Our Story Your Story - Waikato Business News 25 Years

production3

It’s a proud moment for any company to stand up and say ‘we have been serving our business community for more than 25 years’.

That is the case with Waikato Business News. 

In that time our editors have featured many strong and exclusive stories covering the exciting business within the region, and we have built up a loyal group of advertising supporters.

In our special feature “Our story Your story - 25 years” we cast our eye back over a quarter-century of business in the Waikato, and we profile many of the business leaders well known in the community, who make our region a shining light in the country.

1995 - 2020 • PUBLISHED BY DP MEDIA LTD


2 | OUR STORY YOUR STORY

Time to

Celebrate

Kia ora

We reckon 25 is a good number of years to be

in business, particularly when your business is

publishing and you’ve ridden out the upheaval

of the internet - not to mention the disruption

of Covid-19.

So we’re celebrating. In this special issue, you

can read about our journey as a staunchly

independent publisher, from the startup days

through till today with a well entrenched

position in the Waikato business community.

And it’s our business community that is vital

to our success. We wouldn’t be here without

the support of our valued advertisers, many of

whom have joined us in this special issue.

They wouldn’t have stuck with us if they didn’t

know we are widely read, and that puts us on

our mettle.

I am frequently told by readers that they value

our positivity. It’s not hard to feel positive

- I am forever interviewing people doing

fascinating things in creative ways. It’s the

great pleasure of the role.

I am also often told readers want to know

what others in the business community are up

to. They enjoy recognising people they know,

and my hope is they are also picking up tips

for their own venture.

Waikato is in a sweet spot. Small enough

for those in the business community to be

well connected and supportive; big enough

to sustain a full range of businesses and the

professionals to service them. Close enough

to Auckland to benefit from its economic

clout; far enough away to make the living

easier.

For me, just over two years in the editor’s job,

it’s that supportiveness that has been most

compelling. People I talk to are genuinely

interested in what others are up to, and for the

most part happy to share their own stories.

We’re stoked to have been telling your

stories for 25 years. In this issue, our editors

reflect on their time in the seat; Sandra Peek

remembers a time when bromides were cut up

with a scalpel and glued on to paper layouts,

while for Mike Blake, the photography was

an important part of reflecting the business

community back to itself.

Speaking for myself, the most memorable

story is always the most recent, but one

highlight was stretching myself to tell the

story of a major piece of regional planning,

Hei Awarua, the Hamilton-Auckland corridor.

To my surprise, given its slightly abstract

nature, that has proved to be the most popular

story on our website.

But mostly, the job is about having a yarn

with a business owner. On that front, among

many, many other interviews I really enjoyed

spending an hour or so with a couple of young

cousins talking about their fishing show,

Fishing and Adventure, a crazy 10 year journey

of having a go and learning fast. They made for

a memorable cover, which we’re reproducing

in this publication.

Connectedness is our great Waikato strength,

and we at Waikato Business News will

continue to play our part.

Our success has been built by amazing people;

the editors get their say in these pages, but

equally important have been the sales people,

production and office staff over the years. It’s

a team effort and everyone plays their part.

Ngā mihi nui

Richard Walker

Editor


Waikato Business News 25 Years | 3

Contents

4 Then and now

Two covers 25 years apart

5 Hamilton City Council

14 Foster Construction

Fosters builds great communities

18 Sandra Peek

Champion of Waikato Business

20 Mike Blake

Fourteen years in the hot seat

22 Our story, your story

25 years of stories and

highlights in Waikato

24 Te Waka

Building for future

25 Hamilton Central Business Association

Boosting the city centre

26 Stark Property

Community and relationships

at Stark Property’s core

28 PAUA Architects

Placemaking for people

32 WEL Networks

Powering the region for 100 years

34 Chedworth Properties Ltd

Hamilton born and bred

36 Waipā District Council

A district on the move

42 Ebbett Group

Defined by growth, innovation

and progress

44 Gallagher Group

Most memorable moments

since 1995

45 Fast facts

Value of paper and print

46 KingSt Advertising

We still need the creative juice

48 Out and about

50 Lodge Real Estate

Lodge leader looks at an

everchanging real estate world

52 Stiles and Hooker

Architects and engineers

56 Our neighbours

In the heart of the city

58 Bartercard

Proving its worth in the Waikato

60 Deidre Morris

Our future together

Publisher

Deidre Morris

027 228 8442

deidre@dpmedia.co.nz

Editor

Richard Walker

027 814 2914

richard@dpmedia.co.nz

Special thanks to

Mike and Eileen Blake

Production Manager

Kelly Gillespie

Design

Olivia McGovern

Printed by

Ovato

DP Media Limited

Level 1, 25 Ward Street,

hamilton, New Zealand

Phone: 07 838 1333

info@dpmedia.co.nz

www.dpmedia.co.nz

www.wbn.co.nz


4 | OUR STORY YOUR STORY

Then and now

From the Harley riding exec to two cousins gone fishing

Two covers 25 years apart

1995

2020

JULY/AUGUST VOLUME 28: ISSUE 7 2020 WWW.WBN.CO.NZ FACEBOOK.COM/WAIKATOBUSINESSNEWS

Reeling in

the viewers

Ten years after two young cousins with a good

idea and no TV experience started knocking on

doors, they have a top-rating fishing show and

are looking to the future. Page 4

it central

Waikato tech firms scoop

major awards Pages 6, 8

to the rescue

Hamilton teen with a lifeline

for YouTubers Page 10

Mig Rumney, left, and Scott Parry celebrate another catch.

See the full timeline

starting on page 22


1

Our vision

for Hamilton

Kirikiriroa

Ka hua. Ka puaawai. Ka ora.

‘Dreams are realised when people take ownership

for creating, fostering and giving life to the vision.’


Shaping

our city,

together

Hamilton Kirikiriroa is a fantastic city, with the potential

to be one of the very best places in the world to live in

and to thrive in.

We’re already New Zealand’s fourth largest city with 170,000 people

calling Hamilton home. In the space of just three generations, our

population has grown more than eight times over.

And we’re also incredibly diverse. The people of Hamilton represent

more than 160 ethnic groups, making us rich in wonderful cultural

opportunities.

Importantly, we’re young. In Hamilton, our median age is just 32,

making us the ‘youngest’ of all New Zealand cities.

Already, Hamilton has everything it needs to be one of the best places

in New Zealand and the world to live, work and raise families. In our

city, we now have a much stronger focus on environmental issues, intergenerational

equity and housing affordability – things we know are

important to people who live here.

And while your Council is very focused on looking after the city assets

we already have, we want to prepare and plan well for those things

which will further improve the wellbeing of Hamiltonians.

Over the last year, Council has been working alongside our community

to understand what people in our city want the future of Hamilton

Kirikiriroa to look like. We have, through a range of ways, gathered

feedback on what people believe we should focus on to ensure

Hamilton becomes one of the very best places in the world to live.

Every day Council makes decisions that impact the future of our city

and the wellbeing of Hamiltonians. Our decisions always take social,

cultural, economic and environmental wellbeing of people into account.

There’s a lot of things we have to do to keep the city running the way

it should. We must provide and maintain water services, we must

adequately plan for our growing city, we must maintain roads, we must

make sure waste can be disposed of safely... and that’s just the start of

it. These things are non-negotiable, especially for a city like Hamilton

which more and more people are choosing to call home. That important

work on essential services and infrastructure won’t stop. But, we do

more than that.

With people at the heart of everything we do, we also make choices

about how to make our great river city an even better place to be.

Hamiltonians have told us the kind of city they want, and where they

want Hamilton to be in the future.

Paula Southgate

Mayor of Hamilton

We’ve used your feedback to help create five priorities for Hamilton

Kirikiriroa. There’s lots of things we have to do, but alongside these

there’s lots of opportunities.

We’re looking forward to shaping our city, together.


PRIORITY ONE

Shaping

a city

that’s easy

to live in

Ahuahungia teetehi

taaone e tau ai te

noho ki roto

What we want

Hamilton is small enough to enjoy a strong

sense of community but big enough to be

vibrant and interesting.

As we continue to evolve into a metropolitan

centre, we have the game-changing opportunity

to become a 20-minute city. A 20-minute city

is about creating liveable neighbourhoods

with local access to amenity that is important

to residents. It’s also about linking existing

destinations, facilities, places of work and

education with safe walking, cycling and public

transport connections so our residents can safely

access most of the things they need within 20

minutes.

We want our children to be able to cycle safely

to school and for people of all ages and abilities

to easily access different neighbourhoods, from

one side of the Waikato River to the other – by

whatever transport option we choose.

People in our city want to live in lively, safe

communities with shared identities and public

facilities such as libraries, playgrounds and

community hubs accessible to everyone. It

should be easy for us all to look after our mental

and physical health by enjoying our city’s green

and open spaces, including the Waikato River

paths and stunning places like the Hamilton

Gardens.

By investing in cyclepaths and accessways,

and utilising our beautiful gully network, we

will be able to create a city that our people can

easily enjoy and explore. But we’ll also need

improvements in public transport – so we’ll work

with partners like Waikato Regional Council to

get better bus services.

And we’ll need to focus on delivering

the amenities and services that build

strong communities, both in our existing

neighbourhoods and for our new ones, as well

as supporting a mix of housing types, including

affordable housing.

It’s about finding the right balance between

revitalising our established neighbourhoods

with investing in new liveable suburbs required

for the number of new people choosing to call

Hamilton home.

We want a city that’s easy to live in, explore,

and connect.

What we’ll focus on

1. We’ll prioritise building connected and safe

walkways and cycleways that allow us to move

around our city quickly and easily and bring

neighbourhoods together.

2. We’ll revitalise our existing neighbourhoods

and invest in the creation of our new

neighbourhoods to make sure we have a

liveable, sustainable city.

3. We’ll encourage new developments in

Hamilton to include a mix of housing, including

affordable housing options.

4. We’ll enable and support strong public

transport connections which help Hamiltonians

get easy access to essential services such as

education, health centres and supermarkets.

5. We’ll put more focus on our neighbourhoods

having a community identity and supporting

community spaces across our city.


PRIORITY TWO

Shaping

a city where

our people

thrive

Ahuahungia teetehi

taaone e puaawai ai ngaa

taangata katoa

What we want

Our city is welcoming and offers jobs and

opportunities for everyone.

Hamilton already has many advantages and an

economy that looks better placed than most

to withstand some of the challenges facing

other parts of New Zealand. We are located in

the middle of the country’s ‘Golden Triangle’

between Auckland and Tauranga and we have

plans well in place to become New Zealand’s

most important logistics hub.

We are already working closely with central

government, iwi and our neighbouring councils

like Tauranga, Auckland, Waikato and Waipaa

to make sure our region continues to flourish.

When Hamilton thrives, our wider region thrives.

So we’ll continue to advocate for Hamilton – and

Hamiltonians – every chance we get.

We are already home to world-class

businesses across a range of sectors, bringing

opportunities, jobs and investment, including for

our young people. We are a tech-savvy city, with

the digital know-how to deliver research and

development on the world stage.

Increasingly, our city is a place where people

and businesses want to come, stay and grow.

Our attractive lifestyle, based upon a vibrant

city that’s easy to live in, means more and more

people want to be here.

Young people are now coming to our city (and

in some cases, returning home) to find good

jobs, buy homes, raise families and become

part of our community. This, along with more

than 160 ethnic groups making up our city, adds

a valuable diversity to Hamilton which brings

opportunities and benefits for all Hamiltonians.

We want Hamilton to continue to build on its

growing reputation as a centre of excellence

within innovation, training, smart and techsector

industries. We need the infrastructure

and support services in place to nurture and

promote sustainable businesses that add value

to our city.

We want to actively create opportunities for

our people to thrive in their jobs, careers,

and lives so they can leverage the wonderful

lifestyle and opportunities our city has to

offer.

What we’ll focus on

1. We’ll work with partners like central

government and other councils to specifically

deliver fast and efficient transport connections

to connect Hamilton quickly to places like

Auckland and Tauranga.

2. We’ll look beyond our borders and work

with our regional partners to maximise the

opportunities from Hamilton being the hub of

the Waikato region.

3. We’ll make sure our economic strength is

further leveraged and that Hamilton is known as

a great place to work and do business.

4. We’ll empower and enable our diverse

communities to share their voice and shape

their city.

5. We’ll invest in the right infrastructure to

make sure Hamilton is an attractive place for

businesses to succeed.


PRIORITY THREE

Shaping

a central

city where

people

love to be

Ahuahungia te pokapuu

o teetehi taaone e

arohaina ai e te taangata

What we want

We want our central city to be the vibrant heart

of our cosmopolitan and diverse city. A city

centre that is thoughtfully designed around

people, culture and the natural environment. We

want our city to be alive with hustle and bustle,

with people happily living and playing in the

central city.

Our central city should be accessible via

different transport modes and enjoy easy access

to the nearby Waikato River which is celebrated

and treasured for the city taonga (treasure) it is.

Our restaurants and bars will offer Hamiltonians

choice and entertainment and draw people from

outside of Hamilton who know that a visit to

central Hamilton is a trip well worth making.

Our central city should support a thriving visual

arts and performance scene through our iconic

local theatres and bring the area around our

Waikato Regional Theatre alive, further linking

our city to the stunning Waikato River.

Inner-city dwellers will enjoy a range of

apartment options, close to where they work or

close to strong transport links that get them to

where they need to be. But they will always be

close to green open spaces, along the river and

with parks like Victoria on the River nearby.

Local, national and international businesses

will choose to base themselves in our central

city which remains affordable and accessible,

serviced by everything needed to live a full

Hamilton life.

We want our central city to be the

beating heart of Hamilton which always

has something going on for our diverse

communities to come together and enjoy.

What we’ll focus on

1. We’ll strengthen the connection and access

between the city centre and the Waikato River.

2. We’ll promote daytime and evening activity.

3. We’ll create performance spaces such as

the new regional theatre and leverage existing

central city spaces to support arts and culture

initiatives which offer something unique to our

city.

4. We’ll support mixed inner-city living options

which encourage people to live in Hamilton’s

central city alongside vibrant retail, hospitality

and entertainment sectors.

5. We’ll make it easy to get into and around

the city through a range of alternative travel

options.


PRIORITY FOUR

Shaping

a fun

city with

lots to do

Ahuahungia teetehi

taaone ngahau e tini

ai ngaa kaupapa

papai hei whai

What we want

We want to make sure our city provides

opportunities for all our people to play and

have fun - whether it be through organised

sport, local playgrounds, events, or our visitor

destinations.

