STEAM Education in Music: Research, Teaching Design and Resources

chihinleung

Author: Chi-hin LEUNG
Publisher: Department of Cultural and Creative Arts, The Education University of Hong Kong

This publication was supported by the Teaching Development Grant [Project ref. no. T0191]

Copyright © 2018 Department of Cultural and Creative Arts, The Education University of Hong Kong. All rights reserved.

ISBN 978-988-79103-0-5

. .X

STEAM

Education in Music:

Research, Teaching Design and Resources

N

/


This publication was supported by the Teaching Development Grant [Project ref. no. T0191]

Copyright © 2018 by Department of Cultural and Creative Arts, The Education University of Hong Kong.

All rights reserved.

ISBN 978-988-79103-0-5


. .X

STEAM

Education in Music:

Research, Teaching Design and Resources

N

/



FOREWORD

The Hong Kong government, local schools

and institutions substantially needs to promote

STEAM (STEM + Arts) education to nurture

students’ creativity, collaboration and problemsolving

skills through the integration of

academic disciplines of Science, Technology,

Engineering, Arts and Mathematics. This

publication aims to share research findings on

the implementation of an innovative STEAM

course and to provide teaching manual

exemplars and resources for in-service music

teachers in conducting STEAM activities

in classroom music. The scheme of work is

aligned with the current Education Bureau

Music Curriculum in which STEAM activities are

combined with various listening, performing

and creating activities. Students will be able

to (1) identify music characteristics of electronic

music; (2) invent musical instruments through

the application of electronic building blocks;

(3) create a piece of creative music for the

instruments by applying relevant composition

techniques; (4) perform or improvise original

compositions and (5) appraise and evaluate

the creative process and product from STEAM

perspectives.

CHI-HIN LEUNG

Assistant Professor

Department of Cultural and Creative Arts

The Education University of Hong Kong


CONTENTS

Section One

INPUT

3

Collaborative Creativity

in STEAM Education

Section Two

OUTPUT

11

Teaching Design Exemplars

12

19

Key Stage 2

Creative Music Making

with the Use of Electrical Conductors

Scheme of Work | Listening Worksheet

Composition and Invention Worksheet

Peer Assessment Worksheet

Key Stage 3

Timbral Exploration

through Electronic Instrument Making

Scheme of Work | Listening Worksheet

Invention Worksheet | Composition Worksheet

Creating Self-Reflection Worksheet

Peer Assessment Worksheet

Section Three

WIRE

27

Internet Resources

Reading Materials


SECTION ONE

INPUT

Collaborative Creativity

in STEAM Education


COLLABORATIVE CREATIVITY IN STEAM EDUCATION

Empowering Students to Become Music Inventors through the Application of Coding,

Electronic Building Blocks and Contemporary Music Composition Techniques

PURPOSE

The Hong Kong Education Bureau, local schools and institution substantially needs to

promote STEAM education to nurture students’ creativity, collaboration and problemsolving

skills through the integration of academic disciplines of Science, Technology,

Engineering, Arts and Mathematics. This project aims to provide an environment for

students to experience collaborative creativity through innovative STEAM initiatives.

With the funding of Teaching Development Grant (TDG) at The Education University

of Hong Kong, various STEAM activities are enabled in the course – ‘Creativity in Music’.

QUESTION

• How do students collaborate in a creative music project?

• To what extent does the project create a collaborative learning environment for

creative music-making?

CONTENT

• An elective course entitled ‘Creativity in Music’ for all undergraduate students in

the Education University of Hong Kong

• A total of 33 students who meet for three-hour lecture per week in one semester

• Conducted in a formal teaching and learning environment for 13 weeks

• The class consists of music and non-music major students

• Students are equipped with necessary skills in composing, coding, and

instrument making with the use of Max 7 and littleBits electronic building

blocks.

• Students design their electronic instrument followed by creating a composition

• The final product is performed and video-taped by the students

04


LITERATURE REVIEW

• John-Steiner suggests that ‘Sustained mutually beneficial collaboration provides a mirror to

an individual, broadening his or her self-knowledge, which is crucial to creativity’

(Barrett, 2006).

• Collaborative music-making enables students to learn from the differences through the

creative process (Saether, 2013).

• Considering that our modern educational system has labelled artificial disciplinary boundaries

between arts, science and math, the concept of STEAM is a modern throwback to the notion

of educating the ‘whole child’ (Connelly, 2012) for creative expression in multiple media

(Buonincontro, 2018).

