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T H E M A G A Z I N E F O R H O T E L E X E C U T I V E S / J A N U A R Y ~ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 2 1

PLUS: THE 2021 FRANCHISE REPORT

THE FUTURE OF TRAVEL

Experts say travel will resume —but it will look a little

different in a post-COVID-19 world

CANADIAN PUBLICATION MAIL PRODUCT SALES AGREEMENT #40063470

BRIGHTER

DAYS AHEAD

Franchisors & franchisees

have high hopes for a strong

industry rebound

SAFE

PASSAGE

Hotel operators weigh in on

post-pandemic health-andsafety

protocols

SEAMLESS

STAYS

Guests and operators

are embracing mobile

check-in technolgy

hoteliermagazine.com


CONTENTS

VOLUME 33, NO. 1 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021

40

29

44

FEATURES

DEPARTMENTS

7 THE FRANCHISED

FUTURE

Hotel-industry experts predict

brighter days ahead

11 THE 2021

FRANCHISE REPORT

A comprehensive listing of

the industry’s top franchises

29 THE FUTURE

OF TRAVEL

Branding success comes from

meeting guests’ expectations

32 SAFE PASSAGE

Hotel leaders discuss new

COVID-19 safety protocols

38 FISHING WHERE THE

FISH ARE

Revenue teams should look to

non-traditional data sources

40 BREAKFAST BARRIERS

COVID-19 has had severe

impacts on breakfast buffets

42 STREAMLINED STAYS

Hotels and guests are

embracing mobile check-in

2 EDITOR’S PAGE

4 CHECKING IN

44 HOTELIER

Ryan Killeen,

The Annex, Toronto

38

hoteliermagazine.com JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021 | 1


EDITORIAL

INSPIRING

TRAVEL TRENDS

Almost a year after the pandemic surfaced, COVID-

19 continues to fuel uncertainty. And, just as

consumers were finally starting to feel somewhat

optimistic, given the wide distribution of vaccines,

a second wave of the virus hit around the world —

leading us to question when our lives will return to normal.

The answer remains murky and there are a host of variables

to consider: How quickly can the vaccine be distributed around

the world? Will there be a subsequent need for vigilance as the

virus mutates? And, realistically, can we resume travelling before

everyone is vaccinated?

While much remains unclear, the reality is pent-up demand

for travel means consumers will want to return to some sense of

normalcy sooner rather than later. But, what will travel look like

in the post-COVID-19 world? (See story on pg.29). Below are six

key trends from U.S.-based Amadeus Hospitality that will shape

travel in 2021:

1. Go Big (near or far) or Stay Home: When travel

returns, consumers will likely gravitate towards ‘big-idea’

or ‘bucket-list’ trips to tick off once-in-a-lifetime adventures.

The survey found 55 per cent of travellers said they

would travel for 14 days or more and 60 per cent expected

to take only a few trips a year.

2. Nomadic Travel: Companies such as Airbnb and Love

Home Swap are embracing the trend along with countries

such as Barbados, which offers the “digital-nomad” visa.

With COVID-19 causing travel restrictions and stress, there’s a clear desire for

longer holidays that let people take their work with them.

3. The Loyalty Shift: COVID-19 has caused the definition of loyalty to morph.

Travel providers now demonstrate their loyalty to travellers through their

commitments to health, hygiene and safety.

4. Swipe Right on Tech: Touchless tech will inspire traveller confidence.

That means transparency, clear communication and seamless payments and

boarding are the winners of 2021.

5. Travel Agents: While the Internet caused the demise of many travel agencies,

the pandemic is now highlighting their critical role. As a result, 2021 will see

travel agents become the fountains of all knowledge.

