. Garnish with

fresh herbs, smoked paprika, and

pumpkin seeds. Serve immediately.

CORN, BLUEBERRY, AND WILD RICE SALAD

Recipe by Donna LaChapelle and Patricia Chandler

SAGE LACAPA / GATHER

6 ears sweet corn, husked (or

1½ cups frozen corn)

1 cup fresh blueberries

1 small cucumber, diced

¼ cup diced red onion

¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro

1 cup cooked wild rice

1 jalapeño pepper, seeded and

minced

4 tablespoons lime juice

4 tablespoons olive oil

2 tablespoons honey or maple

syrup

½ teaspoon ground cumin

½ teaspoon salt

In a large pot, bring salted

water to a boil. Add corn and

cook, covered, until tender,

about 5 minutes. When cool

enough to handle, cut corn

from cobs.

In a serving bowl, combine

corn, blueberries, cucumber,

red onion, cilantro, wild rice,

and jalapeño.

Prepare the dressing in a

screw-top jar by combining

lime juice, olive oil, honey,

cumin, and ½ teaspoon salt.

Cover and shake well to

combine.

Add dressing to salad and

toss. Cover and refrigerate

overnight or up to 24 hours.

WINTER 2020-2021 | edible SAN DIEGO 9


NEW

Farmers’ Market

SHOPPING ADVICE

1

GET

IN &

OUT AS

QUICKLY AS

POSSIBLE.

2

PREORDER

FROM

YOUR FAVORITE

VENDORS IF

POSSIBLE SO

YOUR GOODS ARE

READY TO GO.

3

LEAVE

YOUR

DOGS/

PETS AT

HOME.

4

SANITIZE

YOUR HANDS

BEFORE

ENTERING

AND ON

LEAVING.

5

KEEP

YOUR

DISTANCE

FROM

OTHERS IN

LINE.

6

KNOW

WHAT YOU

WANT BEFORE

YOU GET TO THE

FRONT OF THE

LINE.

7

YOU

TOUCH IT,

YOU BUY

IT.

8

USE

A CARD,

EXACT

CHANGE, OR

PAYMENT

APP.

9

DON’T

EAT

OR DRINK

AT THE

MARKET.

TAKE YOUR

PURCHASES

HOME TO

ENJOY.

10

BE PATIENT & THANKFUL THAT WE CAN SUPPORT

#LOCALTOGETHER

CAROLE TOPALIAN

10 ediblesandiego.com


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WINTER 2020-2021 | edible SAN DIEGO 11


12 ediblesandiego.com


How to Sustainably Farm in the City

Idzai Mubaiwa turns community garden plots and a neighbor’s

backyard into an urban farm

BY NICOLE BRAVO | PHOTOGRAPHY BY LAUREN DI MATTEO

Idzai Mubaiwa is a mother first and a farmer second. In

2002, she relocated from Zimbabwe to the US with her four

daughters seeking a better life. Her priorities early on were

to find a good school for the girls and a bit of earth to grow her

own food. Eighteen years later, she is now a proud US citizen

and has put her daughters through college—in part from the

income earned by selling produce at farmers’ markets from her

urban garden plots located throughout San Diego County.

In her native Zimbabwe, everyone had a small farm, where

they would grow enough food to sustain a family while selling

the surplus in order to cover the cost of planting again. “If we

didn’t grow something,” Mubaiwa explains, “we would have to

put money into buying what someone else grows, and that just

doesn’t make any sense.” She shakes her head at the absurdity of

it, leaving me a bit bewildered because I’ve never given a second

thought to going to the grocery store and purchasing vegetables

someone else grows.

In addition to Mubaiwa’s plots in community gardens, she’s

transformed a regular neighborhood backyard into a small-scale

farm. Since she sells her pesticide-free produce at local farmers’

markets, she needed more land to keep up with the demand of

patrons, which is what led to the eventual conversion of a friend’s

backyard. What would normally be just a bit of dirt or grass and

a few bushes has been transformed into an edible oasis.

At New Roots Community Farm in City Heights, I

watch Mubaiwa carefully harvest and rinse the vegetables for

tomorrow’s market, throwing aside any leaf of kale or chard

that does not meet her stringent expectations. After spending

hours with her as she labored in the bright sun, I attempt to

curb her over-selectiveness, defending some of the castoffs as

good enough to sell. Her patient reply is that she only provides

her customers with the very best because that is what she would

want to buy.