• As translational disciplines that bridge the generation of new knowledge and its application,

art and design would contribute to innovation and economic competitiveness in the manner

that STEM fields had accomplished in the past. (Allina, 2018)

• Instrument making is frequently excluded from the process of music making, especially

in this technological era. In fact, music making should not be limited to performing and

creating. Designing an electronic instrument is aligned with the composer’s creative intention

(Matsunobu, 2012).

METHODOLOGY

The project is a descriptive research to investigate collaborative music-making through STEAM

initiated activities. The data of this research were collected through:

• Focus group interviews of three groups of students. The objectives were

o To gather the information on students’ music profile

o To understand the experiences of the STEAM initiative

o To understand whether the authentic project provides a collaborative

learning environment for creative music-making

• Students’ group creative music projects over four weeks were documented

• Students’ interviews and reflections were transcribed and analysed through thematic coding

05


FINDINGS

Students’ Background

The research objects are students from different programmes and majors, such as BA (CAC),

BA (HOD), BEd (MUS), BEd (ENG), BEd (CL), BME and BALSE, etc. They have different levels of

musical training and backgrounds, and several students have not received any formal musical

instrument training before. Most of the students have no STEAM experience before this course.

However, some of the students have received composition training.

Experiences of the STEAM initiative

Group A

• The novel experience in STEAM motivates us to experiment the feasibility of using electronic

building blocks to generate unexpected sound effects.

• Creativity is essential in STEAM education. We must practice creative thinking to create new

things.

Group B

• We formed a new sonority with the application of electronic building blocks rather

than following the models to generate existing sounds. The creative process is

different because we are creating and not imitating.

Group C

• We gained STEAM knowledge in the course

• The course enhanced our creativity by providing us with the necessary conditions to

create.

• The electronic building blocks and coding software provided huge possibilities in

this creative project. We were motivated to formulate the final product.

• Compared with a traditional music lesson, this course applied a student-centred

approach that enabled better creative thinking.

06


Collaborative Music Making

Group A

• When we have different comments on the outcome, we will integrate our ideas to create our

ideal sound.

• We did not appoint a leader in our group, and thus, no one was responsible in leading the

entire progress.

• We shared any ideas we had and synthesised.

Group B

• Students handled the parts they were good at and assisted each other.

Group C

• Everyone in the group was responsible for researching sound effects. We divided other tasks,

such as technical operation of the hardware and software, storyline formulation, video and

sound recording and recording the setup of different sound effects. Everyone did their part

well and contributed their strength to the group.

• We settled our theme, which was about aliens attacking the Earth. We discussed the

possibility of using Logic Pro to combine many layers of sound to flourish the product. In the

last stage, we designed the flow of the piece with a meaningful story background.

Students’ Reflection

Group A

• We stagnated for a long time in the second half because we could not reach a consensus on

what to do after the rocket goes to space. In addition, the limitation of the equipment was

one of our consideration. Until we were introduced to overtone in a lesson, we determined

that one of our groupmates can perform overtone, which evoked the concept of alien

searching.

• I really appreciate this composition. In fact, the outcome is more beautiful than I expected.

This is my first time to compose something ‘non-traditional’. The progress is more interesting

compared with the traditional composition. I can ignore all the rules and limitation of

theories, and create the ‘sound’ to express what I think. This is most attractive part for me in

this kind of music.

07


Group B

• Before we started to create this music project, we thought of a meaningful and creative story

because we believe creative music should possess a meaningful message. Therefore, we

created the storyline of ‘Life and Death – A Journey of Life’ with a similar narrative structure

to ‘The Three Little Pigs’.

• This music work is my first step to break away from my comfort zone. I am looking forward to

enhance my creativity after the inspiration of the course and the use of different tools.

Group C

• During the process, some of us only used littleBits and some of us connected it to the

computer to test various sounds. With the increase of understanding, we created different

music pieces, such as the sounds of firing guns, wind, UFO landing or the scream of a

monster, to describe the scenes of our story.

• The creative project focused on performing something new and obtaining new elements to

create music through different means and expand the possibility. Specifically, many group

mates collaborated and several improvisation parts, such as how to describe the war between

human soldiers and aliens, were provided.