A fun city should have something for everyone

whether you want to join a local choir or the

local quiz team — we want all of us to have

something to do and be part of.

We want to build on our growing reputation for

hosting outstanding events; events that bring

economic benefit, that Hamiltonians love, and

that bring people from all over New Zealand to

our city.

But small events also have a role in the life of

our city. We’re keen to support more arts and

cultural events and make sure we have the right

indoor and outdoor facilities in place to support

local community sports events that people of all

ages can get involved in. All of these things add

to the sense of community we all value about

Hamilton.

We have already invested in world-class

stadium and event facilities like Seddon Park,

Claudelands Event Centre and FMG Stadium

Waikato and are home to key visitor destinations

such as Hamilton Zoo, Hamilton Gardens, and

Waikato Museum.

And we’ll continue to embrace the outdoors,

not just the Waikato River but places like

Waiwhakareke Natural Heritage Park, our

destination playgrounds and Lake Rotoroa

(Hamilton Lake). These facilities provide locals

and visitors with memories and experiences that

keep people entertained and wanting more.

They drive interest and appreciation in our city.

They make living here fun.

There’s lots to do in Hamilton, but there’s also

quiet spaces for our community. Whether it’s

lying under a tree in a local park, taking in the

views of the Waikato River or discovering our

past at Waikato Museum, we invest in spaces

where our people can relax, rest and reflect.

We want Hamilton to be an even better place

for everyone to play, with things to do or see

around every corner.

What we’ll focus on

1. We’ll develop open community spaces like

Korikori Park in Rototuna and Minogue Park in

Forest Lake that are accessible to everyone to

enjoy and be part of.

2. We’ll invest in and enhance Waikato

Museum, Hamilton Gardens, Hamilton Zoo and

Waiwhakareke Natural Heritage Park to create

new and unique experiences for our people and

visitors.

3. We’ll host and celebrate city events like the

Hamilton Gardens Arts Festival and Balloons

over Waikato.

4. We’ll actively celebrate and promote a city

where residents have the opportunity to have

fun with their friends and family.

5. We’ll support local sports events by investing in

play spaces and we’ll work hard to attract national

and international sports events to our city.


PRIORITY FIVE

Shaping

a green

city

Ahuahungia teetehi

taaone tiaki taiao

What we want

We’ll promote becoming a sustainable city

by challenging the way we grow our city

and how we live within our city. We love our

environment and we’re all committed to

protecting it for future generations.

We embrace our individual and collective

roles as kaitiaki (caretakers) of our land,

water and air. Together, we honour, enhance

and protect taonga (treasures) like the

Waikato River, and our city’s extensive and

unique gully system.

We are proud of our green, clean city and

we’re taking a thoughtful and city-wide

partnership approach between businesses,

organisations and community groups to

tackle how our city responds to climate

change.

We need to look after what we already have

by embracing the sustainable use of natural

resources such as our water. We want to

enhance our beautiful open green spaces

like Waiwhakareke Natural Heritage Park,

the West Town Belt and Taitua Arboretum

which are valued so highly by Hamiltonians.

And it’s important we continue to minimise

our impact on the land by leading the

country in waste minimisation practices.

We want to continue to plan well for the

future so we can strongly focus on designing

new neighbourhoods like Peacocke in a way

where our natural environment can exist in

harmony with new homes and services. That

means we’ll need a stronger, safer network

of alternative transport which offers people

real choice and also offers ways to reduce

our carbon footprint.

We want to do it right together, so our city

will get better by the day and we can leave a

legacy we can all be proud of.

What we’ll focus on

1. We’ll protect and restore our natural

gully network and the biodiversity of

the city to increase how green our city is

making it healthier and stronger.

2. We’ll reduce the carbon footprint of the

city and build a city that is resilient to the

effects of climate change.

3. We’ll mitigate the impact of the city on

the health and wellbeing of the Waikato

River and Lake Rotoroa (Hamilton Lake).

4. We’ll encourage and enable alternative

ways to move safely and quickly around

our city.

5. We’ll plan our future as a sustainable

city - balancing the natural and built

environments so they can live in harmony.


When we work in collaboration with our community, stakeholders,

and partners, we get much better outcomes for Hamilton.

Shaping a city and doing it well can only be done together with people

who live here and by working with groups that have a stake in our success.

So we have purposefully put people at the heart of our thinking and at

the heart of the priorities we have outlined here. In fact, it’s the people of

Hamilton who so far have shaped these priorities for us.

We also acknowledge that we have a specific obligation to achieve the

economic, environmental, cultural and social aspirations of taangata

whenua (indigenous people of the land) of our city.

We acknowledge the special place of Maaori in Hamilton’s history and

the important role Maaori will play in building our city’s future. Maaori are

taangata whenua with kaitiakitanga (guardianship) status. This is important

for our city and by keeping open minds, and open hearts, these manaenhancing

relationships with Maaori offer all of us opportunities.

We have

a vision

for our city

but we can’t

do it alone

Young people also have a huge role to play. We’re a young city, full of the

promise arising from talented and well-educated young people who have

a huge amount to offer. We need to support them so, in turn, they can

contribute in a meaningful way to our future.

Finally, as we move ahead, we should respect and honour all our partners

in central government, local government, the wider community, the

philanthropic sector and others who have already contributed so much

and will continue to shape Hamilton for years to come.

We look forward to working with you, to shape the future of our city,

together.

futurehamilton.co.nz

Contact us

Hamilton City Council

260 Anglesea St

Hamilton

Email: info@hcc.govt.nz

Phone: +64 7 838 6699

/hamiltoncitycouncil

@hamiltoncitycouncil

/company/hamilton-city-council


We want to make sure

our people are at the

heart of what we do,

which is why we are proud

to be working with you, for you.

BACK ROW L-R:

Cr Rob Pascoe, Cr Sarah Thomson, Cr Mark Bunting, Cr Martin Gallagher, Cr Kesh Naidoo-Rauf, Cr Dave Macpherson, Cr Ryan Hamilton

FRONT ROW L-R:

Cr Margaret Forsyth, Cr Maxine van Oosten, Chief Executive Richard Briggs, Mayor Paula Southgate, Deputy Mayor Geoff Taylor, Cr Angela O’Leary, Cr Ewan Wilson


FOSTERS BUILDS

great communities


Leading Waikato firm

Fosters is delighted to

support and partner with

the Waikato Business News,

and join in celebrating its

25 years.

“For us, Waikato Business News is a really

important part of our community for its story

telling of business in a positive way,” says Foster

Group CEO, Leonard Gardner. Community

is important for Fosters, which has a proud

heritage stretching back almost 75 years after

LG Foster Ltd was formed in 1946 before

becoming Foster Construction Ltd in 1973.

Our purpose is great communities through

strong foundations, and we have a really

rich heritage of delivering projects that have

transformed the way that community works,”

Leonard says.

In his 18 years with the company, Fosters has

completed many significant projects for the city

and region.

That includes the Claudelands arena and

conference centre build. “The community

impact, amenity and pride of place created

there is something I’m really proud of.”

CONTINUED ON PAGE 16


16 | OUR STORY YOUR STORY


Our purpose is

great communities

through strong

foundations

FROM PAGE 15

Other notable projects during his time

include The Verandah at Lake Rotoroa

(Hamilton Lake), and a significant build and

refurbishment of Centreplace, completed

under time pressure to get it finished for the

Rugby World Cup.

Fosters is also responsible for both the

Torpedo7 and Visy builds in the airport

precinct, the latter bringing a major

manufacturer based in Auckland down to the

Waikato.

The high-profile build for APL at Hautapu

has extra resonance because of the two

companies’ long-term relationship.

“One of the pleasures of the job has been

able to work with businesses that have grown

alongside Fosters - and APL is an amazing

business that we’re very privileged to have here

in the Waikato,” Leonard says.

“The privilege of our role is that we can

help support their growth with property

solutions and delivering magnificent pieces of

infrastructure for them.”

In recent times there have been community

placemaking projects like Lakewood in

Cambridge, Tamahere Village, and the master

planned Union Square multi-building office

development in central Hamilton, where

earthworks are underway.

“Union Square is all about creating a highly

experiential workplace where the people and

business can flourish,” Leonard says.

For Fosters, there has to be a sense of

purpose to what they do.


Waikato Business News 25 Years | 17

“So we ask ourselves the question with

our projects: how is this contributing to

community? And we want to make sure we do

things well.”

Fosters has always reinvested back into the

industry through training and apprenticeships,

and supported the community with great

buildings.

That sense of purpose and commitment has

evolved into the establishment of the Foster

Group Trust, which comes from a conscious

decision to use their growth to invest back into

the community.

“I sort of see it as almost a cycle,” Leonard

says. “As we invest, the community supports

us so that we can continue to invest into the

community.”

One good example is that every employee gets

$500 each year to support something within

their immediate community.

“I guess it’s one of those things that gives a

little bit of purpose to the day job.”

The Trust fund also supports Smart Waikato,

the Boon Street Art Festival, the Community

Enterprise Leadership Programme and

Hamilton Gardens, among many others.

“Fosters strives to be a responsible corporate

citizen within the Waikato community,”

Leonard says. “And over 25 years, part of the

joy of business is seeing other businesses

grow as well as our own team grow and

flourish in our capabilities to support and grow

community.” •


18 | OUR STORY YOUR STORY

Champion

of Waikato business

... By Sandra Peek ...

Someone recently introduced

me as having “been an editor”

and I was slightly taken aback.

Technically she was correct but I

doubt that anyone who has been

in that role ever fully recovers –

once an editor, always an editor.

In October 1993 I was one of three experienced

journalists – with Grant Hubbard and Philippa

Stevenson – who formed Byword Publishing.

The Business Development Board, chaired

by David Braithwaite, wanted to outsource its

business newsletter and we were a suitably

enterprising trio.

David soon convinced the board we should be

given the masthead. It was a far-sighted move.

The Business Development Board is long gone

but Waikato Business News continues to be

the media’s strongest champion of Waikato

business. A good publication can act as the

glue in its community, building awareness

and knowledge, sparking connections,

presenting opportunities. Celebrating,

discussing, disagreeing, recording the life of

the community, its pages open to everyone.

Waikato Business News is that gem.

I was nominated editor by Grant and Philippa

in a totally democratic process. They both had

busy freelance and PR businesses and I had just

recently left the Waikato Times. I had the most

time available so I was it! Philippa dropped out

after a few months to focus on her freelancing

then, about a year after startup, Grant also

came to the reluctant conclusion that feeding

his family was incompatible with endless hours

of unprofitable slavery managing a fledgling

business newspaper. I gulped, but by then I

was hooked.

A monthly newspaper sounds like such a

leisurely enterprise. Sell some ads, write a few

stories, regularly catch up with interesting

people for coffee, drag money out of the rare

rogue who tries advertising in a last-ditch

effort to save his failing business.

How hard can it be? Actually, it can be a weeny

bit challenging at times. I was not only editor,

but owner, production manager and often

business manager, backup ad designer, backup

sales rep, and whatever else. I’m sure current

owner Deidre Morris wears a similar number

of hats.

But it was incredibly stimulating too.

It’s a huge privilege having access to the best

and most interesting business minds, both

locally and on a wider scale. Once trust is

established those relationships can produce

treasure troves of business intelligence.

My interest was always in knowing and

understanding business, so Waikato Business

News became a newspaper that hunted for

insights, case studies and practical knowledge

that would interest and help businesses. I was

delighted when I was told by one business

owner that every month he applied something

he’d learned from that month’s issue.

My ideal reader!

There were some people who were always

fantastic to interview, such as John Fletcher,

then HR director of NZ Dairy Group. Nothing

was off the table but our deal was that he

could read the copy before it went to print.

It was a rare concession on my part and highly


Waikato Business News 25 Years | 19

trusting on his, but it worked beautifully.

He was completely forthcoming and insightful.

Only once did he ask me to delete some copy

to save him from being fired!

With others, the interview was an opportunity

to sit back and think about things that never

ordinarily get aired: the toll their business

took on other parts of their life, the challenges

too sensitive to be allowed into any story,

paths not taken.

Like all free newspapers, we survived or

thrived on our ability to attract advertising.

We were incredibly lucky with some key

people in the sales manager role. Kim Hill,

who had previously started and grown her

own business, then later Deidre Morris.

They were particularly skilled at helping

clients understand the purpose and value

of our policy of not allowing editorial and

advertising to be linked. Clients often pushed

hard at that door, some because they simply

loved negotiating (I’m looking at you, Owen

Embling!), others because they’d been misled

by marketers or PR practitioners. To those

business people my response was always the

same: “We would love you to advertise but

we won’t accept your ad if it’s conditional on

editorial space. But, regardless of whether you

advertise, if your business has a good story

to tell we will run it.” And yes, we did lose

advertising because of that policy.

There were many others in our team who

made great contributions – journalists,

columnists, designers, sales reps,

photographers, admin and managers. And a

handful of people in the business community

who always had our back. The late Jim Grace,

a man of integrity and law, seemed to have

an uncanny sense of when a phone call to

comment encouragingly on the latest issue

would be most welcome.

The mechanics of producing a newspaper has

evolved hugely since the early 90s.

Then, it was much more time consuming and

manual. Stories, photos and advert content

was handed on a disk to an imaging service

and hours later it came back as bromides that

then needed to be cut up with a scalpel and

glued on to the paper layouts. By the time the

completed newspaper was ready to be driven

to the printer the floor was a sea of discarded

offcuts, many of them with glue attached! It

was a glorious leap forward for mankind when

computer technology made that process

redundant.

But after eight years of never allowing myself

a proper break I was ready to pass on the

torch. It has been so good for our business

community that Deidre Morris was the person

who took on the challenge. It takes guts,

humour, creativity and endless hard work

to reach the 25 year milestone. Well done

everyone who has helped it get there. •


It’s a huge

privilege

having

access to

the best

and most

interesting

business

minds.


20 | OUR STORY YOUR STORY

Fourteen years in the

hot seat

... By Mike Blake ...

It began in 2002 when at a family

gathering Deidre mentioned

she was looking for an editor

for the newly acquired Waikato

Business News.

My wife Eileen and I were quite comfortable

playing our roles in a corporate environment

in Auckland, but a move back to the great city

of Hamilton offered an even more comfortable

lifestyle…we thought.

the sound teaching of editor John Barrett,

news editor Ken Coates, chief reporter Claude

Coombes and others.