I ask what she wishes patrons understood about her work. She

replies, “When they go to the store, they don’t ask for a bargain,

but when they come to me, they just want a bargain—after all the

time and effort I put into raising the plants. It takes a lot of time,

we put in a lot of hours here. At times I wish they could just, you

know, help us too because it is hard work.” She goes on to detail

the refreshing exceptions: those customers that encourage her to

raise her prices because they understand the work that goes into

organic practices and recognize the quality of her healthy, vibrant

produce. There are even those who overpay her, offering the

amount they believe she deserves rather than the advertised price.

WINTER 2020-2021 | edible SAN DIEGO 13


THE MARKET AT HFS

Authentic Hawaiian-Style

Poke & Local Seafood

Open Daily 10am-4pm

6491 Weathers Place

San Diego, CA

(858) 282-0591

Follow Us @TheMarketHFS

Woof ‘n Rose Winery

RAMONA VALLEY

Specializing in red

wines made only from

estate grown and other

Ramona Valley grapes.

National and

international

award-winning

wine.

Tasting veranda

open Sat. and Sun.

and by appointment.

steve@woofnrose.com

760-788-4818

woofnrose.com

14 ediblesandiego.com


While shopping at farmers’ markets,

we often fail to truly see the farmers,

even when they are standing before us.

We aren’t there for the early mornings,

laborious days, and late evenings. We

never hear about the unexpected heat

that scorches a crop, or the caterpillars

that show up overnight eating their

way through much of that week’s

income. Or all of the trial and error

involved in getting the watering just

right to avoid watery strawberries or

not-too-tiny beets—most of us are

ignorant of it all.

There are countless advantages to

buying from farmers’ markets. We

are directly supporting hardworking

farmers and purveyors who labor

to sustain our families and offer us

the opportunity for reciprocity in

supporting theirs. They are passionate

people who do the work not because it

will make them rich, but because it will

make them happy and strengthen their

communities.

We are investing in fresh,

wholesome products with a higher

nutrient density, which contributes

to healthier, more productive lives

now and lower medical bills in the

future. What is more, we are fostering

the expansion of a local food system

that is more sustainable for everyone

involved and far less harmful to the

environment. Considering these shortand

long-term benefits, I’d venture to

say we should actually be paying more

for these products, not less.

In her garden, I notice Mubaiwa’s

eyes squinting from pain every now

and then. As her body forces her to

move a little slower than she’d like, she

reiterates that the garden is her therapy.

“I have arthritis,” she says. “When

I’m home, I hurt. When I come here,

I don’t feel any pain. I love this. I’m

always the last to leave the garden.”

Wrapping up for the day she bends

down near her plants to do just one

more thing. I overhear her say, “Okay

babies, I’ll see you very soon.”

Mubaiwa currently sells at the

Hillcrest Farmers’ Market with her

sister. You can find them under the

banner African Sisters Produce.

Originally published September 21,

2020, on ediblesandiego.com.

WINTER 2020-2021 | edible SAN DIEGO 15


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16 ediblesandiego.com


Building a

Better Meat

System

BY MARILYN NOBLE

COURTESY OF WHITE OAK PASTURES; COURTESY OF MIKE CALLICRATE

All it’s taken to expose the precarious state of our modern

industrial meat supply is a tiny bit of infectious genetic material

wrapped in a protein coat.

The coronavirus pandemic has shone a not-so-friendly light on

the inhumane ways both animals and people are treated in a system

dominated by four major companies: Tyson, JBS, Cargill, and

National Beef. Over the past 40 years, as the meatpacking industry

has consolidated in the name of scale, efficiency, and profits—and

while consumers have been the beneficiaries of cheap meat—

producers, rural communities, slaughterhouse workers, and the

environment have all paid a steep price.

As the virus rampaged through enormous packing plants in the

Midwest, sickening thousands of mostly immigrant workers and, as

of June, killing more than 100, the packers slowed production and

claimed a meat shortage was imminent. This sent meat prices soaring,

and panicked consumers cleaned out grocery store meat cases. In

the meantime, decreased packing house capacity meant farmers

had nowhere to sell their animals and were forced to exterminate

millions, mostly hogs and chickens, the disposal of which (by burying

or incineration) has created serious groundwater and air pollution.