• Several sounds were created through the instruments. However, we had to combine the

designed sounds into a meaningful story and background. Considering that most of the

songs we heard contained background and meaning, we investigated the possible sound

combination with littleBits, Max 7 and Logic Pro. We also brainstormed and formulated

meaningful flows of the alien theme.

• I think we succeeded in creating several ‘new’ music. In this type of music, sound design

was important.

• Generally, I am proud of my group in creating such a masterpiece. The product was great

because this was a collaborative work and the standard of the work was high. We combined

different applications and our talents in the work.

08


GROUP CREATIVE WORK DESCRIPTION

Group A: Journey to the Stars

Journey to the Stars is the story of the adventure of an astronaut in the universe. The music

depicts the rocket launch, the long journey in space and the landing on a mysterious planet.

littleBits, Max 7 and inside piano were used in this piece.

Group B: Life and Death – A Journey of Life

Life and Death – A Journey of Life depicts the life journey from birth to death. This piece is a

journey of happiness, sadness, hopefulness and frustration. littleBits, GarageBand and several

existing melodies were used in this piece.

Group C: Aliens Attacking the Earth

Aliens Attacking the Earth is a fictitious piece that sets in the post 21st century when a large

number of aliens invade the Earth with their strange UFOs. The music depicts the invasion of

aliens, the battle between aliens and humans, the loss of the humans and the aliens ruling the

Earth. LittleBits, Max 7 and Logic Pro were used in this piece.

Video link: https://youtu.be/cs1pWHxj4vw

CONCLUSION

• This project provided a collaborative environment for creative instrument making and

music making.

• The STEAM initiative was new for the participating students.

• The students appreciated the collaborative process of music-making, especially in the sound

exploration and organisation.

• The students worked well in a group without any conflict. They did not reject others’ opinions.

Instead, they transformed the opinions into another form that fitted the artistic goal of the

music project.

• Students were stimulated to generate innovative concepts with the application of coding and

electronic building blocks.

09


IMPLICATION FOR TEACHERS

• Students were highly engaged in collaboration and creative activities with the addition of

STEAM initiative in a creative project.

• To facilitate the collaborative learning in music, teachers should track their creative process,

encourage students frequently to explain their ideas and determine how the created sound

served their ideas.

REFERENCE

Allina, B. (2018). The development of STEAM educational policy to promote student creativity

and social empowerment. Arts Education Policy Review, 119(2), 77-87.

Barrett, M. (2006). ‘Creative collaboration’: An ‘eminence’ study of teaching and learning in

music composition. Psychology of Music, 34(2), 195-218.

Connelly, G. (2012). Art puts the STEAM in STEM. Principal, 92(2), 48. Retrieved from

http://www.stemedcoalition.org/stem-ed-coalition-activities/

Katz-Buonincontro, J. (2018). Gathering STE(A)M: Policy, curricular, and programmatic

developments in arts-based science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education

introduction to the special issue of arts education policy review: STEAM focus. Arts Education

Policy Review, 119(2), 73-76.

Matsunobu, K. (2012). Instrument making as music making: A slow food approach to

musicianship. In A. R. Brown (Ed). Sound musicianship: Understanding the Crafts of Music (pp.

178-188). Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

Saether, E. (2013). The art of stepping outside comfort zones: Intercultural collaborative

learning in the international GLOMUS camp. In H. Gaunt & H. Westerlund (Eds).

Collaborative learning in higher music education (pp. 37-48). Surrey: Ashgate Publishing

Limited

10


SECTION TWO

OUTPUT

Teaching Design Exemplars

Key Stage 2

Creative Music Making

with the Use of Electrical Conductors

Scheme of Work

Listening Worksheet

Composition and Invention Worksheet

Peer Assessment Worksheet

Key Stage 3

Timbral Exploration

through Electronic Instrument Making

Scheme of Work

Listening Worksheet

Invention Worksheet

Composition Worksheet

Creating Self-Reflection Worksheet

Peer Assessment Worksheet


CREATIVE MUSIC MAKING WITH

THE USE OF ELECTRICAL CONDUCTORS

Learning phase Key Stage 2

Learning duration 4 periods, 40 minutes per period

Introduction

Learning goals

This unit aids students in understanding the music

characteristics and composition device and to nurture

their creativity by designing an instrument with electronical

conductors for creative performance and creation

To appreciate music and create a melody with a tailor-made

instrument

Learning Objectives

Students will learn to

• sing in unison with technical accuracy in pitch

and rhythm

• create rhythmic patterns to accompany the song

• design an instrument by using an invention kit

- Makey Makey

• play instruments with accurate rhythm

• apply technology to turn conductive objects

into touchpad and create a melody

• notate the melody with graphic score/chart

• perform the original melody with Makey Makey

and conductive objects

• apply predetermined criteria to appraise

compositions and performance using appropriate

musical terms

12


SCHEME OF WORK (PRIMARY SCHOOL P4-6)