6. Travel with an impact: Today’s travellers want to minimize their footprint

and make sure their presence is having a positive

impact on their host destination. Travellers also want

to do good: a recent survey found 68 per cent of

travellers want the money they spend

ROSANNA CAIRA rcaira@kostuchmedia.com

CONNECT

WITH US

HotelierMagazine

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@hoteliermagazine

PHOTO BY NICK WONG

2 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021

hoteliermagazine.com


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ADVISORY BOARD

Andrew Weir, Tourism Toronto; Anne Larcade, Sequel Hotels & Resorts;

Anthony Cohen, Cresent Hotels — Global Edge Investments; Bonnie

Strome, Hyatt Hotels; Christiane Germain, ; Germain Hotels;

David McMillan, Axis Hospitality International; Don Cleary, Marriott Hotels;

Geoffrey Allan, Project Capital Management Hotels;

Hani Roustom, Friday Harbour Resort; Heather McCrory, Accor;

Reetu Gupta, Easton's Hotels; Ryan Murray, The Pillar + Post Hotel;

Stephen Renard, Renard International Hospitality & Search Consultants

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CHECKING IN

THE LATEST INDUSTRY NEWS FOR HOTEL EXECUTIVES FROM CANADA AND AROUND THE WORLD

A LASTING

LEGACY

Tourism industry mourns the

passing of Charlotte Bell

Charlotte was a proud,

"strong and passionate

leader for our collective

cause. She was a role

model for young female

leaders on how to be

tough, effective, and

a visionary, while still

leading with kindness.

She leaves a proud

legacy across Canada

and numerous political

leaders have expressed

their respect, grief and

common loss'

Dave McKenna

Board Chair, TIAC

The passing of Tourism Industry Association of

Canada (TIAC) president and CEO Charlotte Bell

in December shook the Canadian tourism industry.

Bell was appointed president and CEO of

TIAC in 2015 and led the organization in its mission

since, working to improve the Canadian tourism industry’s

global competitiveness as an international destination

through leadership and advocacy. And, throughout the

pandemic, Bell and TIAC advocated on behalf of the

industry and for the future of the visitor economy.

Prior to joining TIAC, Bell was a senior consultant

with Capital Hill Group and had been vice-president of

Corporate Affairs for the Atlantic Lottery Corporation.

Earlier in her career, she spent more than 25 years in the broadcasting sector in Canada and

had an extensive background in advocacy, strategic planning and public affairs.

Bell also served on a number of boards through her career, including Canadian Women

in Communications, The Banff International Television Festival and Advertising

Standards Canada.

Gudie Hutchings, MP for Long Range Mountains, acknowledged Bell’s contributions to

the industry in the House of Commons, saying “Many of us know Charlotte as the CEO of

TIAC, the Tourism Industry Association of Canada. We know her passion for the tourism

and hospitality sectors and we know that during the pandemic that passion only grew. Her

forward thinking and outright love for this industry, its leaders, workers and clients, many

of us have seen fi rst-hand. We have seen the results of her hard work and planning among

the many winding roads that she has travelled throughout our country from coast to coast

to coast. Charlotte is now travelling another road, and wherever this road leads, I know

her passion for tourism will always be with her.”

In her role as president and CEO of the Tourism Industry Association of Canada,

Charlotte embraced her advocacy role to include MMBC and the importance

of business events to the Canadian economy. We will be forever grateful for her

leadership and friendship,” Meetings Mean Business Canada stated in an email.

“Charlotte will always be remembered in the familiar things she touched, spoke

and was passionate about. Her memory will continue to live in the lives of all of

us who knew her and the legacy she leaves behind.

4 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021

hoteliermagazine.com


FROM

BEST

TO

BETTER

Best Western Hotels & Resorts

(BWHR) has selected Franklin-

Covey’s ‘gold standard’ leadership-development

curriculum to

assist in further elevating leadership

excellence in its general

managers across North America.

BWHR will provide general

managers from every hotel in

North America with access to

FranklinCovey’s All Access Pass.

This comprehensive access will

complement BWHR’s existing

training programs, which include

the Care Every Guest Every

Time employee training. Franklin-

Covey’s All Access Pass is an

annually renewable program

providing Passholders with

unlimited access to the

company’s entire collection

of content and solutions

available through a variety

of channels.