In the modern industrial system, once animals reach their slaughter

weight, there’s no alternative to mass euthanasia and disposal if the

facilities aren’t available.

“What do you do with a million cattle and no slaughter capacity?

You cannot keep feeding them,” says Mike Callicrate, a rancher in

St. Francis, Kansas, who owns a small slaughter plant, along with

a processing plant and retail store in Colorado Springs. He’s also a

fiercely outspoken advocate for small family farms.

“These companies are so unbelievably fragile. One little thing

happens and they fall apart. It’s just a house of cards,” he adds.

In the late 1960s, the US was home to around 9,000 mediumand

small-scale slaughter plants scattered throughout the country.

By 2018, that number had shrunk to about 800, with the vast

majority of beef and pork processed in only about a dozen extremely

large plants concentrated in the Midwest. Not only does this leave

the meat supply vulnerable to disruption, but as small plants have

disappeared, it’s become harder for livestock growers to opt out of

Mike Callicrate, the founder of Ranch Foods Direct, is a

rancher, business entrepreneur, and family farm advocate.

WINTER 2020-2021 | edible SAN DIEGO 17


Will Harris, a fourth-generation cattleman and owner of White

Oak Pastures in Bluffton, GA, is a recognized as a leader in

humane animal husbandry and environmental sustainability.

the industrial system, and small rural economies have collapsed

as competition has disappeared and dollars have been siphoned

off by massive corporations.

Callicrate places many of the problems inherent in the

commodity meat system at the foot of the USDA for several

reasons—especially when it comes to truth in labeling, another

issue depressing prospects for small producers. “We’ve got USDA

out there acting like they’re the food police and making sure our

food is safe and wholesome, and yet they are complicit in one

of the biggest labeling frauds in our history: ‘Product of USA,’”

he says. “We’ve got to realize that USDA does not represent the

people’s interest anymore.”

Consumers may think they’re buying American beef when

they read “Product of USA” on the label, but meat can legally

carry that terminology even if it’s imported from countries like

Australia or Brazil, as long as it’s processed in a US packing plant.

The misleading Product of USA label goes hand in hand with

the end of Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) for beef. When

Congress allowed the industry to drop the country of origin

from the label in 2015, the doors opened wide for consumer

confusion, especially with grass-fed beef.

“The USDA rule that allows multinational corporations to

shop for grass-fed beef in the cheapest markets in the world

and then sell it to the most lucrative market in the world (the

US) and call it a product of the USA is a major issue,” says Will

Harris. He’s the fourth-generation owner of White Oak Pastures

in Bluffton, Georgia. In the mid-90s, he began transitioning

his commodity cattle operation to a pasture-based, multispecies

model, and now is vertically integrated, with two slaughter plants

and a robust sales and marketing department that moves product

through several different sales channels, including retail, food

service, and direct-to-consumer.

In the years since COOL ended, Harris says he’s seen his

business revenues drop almost 25%. “We’re selling the same

amount of beef,” he says, “but our margins are dropping because

we’re competing with cheaper meat from other countries.”

But there’s one pandemic-related glimmer of hope: When the

Big Four slowed and shut down plants, small producers who had

COURTESY OF WHITE OAK PASTURES

18 ediblesandiego.com


COURTESY OF MIKE CALLICRATE

direct-to-consumer sales channels in place saw dramatic growth

in business. For both Callicrate and Harris, it was unexpected

and somewhat overwhelming. “We’re just trying to figure out

how we’re going to adapt,” says Callicrate.

Harris says his farm was inundated with orders from new

customers, and that left some of their regulars in the lurch. “I was

embarrassed that I allowed our regular customers to go without,”

he says. His team is building a loyalty program to potentially

alleviate that situation in the future, and he’s considering increasing

capacity in the farm’s fulfillment center if business keeps up.

But will the sudden interest in local meat from small family

farms last and create meaningful change in the industry?

Callicrate says it’s up to both the government and

consumers. “Part of it depends on what the government does,”

he says. “If we continue to allow these big meatpackers to

run chains at 400 head an hour and have workers standing

shoulder to shoulder, paying them below living wage, and

allow the continuation of these animal factories that are

inhumane and polluting, and if we don’t protect the better

local or regional model, nothing will change. It’ll go back to

hiding behind the curtain again, as it has been for 30 years.

Right now, consumers are learning about what’s actually

happening. They’re seriously concerned.”