Overall Objectives: To understand the music characteristics and the device of musical development by performing and listening and to

nurture creativity by designing an instrument with conductive objectives and by creating a melody

Key Stage: 2

Total Number of Periods: 4 periods, 40 min per period

Learning Targets*

Learning Activities

Learning Objectives

CI SP CR MC Listening Performing Creating

Generic Skills /

Value and Attitudes Assessment Resources

Students learn to:

1. sing in unison with technical

accuracy

2. create rhythmic patterns to

accompany the song

3. design an instrument by

using Makey Makey

4. play the instruments with

accurate rhythm

5. apply technology to create

a melody

6. notate the melody with

graphic score/chart

• Identify the major

tonality through singing

and listening

• Listen to Ode to

Joy from Beethoven's

Symphony No. 9 in D

minor, Op. 125,

complete the listening

worksheet, describe

and analyse the music

characteristics, such as:

i. time signature;

ii. melodic contour;

iii. rhythm;

iv. mood

• Identify the changes

of tonic and dominant

chords

• Conduct peer

assessment on

composition and

performance based on

predetermined criteria

• Sing Ode to Joy based

on the given tempo,

dynamic and expression

markings

• Perform rhythmic

pattern on Makey Makey

instruments to

accompany Ode to Joy

• Perform the melody

composed by students

with the use of Makey

Makey

• Design an instrument

by creating a closed

circuit through

conductive objects with

the application of Makey

Makey and complete

the composition and

invention worksheet

• Create an eight-bar

melody in C major

• Notate the melody with

graphic score/chart

• Creativity

• Collaboration skills

• Communication skills

• Critical thinking skills

• Information

technology skills

• Problem solving skills

• Self-learning skills

• Respect and

appreciation of

others’ work and

performance

• Positive and active

learning attitude

• Observe students’

development in

attitudes and generic

skills to adjust the

learning and

teaching strategies

accordingly.

• Use listening

worksheet to

assess students’

ability to identify the

characteristics of the

music.

• Assess students’

composition and

performances based

on predetermined

criteria.

• Scores, audio/video

recordings and a

listening worksheet

• Makey Makey

• Computer

• Online resource

• Composition and

invention worksheet

• Peer assessment

worksheet on

composition and

performance

7. perform the original

melody

8. apply predetermined

criteria to appraise

compositions and

performance using

appropriate music terms

* Learning Targets: CI – Developing Creativity and Imagination SP – Developing Music Skills Processes

CR – Cultivating Critical Responses in Music MC – Understanding Music in Context

Source: Beethoven, Ludwig van (1826). Symphony No. 9 in D minor, Op. 125. Mainz Germany: Breitkopf & Härtel

13


LISTENING WORKSHEET

NAME: ( ) DATE:

CLASS:

1. Listen to Beethoven's Ode to Joy and draw the chart notation below.

bar 1 2 3 4

s

f

m

r

d

Joy - ful, joy - ful We a - dore Thee God of glo - ry Lord of Love

s

5 6 7 8

f

m

r

d

Hearts un - fold like flowers be - fore Thee Hail Thee to the sun a - bove

s

9 10 11 12

f

m

r

d

Melt the clouds of sin and sad - ness Drive the dark of doubt a - way

14


s

13 14 11 12

f

m

r

d

Gi - ver of im - mor - tal glad - ness Fill us with the light of day

2. Please circle or write down the suitable description of the musical characteristics

of Ode to Joy.

2/4

Time signature

3/4

4/4

Melodic contour

(circle all that apply)

Step

Leap

Repetition

Minim

Crochet

Rhythm

Quaver

Semiquaver

Dotted Rhythm

Triplet

Mood

(please describe)

15


COMPOSITION AND INVENTION WORKSHEET

NAME: ( ) DATE:

CLASS:

GROUP:

GROUP LEADER:

GROUP MEMBERS:

Part I – Invent instrument with Makey Makey

1. Find three electrical conductors and draw their shape in the boxes below.

Name of the

conductor

1 2 3

Diagram

2. Plug in Makey Makey on the computer USB port

3. Close pop-up window for any setup

4. Open the app Chamber Music (http://www.nyu.edu/projects/ruthmann/ CMSD/piano/)

5. Connect one end of an alligator clip to ‘Earth’ on the bottom of the front side of Makey

Makey.