But this latest move to Hamilton was not

a done deal, really, until we saw what we

were getting ourselves into with Waikato

Business News.

On an early visit a copy of the paper was

reverently laid in front of me. It was a 16-page

tabloid newspaper with the potential to grow.

And as I had made several moves away and

back to Hamilton I felt I knew the town and

many of the key people making it buzz.

Eileen and I said yes and sealed the deal.

the other with early set ups…the hopes

and aspirations of young people willing to

get out and give it a go.

Meanwhile I went out, camera in hand, to

record as many business functions as possible

and include attendees’ faces in the paper.

The tactic worked as people were pleased to

see themselves in WBN and others, in turn,

wanted theirs to be there next time. This meant

they needed to attend some of the functions.

This also meant attendances went up and host

businesses got a better bang for their buck.

And people would seek out the paper which led

to ever-increasing circulation numbers.

So, a deal was agreed, hands were shaken, and

after our resignations were accepted by the

Auckland team, our Ponsonby home was put

up for rent and we moved to the town where it

all began (for me anyway).

I had joined the Waikato Times as a cadet

reporter in 1965 and a career emerged from

A couple of my first moves were to visit the

Waikato Chamber of Commerce and chat to

CEO David Robinson, then on to the Business

Development Centre and CEO Sandra Perry.

Both these organisations were geared to

direct me to business happenings throughout

the city. One with established businesses,

Advertisers received positive feedback and

everyone felt they were on a win…win...win.

Quite quickly, Deidre could see the benefit

of giving the paper a better look and began

printing on gloss paper. Another bonus

for advertisers and much better photo

reproduction.


SH1 to Auckland

N

The Boulevard

Te Rapa Road

Te Kowhai Road

Business News

I

April/may 2013 Volume 21: issue 4 www.wbn.co.nz

$20m expansion

keeps Sealed Air

ahead of market

Reading market

needs nationally

and around the

globe sets the

team at Sealed

Air, Te Rapa

ahead of the field.

By Mike Blake

n an exciting expansion

move, costing in

excess of $20 million

and involving planning and

designing a new plant as

well as upgrading existing

buildings, the company has

responded to the needs of

its customers in the growing

global dairying market.

Sector manager-ANZ

dairy John Dawson said:

“We saw the need for customer

security/retention and

realised that investment in

new technology would allow

Sealed Air to support clients’

growth, many of whom are

involved with dairy in the

local and more particularly

the international marketplace.

“And being in a very competitive

global market, this

investment gives us an edge,”

he said.

“While our research

and development team and

designers on site are thinking

globally and locally, a focus

has been on how to play to

New Zealand’s strengths in

the international dairy space.”

“With this investment we

have advanced our ability to

ON OFFICIAL opening day, visitors walk down the driveway in front of the new Sealed Air

multiwa l paper sack production facility at Te Rapa with renowned plastics man Bi l Foreman

centre front. – photo courtesy Rhys Palmer

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beverage for your business

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tailor-make solutions for that

market.”

“And our solutions fit

well,” said John.

Our expansion project

is one of the largest capital

investments undertaken globally

by Sealed Air for 2013.

“New equipment brought in

from Germany enables us to

produce 25kg multi-wall bags

for packaging export milk

powder far more accurately

and efficiently than we currently

do.

“These are high performance

bags made to the

strictest hygiene demands of

our dairy export sector,” said

John. “We make and deliver

and the client fills and

exports.”

There is enough demand

for the 25kg bags in the New

Zealand market alone to keep

the new production line rolling

24/7, according to John.

The project began back

in 2011 under the expert

supervision of manufacturing

director, Hamilton-Rotorua,

John Hall.

INSIDE

Torpedo 7 has

Raynes Precinct

on the move at

Titanium Park

“Planning began in earnest

and in 2011 with conceptual

designs drawn up and

requests for proposals advertised

for the manufacture of

the facility.

“By the end of 2011 contracts

were in place and

groundwork had begun,” he

said. “Building progressed

through 2012 and was completed

in November, about six

months ahead of projections.”

“And it needed to be,

considering the volumes

Continued on page 5

(centre pages)

Frustrated TGH

boss says:

“Consider the

big picture”

By Mike Blake

If you’re a business owner, club o represent an association you could

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The group expanded, firstly adding two

scientific magazines, NZ Bioscience magazine

and NZ Laboratory News. Then New Zealand

Grey Power came to us with a proposition

to write, produce and print their national

magazine.

Having the title of ‘Group Editor’ bestowed

upon me meant these were all my ‘babies’.

Earlier I had been elected to the board of the

Waikato Chamber of Commerce. This was

a good move and under the leadership of

Dr Steven Saunders (Dr SAS) along with the

expertise of several board members elected

from professional organisations within the city,

the Chamber progressed. After a few years

Steven retired and it became my turn at the

helm. Thank goodness for a strong team on the

board and in the office. When I stood down,

some six to eight years later the board very

kindly honoured me with life membership.

R

ecent claims that there

has not been enough

consultation on Tainui

Group Holdings’ proposed

development at Ruakura

seem to have lost sight of

the bigger picture and TGH

CEO Mike Pohio is encouraging

people to take a step

back and consider the project

in its entirety.

More than half of a l freight

in New Zealand is today transported

between Hamilton,

Tauranga and Auckland.

“Current volumes will

double over the next 20 years

and the real issue is understanding

that there are significant

value-add opportunities

for Waikato in what is

being carried in trucks and

on trains,” said Mike. “There

is also the issue about how

we most efficiently deal with

what is coming at us.”

Ruakura has direct access

to the existing East Coast main

trunk railway which connects

Waikato and Bay of Plenty to

We lington and Auckland.

Simsey

TGH CEO Mike Pohio

The Waikato Expressway

wi l run alongside it which wi l

give a direct motorway link

into Auckland.

“That means Ruakura wi l

take a lot of that freight off

local roads,” said Mike.

“Value-add benefits from

the proposed Ruakura development

wi l be shared by many

people and organisations in

Waikato,” he said. “This project

has strong elements of

national benefit and it is certainly

hugely important regiona

ly.”

In total, the development is

estimated to a tract more than

$3 bi lion of direct investment,

Continued on page 39

Church Road


I felt I knew

the town and

many of the key

people making

it buzz.

Eileen and I are ‘semi-retired’ now and live in

a great spot at the rapidly forming Tamahere

Country Club. •


22 | OUR STORY YOUR STORY

1995

GORDON CHESTERMAN

“ We profile the

marketing maestro

who rides a Harley

Davidson “

The Waikato-

Tainui Raupatu

Claims Settlement

Act is passed by

Parliament.

1997

DIGGING IN

OUR STORY,

YOUR STORY

Brothers build marketresponsive

drainage

business

25 years of business, sporting and

cultural highlights in Waikato


Waikato Business News 25 Years | 23

1999

Hobbiton set

is built near

Matamata for

filming of Lord

Of The Rings

trilogy (guided

tours start on

2002).

2000

Single sculler

Rob Waddell wins

Olympic gold in

Sydney.

2001

ROBOTICS FUTURE

2001

Fonterra is established

in October 2001 following

the merger of the

country’s two largest

dairy co-operatives,

Waikato-based New

Zealand Dairy Group and

Kiwi Cooperative Dairies,

with the New Zealand

Dairy Board.

Gallagher Academy of

Performing Arts opens at

University of Waikato.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 30

Collaboration boosts

sector’s potential

1999

ALAN GRANT

Pam Corbett talks to the man

driving the growth of Lollipop’s

Playlands in New Zealand and

Australia

2002

Publishers change at

Waikato Business News

Waikato Business Publications

purchases the publishing assets

and rights from Sandra Peek’s

Byword Publishing Ltd

Waikato Stadium opens

with a Super 12 rugby match

between the Chiefs and the

Crusaders.


Te Waka

builds for future

Hamish Bell

Waikato is coming of age, with Te Waka wellpoised

to aid the region’s future development.

The potential is huge, with industries across

the region that are of national size and scale,

says the regional development agency’s chair,

Hamish Bell.

He points to established industries like

agriculture and horticulture, construction,

health and education as major contributors.

He also notes that specialised manufacturing,

manufacturing and food technology, IT

and the rapidly growing distribution and

logistics industry are all industries to watch

as companies look to the Waikato as a key

geographic hub.

Hamish says in recent years there has been an

increasing awareness of the region’s economic

scale, and of its livability and attractiveness.

That is seeing professionals and business

owners flocking to the Waikato – attracted by

strong business growth and the highly desirable

lifestyle the region offers.

Te Waka is playing a vital role and creating

impact by building relationships with iwi, local

and central government and business.

“We believe that economic development is a

foundation for broader wellbeing,” Hamish says.

Our role as an economic development agency

should be as an enabler and connector. To say,

how can we enhance economic development,

and use that as a basis to provide further

leverage to build the Waikato, to create

employment and wellbeing.”

Challenges come from the region’s diversity,

including its geographic spread and large

number of stakeholders – though he notes that

a growing level of collaboration can make a real

difference, citing the recent win for the region

in attracting the national head office for the

New Zealand Institute of Skills & Technology, a

collaborative effort with iwi and Hamilton City.

“We're here to lift economic performance

across the region, support and enable business

and industry growth, and attract business and

investment,” Hamish says.

He cites the Ruakura inland port development

as an example of the role Te Waka can play.

The port will be a major employer and save

distribution costs in the North Island, but will

also enable the attraction of further industry

providing further jobs. “It is a very significant

project that has major ramifications. We put

time and attention into that, it has a very big

dollar return.”

Te Waka recently brought together the

chief executives of key freight and logistics

companies together with key freight owners

in a forum to discuss the economic benefits

of Ruakura as a logistics and supply chain

proposition. They looked at how Te Waka could

work in partnership with industry to accelerate

the port development’s impact on the region’s

economy.

Despite a range of successes, Hamish says Te

Waka, formed two years ago, is the newest

economic development agency in the country

and has been on a learning cycle.

To meet its goals, it has launched a revised

strategy, with a tighter focus on creating

impacts that drive wellbeing outcomes in the

next two to five years, and provide a platform

for the future.

“We're laying a foundation now to have a

much stronger partnership with iwi, with

government agencies and with business and

local government.

“It's fantastic the region has finally got together

behind one economic development agency.

“The biggest opportunity for us is, if we work

together off the base we have created, we have

more inherent natural talent in so many ways

than any other region. So it's time for that to

happen.

“Te Waka is not meant to be the icing on

the cake. We are a platform - the board that

the cake can sit on, that helps bring people

together and to enhance and champion the

best of what's already there.” •


Boosting

the city centre

LEFT

A bustling Victoria on the River has helped connect the city to the Waikato River.

ABOVE

The CBD Awards have become an annual fixture.

Hamilton Central Business Association

has played a vital role in a sustained

burst of central Hamilton activity since

the association’s inception in 2008.

HCBA represents the businesses based in

the central city, to be their voice on issues of

strategic importance to the CBD, to promote

the businesses and their offerings to the public

and to contribute to and collaborate on projects

that support the city centre business economy.

It is uniquely positioned as an organisation that

can work with the local business community,

the Hamilton City Council and other key

players and investors in the city to ensure

the CBD is a desirable commercial business

hub, shopping, dining and entertainment

destination. HCBA does this by building strong,

effective relationships to support, advocate and

promote the central city on behalf of the 1,200

business and property owners that make up the

membership.

HCBA has plenty to point to as it promotes

the city centre as a bustling, active, innovative,

vibrant place that offers exceptional businesses

and experiences.

The CBD has gone on a journey of rebuild and

development, from businesses to buildings,

from residential to commercial, and there is no

sign of that slowing down.

Among a slew of current projects, office block

Tristram Precinct is due for completion in early

2021, and earthworks are underway for Union

Square, with its first tenants to be AA Insurance

and Rabobank. Also in the immediate pipeline is

a build for ACC, along with the much anticipated

start to work on the Waikato Regional Theatre.

Apartment living has also been boosted with

new builds including the mixed-use Parkhaven

and London Central. Meanwhile, retail has seen

the opening of Riverbank Lane, as well as the

redevelopment of Centre Place and an increase

in boutique style independent retailers. Wide

ranging hospitality offerings contribute to

the vibrant landscape of the central city with

eateries Gothenburg, Banh Mi Caphe, Mr Pickles

and Palate all boasting views of the Waikato

River.

Two parks have been developed on Victoria

Street. HCBA was on the Embassy Park

Working Group and Riff Raff Trust during a

redevelopment of the park in a collaboration of

community, business and local government.

Following that was the development of Victoria

on the River, which has created a further

valuable link to the river.

HCBA General Manager Vanessa Williams and

BELOW

The Chinese Lantern Festival adds life and colour to the city centre.

her team have shown off the central city with

their annual awards held on consecutive years

in high-profile venues Riverbank Lane, Hamilton

Hotel and the former IRD building, capped off

in 2020 with a transparent marquee on the

riverside.

They also provide an annual activation

programme which sees more than 100 events

held in the four main public spaces in the CBD:

Garden Place, Victoria on the River, Embassy

Park and Civic Square.

HCBA is a non-political organisation driven by a

voluntary executive committee contributing to

the revitalisation, support and promotion of the

Hamilton CBD. •

www.hamiltoncentral.co.nz


Community and

relationships at Stark

Property’s core

In 2010, while in the process of looking for a suitable central city office space for

his father’s company, Matt Stark and wife Jaimee realised the lack of commercial

leasing opportunities in the city with the option of full office design and fit out.

There was a need for well-designed workspaces throughout the CBD.

The first space they worked on took the form

of an events space with meeting rooms and a

full cafe, located on the top floor of a fivestorey

office building overlooking Garden Place

in central Hamilton.

In 2012, the first commercial property was

purchased in central Hamilton marking

the beginning of Stark Property and the

development of multiple buildings and unique

spaces. Over the years, Stark Property has

developed a passion for revitalising the

Hamilton CBD with a vision of utilising the

city’s most beautiful natural asset - the river -

for all Hamiltonians to enjoy.

Projects include award-winning South Bloc; the

Knox Street property underwent a full internal

and external refurbishment in 2016. The

redevelopment was completed while working

above a fully operating private hospital. The

completed project has received multiple

architecture and design awards.

Since then, Stark Property has taken on

numerous notable projects including Tristram

Precinct at 20,000sqm, with multiple

substantial tenants bringing more than

750 workers into the Hamilton CBD. The

Riverbanks development comprising boutique

retail and hospitality through a laneway

connects the public to the Victoria on the River

civic development and provides sought-after

premium office space with some of the best

views in the city, overlooking the Waikato

River.