LEADING

TOURISM

David Goldstein is Travel Alberta’s new CEO.

He takes over the role from Chris Heseltine,

who served as the acting CEO for six months.

Goldstein has an extensive background in tourism

and media, most recently serving as COO at Gusto

Worldwide Media. Prior to this, he was president

and CEO of Destination Canada for nearly fi ve

years, in addition to his nearly five years as president

and CEO of the Tourism Industry Association

of Canada (TIAC). Heseltine will continue as

vice-president of Economic Development and

Community Engagement for Travel Alberta with

acting responsibility for Strategy, Insights and

Stakeholder Engagement.

After fi ve years at the

Hazelton Hotel, most

recently as the its

managing director, Hani

Roustom has left the

Toronto luxury property.

Roustom is now CEO

of the Friday Harbour

Resort, an all-seasons

waterside resort on Lake

Simcoe, in Innisfi l, Ont.

THAT'S

A WRAP

Hotel-industry icons David

Larone and Brian Stanford are

Brian Stanford

David Larone

beginning their transition into

retirement as CBRE Valuation

and Advisory Services (VAS) embarks on a new chapter.

Larone and Stanford have guided hotel development, investment and operations

decisions for four decades. The pair helped build PKF Consulting into an industry

leader before joining forces with CBRE in 2015.

“Not only are they subject-matter experts, they are also gentlemen,” says Paul

Morassutti, vice-chairman, CBRE. “We have benefitted from their professional

guidance and personal friendship all these years.”

Nicole Nguyen, Rebecca Godfrey and David Ferguson will form the new senior

leadership team of CBRE’s VAS hotels operation.

RECOGNIZING

EXCELLENCE

Mandy Farmer, CEO of Accent Inns and Hotel Zed, was awarded the

RBC Canadian Women Entrepreneur Excellence Awardin November.

The RBC Canadian Women Entrepreneur Awards is the premier

national awards program celebrating the achievements of the

most successful and impactful women who have demonstrated

excellence across multiple sectors. The Entrepreneur Excellence

Award recognizes how Farmer has run her business, contributed

to the community and taken care of her employees.

hoteliermagazine.com JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021 | 5


SETTING

UP CAMP

Basecamp Resorts opened its newest hotel in

December near downtown Revelstoke, B.C.

Basecamp Revelstoke features 32 units equipped

with remote keyless entry, a full kitchen, washer

and dryer, complimentary wireless Internet, a

fl at-screen LED TV with cable and a private patio

with outdoor seating. The property also offers two

shared rooftop hot tubs, free access to cruiser bikes

for guests and complementary parking. Interiors

feature vaulted living spaces to capitalize on the

scenery and original artwork produced by local

Revelstoke artist, Hayley Stewart. Basecamp

Resorts’ portfolio also includes four properties in

Canmore, Alta. — Basecamp Canmore, Basecamp

Lodge, Lamphouse Hotel and the recently opened

Basecamp Suites.

Reetu Gupta was named

among Women’s Executive

Network’s (WXN) 2020

Canada’s Most Powerful

Women: Top 100 Award

Winners, marking her

second-consecutive year

on the list. Gupta, who was

recognized in the awards’

BMO Entrepreneurs category,

is the president and CEO

of The Easton’s Group of

Hotels and The Gupta Group,

the co-founder and Chief

Strategy Offi cer of Rogue

Insight Capital. and president

and CEO of The Gupta Family

Foundation

NEW FRONTIER

Accor has launched a new Apartments & Villas website, dedicated

entirely to the rental of private residences and extended-stay hotel

properties. The site makes more than 50,000 apartments, villas and

chalets available, drawing from Accor’s 15 extended-stay hotel brands,

as well as the company’s portfolio of branded private residences,

which are privately owned and frequently included in managed-rental

programs, and one-of-a-kind private rentals (onefi nestay), in more than

350 destinations. The Apartments & Villas website offers fully equipped

apartments, villas, houses and suites while allowing guests to enjoying

all the benefi ts of the ALL - Accor Live Limitless program, as well as

Accor’s new cancellation policy and the intensifi ed hygiene-andprevention

measures (Allsafe).