But he adds, “One of the worst, most deadly diseases in our

country is aggressive price shopping consumerism because it

wipes out your economy. Eventually, it’s all gone. Your money is

being siphoned off into the Walton family bank account, along

with a handful of other multinational corporations. So that’s the

really big dread, that people will not start considering more than

the price in their purchasing.”

Harris believes that if consumers shop their values,

meaningful change can happen. “Right now, there aren’t very

many people doing what we’re doing, maybe about 20 of us in

the whole country. I don’t think any of us care about becoming

hundred-million dollar companies, but if there were a hundred

companies doing what we’re doing, then we could build those

regional food systems.”

So how does an aware and enlightened consumer help grow a

sustainable and healthy food system? Harris offers some tips:

Decide what values you want to support, whether it’s animal

welfare, regenerative agriculture, healthy food, local farms, or a

combination.

Find a farm or ranch that fits your values and don’t rely on

package labels or certifications. In these days of social media,

it’s increasingly easy to learn about how businesses run. Most

family farms have websites and engage with interested potential

customers on Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, and others. Ask

questions; get to know the people producing your food.

Once you find a farm or two, buy their products and

support them. “Consumers buying from us is the air we

breathe,” says Harris.

Callicrate sums it up: “The consumer is the only way we get

out of the ditch. They’ve got to support something better.”

Marilyn Noble is an independent food and agriculture journalist based in

Arizona. In the past three years, she’s written regularly for Edible Phoenix and

is a contributing writer for The Counter, a nonprofit, independent newsroom

that investigates the forces shaping how and what America eats. One of

her articles was selected by Samin Nosrat for inclusion in The Best American

Food Writing 2019 anthology. In addition, she’s written several Southwesternthemed

cookbooks, the latest of which was published in May 2020. Follow her

on Twitter @mariwrites or visit her website marilynnoble.com.

Look for this story on ediblesandiego.com with

perspectives on the topic from local stakeholders like

Paul Grieve of Pasture Bird, and Brad Wise, owner

and chef of the Wise Ox Butchery & Eatery and Trust

Restaurant Group.

WINTER 2020-2021 | edible SAN DIEGO 19


Partner Content |

The Beautiful

Dragon Fruit

BY NAN STERMAN

These are the most amazing-looking fruits. Large, deep pink

orbs covered in green scales—no wonder their nickname is

“dragon fruit,” a term that comes from Vietnam, where the

fruits were introduced in the late 1800s. In their native tropical

Central and South America, however, these fruits are called

pitaya, which is the term for all cactus fruits, or pitajaya, the

name for this particular cactus fruit.

The fruits of this climbing, epiphytic cactus start out as

gigantic, fragrant white flowers that open for just one night, and

close as the sun climbs in the sky. In their native habitats, moths

and bats pollinate the flowers. Here in San Diego, bees can do

that job, but many growers prefer to do it themselves. They use a

makeup brush to move the white powdery pollen from the male

parts of the flowers to the female parts.

Pitajaya is very easy to grow. The bright green succulent

stems do best in full sun and well-draining soil, with minimal

irrigation, something sturdy for support—a post, a wall, even a

tree—and the long vines pruned short so fruits develop within

easy reach. Plants flower in cycles from May to November,

depending on the variety. Six weeks after pollination, the fruits

are ready for harvest.

Ripe dragon fruits weigh

between half a pound to more

than three pounds. Their skin

gives slightly to the touch, and

the fruits feel very heavy in your hand. Slice a pitajaya open

to reveal the color of its flesh, from white to hot magenta and

studded with tiny black seeds.

The tastiest varieties are the brightest pink to deepest magenta

colored. They are sweet, juicy, fragrant, crunchy (from the seeds),

and absolutely delicious. They also pack a nutritional punch as a

high-fiber and antioxidant-rich food.

Most often, we eat the fruits fresh, sliced in fruit salad, as

a garnish, in smoothies, and even combined with lime juice

and ice for aguas frescas. Dragon fruit makes surprisingly good

sorbets and ice creams. In Florida, daring chefs chop dragon fruit

into ceviche. One of my favorite breakfasts is sliced dragon fruit

with cottage cheese—yum!

Increasingly, San Diego home gardeners grow pitajaya in

frost-free backyards. Today, just three or four farms in north San

Diego County grow commercial crops. Expect that number to

increase as farmers look to move from thirsty crops like avocados

and citrus to crops that need less water.