Stark Property’s Panama brand offers

exceptional co-working with thoughtfully

designed work spaces and flexible contracts,

catering to businesses across a range of

industries and providing professional,

innovative and functional spaces. The Panama

team looks after day-to-day operations so

businesses can focus on what they do best.

Panama has grown substantially, with more

than 40 businesses represented and working

from beautiful locations throughout the CBD.

Hills Village is Stark Property’s first residential

development. Nestled on the brink of the

Waikato River with direct access to the city

centre, the collection of high-end apartments

is the first of it’s kind in Hamilton. The

pocket-neighbourhood is a master-planned

community of residential living, work-live

apartments and commercial offices. The

project continues to contribute to the

transformation of Hamilton East, providing

another great connection to the river and

again adding to the revitalisation of the

Hamilton city centre.


Panama Square

Tristram Precinct

Revitalisation of the Hamilton CBD remains at the core of Stark Property.

Fostering a sense of community, working closely with others and building

meaningful relationships is at the heart of everything we do. •

www.starkproperty.co.nz

Hills Apartments


Pencarrow House -Tamahere, Waikato

PLACEMAKING for people

People and community are

at the heart of Hamiltonbased

PAUA Architects and

their designwork.

NZ Clean Energy Centre - Taupo

These have also been driving values for

principal architect Antanas Procuta since

his return to the Waikato 25 years ago and

these values have seen the practice being

commissioned a range of standout projects.

The ‘people and community’ approach saw

PAUA Architects focus on creating a sense

of neighbourhood when masterplanning the

Jack’s Landing development near Rotoroa

(Hamilton Lake), and PAUA is taking the same

attitude to a village development with the Brian

Perry Charitable Trust using modular homes.

A similar project awarded through a design

competition is a sustainable mixed-use

neighbourhood in Taupō. With about 60

households and a commercial centre with half

a dozen shops, and apartments above, it was

to be an exemplar development for the council

using a concept of neighbourhood enclaves,

as well as environmental strategies throughout

the design.

“This idea of community is very important,”

Antanas says. “It's really about creating

identity and enhancing a sense of ‘home’.

Too often what happens with housing

developments is there's no sense of character

or neighbourliness.

“Architecture is ultimately about people and the

way we live - it's really important to remember

that it's not foremost about buildings.”

Taupō is also the site for the NZ Clean

Energy Centre, which reflects PAUA’s strong

environmental interest - “a common thread

through all our work”.

A building to both showcase clean energy

- such as bio-fuels - and to provide a base

for clean energy research organisations,

the Clean Energy Centre was built using

recycled concrete and primarily heavy timber

construction rather than steel.

Heat is drawn via a ground-source heat-pump

from below the building, and the facility uses

solar and wind power.

The Clean Energy Centre is another example of

a project PAUA Architects has won through a

design competition, and Antanas is proud that

the practice does well against much larger firms

in such competitions.


Waikato Business News 25 Years | 29

Similar ideas to the Taupō build were used

when PAUA supported Hukanui Primary School

in developing its ecoclassroom, ”The Living

Room”, built with untreated macrocarpa rather

than treated pine, and incorporating an earth

brick wall. PAUA is also supporting the Fairfield

Project, a proposed environmental education

centre providing educational opportunities for

surrounding schools, tertiary institutions and

the broader community.

The sustainability thread runs through PAUA

Architects’ extensive residential portfolio,

including a Cambridge house that gained

the country’s first HomeFit PLUS rating, and

a 6-HomeStar-rated Pencarrow home, both

ratings from the NZ Green Building Council.

Aotea Bach - Aotea Harbour, Waikato

Linked to its environmental commitment is an

interest in heritage work, including a number

of historic houses around the Waikato and the

recent award-winning renovation of St Mary’s

Convent Chapel in Hamilton.

Meanwhile, a long-standing relationship with

Waikato iwi and hapū includes marae and

whare design work by senior architect Richard

Mauriohooho, and now sees PAUA designing

the new Cambridge police base, a partnership

between New Zealand Police and Waikato-

Tainui, with Tainui Group Holdings as landlord.

PAUA Architects appointed a business

development manager this year, among other

recruitments that will see it increase in size to

around 10 practitioners. The practice is busy

post-lockdown with a range of projects, and

Covid-19 has motivated PAUA Architects to

reflect and focus on the future.

Newly appointed business development

manager Phil Mackay says: “I think the Covidchanged

world probably brought more focus to

the practice in terms of how we best respond

to client and community requirements,

what our strengths are as a practice, and the

direction of work that is important for the

future, which is ultimately about sustainability

and new ideas for living and building.”

At the core of any PAUA project is the same

concern.

“It's about placemaking; getting to the essence

of what underlies a client's brief, the essential

characteristics of the site and its context,”

Antanas says.

“Whatever our clients are involved in, it's

actually working really closely with a client to

understand what's really important for them,

and untangling the knots of their requirements

to create order and connnections and beauty

all at the same time.” •

pauaarchitects.co.nz

3 Anzac Parade, Hamilton

office@PAUAarchitects.co.nz

T 07 839 6521


30 | OUR STORY YOUR STORY

2003

2008

SLUDGE TO

SAND

City firm

revolutionises

waste treatment

2008

Waikato-based

Caroline and

Georgina

Evers-Swindell

win double

sculls Olympic

gold in Beijing

- backing up

their first gold

in 2004.

2004

NICOLA PERE

Hamilton mum

goes global with

baby bibs business

2009

PETER MOLAN

Manuka honey’s

medical marvels

measured in gold

2004

Sarah Ulmer is the first

New Zealander to win

an Olympic cycling

gold medal, in the 3km

individual pursuit in

Athens.

Titanium Park industrial

precinct is established

at Hamilton airport.

First building opens at

Waikato Innovation Park.

4 The WAIKATO BUSINESS NEWS October 15 – November 15, 2009

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4

Spread over three levels, this residence occupies a

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over fantastic views of the river and the iconic Fairfield

bridge. The lavish interior with award winning kitchen

and up to the minute chattels complete with lift will

definitely win your heart over. Tenders close 4.00pm, 5th

November 2009 contact Tony Kerapa, Harcourts Real

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GET YOUR TOP OFF!

One of the best looking hard top convertibles on

the road is the New Peugeot 308 CC. World class

safety features, impeccable drive and excellent fuel

economy. The New 308 CC is going to be the big

head turner this Spring/Summer. To book a test

drive contact Waikato Motor Group, 07 849 7733,

e-mail matt@wmg.co.nz, www.wmg.co.nz.

Waikato

Business News

The

October 15 – November 15, 2009 Volume 17: issue 10

Kudos Awards

special

Pages,16 and 17

Employment

Law

with

Anne

Aitken

Page 10

Investment

with

Stuart

Anderson

Page 14

Export Feature

www.wbn.co.nz

the standard is set

Manuka honey is one of the world’s great

Pages 20 – 22

Tax Law

With

PwC

health honeys and has become a well known

food icon of New Zealand. Now the scientist

who discovered the original manuka activity

has put his name to a Gold Standard that

defines the unique bioactivities identified in his

research and will give customers confidence in

the honey product they are purchasing.

Read ‘Manuka honey’s medical and health

Page 12

marvels’ on Page 5.


SH1 to Auckland

N

Te Kowhai Road

Waikato Business News 25 Years | 31

Employment

Law

with Anne

Aitken

Page 6

Waikato

Business News

The

JAnuary 15, 2010 – February 15, 2010 Volume 18: issue 1

www.wbn.co.nz

But Putaruru Blue Spring is world class

Emissions

Trading

The cost of

progress

Page 8

By MIKE BLAKE

A desire to ‘make something good for people’ saw property man Ian Riley

dip his toe into the water...literally.

Jus three years ago he invested in a Putaruru company, New Zealand Quality

Waters Ltd, that was bottling natural spring water to world class standards.

Ian also reckons that 20 years in project management with major oil companies,

developing major petroleum industry infrastructure throughout Australasia and

South East Asia has given him an excellent grounding for this type of business.

Importan to the company’s success is the source of water...the famous Blue

Spring from which water of the utmost purity has flowed for thousands of years.

How chopsticks

and forks can

work together

Page 7

Photograph by Edward Aish (Pro-Vision)

Investment

Getting an

edge on the

market

Page 9

Continued on Page 5

UK business

migrants

Show interest

in Hamilton

Page 16

2013

DAIRY DRIVER

New plant,

upgrade, aimed

at global market

Business News

I

April/may 2013 Volume 21: issue 4 www.wbn.co.nz

$20m expansion

keeps Sealed Air

ahead of market

Reading market

needs nationally

and around the

globe sets the

team at Sealed

Air, Te Rapa

ahead of the field.

By Mike Blake

n an exciting expansion

move, costing in

excess of $20 million

and involving planning and

designing a new plant as

well as upgrading existing

buildings, the company has

responded to the needs of

its customers in the growing

global dairying market.

Sector manager-ANZ

dairy John Dawson said:

“We saw the need for customer

security/retention and

realised that investment in

new technology would allow

Sealed Air to support clients’

growth, many of whom are

involved with dairy in the

local and more particularly

the international marketplace.

“And being in a very competitive

global market, this

investment gives us an edge,”

he said.

“While our research

and development team and

designers on site are thinking

globally and locally, a focus

has been on how to play to

New Zealand’s strengths in

the international dairy space.”

“With this investment we

have advanced our ability to

ON OFFICIAL opening day, visitors walk down the driveway in front of the new Sealed Air

multiwall paper sack production facility at Te Rapa with renowned plastics man Bill Foreman

centre front. – photo courtesy Rhys Palmer

tailor-make solutions for that

market.”

“And our solutions fit

well,” said John.

Our expansion project

is one of the largest capital

investments undertaken globally

by Sealed Air for 2013.

“New equipment brought in

from Germany enables us to

produce 25kg multi-wall bags

for packaging export milk

powder far more accurately

and efficiently than we currently

do.

“These are high performance

bags made to the

strictest hygiene demands of

our dairy export sector,” said

John. “We make and deliver

and the client fills and

exports.”

There is enough demand

for the 25kg bags in the New

Zealand market alone to keep

the new production line rolling

24/7, according to John.

The project began back

in 2011 under the expert

supervision of manufacturing

director, Hamilton-Rotorua,

John Hall.

INSIDE

Torpedo 7 has

Raynes Precinct

on the move at

Titanium Park

R

“Planning began in earnest

and in 2011 with conceptual

designs drawn up and

requests for proposals advertised

for the manufacture of

the facility.

“By the end of 2011 contracts

were in place and

groundwork had begun,” he

said. “Building progressed

through 2012 and was completed

in November, about six

months ahead of projections.”

“And it needed to be,

considering the volumes

Continued on page 5

(centre pages)

Frustrated TGH

boss says:

“Consider the

big picture”

By Mike Blake

ecent claims that there

has not been enough

consultation on Tainui

Group Holdings’ proposed

development at Ruakura

seem to have lost sight of

the bigger picture and TGH

CEO Mike Pohio is encouraging

people to take a step

back and consider the project

in its entirety.

More than half of all freight

in New Zealand is today transported

between Hamilton,

Tauranga and Auckland.

“Current volumes will

double over the next 20 years

and the real issue is understanding

that there are significant

value-add opportunities

for Waikato in what is

being carried in trucks and

on trains,” said Mike. “There

is also the issue about how

we most efficiently deal with

what is coming at us.”

Ruakura has direct access

to the existing East Coast main

trunk railway which connects

Waikato and Bay of Plenty to

Wellington and Auckland.

TGH CEO Mike Pohio

The Waikato Expressway

will run alongside it which will

give a direct motorway link

into Auckland.

“That means Ruakura will

take a lot of that freight off

local roads,” said Mike.

“Value-add benefits from

the proposed Ruakura development

will be shared by many

people and organisations in

Waikato,” he said. “This project

has strong elements of

national benefit and it is certainly

hugely important regionally.”

In total, the development is

estimated to attract more than

$3 billion of direct investment,

Continued on page 39

If you’re a business owner, club or represent an association you could

HAMILTON become a Gilmours member, it’s FREE!

Church Road

CONTINUED ON PAGE 40

Sourcing food and

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Monday: 8am-8pm

Tuesday to Friday: 8am-6pm

Saturday: 8am-4pm

2009

Council and

iwi planning

initiative

Future Proof

is launched.

2010

BLUE SPRING

Property man

invests in water

2013

Hamilton born and raised

Kimbra wins Grammys for

Record of the Year and Best

Pop Duo/Group Performance

with Australian musician

Gotye.

Community foundation

Momentum Waikato is

established

OUR STORY,

YOUR STORY

Hamilton

& Waikato

Tourism is

established.

25 years of business, sporting and

cultural highlights in Waikato


32 | OUR STORY YOUR STORY

Powering

100

the

years

region for

WEL Networks is marking a proud 100 year

history of bringing electricity to the Waikato in

2020, a history that sees it poised to continue

to deliver to the region as a 100 percent

community owned company.

Once a traditional lines company, it is

moving with the times to become an energy

services business, all while giving back to the

community and playing a key role in the region’s

economic and social development.

The story of the introduction of electricity

supply to the Waikato began in 1912 when the

Borough of Frankton started constructing lines

and a generating plant with the first residential

property receiving electricity supply in 1913. In

February 1920 a meeting was held to consider a

proposal to constitute an Electric Power District

for portions of the Waikato and Waipa Counties.

This meeting 100 years ago resulted in the

formation of the Waikato Electric Power Board,

which later became the Central Waikato Electric

Power Board (CWEPB).

A CWEPB employee

working on an air break

switch in the 1970s.

• In 1931 the power board sold 10 million units

of electricity – by 1961 this had grown to 145

million.

• In 1967 the power board installed its first

computer system.

• In April 1974, a 33 kilovolt supply was

switched on to supplement the 11 kilovolt

system that had operated since the 1920s.

• In 1989, an amalgamation with the Hamilton

City Council Electricity Department saw

the formation of Waikato Electricity Limited

(WEL).

• In 1998 the Electricity Industry Reform Act

required WEL to sell off its retail business

and thus lose direct contact with its

customers.

Today WEL’s electricity network spans the

region from Maramarua in the north to just

south of Hamilton city, from Raglan in the

west to Tauhei in the east. It connects more

than 93,000 residential properties and small

businesses, plus more than 800 commercial

and industrial sites, delivering more than 1,200

Gigawatt hours of electricity annually.