6. Hold the metal part of the other end of the alligator clip between your fingers.

7. Test the conductors by connecting them to Makey Makey by another alligator clip

8. Design an instrument with the use of Makey Makey and draw the prototype in the box

below that includes electrical conductors, Makey Makey, alligator clip and cable.

16


9. Consider the musical characteristics of your melody. (cirlce all that apply)

Pitch High Medium Low

Time Signature 2/4 3/4 4/4

Tempo Allegro Moderato Andante

Mood

(please describe)

Part II – Melodic Writing

Compose a melody with eight measures in two phrases and notate in the chart below.

Test the melody with Makey Makey.

s

f

m

r

d

s

f

m

r

d

17


PEER ASSESSMENT WORKSHEET

NAME: ( ) DATE:

CLASS:

GROUP:

GROUP LEADER:

GROUP MEMBERS:

Group 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Assessment Criteria

Fill in the marks of each group.

Marks (1 = lowest; 5 = highest)

1

2

3

4

5

6

Whether the Makey

Makey setting is creative

Whether the music

matches the pre-set mood

Whether the music is

fluent

Whether the notation is

accurate

Whether the performance

is fluent and accurate

Whether the overall

outcome is satisfactory

OVERALL PERFORMANCE/ OTHER COMMENTS:

18


TIMBRAL EXPLORATION THROUGH

ELECTRONIC INSTRUMENT MAKING

Learning phase Key Stage 3

Learning duration

Introduction

Learning goals

8 periods, 40 minutes per period

This unit nurtures the creativity of students through

STEAM-integrated listening, performing and creating

activities

To nurture students’ creativity and critical response in music

through innovative STEAM activities and to enhance their

understanding of musical characteristics in electronic music

through performing and listening

Learning Objectives

Students will learn to

• describe and analyse electronic music in terms

of pitch, rhythm, timbre, notation and mood

• use the appropriate style of interpreting

graphic notation with electronic building blocks

• design an electronic instrument with suitable

controller

• apply technology to create a composition

• notate the composition with the graphic score

• perform the original composition

• develop a list of criteria for appraising

compositions and performance

19


SCHEME OF WORK (SECONDARY SCHOOL S1-3)

Overall Objectives: To nurture students’ creativity and critical response in music through innovative STEAM activities and to enhance

their understanding of musical characteristics in electronic music through performing and listening

Key Stage: 3

Total Number of Periods: 8 periods, 40 minutes per period

Learning Targets*

Learning Activities

Learning Objectives

CI SP CR MC Listening Performing Creating

Generic Skills /

Value and Attitudes

Assessment Resources

Students learn to:

1. describe and analyse electronic

music with suitable musical

terms

2. use appropriate style to

interpret graphic notation with

electronic instruments

3. design an electronic instrument

with the use of the electronic

building blocks with suitable

controller

4. apply technology to create a

composition for the electronic

instrument

5. notate the composition with

graphic score

6. perform the original

composition

7. develop a list of criteria for

appraising compositions and

performance

• Listen to Ligeti’s

Artikulation with the

graphic score, complete

the listening worksheet

and describe and analyse

the music characteristics,

such as:

i. pitch;

ii. rhythm;

iii. timbre;

iv. graphic notation;

v. mood

• Develop a list of criteria for

assessing compositions

and performances,

such as:

i. cohesion ofcomposition

and title/idea

ii. structure and duration

of the composition

iii. appropriate instrument

designed with suitable

performance ritual

iv. accuracy of the graphic

notation

v. accuracy of rhythmic,

pitch and dynamic in

the performance

• Conduct peer assessment

on composition and

performance based on

predetermined criteria

• Perform Ligeti’s

Artikulation based

on the graphic

score with

electronic

instruments

• Perform the workin-progress

by

classmates

• Perform the

compositions in

groups

• Create an electronic

instrument in

group from

scientific, technological

and mathematical

perspectives and

complete the invention

worksheet, such as:

i. frequency of pitch

ii. signal generators

iii. controllers

iv. modulators

v. modifiers

• Create a short

composition in groups

and complete the

composition planning

worksheet

• Make a brief oral

presentation on

instrument-building

and creation process

• Creativity

• Collaboration skills

• Communication skills

• Critical thinking skills

• Information technology

skills

• Mathematical skills

• Problem solving skills

• Self-learning skills

• Self-management skills

• Respect for and

appreciation of others’

work and performance

• Positive and active

learning attitude

• Observe students’

development in

attitudes and generic

skills to adjust the

learning and teaching

strategies accordingly.