LET’S TALK ABOUT HOW

OUR CANADIAN-BASED

TEAM CAN HELP GROW

YOUR BUSINESS!

1.800.646.2435

development@travelodge.ca

travelodge.ca/development

OVER 100 LOCATIONS

ACROSS CANADA


THE FRANCHISE REPORT

The

FRANCHISED

Future

Hotel franchisors and franchisees

have faced steep challenges in

the past year, but there’s hope

for brighter days ahead

BY DANIELLE SCHALK

OTEL FRANCHISE companies spent much

of 2020 in defense mode, responding to the COVID-19

crisis with franchisee-support packages, new policies and

procedures and heightened levels of communication, while

also working with industry associations to advocate for

government support. And, while navigating the pandemic has

been challenging and forced major hotel companies to make

a lot of tough decisions, the franchisors that most effectively

supported and guided franchisees through the crisis are

expected to see a return on their investment.

Brian Leon, president, Choice Hotels Canada, describes

the current economic uncertainty as a “double-edged

hoteliermagazine.com JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021 | 7


INDUSTRY

INPUT

MARRIOTT INTERNATIONAL: “We’ve had an

unprecedented level of engagement with [our owner

and franchisee community] this year, including weekly

webinars in many regions and more frequent interactions

with our owner advisory committees,” Arne Sorenson,

president and CEO, Marriott International, said

during the company’s third-quarter

investors’ call. “We’re deeply

committed to working closely

together to manage through these

challenging times. We remain

focused onreducing their costs

as much as possible in this

environment.”

sword”

in terms of its

impact on hotel

franchising. “We

saw very significant

impact and have

seen the availability

of financing [dry up], so

that translates to a negative

impact on new-build growth,”

he explains. “We’ve also seen a

big reduction in hotel transactions, [which] are often a good

source of conversion growth for a system like ours.”

Combined, this has resulted in a “primarily negative impact

on growth in the short term,” says Leon, adding, “We are

seeing that change and there are some positives that come out

of this as well.”

“What we’re going to see, in hotel franchising, is a lot of hotel

owners question what they’re getting out of their franchisors and

wanting to make sure they’re getting [good] value,” says Leon.

“And, those of us that are able to provide that great value [are

going to see] really good opportunities to continue to grow.”

In the current environment, a key part of that value is

consumer confidence. With cleanliness and safety top of mind

for current and future travel, it’s expected that trusted brands

will hold an advantage over their competition going forward.

“What we may have demonstrated to hotels that are not

presently affiliated with any brand is that there’s some solid

merit in having a brand affiliation, because you do get the

weight of global brands to come to the table to create these

policies and procedures in a fast, efficient manner,” says Irwin

Prince, president and COO of Realstar Hospitality — franchisor

of the Days Inn, Motel 6 and Studio 6 brands in Canada.

FUTURE DEVELOPMENT

The circumstances of the past year led to the delay of hotel

openings, as well as a reduction in the number of new

signings, effectively stunting the growth of franchise brands.

But, even by the end of the year, signs were improving.

In its Q3 2020 earnings report, Marriott International indicated

strong openings in the quarter, with net rooms growth for the

year expected to reach 2.5 to three per cent. And, the company’s

president and CEO, Arne Sorenson stated, “Although signings

are not as strong as in 2019, they’re quite solid considering the

extraordinary impact of COVID-19 on our industry…We’re also

encouraged by the increasing number of conversations we’re

having around conversions.”

Leon also stresses that new opportunities will present

themselves. “With the reduced pipeline of new hotels

coming online…as demand comes back to the market,

there will be a more favourable demand-supply

relationship,” he explains. “That’s going to create some

good new-hotel development opportunities.”