WEL Networks continues to identify and invest

in new technologies to serve the future needs

of its communities and customer expectations.

An example is the Te Uku wind park near

Raglan. The 28-turbine park was built in

partnership with Meridian. WEL owns and

manages the electrical lines and substation

within the wind park and the high voltage line

connecting to the national grid.

Climate goals, coupled with the acceleration

of electrification, solar, batteries and EVs, are

changing the energy landscape.

Energy hardship is a significant issue in the

region, which is why WEL Networks continues

to upscale its low-cost electricity retailer,

OurPower, following a successful trial period.

So far more than 2000 OurPower customers,

many of whom face energy hardship, have

saved over $1.1 million, and WEL Networks is

embarking on further customer growth. This

includes a solar farm plan - partnering with

community-minded Waikato land owners to

produce electricity through solar generation

that will help provide cheaper power to

OurPower customers.


LEFT

Then and now: Fixing powerlines in the past and today.

BELOW

A 1924 work vehicle and WEL’s new 100% electric truck.

...

Benefit goes back

to community

The company’s micro-grid project is another

example of adapting to a changing environment

by integrating new solar and battery energy

storage system technology into the traditional

network to harness renewable power.

To support EV growth, the company has

invested in the growth of an electric vehicle

charger network with 25 chargers located

across the Waikato, and, in partnership with

Counties Power, has an EV charging app -

OpenLoop.

“We’re proud of our contribution to the Waikato

region over the last century and for our track

record of innovation and achievement,” says

WEL Networks chief executive, Garth Dibley.

Our communities remain at the heart of our

business decisions, ensuring they continue to

benefit and thrive from our ongoing success.”

www.wel.co.nz

The Waikato community gets the benefit

of WEL Networks running as a successful

energy services business.

WEL Energy Trust has for 20 years been

giving back via grants, investments and

discounts as sole shareholder of the

company.

The nature of the return to the community

has changed over time, but the key is that

trustees own the company on behalf of the

community, says WEL Energy Trust chief

executive Raewyn Jones.

She points to substantial investments

over the past 20 years, including Waikato

Innovation Park and Momentum Waikato,

both of which WEL Energy Trust was

instrumental in setting up.

Expanding into the delivery of ultrafast

fibre was another significant development,

Raewyn says. “The network was built ahead

of time and budget. During Covid, it proved

its worth - we've had world class fibre.”

WEL Energy Trust became the sole

shareholder of WEL Networks in 2000

although community ownership was not

a certainty after regulatory changes in the

early 1990s.

WEL’s predecessor companies were

essentially community owned, but with the

reforms of the 1990s there was a move away

from community ownership, with the WEL

Energy Trust owning a third of the company,

a US energy company owning a third and

the remaining third owned by customers.

Through a process of complex and often

acrimonious ownership battles through the

1990s, ownership finally reverted to the

community at the turn of this century.

“From the company perspective, WEL

Networks runs as a successful business but

it's 100 percent the community that gets

the benefit of that,” Raewyn says. “That’s

something people should be proud of.” •

www.welenergytrust.co.nz

This year WEL Networks sold its UltraFast

Fibre share so it can further unlock its energy

potential, deliver to the changing needs of

customers and a changing landscape, and

continue its journey towards a sustainable

and innovative energy future.

Raewyn Jones also points to the Trust’s

significant contribution to the establishment

of the Waikato Wellbeing Project, which is

focused on helping the region work towards

the UN’s sustainable development goals,

as a highlight of recent years. “That's the

Trust taking a leadership role within the

community and bringing people together.”

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern at the launch of

the Waikato Wellbeing Project in February 2020.


34 | OUR STORY YOUR STORY

Hamilton

BORN AND BRED

Chedworth Properties has been dedicated to

the growth of Hamilton city since the 1960s.

First at the helm were Hector Webb and

Duncan Murray, both seriously influential in the

development of the city, with developments

under the Chedworth Properties umbrella over

the years having included the Hillcrest Basin,

Chedworth, Pukete, Fairview Downs, Sherwood,

Coleraine, St James, and Horsham Estate.

Today, director Jon Webb and development

manager Tony McLauchlan are steering the

company using the same family philosophy

which focuses on delivering sections for those

in the mid-market.

Chedworth Properties’ latest development is

Greenhill Park which offers 2000 sites over 136

hectares in north east Hamilton.

This is the city’s first medium density suburb

and already 500 sections have been

developed and sold.

A proud point of interest is that Chedworth

Properties has sold more than 6000 sections

in its various development projects within

Hamilton City’s boundary since the company

began business in the 1960s. According

to Jon Webb the company has had many

opportunities over the years to take their

expertise elsewhere.

“But we have stuck loyally to Hamilton, the

place we can honestly call home,” he said.

“It has been satisfying to grow with the city

and see so many people take advantage of our

developments.”

Chedworth Properties itself has grown with

the City. In its early years it would build

around 20 sections per year, however as the

City has grown so has Chedworth Properties’

operations to keep up with demand, now

building around 100 sections per year.

Chedworth Properties’ long history in land

development in Hamilton has also seen it

at the forefront of many of the changes.

It has been satisfying

to grow with the city


Waikato Business News 25 Years | 35

Certainly the rules and regulations governing

land development have changed dramatically

between the 1960s and today and Chedworth

Properties has had to adapt to these changes.

Gone are the days of a simple subdivision

application being quickly prepared and

processed by Council, with Chedworth

Properties now engaging a raft of Urban

Design, Planning, Engineering, Geotech,

Landscape, Ecology, Survey, Transport and

Legal experts to prepare applications and assist

in the delivery of its subdivisions.

Jon strongly believes that the Chedworth’s

team of consultants and contractors is one

of the key reasons why Chedworth has been

successful. As he says, “they all take immense

pride in their work and are passionate about

delivering communities which people will

enjoy living in”.

Jon also sees Waikato Business News as

part of this team, having had a long standing

relationship with them and he is therefore not

at all surprised that they are celebrating more

than 25 years of success in Waikato alongside

the likes of Chedworth Properties.

Certainly during Chedworth’s time in business

in Hamilton it has seen a significant change

as New Zealanders have come to grips with

living on smaller sites and affordable housing

has become more of an issue. While smaller

sections are part of the solution to affordable

housing, the design of roads and storm

water infrastructure, in particular, also play

an important role. The design of subdivisions

therefore now requires a lot more attention to

detail and co-ordination of infrastructure which

Chedworth Properties achieves through the

use of design guidelines and a design review

committee.

Jon says that Chedworth Properties is providing

people with a superior level of amenity, setting

new standards for subdivision in Hamilton.

The completed houses give an excellent

indication of the effort that has gone into

landscaping and design.

“There is a stunning variety of house designs,

floor plans and materials on display,” said

Jon. “A great deal of care has been taken with

landscaping and fencing.”

Rather than just rely on covenants to ensure

quality design, Chedworth Properties utilises

a design review committee which requires

builders to have their designs accepted at three

stages: concept, detail and final.

“We’re not trying to create palaces, but we are

trying to ensure that the houses facilitate a

better community and interact better with each

other and their environment,” says Tony.

“In managing business this way we are going to

ensure that Greenhill Park is done well and is an

exceptional place to live.

“We want people who live at Greenhill Park to

be proud of their homes,” he said.

This latest Chedworth Properties undertaking

comes after a long line of successes across

Hamilton and with many more sections still to

build at Greenhill Park, Chedworth Properties

will continue to play an important role in

Hamilton’s future. •


36 | OUR STORY YOUR STORY

Waipā

A DISTRICT ON THE MOVE

Waipā has gone from strength to strength in the past

25 years, with a list of achievements that includes the

opening of the Avantidrome outside Cambridge and the Sir

Don Rowlands Centre at Karapiro, along with high-profile

industrial builds for Visy and APL.

Lake Rotopiko


The Avantidrome

Waipā economic development manager Steve Tritt at Lakewood

The equine industry is

important to the district

It has been growing strongly as New

Zealanders have recognised its appeal as a

place to live, and growth in tourism has added

to a solid agricultural base.

Residential cells continue to be opened up,

while industrial development is roaring ahead

at the airport precinct and Hautapu, and

mixed-use style apartment living received a

boost from the Lakewood development close

to central Cambridge.

“The district has a strong agricultural sector

and is an attractive place to live,” Mayor Jim

Mylchreest says.

“We are building a reputation for being the

home of champions and also as a sport-related

visitor industry, with major sporting events

coming to Waipā, and Cambridge in particular.”

Waipā regularly hosts elite sporting events,

including international track cycling at the

Avantidrome and the World Rowing Champs at

Lake Karapiro in 2010.

The district boasts rowing, canoeing and

cycling high-performance centres, and its

sporting facilities includes the ASB Stadium

Te Awamutu Events Centre, seating up to 800

spectators.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 38

Te Awamutu library


FROM PAGE 37

Cycling has enjoyed a boom thanks partly to

the Avantidrome and the building of Te Awa

cycleway, the Hamilton section of which is

under construction. Cycleways are also being

built and upgraded to Lake Ngaroto and

Pirongia.

Meanwhile, the district’s picturesqueness has

seen Cambridge pick up Most Beautiful Large

Town and Best Street in consecutive years in

the Keep New Zealand Beautiful Awards.

Mylchreest says the district’s attractiveness

as a place to live has been boosted in recent

years by the building of amenities including a

new library and swimming pools.

The new pool, nearing completion in

Cambridge, is an indoor facility including

a 25 metre pool, and learners and toddlers

pools, which will add to the existing 50 metre

outdoor pool.

In neighbouring Te Awamutu, a $4.4 million

rebuild in 2016 transformed the town’s

library, while its museum showcases the

rich social history of Waipā, including an

exploration of the New Zealand Land Wars.

Industrial activity is set to remain an

important part of the district’s future,

including development around the

airport and at Hautapu. Mylchreest says

the developments are providing an

impetus for jobs in the district, while the

expressway is an important transport

linkage enabling ready access to Auckland

and Tauranga.

While the land’s productivity means

much of it is farmed, the district has

also supported environmental projects

including the iconic Sanctuary Mountain

Maungatautari, which plays an important

New Zealand conservation role thanks

to its pest-proof fence. “The other area

that we've worked hard on over the last

25 years is protecting the peat lakes that

are left in the district.” That includes

Lake Rotopiko, near Ohaupo, where the

National Wetland Trust have eradicated

pests to form a wetland garden which is

now a safe haven for native wildlife.


The district

has a strong

agricultural

sector and is

an attractive

place to live

But it is the primary sector that remains the

district’s foundation, Jim says. Dairying is a

cornerstone, with the equine thoroughbred

industry also important, and horticulture,

including blueberry and kiwifruit growing,

gaining in significance.

“Producing top quality food for the world is

the strength long term for Waipā.” •

Stories of the Land Wars are also among 169

unique stories shared in Te Ara Wai Journeys,

a free self-guided tour of Waipā sites.

“Being able to tell those stories to the

community has been really important,” Jim

Mylchreest says.

Since it was launched in December 2019,

thousands of people have taken the journey

via the website.

Cambridge’s award-winning main street


94%

OF PRINT READERS

TALK ABOUT

WHAT THEY READ

IN MAGAZINES OR

NEWSPAPERS

SOURCE : TWOSIDES UK


SH1 to Auckland

N

The Boulevard

Te Rapa Road

SH1 to Auckland

N

busine s

The Boulevard

Te Rapa Road

Te Kowhai Road

Te Kowhai Road

40 | OUR STORY YOUR STORY

OUR STORY,

YOUR STORY

25 years of business, sporting and

cultural highlights in Waikato

2016

BUILDING COMMUNITY

Leadership focus of

university-business

partnership

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2016 VOLUME 24: ISSUE 8 WWW.WBN.CO.NZ FACEBOOK.COM/WAIKATOBUSINESSNEWS

2014

IT’S A SITTER

Babysitting service

wins at Young

Enterprise trade fair

Business News

J

August/September 2014 Volume 22: issue 8 www.wbn.co.nz

Kidding about

creates unique

‘best business’

JUST KIDDING Babysitting girls from Waikato Diosecan School for Girls

BaBysitting is Big Business

ust ask the Waikato hard on their marketing and

winners of the Lion have created an attractive and

Foundation Young unique business. Providing a

Enterprise Scheme Trade smart solution for busy families

Fair.

has been at the heart of their

Just Kidding Babysitting, of winning entry,” Mary said.

Waikato Diocesan School for Chop Top, of Putaruru

Girls, was voted top business College, was named runner

at the fair, held at the Hamilton up at the fair, with their stall

Night Markets for the first time selling recycled native timber

in August.

chopping boards proving popular.

The trade fair gave almost

25 teams of budding entrepreneurs

from Waikato secondary native timber from an old home

“They have used recycled

schools a chance to tout their to create some beautiful product,”

Mary said.

wares before thousands of market

goers.

Students operated market

YES regional co-ordinator stalls alongside regular night

Mary Jensen, of Smart Waikato market stallholders, selling a

Trust, was impressed by the range of products and services,

effort of all teams but a judging from chocolate and perfume to

panel of business leaders unanimously

decided Just Kidding About 250 years 12 and

a light up chilly bin.

Babysitting was the best. 13 students from throughout

“Competition was tough the region are involved in the

but this team has worked extra

Continued to page 3

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INSIDE

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Mediaworks

Page 5

Check your

coffee

calendar

Page 7

HCBA

Awards

Pages 14 -15

Waipa

Business

Awards

Page 19

Mayor speaks

on Central City

transformation

Page 30

Christmas

events and

venues

A FIT AND HEALTHY team celebrate the birth of Fitness Journal… the latest addition to

Waikato Business Publications’ stable (from left) sales director, Deidre Morris; editor, Lisa

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Page 33

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Church Road

Long established Waikato

publishing company Waikato

Business Publications has

launched the first edition

of new monthly title Fitness

Journal, aimed at promoting

a healthier community.

“This is something completely

new which could have

a real and positive impact on

the health of Waikato people,”

says Fitness Journal editor Lisa

Potter.

“We’re able to buy glossy

international magazines about

marathon running, DVDs

showing the latest dance and

Continued to page 3

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2014

Associate professor Dr Peter Sun at

Waikato University’s Management School.

THE REGION’S BUSINESS VOICE

CREATING

GREAT

LEADERS

A unique partnership between business

and the University of Waikato is creating

leaders across both business and

community organisations.