• Use listening worksheet

to assess students’

ability to identify

the characteristics of

electronic music.

• Assess oral presentation

• Assess students’

composition and

performances based on

predetermined criteria.

• Scores, audio/video

recordings and a

listening worksheet on

Ligeti’s Artikulation

• Electronic building

blocks

• Computer

• Online resource

• Invention worksheet

• Composition worksheet

• Self-reflection worksheet

for creation

• Peer assessment

worksheet on

composition and

performance

* Learning Targets: CI – Developing Creativity and Imagination SP – Developing Music Skills Processes

CR – Cultivating Critical Responses in Music MC – Understanding Music in Context

Sources: Ligeti, György (1958). Artikulation. Mainz Germany: B. Schott's Söhne

20


LISTENING WORKSHEET

NAME: ( ) DATE:

CLASS:

GROUP:

GROUP LEADER:

GROUP MEMBERS:

Learning focus: Musical characteristics

Music: Ligeti’s Artikulation

1. Listen to Ligeti’s Artikulation and circle the suitable musical characteristics.

Melody motion

Leap

Step

Repetition

Rhythm

Regular

Irregular

Syncopation

Non-metric

Texture

Thick

Thin

2. How is the timbre of the piece?

3. How is the atmosphere of this piece?

4. Does the graphic notation matches the music?

5. What are differences of Ligeti's Artikulation from traditional instrumental music?

21


INVENTION WORKSHEET

NAME: ( ) DATE:

CLASS:

GROUP:

GROUP LEADER:

GROUP MEMBERS:

1. PLANNING

i. I will invent

ii. What will it do?

iii. Why did you choose that idea?

2. REALISATION

Draw the prototype and indicate the electronic building blocks you have used for your

instrument invention.

i. Describe the timbre of the invented instrument?

3. REFLECTION

i. How does the invented instrument serve your ideas?

ii.

Are you satisfied with the design of your invention?

iii.

What are your constraints in regard to group collaboration and instrument design?

22


COMPOSITION WORKSHEET

NAME: ( ) DATE:

CLASS:

GROUP:

GROUP LEADER:

GROUP MEMBERS:

1. Title of the piece:

2. Describe the idea of the composition.

3. Plan your group composition project, and circle the music elements that apply.

Sound source(s)

Human voice

Instrumental:

Electronic Building Blocks

Tonality

Major Minor Pentatonic

Others:

Tempo Allegro Moderato Andante

Change of tempo No Yes:

Texture Thick Medium Thin

Sound effects Filter Delay

Relaxing Calm Exciting

Atmosphere

Vivid Expressive Graceful

Psychedelic Sorrow Horrifying

Others:

4. Duration:

23


GRAPHIC NOTATION

Plan and draw the musical events by using any shapes in the diagram below.

EVENT

TIME

24


SELF-REFLECTION WORKSHEET FOR CREATION

NAME: ( ) DATE:

CLASS:

GROUP:

GROUP LEADER:

GROUP MEMBERS:

1. Write down the title of the piece.

2. Write down the ideas of the piece.

3. How do the ideas develop?

4. Introduce the characteristics of the piece.

5. Do you think the music/sound design is cohesive with the title? Why?

6. Do you think the melody/sound effect created the mood effectively?

7. Are you satisfied with your composition? Why?

8. What challenge did you encounter in the creative process? How did you solve the

challenge?

25


PEER ASSESSMENT WORKSHEET

NAME: ( ) DATE:

CLASS:

GROUP:

GROUP LEADER:

GROUP MEMBERS:

Group 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Assessment Criteria

Fill in the marks of each group.