While the high-touch nature of growing dragon fruit makes

the fruits expensive at local farmers’ markets and specialty

retailers, just one taste tells you they are worth every penny.

Get started growing your own pitajaya by selecting a named

variety so you don’t end up with a bland-flavored white fruit.

(White-flesh fruits are still beautiful, but they aren’t very tasty.) My

favorite varieties are Delight, which has a pale pink flesh, and the

deep magenta-fleshed Physical Graffiti and American Beauty.

Follow A Growing Passion on Facebook and

Instagram for a behind-the-scenes look at

our Season 8 episode featuring this delicious

and surprisingly sustainable fruit, and watch

older episodes of A Growing Passion at

agrowingpassion.com.

20 ediblesandiego.com


WINTER 2020-2021 | edible SAN DIEGO 21


edible san diego

Local

Monday

Escondido—Welk Resort √†

8860 Lawrence Welk Dr.

3–7pm

760-651-3630

Enjoy the Open Air

Wednesday

Thursday

Tuesday

Coronado √

1st St. & B Ave., Ferry Landing

2:30–6pm

760-741-3763

Escondido √*

262 East Grand Ave.

2:30–7pm (2:30–6pm Oct to May)

760-480-4101

The Farmstand NEW

(formerly People’s Produce Night Market)

4261 Market St.

5–8pm

619-813-9148

Mira Mesa √*

10510 Reagan Rd.

2:30–7pm (3–6pm fall-winter)

858-272-7054

Otay Ranch—Chula Vista √

2015 Birch Rd. and Eastlake Blvd.

4–8pm

619-279-0032

Pacific Beach Tuesday à

Bayard & Garnet

2–7pm

619-233-3901

San Marcos √

1035 La Bonita Dr.

3–7pm

858-272-7054

UCSD Town Square √

UCSD Campus, Town Square

10am–2pm, Sept to June

858-534-4248

Vail Headquarters √*

32115 Temecula Pkwy.

9am–1pm

760-728-7343

Little Italy Wednesday √*†

501 W. Date St.

9am–1pm

619-233-3901

Ocean Beach √

4900 block of Newport Ave.

4–8pm

619-279-0032

Santee *†

Carlton Hills Blvd. & Mast Blvd.

3–7pm (2:30–6:30pm winter)

619-449-8427

South Bay √

4475 Bonita Rd.

3–7pm

Place orders at

onthegofarmersmarket.com

by Tuesday at 3pm

619-550-7180

State Street in Carlsbad Village √

State St. & Carlsbad Village Dr.

3–7pm (3–6pm fall-winter)

858-272-7054

Temecula—Promenade √*

40820 Winchester Rd. by Macy’s

9am–1pm

760-728-7343

EAT the most

delicious

californiagrown

fruits

and vegGIES

7 days a week

Lemon Grove √*

2885 Lemon Grove Ave.

3–7pm

619-813-9148

Linda Vista √*†

6939 Linda Vista Rd.

3–7pm (2–6pm winter)

760-504-4363

North Park Thursday √*†

2900 North Park Way

3–6pm

619-550-7180

Oceanside Morning √*

Pier View Way & Coast Hwy. 101

9am–1pm

760-791-3241

Rancho Bernardo √

16535 Via Esprillo

11am–1:30pm

619-279-0032

Friday

Borrego Springs √

700 Palm Canyon Dr.

7am–noon, Oct to Apr

760-767-5555

Horton Plaza Lunch Market

225 Broadway Circle

11am–2pm

619-795-3363

Imperial Beach √*†

10 Evergreen Ave.

2–7pm (2–6pm winter)

info@imperialbeachfarmersmarket.org

La Mesa Village √*

La Mesa Blvd. btwn Palm & 4th St.

3–7pm, year-round

619-795-3363

Rancho Bernardo √

13330 Paseo del Verano Norte

9am–1pm

760-500-1709

22 ediblesandiego.com


Markets Guide

Cook All Weekend

Saturday

find the freshest local catch

City Heights √*†!

Wightman St. btwn Fairmount & 43rd St.