T

By GEOFF TAYLOR

he Community

and Enterprise and

Leadership Foundation

(CELF) programme at Waikato

University’s Management

School is a co laboration

between the university and

Community and Enterprise

Leadership Foundation - a

Waikato-based trust - which

has the aim of producing great

and connected leaders for

the region.

The nine month course,

convened by associate professor

- management communication,

Dr Peter Sun has turned

out its first 21 graduates and a

second cohort began the second

course last month.

A fundamental point of difference

with the programme is

that it combines an equal number

of representatives from

both business and not for profit

Continued on page 3

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and Duchess of Cambridge.

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The 4 ha site will feature

average house price.

The 110 house development,

achieved under the now

defunct special housing area

Homes and Holah Homes.

They are the joint shareholders

of Quentin Residential,

is set to help achieve the city

council’s goal of denser living

in the city.

Blake Richardson, of

Golden Homes, says they want

the development to contribute

to the council’s aspiration

“I think it offers something

that you don’t see really anywhere

else in Hamilton, which

is a mixed community close

Golden Homes co-owner

Craig Smith says communities

need variety. “So one of

2018

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2018 VOLUME 26: ISSUE 8 WWW.WBN.CO.NZ FACEBOOK.COM/WAIKATOBUSINESSNEWS

Te Waka

launched

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2018 VOLUME 26: ISSUE 8 WWW.WBN.CO.NZ FACEBOOK.COM/WAIKATOBUSINESSNEWS

Te Waka

launched

at ‘powerful’ summit

at ‘powerful’ summit

T

“We’ve had the hui, now let’s have the do-ey.”

By RICHARD WALKER

T

hat’s the call from

Dallas Fisher after a

high-powered summit

that brought together 250

Waikato business leaders and

politicians to help shape the

future economic development

of the region.

Te Waka, the new name for

Waikato’s regional economic

development agency, was

launched at the event, held on

the banks of Lake Karapiro at

the Sir Don Rowlands Centre

recently.

Dallas Fisher, chair of Te

Waka’s establishment board,

said after the summit that it had

been a “powerful” two days,

aimed at helping the well-being

of Waikato communities.

“There was real horsepower

in this room. It's been phenomenal.

The two-day commitment

from all the people is

significant and they stuck at

it. They were excited about it,

committed to it.”

The conference opening

address was by Regional Economic

Development Minister

Shane Jones, and attendees

included representatives from

all five iwi the region touches,

hat’s the ca l from

Da las Fisher after a

high-powered summit

that brought together 250

Waikato business leaders and

politicians to help shape the

future economic development

of the region.

Te Waka, the new name for

Waikato’s regional economic

development agency, was

launched at the event, held on

the banks of Lake Karapiro at

the Sir Don Rowlands Centre

recently.

Da las Fisher, chair of Te

Waka’s establishment board,

said after the summi that it had

been a “powerful” two days,

aimed at helping the we l-being

of Waikato communities.

“There was real horsepower

in this room. It's been phenomenal.

The two-day commitment

from a l the people is

significant and they stuck at

it. They were excited about it,

commi ted to it.”

The conference opening

address was by Regional Economic

Development Minister

Shane Jones, and a tendees

included representatives from

a l five iwi the region touches,

as we l as major Waikato businesses

and industries.

It was a first for Waikato,

which is one of the last regions

in New Zealand to establish a

regional economic development

agency.

“This has never happened

before. This is original territory

bringing everyone from

the region together across a l

these industry groups, central

government, local government.

It’s never happened in

the area of economic development,”

said Da las.

We're late to the

game and we've got

to catch up, but I

look at us like being

Melbourne Cup,

Kiwi coming down

the outside. That's

Waikato.

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“We've ca led for unity, the

focus of that ca l is kotahitanga.

We've ca led for a collective

approach. No one group

can do this by themselves.”

The two days saw the

development of some overarching

themes, including tourism,

Waikato as a food bowl

and utilising the Waikato River

sustainably. It also established

a set of priorities while ge ting

down to what Da las ca led the

“ni ty gri ty”.

“We've got the prioritised

list and we've come up with 20

major ideas for projects.”

The next step is to cluster

those ideas under the themes

and present the long-term

strategy to central government

in October.

Da las said one of the jobs

of Te Waka is to help join the

dots between national and

regional strategies and look

at how to accelerate business

development.

He gave the example of

rail. “There's a national strategy

around rail, which absolutely

connects to the food processing

strategy, the tourism

strategy - so it's [about] our

regional strategies connecting

to the national strategies.”

In the meantime, Te Waka is

also doing its bit to help with

applications for the Provincial

“We’ve had the hui, now let’s have the do-ey.”

By RICHARD WALKER

DALLAS FISHER

Summit launches

region’s first economic

development agency

as well as major Waikato businesses

and industries.

It was a first for Waikato,

which is one of the last regions

in New Zealand to establish a

regional economic development

agency.

“This has never happened

before. This is original territory

bringing everyone from

the region together across all

these industry groups, central

government, local government.

It’s never happened in

the area of economic development,”

said Dallas.

We're late to the

game and we've got

to catch up, but I

look at us like being

Melbourne Cup,

Kiwi coming down

the outside. That's

Waikato.

Da las Fisher on the banks of Lake

Karapiro. Sustainable use of the

Waikato River was prominent in theme

discussions a the two-day summit.

“We've called for unity, the

focus of that call is kotahitanga.

We've called for a collective

approach. No one group

can do this by themselves.”

The two days saw the

development of some overarching

themes, including tourism,

Waikato as a food bowl

and utilising the Waikato River

sustainably. It also established

a set of priorities while getting

down to what Dallas called the

“nitty gritty”.

“We've got the prioritised

list and we've come up with 20

major ideas for projects.”

The next step is to cluster

those ideas under the themes

and present the long-term

strategy to central government

in October.

Dallas said one of the jobs

of Te Waka is to help join the

dots between national and

regional strategies and look

at how to accelerate business

development.

He gave the example of

rail. “There's a national strategy

around rail, which absolutely

connects to the food processing

strategy, the tourism

strategy - so it's [about] our

regional strategies connecting

to the national strategies.”

In the meantime, Te Waka is

also doing its bit to help with

applications for the Provincial

Growth Fund, with several in

the pipeline.

“Minister Jones ca led

himself a retail politician at

the event,” said Fisher. “We l,

we're a buyer of the Provincial

Growth Fund.”

Also on the immediate

agenda is the appointment of

a chief executive. The agency,

based at Innovation Park, currently

has six sta f. There wi l

be further recruitment, while

a new board to replace the

establishment board should be

formed within six months.

Da la said there have been

some predecessor organisations,

and part of the impetus

for the agency came from

Waikato Means Business, an

organisation which he chairs.

“It needed to evolve and

connect with the business

world much more strongly, and

in se ting up Te Waka that's

what we've done. a true partnership.

I think this is vita ly

important. We are behind

because we haven't worked

together enough as a region,”

he said.

“We're late to the game and

we've go to catch up, but I look

at us like being Melbourne

Cup, Kiwi coming down the

outside. That's Waikato.

“The process has delivered

quality outcomes but now, let's

make some things happen.”

See further story on page 4

Dallas Fisher on the banks of Lake

Karapiro. Sustainable use of the

Waikato River was prominent in theme

discussions at the two-day summit.

Duncan & Ebbett

07 838 1211

Growth Fund, with several in

the pipeline.

“Minister Jones called

himself a retail politician at

the event,” said Fisher. “Well,

we're a buyer of the Provincial

Growth Fund.”

Also on the immediate

agenda is the appointment of

a chief executive. The agency,

based at Innovation Park, currently

has six staff. There will

be further recruitment, while

a new board to replace the

establishment board should be

formed within six months.

Dallas said there have been

some predecessor organisations,

and part of the impetus

for the agency came from

Waikato Means Business, an

organisation which he chairs.

“It needed to evolve and

connect with the business

world much more strongly, and

in setting up Te Waka that's

what we've done. a true partnership.

I think this is vitally

important. We are behind

because we haven't worked

together enough as a region,”

he said.

“We're late to the game and

we've got to catch up, but I look

at us like being Melbourne

Cup, Kiwi coming down the

outside. That's Waikato.

“The process has delivered

quality outcomes but now, let's

make some things happen.”

See further story on page 4

2020

JACK’S LANDING

Hamilton builders

in ambitious

development

Waikato Business News 25 Years | 41

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Agritech startup moves fast and

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‘much needed housing’

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2019

THE COOL FACTOR

Town rides a

wave of growth

Duncan & Ebbett

07 838 1211

for city centre’s

doorstep

By RICHARD WALKER

With residential land at a premium in central

Hamilton, a rare development will see more

than 100 homes built on a site close to the

city centre.

T

Fifteen finalists chosen for Westpac

Waikato Business Awards Page 22

hree well known Hamilton

builders are combining

forces to create a

mixed community beside Innes

Common and just 2.5km from

the centre of the city.

two, three and four bedroom

homes, with a set proportion

selling below Hamilton’s

for Hamilton to be a compact,

livable city.

legislation, brings together

Anthem Homes, Golden

to town with lots of amenities

close by,” he says.

Cambridge

APRIL/MAY VOLUME 27: ISSUE 4 2019 WWW.WBN.CO.NZ FACEBOOK.COM/WAIKATOBUSINESSNEWS

on a roll

Artist’s impression of Jack’s Landing street view

the things we’ve tried to do is

make the houses with a range

that could fit all sorts of age

groups.”

He says the group also

wanted to give back, via

the affordable homes in the

development.

The former special housing

area (SHA) legislation provided

a mechanism by which

the land could be rezoned from

industrial to residential. That

came with the condition at

least 10 percent of the homes

2019

which is buying the Quentin

Drive site off Jack House

Transit.

Dubbed Jack’s Landing in

honour of the long-established

house moving business, earthworks

will begin in November,

with building to start in April

and stage one completed by the

start of 2022.

Jack’s Landing is unusual

in central Hamilton as a large

tract of land zoned residential.

Featuring cycle and pedestrian

access to Rotoroa (Hamilton

Lake), the development

Continued on page 8

Cambridge’s clock tower stands out against a

backdrop of hi ls: Pukekura and, in the distance,

Maungatautari. Photo: Antanas Procuta

Also inside

this issue

EXCITING and SCARY

Challenging world full

of opportunities

P3

“It's got that village feel, it's got a lot of

energy, there's a real cool factor sneaking

in.” That’s what Cambridge Chamber of

Commerce chief executive Kelly Bouzaid

says about the town, and plenty of others

agree. We take the pulse and look at the

opportunities and challenges posed by

future growth in the Town of Trees.

See story, page 16.

LEADING THE WAY

Community commitment

“part of DNA”

P8

Formation

of H2A, the

Hamilton-

Auckland

Corridor.

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42 | OUR STORY YOUR STORY

Ebbett Group

defined by growth, innovation,

and progress

There are always

challenges in business –

it’s how you respond that

determines success.

The Ebbett Group, with the surety of its deep

roots and loyal customer base dating back to

1928, has faced down the challenges of 2020

and focused on investment to position itself

strongly for the future.

Not only have the Ebbett Group taken the

opportunity to undergo a complete update of

their own brand, they have taken on a range

of new car brands, brought a new dealership

on board and accelerated the building of new

premises, including doubling the size of their

VW dealership at the new site in Te Rapa.

And, if that wasn’t enough, the Group have

plans in place to continue the pace of growth

and development through 2021. Those plans

include a large scale head-office dealership

development next to Volkswagen in Te Rapa,

due to open in March, which will feature an

on-site paint and panel facility and a tyre shop.

This expansion will be followed by a brand

new multi-franchise development in Pukekohe

as well.

Even General Motors stopping the sale of new

Holden vehicles in New Zealand in 2020 was

a challenge they met head-on by advocating

strongly for Holden owners and taking on the

role of HSV national parts distributor. With

these moves, Holden fans and customers

can rest easy knowing the Ebbett Group

is committed to supporting their Holden

ownership experience long into the future.

In June, Karamu Holden in the Hawke’s Bay was

brought into the Ebbett Group and rebranded

as Ebbett Hawkes Bay. New brands were

also introduced throughout the North Island,

with Kia and MG in Pukekohe; Hyundai and

Isuzu in Tauranga; Isuzu, Seat, Cupra, and GM

Special Vehicles in Hamilton; Kia and Nissan in

Wellington; and Renault in Hawke’s Bay.

In addition, upon Ebbett Skoda moving to their


Ebbett Hamilton’s new Te Rapa dealership, opening March 2021


I couldn’t be

prouder of every

person in this

business

new premises in Hamilton East they became

the largest Skoda dealership in New Zealand!

service remains at the heart of their business,

with the Group believing that is best delivered

through sustained progress.

Managing Director Ben van den Engel said 2020

was a year no-one in the group predicted.

“But the choices were simple – cut back or

push on and, whilst we were careful to take

appropriate action through the most uncertain

times, we strongly felt that our people, our

customers and our business would be best

served by continuing to work hard moving

forward.

some sales records in the last few months –

I couldn’t be prouder of every person in this

business for the effort they have put in this year

under such challenging circumstances.”

The Ebbett Group’s stability and strong values

have proven invaluable in helping it prosper

through a difficult year. While quick to admit

the business benefits hugely from its past,

the company has not been slow in using

those deep roots as a springboard for a very

bright future. •

Through all these developments, a strong

adherence to values of Respect, Integrity,

Care and Excellence ensure personal customer

“We have taken on new brands, opened new

dealerships, continued to deliver the highest

levels of customer service and even broken


Congratulations to Waikato Business News on 25 years!

Having been in business for over 80 years, we

know what it takes to stand the test of time.

All the best to the team for the next 25 years

ahead. Here are some of our most memorable

moments since 1995.

TODAY

The company distributes

to 160 markets around the

world and employs over 1000

people globally.

1999

Gallagher enters

Fuel Systems business

1995

2000

Gallagher Command

Centre launches.

Gallagher (formally

known as Cardax)

Security Prox Readers

hit the market .

2006

New perimeter

technology developed

– the release of

the high speed

configuration range.

2012

Gallagher donates much

needed infrastructure to

improve 1500 families’

lives in two communities in

South Luangwa, Zambia.

2013

Gallagher opens a new

state-of-the-art facility in

Kansas City, United States,

which highlights the

company’s commitment to

customers in North America.

2015

2015

Gallagher Security

becomes mobile.