Marks (1 = lowest; 5 = highest)

1

2

3

4

Whether the music/sound design

is cohesive with the title

Whether the music is structured in

the set duration

Whether the invented instrument

serves the music ideas

Whether the musical ideas

developed effectively

5 Whether the notation is accurate

6

Whether the performance is fluent

and accurate

OVERALL PERFORMANCE/ OTHER COMMENTS:

26


SECTION THREE

WIRE

Internet Resources

Reading Materials


I N T E R N E T

R E S O U R C E S

Listening

The Guardian: Symphony guide: Beethoven's

Ninth ('Choral') (With audio)

György Ligeti’s Artikulation

(with score and audio)

London Sinfonietta: Turning Point – Ligeti

Electronic Building Blocks

littleBits

littleBits’s Educator Guide

Makey Makey

Coding

Max

Scratch

https://www.theguardian.com/music/tomserviceblog/2014/

sep/09/symphony-guide-beethoven-ninth-choral-tom-service

https://blogthehum.wordpress.com/2016/04/05/gyorgyligetis-artikulation-with-score-and-audio/

http://www.londonsinfonietta.org.uk/stories/turning-pointsligeti

http://littlebits.com/education

https://d2q6sbo7w75ef4.cloudfront.net/littleBits-educatorsguide-8-2016.pdf

https://makeymakey.com/

https://cycling74.com/products/max/

https://scratch.mit.edu/

R E A D I N G

M A T E R I A L S

Book/Serial Title Author Publisher Year

From STEM to STEAM

David A. Sousa

and Tom Pilecki

Corwin 2013

Foundations of Music Technology V. J. Manzo Oxford University Press 2016

LittleBits Amber Lovett Ann Arbor, Cherry Lake Publishing 2016

Makey Makey Sandy Ng Ann Arbor, Cherry Lake Publishing 2017

Max/MSP/Jitter for Music: A Practical

Guide to Developing Interactive Music V. J. Manzo OUP USA 2011

Systems for Education and More

STEAM Makers – Fostering Creativity

and Innovation in the Elementary Jacie Maslyk Corwin 2016

Classroom

The Big Book of Maker Space Projects

Colleen Graves

and Aaron Graves

McGraw-Hill Education 2017

The Oxford Handbook of Technology

and Music Education

Understanding Contemporary Music –

A Teaching Manual for Secondary and

Primary School Teachers

Alex Ruthmann (editor) and

Roger Mantie (editor)

Oxford University Press 2017

Sineng He The Chinese University Press 2006

28


BIOGRAPHY

CHI-HIN LEUNG

Principal Author

Dr Chi-hin Leung’s compositions mix elements of East and West and reveal the

composer’s diverse cultural background and his particular interest in timbral and

textural explorations. His compositions have been featured as part of the ISCM

World New Music Days, the UNESCO International “Arts for Peace” Festival, the

International Rostrum of Composers, International Electronic Music Week, the World

Choir Games, the International Handbell Symposium, the ISME World Conference on

Music Education, the Asian Recorder Festival, the Singapore Saxophone Symposium,

the Summa Cum Laude International Youth Music Festival Vienna, Musicarama and the

Hong Kong Schools Music Festival.

Leung was a composer at the Oxford University Press, author at Creative Notes and

Keys to Music of the Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra, lecturer at the Education

Bureau School Collaboration Scheme of Music Training for Senior Secondary Students

and instructor at the ISCM Education Music Creativity Campaign. He also provided

teacher training on e-learning in music at Education Bureau and schools.

Leung is currently President of the Hong Kong Association for Music Educators, Vice

Chairman of Hong Kong Composers’ Guild and Assistant Professor at the Department

of Cultural and Creative Arts, The Education University of Hong Kong.

GLORIA WAI-YEE PANG

Research Assistant

Gloria Wai-yee Pang is a Research Assistant at the Department of Cultural and Creative

Arts, The Education University of Hong Kong. She has served as a Research Assistant

for various art projects in different universities. She received her Bachelor of Arts in

Music and Master of Art in Cultural Management from The University of Hong Kong

and The Chinese University of Hong Kong respectively. Apart from her research on arts,

she is also experienced in arts management.

29


ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

NYU Steinhardt Music Experience Design Lab

Dr. Vivian Cheng

Dr. Steve Ho

Prof. Bo-wah Leung

Dr. Koji Matsunobu

Ms. Lok-yan Ng

Dr. Alex Ruthmann

Mr. Alex Sze

Mr. King-ho Tang

Ms. Wing-yan Tsui

Dr. Paulina Wong

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