9am–1pm

760-504-4363

Del Mar √

1050 Camino Del Mar

1–4pm

858-465-0013

Little Italy Mercato à

600 W. Date St.

8am–2pm

619-233-3901

Sunday

Hillcrest √*

3960 Normal & Lincoln Sts.

9am–2pm

619-237-1632

La Jolla Open Aire √

Girard Ave. & Genter

9am–1pm

858-454-1699

Leucadia √*

185 Union St. & Vulcan St.

10am–2pm

858-272-7054

Pacific Beach √

4150 Mission Blvd.

8am–noon

760-741-3763

Poway √*

14134 Midland Rd.

8am–1pm

619-249-9395

Rancho Penasquitos

9400 Fairgrove Ln.

9am–1pm

858-484-8788

Murrieta √*

Village Walk Plaza

I-15, exit west on Calif. Oaks & Kalmia

9am–1pm

760-728-7343

North San Diego / Sikes Adobe à

12655 Sunset Dr.

10:30am–3:30pm

858-735-5311

Rancho Santa Fe Del Rayo Village √

16077 San Dieguito Rd.

9:30am–2pm

619-743-4263

Temecula—Old Town √*

Sixth & Front St.

8am–12:30pm

760-728-7343

Tuna Harbor Dockside Market

598 Harbor Ln.

Port of San Diego

8am–1pm

Vista √*†

325 Melrose Dr.

8am–noon

760-945-7425

Support local growers

and businesses

Santa Ysabel √

21887 Washington St.

Noon–4pm

760-782-9202

Solana Beach √

410 South Cedros Ave.

Noon–4pm

858-755-0444

cultivate community

DUE TO COVID-19: Markets shown in gray are temporarily closed

and all listings are subject to change. Please contact markets

directly to confirm hours of operation and locations.

Visit ediblesandiego.com and click on “Resources”

for more complete information and links to market

websites.

* Market vendors accept WIC (Women, Infants, Children) Farmers’

Market checks.

† Market vendors accept EBT (Electronic Benefit Transfer).

! Market vendors accept WIC Fruit and Vegetable checks.

√ Indicates markets certified by the San Diego County Agriculture

Commissioner, ensuring that the produce is grown by the seller

or another certified farmer in California, and meets all state

quality standards. Temecula markets and the Murrieta market

are certified by the Riverside County Agricultural Commissioner.

WINTER 2020-2021 | edible SAN DIEGO 23


Prep (For Real Life) |

Manifesting 101

According to the laws of attraction, creating a vision board

is one of the primary practices of manifesting. You tell the

universe what you want, and the universe delivers. If only it

were that easy—but surely there is something to it if you are willing

to put in the work.

Food Vision 2030 is an 18-month project led by the San Diego

Food System Alliance (SDFSA) and a steering committee with

input from local stakeholders designed around three goals: to

cultivate justice, fight climate change, and build resilience. Earlier

this year SDFSA invited San Diego County residents to share their

needs and aspirations related to food in their communities; over

2,200 individuals participated, with 55% of the respondents being

food workers or residents of marginalized communities.

“This year’s pandemic, climate disasters, and events highlighting

deeply entrenched racial injustices reinforce that transforming

many of our systems is more important than ever,” says Elly Brown,

executive director of SDFSA. “The food system, in particular,

can be a powerful lever for elevating social, environmental, and

economic equity for all. Changing the way we grow food, move

food, share food, and think about food ultimately changes the way

we treat the planet and each other.”

Early previews find participants are most concerned about

reducing hunger and food insecurity, minimizing food waste, and

reducing racial and ethnic disparities, while many expressed interest

in seeing more community gardens, composting programs, coops,

and urban farms. Finding healthy, affordable, and culturally

appropriate food was the most important issue to participants in

City Heights, Logan Heights, and National City.

Vital feedback and comments from participants are helping to

shape the framework for a vision, with the final report due in 2021.

What can you do to be a part of this vision with us? Continue

to share in these hopes and dreams as part of a 10-year strategy, and

let’s make it happen in 2030.

Be a part of Food Vision 2030 and find more information at sdfsa.org.

COURTESY OF SAN DIEGO FOOD SYSTEM ALLIANCE

24 ediblesandiego.com


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great content.

WINTER 2020-2021 | edible SAN DIEGO 25


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DAILY BREAKFAST, LUNCH AND DINNER

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Al Fresco Dining | Sushi & Seafood Options | Complimentary Parking

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26 OCK_Edible_Full ediblesandiego.com

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7/16/2020 9:20:48 AM

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