Gallagher launches the

world’s most powerful

energizer – the M10,000i

Electric Fence Energizer.

2016

A new facility called the

Gallagher Customer Service

Centre, which opened in

Melbourne, Australia, doubled

Gallagher’s capacity and

improves logistical capabilities

as well as customer &

technical support.

2016

A giant Chiefs jersey adorns

the Gallagher building to

celebrate the start of the

Gallagher Chiefs partnership.

2019

Gallagher ranked number

one privately owned tech

company in New Zealand

in the TIN Report.

2018

World’s first fully

integrated solar

energizers – the S200

and S400 – are launched.

2020

Gallagher develops Contract

Tracing functionality to support

the world’s COVID-19 efforts.

2020

Six awards won in

the first six months

of the year.

2020

Gallagher strengthens

commitment to responsible

business practices with new

Risk & Responsibility team.


Fast facts

VALUE OF PAPER AND PRINT

GLOBAL STUDY:

MOST PEOPLE HIGHLY

VALUE PAPER AND PRINT!

Recently commissioned by Two

Sides, this consumer survery reports

global attitudes toward paper and

print, as well as toward corporative

environmental claims.

Newspaper

ads are viewed

2.5 times longer

than the average

digital ad”

Magazines deliver

outstanding

performance.

With a return of

130%, magazine

advertisements

produce the highest

ROI of all media

channels

- GFK Australia 2015

81% OF PEOPLE

have bought an item or

visited a place after reading

about it in a magazine.

56%

OF PEOPLE

REGARD PRINT

MARKETING

AS THE MOST

TRUSTWORTHY

OF MEDIA

CHANNELS

For the paper and print industries

global markets and consumer

preferences remain widely diverse

and difficult to predict - yet there

is at least one major source of

agreement: Around the world,

people like and want print on paper!

9 IN 10

WORKPLACE DECISION MAKERS

READ PRINT MEDIA

CHOOSING THE PAPER OPTION:

In terms of reading preference and

tactile experience, people prefer

print on paper compared to reading

from a screen or electronic devices.

SOURCE : TWOSIDES UK


46 | OUR STORY YOUR STORY

WE STILL NEED THE

creative juice

In 1849, French writer Jean-Baptiste Alphonse Karr wrote

that the more things change, the more they stay the same.

Two centuries on and faced with the impacts

of both the digital revolution and Covid-19

on the advertising world, King St CEO Chris

Williams agrees.

Despite the exponential growth in advertising

platforms available to King St over the last 20

years, and an economy turned inside out by

this year’s pandemic, Chris notes one thing

remains true.

“Despite all the change, we still need strong

ideas, and clever execution of those ideas.

We still need to get people’s attention,

achieve the cut-through in the mass of

messages. In the end we still need the

creative juice.”

Chris, who bought Hamilton’s only full-service

advertising company back in 1999, says the

internet and digital revolution have been

“amazing drivers” in his industry.

“The digital space is creating unbelievable

change across everything. Media consultancy

has changed beyond belief with players such

as Netflix, Neon, YouTube, Spotify. We have

had to change our mindset completely. Social

media is an additional layer and very complex

to deal with.

“In the past you just had a choice of a couple

of radio stations, local TV, the papers, and

maybe outdoor. Now there are so many

platforms and so many ways of helping a

business reach their customers.”

During the last 21 years Chris has grown

King St from four employees to a

specialised team of 23, with offices in

Hamilton and Tauranga.

And the complexity of the options available

to the agency to get their clients in front of

clients means Chris has to admit he no longer

fully understands how some staff go about

doing their jobs.

“While other agencies have specialised, say in

digital, King St have very proudly remained a

full- service agency. That means I don’t claim

to know exactly how some of the complex

technology is operated – there are many



Despite all the

change, we still need

strong ideas, and

clever execution of

those ideas.

CHRIS WILLIAMS

specialisations now. I do know just enough to

be dangerous really!

“Google and Facebook for example are really

complex platforms. Sometimes we have

to create work that is really specific to the

platform, say with YouTube, where you have to

make six-second clips – to do that effectively

you really have to think how to break through

on that specific platform, rather than adapt the

material from a longer form – it certainly keeps

us busy with our thinking caps on.

“The challenge is how to give the best advice

on how clients should spend their hard-earned

cash, how to most effectively get them in

front of their customers and prospects. Then,

of course, we match this with smart strategy

and clever creative that we execute to the

highest quality possible across all platforms.

And our work is very trackable now – we can

very quickly work out what is successful and

make changes if we need to.”

Chris says 2021 is sure to challenge his King

St team.

“The lockdown rebound is slowing, a lot of

the discretionary spend is going to go. It will

be a major challenge for the economy and

the agency.

“Research shows in adverse conditions people

go with brands and companies they trust.

Companies are going to have to appeal to

both the head and the heart. Digital platforms

can struggle to make that emotional

connection with the audience. We are going to

have to work that out. Companies will have to

ask themselves what makes their customers

tick and how best to tackle that connection.

“I think we’ll see a return to basics – remember

what got you here, look after that, treasure

every new lead.

“Looking ahead I’m excited by the challenges,

it’s time for the old dogs to step up. While we

haven’t been through a pandemic, I had my

first job during the ’87 stock market crash –

we’ve sailed some stormy seas before.” •


48 | OUR STORY YOUR STORY

Chantal Baxter, Natasha Harvey and Glenn Forster

Melissa Clothier, Malcolm and Julie MacDonald

David O’Neill

Out and about

Some of the many people who have made an

appearance in Waikato Business News over the years.

Paula Sutton and Chris Simpson

Sir William Gallagher, David Barnett, Jack Ninnes and Steve Hayidakis

Toby Morris and Te Radar

Andrew Wood and Senga Allen

Biren Patel and Tesh Randall

Karen Thomson and Maureen Tims

Harshmmen Kaur and Nick Dromgool

Kingsley Field, Gaye Barton, Mike Blake and Roger Laybourn

Vanessa Williams and John Lawrenson


Waikato Business News 25 Years | 49

Michael Bassett-Foss

Lou Cables, Ross Townshend and Bronwyn Main

Ashleigh Turner, Lee Ann Muntz, Vaughan Payne

Jon Tanner and Andrew Flexman

Michelle Bailey

Sandy Guscott and Katrina Van de Ven

Mark Morgan and Dion Merson

Geoff Taylor and Martin Gallagher

Sarah Wollerton, Ella Warren and Alice Norton

Carey West and Jeremy Hughes

Kirstie Dawson-Smith, Paula Sutton and Terry Wilson

Sandra Hutton and Donna Cunniffe

Peter Nation, Ron Fleming, Richard Walker, Beth Jobin

Mike Neale, Nicole Hartopeanu and Sarah King

Terry and Roy Braggins and

Bruce and Pamela Nixon

Rob Pascoe, Dick Breukink and Paula Southgate

Adrian Paterson, Trish Tate and David Bennett

Sarah Rundstrom, Brian Squair and Vicky Williamson


Lodge

ever-changing

leader looks at an

real estate world

It’s an ever-changing world for those engaged

in today’s real estate industry.

electronic world this is an essential element in

successful real estate selling,” said Jeremy.

This sector has seen many highs and lows

during the past 25 years with mortgage interest

rates being the ruler in most cases.

In Hamilton a very positive Lodge Real Estate

managing director, Jeremy O’Rourke, has seen

many of them from the time he began his

career as a keen young sales representative to

today where he sits in the seat of power.

Lodge is Hamilton’s largest real estate

company.

The sales teams use a multitude of

communications platforms to ensure vendors

and buyers are knowledgeable in all aspects of

their property sales and purchases.

“Go back a few years (at least 25) and you

would see salespeople using radio telephones

to keep in touch with the office,” said Jeremy.

“Now with mobile phones the gaps have closed

and they are in close contact with vendors,

potential buyers, their teams and the office.”

The exponential growth in the use of

electronic platforms seen in the use of texting,

Messenger, Instagram, Snapchat and email has

opened many doors through which vendors

and buyers can step.

“At the same time sales teams are growing with

customer needs.”

Jeremy says that since the Covid-19 lockdown

the strong introduction of Facebook, Google

and Trade Me have been used to target people

in the market as well as those who are planning

to come on board as either sellers or buyers.

“All the methods of communication we have

included are consumer-centric and speed up

reactions by our sales teams towards vendors

and buyers,” said Jeremy.

“We have never before seen this rate of change

in the sector…it’s like a freight train screaming

up the main trunk line…it’s enormous and is

improving our service delivery.

Jeremy O’Rourke

and, in turn, taking better care of customers

overall.

According to Jeremy more young people are

taking up real estate sales as a career.

“When I told my parents I wanted to become a

real estate salesperson, they didn’t believe it.

It was not seen as a career – certainly not one

they thought I should take. But I have proved

them wrong and have made a success of my

chosen profession.

“In that time newspaper advertising was very

strong with a majority of households receiving

a copy of the ‘daily rag’, he said. “Now with

population growth and sadly circulation

decline, this form of communication has taken

on a scattergun style and is used mostly in

niche market publications aimed directly at a

target audience.

“Face-to-face communication is most

important, as it has been from the beginning

of property sales. And in what is a developing

“It allows our people to spend more time in

front of clients who can then appreciate the

amount of background work that has been

done.

“There has been a general increase in

consumer protection. Unlike the old days of

‘Let the Buyer Beware’ our job today is to ‘Make

the Buyer Aware’.

“This has led to salespeople increasing their

levels of due diligence when listing properties

“It is exciting to see the number of younger

people stepping up to the plate to join our

ranks,” Jeremy said.

“They are inquisitive and ask questions as

well as listening to the needs of vendors and

buyers.

“This helps them stand firmly by the real estate

edict of today…

“Make the Buyer Aware” •


Waikato Business News 25 Years | 51

If it’s a rush job,

don’t say no... say

NOW!

To work in the advertising business is to

work in the land of perpetual deadlines,

imposed and (I must confess) self-imposed.

All my life I’ve always said “Now” instead of

“No.” Most creative industries have grueling

work schedules and deadlines.

No matter what kind of work you’re in,

do it fast, on-time, and do it perfectly.

SOURCE : DAMN GOOD ADVICE - GEORGE LOIS


The Stiles and Hooker team

Stiles and Hooker

Architects and Engineers

This is a team at the top of its game, producing

quality projects with passion.

From its home in the mighty Waikato, the team

of 30 at Stiles and Hooker have been delivering

locally, nationally and internationally for many

valued clients for nearly on 40 years, with a big

celebration planned for next year.

Stiles and Hooker has a strong focus on the

industrial / food processing sector.

Dairy process plants, meat processing plants,

beverages & wineries, honey and their

associated energy, water and water treatment

services are Stiles and Hooker’s niche.

Stiles and Hooker Ltd has close associations

with all the food industry process specialists in

New Zealand, adding value to project success

due to their vast experience, understanding

of the requirements of the plant, the space

and hygiene requirements that need to be

incorporated in the various factories.

Almost all dairy process sites in New Zealand

include buildings and structures designed by

Stiles and Hooker.

Director and general manager Glenn McHardie

said: “We enjoy delivering quality projects,

“working together and coming up with clever

solutions excites the whole team.”

Glenn says: “The ‘together’ includes our design

professionals, the building contractor and

the process engineer, delivering outstanding

results for the clients.

“We enjoy the challenge which means

working on extremely fast track projects

where once the project is approved it is ‘all go’.

The contractor is often on site preparing the


ground immediately, the foundations are in for

consent, and we are working on the detailed

design of the upper structure.”

Beyond putting an effective structure and skin

over process equipment, what makes Stiles

and Hooker shine in its niche market - New

Zealand’s leading industrial/food process

facility design team - comes down to three

main elements.

Our depth of knowledge, shared over many

years with our clients’ businesses including

critical focus on effective flow and masterplanning

on specific sites.

The ability to orchestrate the parts involved to

give advice that is practical and only involves a

few of the experienced Stiles and Hooker team

as opposed to having a multitude of specialists

not owning the whole process.

The company has consciously decided to

remain medium in size, for efficiency and

to provide clients with direct access to the

directors, ensuring the philosophy of the

business is never diluted.

Working with excellent clients around the

country and producing ‘the goods’ on each

project has earned 85 percent in repeat

business.

We go strong for our clients and while, as a

professional business, we depend on them,

they accept our strengths and come to rely

on us.

“We accept and relish the design challenge,

and take immense satisfaction in the part

we’ve played in the shared success of the of

the overall project,” says Roger Baker, director,

engineer

Our approach

We listen

Our team focuses on effective listening,

enabling us to determine a client’s requirements

and desires from project inception to its

full realisation. We are a personable group

of professionals to whom you can chat in

confidence. We invite you to enjoy the process

with us.

We collaborate

We pride ourselves on getting projects off

to a decisive start by collaborating with key

players early during the design process. Added

to that we have taken the proven benefits of

collaboration a step further, gathering the best

and most dynamic architectural and engineering

minds under one roof. This team effort will

deliver optimal results for your project.

We Innovate

For our talented team, using innovation to come

up with smart solutions that help our clients

do better, is part of everyday life. We look for

ongoing improvement so the solutions we offer

are both creative and effective for our clients’

projects.

We deliver

We have a proven track record, with industry

respect for the thorough level of documentation

we provide and our sound management of

projects. We are motivated to deliver projects for

our clients that strike the right balance between

quality, cost-effectiveness and timely delivery.

The practice is a member of ACE, the

Association of Consulting and Engineering.

Three directors are members of Engineering

New Zealand. One director is an associate of

the New Zealand Institute of Architects (NZIA).

FROM TOP

Directors Iain Brown, Roger Baker, Glenn McHardie, Tony Wade and

associate director Scott Lawrence

CONTINUED ON PAGE 54


The company in brief

FROM PAGE 53

Looking back to the beginning…

Design essence

We believe that a building should reflect the

unique characteristics of its location, function

and the identity of the client for whom it is being

built.

This helps us to ensure we create an

environment that best suits our clients needs

and expectations.

Roger Stiles and Roydon Hooker founded the

engineering and architectural practice of Stiles

& Hooker Limited in 1981.

Nearly 40 years later the business continues

to run strong under the watch of current

directors: Iain Brown, Roger Baker, Glenn

McHardie and Tony Wade.

Stiles and Hooker has a strong future with

ongoing succession planning, which includes

welcoming Scott Lawrence this year as

associate director, with a plan to become a

director in 2021

The Stiles and Hooker team gains great

satisfaction from creating buildings of enduring

quality that add immense value to the lives of

the people who interact with them.

Quality assurance

We use the latest and greatest technical tools.

Our in-house technologies are continually

being audited to ensure they are up-to-date.

This means we consistently utilise the latest

technical tools, enhancing our company’s

capacity to deliver exceptional projects.

A company with heart

Our purpose: To deliver quality projects with passion

Our focus: We are New Zealand’s leading industrial/food process facility design team. We do

the best by the project by being approachable, experienced and connected.

Our culture:

1. Integrity… We do right by the project – we do right by the team

2. Customer focus… We make them part of our team so we truly understand them and

deliver on promises

3. Team… We collaborate to succeed together

4. Quality… We use our skills and knowledge to provide quality we are proud of

5. Passion… We celebrate our vision becoming reality… enjoying the journey

6. Balance… We are balanced in all we do: Family, health, work and play

Our professionals and technicians keep abreast

of new developments in design trends, building

processes, materials and technologies to

ensure they are equipped to provide clients with

the most sound advice and ultimately great

buildings.

All clients may be assured of quality and peace

of mind when Stiles and Hooker works with

them.

We provide the quality assurance you deserve

being registered with TELARC New Zealand (ISO

9001) 2015. •


56 | OUR STORY YOUR STORY

19 Black

3/19 Worley Place, Hamilton

Phone: 027 694 8870

19black.co.nz

3 Wise Men

25 Ward Street, Hamilton

Phone: 07 838 0696

3wisemen.co.nz

Centre Place Shopping

501 Victoria Street, Hamilton

Phone: 07 839 8563

kiwiproperty.com/centre-place

Victoria Street

Our neighbours

Ward Street (Centre Place)

Crate Clothing

12 Ward Street, Hamilton

Phone: 07 835 2591

crateclothing.co.nz

In the heart

of the city

DP Media Ltd

25 Ward Street, Hamilton

Phone: 07 838 1333

www.dpmedia.co.nz

www.wbn.co.nz

dynamo6

Level 1, 3 Ward Street, Hamilton

Phone: 0800 396 2666

dynamo6.com

Worley Place (Garden Place, Hamilton City Council)


Fill a Bowl

15 Ward Street, Hamilton

Phone: 021 360 906

fillabowl.co.nz

Gates Optometrist

1 Ward Street, Hamilton

Phone: 07 839 6996

gatesoptometrists.co.nz

Gails Floral Studio

7 Worley Place, Hamilton

Phone: 07 839 0988

gails.co.nz

Harper Inc

2/19 Worley Place, Hamilton

Phone: 07 834 0017

harperinc.co.nz

Hart Jewellers

12 Ward Street, Hamilton

Phone: 07 839 5666

High Above

36 Ward Street, Hamilton

Phone: 021 199 7355

highabove.co.nz

Kebab Salateen

26 Ward Street, Hamilton

Phone: 07 839 3375

Magazine

Designer Clothing

19 Worley Place, Hamilton

Phone: 07 834 3106

magazineclothing.co.nz

Margaret Wallace

Clothing Alterations

25 Ward Street, Hamilton

Phone: 07 839 5834

OFF & ON

25 Ward Street, Hamilton

Phone: 07 949 9836

offandon.co.nz

OOBE

43 Ward Street, Hamilton

Phone: 07 850 5231

oobe.co.nz

RUBY

25 Ward Street, Hamilton

Phone: 07 834 0210

shop.rubynz.com

Sol Studio

36 Ward Street, Hamilton

Phone: 07 834 1012

Waikato Business News 25 Years | 57

Starbucks

Corner Ward Street & Worley Place

Phone: 07 839 7302

starbucks.co.nz

Star of India

4/39 Ward Street, Hamilton

Phone: 07 949 8342

starofindiahamilton.com

Sunshine Health

7/11 Worley Place, Hamilton

Phone: 021 0239 6096

Trade Aid

4/19 Worley Place, Hamilton

Phone: 07 838 1410

tradeaid.org.nz

Texas Radio

43 Ward Place, Hamilton

Phone: 07 839 5615

texas-radio.co.nz

Ward Street Barber

12 Ward Street, Hamilton

Phone: 07 838 2620


He bought the Bartercard Waikato franchise

(as it was then structured) in 1999. Paul

then spent the next three years in the

mighty Waikato, along with his business

partner, driving the Bartercard franchise from

strength to strength.

Bartercard

proves its worth

in the Waikato

The Bartercard principles of assisting small

business owners to gain new customers and

conserve cash through its digital currency

of trade dollars was a key to the franchise

proving its worth in Waikato, a region well

known for its large number of small business

enterprises (SMEs), and it’s still as important

today. The branch is thriving and is helping

thousands of card holders benefit from the

cashless currency.

After 28 years in New Zealand, Bartercard

has 10,000 cardholders turning over eight to

10 million trade dollars a month. There are

now 13 regional offices and the membership

base continues to expand through its referral

programme, bRewards.

Bartercard has helped assist many

businesses to grow and realise their potential

by putting their spare capacity to use.

An opportunity knocked,

and the now Bartercard NZ COO,

Paul Hebbink snapped it up.

In the real estate sector trade dollars are used

to invest in properties. It allows for spare

capital to be invested into bricks and mortar.

For accommodation providers, restaurants,

bars and cafes, Bartercard is a great

opportunity to fill empty seats and idle

capacity.

The Bartercard presence in Waikato is

also visible through its strategic alliances

and support of sports teams and events

as Paul believes in investing back into the

community which supports the Bartercard

brand.

In rugby the Chiefs have had the advantage

of Bartercard support for the past few

seasons, as has Magic Netball and going back

a year or two the V8s.


Sponsorship Manager for the Waikato

Chiefs, Kate Shirtcliff has commented

“Bartercard has a long-standing

relationship with the Waikato Chiefs

through our sponsorship scheme.

Bartercard has allowed our organisation

to approve capital expenditure projects

based on a portion of that expense being

purchased on trade. We primarily use

our trade dollars for accommodation

when the team is touring, team manager

expenses, functions and events,

sponsorship events, operating

expenses, and some capital expenditure.

Bartercard has really helped us to

preserve cash where we've needed to, and it's

a great support network for other charities and

organisations looking for sponsorship.”

Today, Paul holds the position of Chief Operating Officer for Bartercard

NZ and is based out of Auckland. As he would say, his blood runs

green and he is proud of what the business has achieved over the

years. The business is recovering well post-Covid and the flexibility of

the alternative digital currency is allowing its members to continue

trading through these uncertain times, and conserve that allimportant

cash.

“ Bartercard has really

helped us to preserve

cash where we've

needed to

It has been an exciting journey for Bartercard since its inception in

New Zealand in 1992, and the journey continues with the next phase

of its growth strategy aligning itself to the crypto world, Qoin, which

launched New Zealand wide in October 2020. •

Bartercard.co.nz

Qoin.world

Paul Hebbink

Bartercard NZ COO

ATTRACT

NEW CUSTOMERS

Increase your customer base and

geographic reach through Bartercard’s

referral network (and that’s on top of

your cash paying customers!)

“We have seen a steady increase in

customer traffic with very little effort on

our behalf – we put this down to being a

Bartercard member and being exposed

to a network we wouldn’t have had if we

were just in a cash business.”

— Linda, local cafe owner

Find out how your business can benefit.

Contact Bartercard today on

07 834 3443

bartercard.co.nz


60 | OUR STORY YOUR STORY

Our future

together

... By Deidre Morris,

Waikato Business News director

Coronavirus has sent ripples

into our lives that have

affected us in so many ways.

This year, as Waikato Business

News celebrates 25 years, it’s

meant the traditional pause

to take stock of past and

future is especially compelling

and confusing.

When I look back on the extraordinary

experience of working with the Waikato

business community so deeply for so long,

I am both grateful and proud of what we’ve

achieved as a community. It’s an amazing

foundation that this community has built with

hard work, innovation, and incredible integrity.

And I like to think Waikato Business News has

played a strong role in some of those gains.

But, as I’ve been thinking about what the

next 25 years – or 50 years – will look like, I

feel I need to draw a line under the past and

recognise that the future will probably look

different. Being flexible has always been

important in business, and now more than ever

the Waikato business community’s leadership

is needed to help our region and country adapt

and find the new opportunities that will help us

thrive.

My first realisation of how special the Waikato

business community is happened before

I arrived. I tried to start a rival business

newspaper from Auckland and got sent

packing; businesses here valued Waikato

Business News and they weren’t about to

encourage an Auckland upstart! So I changed

tack and bought Waikato Business News, and I

haven’t looked back!

It’s not until you live in this region that you

really see its magic. I am still blown away by

what this community achieves on the global

stage by great Waikato companies and downto-earth

people. I’ve seen more business

achievements come from this region than I

ever did in Auckland.

The clients I’ve established a particular rapport

with have all been straight shooters. I love

working with the kind of people you can have

a great debate with and then go and have a

beer together. Some are important to me for

a mix of reasons: it’s been wonderful watching

Ebbett’s grow, for example. They live their

values and I’ve learned so much from Ben and

Walter.

I’m very proud that Waikato Business News

has earned the respect of business people

who also work with integrity. That translates

into operational decisions, such as maintaining

an ad/editorial ratio that is respectful to the

audience. As a team we have core values

that we try to stick to. It evolves every day

but the key is to be flexible and keep lines of

communication open.


Waikato Business News 25 Years | 61

Our children have grown up learning the

realities – sometimes harsh but sometimes

very beneficial – of parents who run a timeconsuming

business. We lived with highly

organised routines at home but they also had

a mum who was great at fundraising for their

overseas school trips and who was able to

show up to school sports events. Everything

was about preparation.

One of my major motivations for owning

a business was to put myself in a situation

where I was solely responsible for the results,

both of the business and myself.

There was the freedom to choose every day

what was most important, and to set my own

limits on the income I could achieve. But I also

wanted to understand myself: what skills do I

really have, and what is the right thing to do in

any given situation? Those are things I would

not have been able to explore if I’d stayed

working for someone else.

Now I have gathered 25 years of priceless

memories of people and achievements, for

me, Waikato Business News, and the Waikato

• business community.

When I think about the many good people

who’ve sweated blood alongside me in

Waikato Business News, there are a handful of

women who have changed my life and who I’m

in awe of. Sally Birch: writer, seller, genuinely

interested in people and it showed, a

gorgeous warm, gentle person. Bev McIntosh:

she’d had a tough life but she was always

beautifully presented and professional, always

with a smile on her face. Tania Hogg, a lovely,

gentle person. So many of our good people

headed off on their own adventures then came

back. They were family.

I like to believe Waikato Business News

is trusted and has earned its place in the

community.

That became clear when my partner and

I ended our relationship and we split the

business. It was tough but I have been

amazed and humbled by the support I’ve been

given. In this business community, if you’ve

done business with integrity, the support is

phenomenal. It’s given me back my sense of

pride in myself. Thank you everyone for your

kindness.

Being included in the Mystery Creek 50 year

celebrations was a thrill and another indication

of how Waikato Business News is perceived.

My inclusion in the time capsule was the

first issue of Waikato Business News that I

did flying solo after the business split. It felt

momentous.

I am still ambitious for Waikato Business News

and the Waikato region. As well as growing

the publication, I hope we can develop closer

relationships with the region’s organisations

that are also ambitious. I want us to be the

link and a force for helping the Waikato move

forward.

Media has changed so much over the past 25

years but newspaper has been making a quiet

comeback. There is so much available online

but print is still trusted. We will continue to

ask the same questions we always have: how

can we make it work best for you? I want

your business to be thriving in 100 years, so

how can we work together to achieve that?

Waikato Business News has a solid past and

we’re looking forward to an incredible future.

The way we Waikato businesses achieve our

goals might need to change in this weird new

world, but Waikato business is smart and

flexible. We can do it together!

I have been blessed over the decades with

the people I have worked with and for, and I

have felt the responsibility, accountability and

pressure of building and maintaining the WBN

brand.

For this publication in particular, on top of

my role as managing director, I found myself

back where I began - beating the pavement

as a sales rep. With so many businesses

and individuals suffering from the effects of


Waikato

Business

News has a

solid past and

we’re looking

forward to

an incredible

future.

nationwide lockdowns and a rapidly changing

environment, I really had no idea how this

might pan out but it felt good to be out again

spending time with our clients and doing

what I love. The support and respect I felt

with every call was a very humbling, positive

and proud experience.

The team here got me through some tough

times, and helped to reshape the business;

they are dedicated, loyal, hardworking and

very passionate also about what they do.

I am blessed and feel truly grateful to be

surrounded by such good people - so a

massive thank you to them.

To our advertisers - thank you for investing

and trusting. I would also like to take this

opportunity to thank our very loyal readers,

clients, partners and associates. •


would like to congratulate

on their 25th year in business.

We are proud to support and continue

to be your print partner of choice.

To celebrate we are offering your readers this fantastic deal

Your

Flyer

10,000

A5

PMP maintains Diamond

FLYERS

Enviro-­‐Mark certification. Achieving Diamond Enviro-­‐Mark status, means

we have robust systems in place to ensure best practices are applied with waste and energy while

ensuring that any by-­‐product from the printing process does not harm the environment.

In addition to Enviromark

$

Certification, PMP New Zealand continues to meet the requirements for

399

ISO 14001: 2015 Environmental Management Systems. The ISO standard provides an internationally

recognised framework for organisations to follow.

FOR ONLY

Where possible PMP will purchase from sustainable sources and are continuously improving the

printing process by working closely with our supply chain to develop less harmful inks, washes and

solutions that are better for the safety of our staff and the environment as a whole. PMP have also

recently successfully trialled compostable plastics in our product wrapping stage and see this as yet

another area where we lead the industry in innovative print solutions.

PMP is fully FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) accredited. Founded in 1993, the Forestry Stewardship

Council (FSC) is an independent, not-­‐for-­‐profit, non-­‐government organization promoting responsible

forest management. The FSC label represents a globally-­‐recognised certification system of tracing,

verifying and labelling or raw material, wood and paper products that originate from FSC-­‐certified

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can guarantee it comes from a sustainable forestry program.

PAPER RECYCLING

Ovato is an environmentally certified company

Enterprise Park currently recycles approx. 650 tonnes of paper per month. This volume of recycling

by PMP makes us the largest print recycler in NZ. Most of the paper taken from Enterprise Park is

recycled here in NZ and made into corrugated board for the manufacture of corrugated cartons and


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