That said, Leon expects Choice will see more

immediate gains on the conversion front, as independent

hoteliers recognize the value of branded systems, which

has been proven through the crisis. “The support we’ve been

providing to our hotels has been a good story for our company,”

he says. “Our development team, [is] getting calls from people

saying ‘we hear good things about Choice and we want to talk

about branding in the future.’”

And, Leon isn’t the only one to hold this sentiment. “In

the near term, quality brands should benefit as investors

are expected to focus on brand companies that have shown

they’re out-performing the market based on strong programs

in place in response to COVID-19,” agrees Tim Marvin, EVP

of U.S.-based JLL’s Hotels & Hospitality Group.

And, in May, Ralph Hollister, Travel & Tourism analyst for

London-based GlobalData, noted COVID-19 may accelerate

the trend of independent hotels joining soft brands. “Large,

multi-national chains have the brand and marketing power

to outline new hygiene standards to vast amounts of potential

guests,” he explains. “This may create a new pull factor that

could help large chains consume even more of the global

market share post-pandemic.”

With the industry’s segments impacted to varying degrees

by restrictions and uncertainty — and the resulting effects on

demand — some franchises are expected to outperform others

when it comes to future development.

According to data from CBRE Hotels, Canadian limitedservice

properties saw a 69-per-cent RevPAR decline in Q2

2020, while RevPAR for resorts dropped 83 per cent and 88 per

cent for full-service hotels. The company’s COVID-19 Recovery

Framework also highlights limited-service properties as the

first segment to see recovery as local leisure and local/regional

corporate travel return, followed closely by focused-service and

extended-stay. By comparison, business is not expected to return

to full-service and resort properties until much later, due to their

reliance on group and business travel.

As Marvin points out, companies that specialize in the

property types that have shown resiliency and performed well

through the pandemic “are expected to outperform and it’s

likely more developers will adjust their short-term strategies

to take advantage of these dynamics.”

“We’ve seen that our midscale segment has significantly

outperformed the overall industry,” Leon explains. “From a

standpoint of profitability, [operators have] realized our limitedservice

hotels can be operated efficiently [and] have a great

agility to be able to respond to things like the [fluctuating]

occupancy rates we’ve seen.”

Leon points to Choice’s Quality and Clarion Pointe as

mid-scale conversion brands that are poised to present key

growth opportunities as the industry moves forward. For more

up-scale conversions, he calls out the Ascend Collection soft

brand as a key opportunity.

Choice H

Penticto

Garry H

8 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021

hoteliermagazine.com


LONG-TERM LOOK

There are other shifts expected to develop within hotel

franchising, in the mid- to long-term, as travel recovers and

we move through the post-pandemic world.

Marvin notes the pandemic crisis may have a lasting impact

on the structure of major franchise companies. “Historically,

many brand companies have pushed to maintain a significant

mix of managed assets under their brand portfolios. This

strategic decision is to help protect the brands (particularly

luxury brands) by controlling operations, as well as to provide

revenue to support large management infrastructures,” he

explains. “During COVID-19, brand companies have downsized

their organizations in an effort to reduce expenses. As franchising

requires less support and infrastructure than managing properties,

we’re seeing brands more willing to franchise than in the past.

It’s likely brand companies will use this time to permanently

re-structure their organizations to become more profitable

and franchising will be more prevalent.”

Also among the lasting shifts will be changes to brand

standards. “One of the things we’re looking at pretty aggressively

— and I suspect some of our competitors are, too — is

opportunities to eliminate costs from the business,” says Leon.

As he explains, short-term service changes caused by

COVID-19 restrictions have caused some to re-think offerings.

As an example, he says, “My expectation would be breakfast

isn’t going to go back to exactly the way it was before.

Complimentary breakfast will come back and still be part of

the value proposition for guests, but [will] probably look a

little bit different.”

What will this look like? Leon suggest a greater focus on

grab-and-go offerings could be in store.

Other changes could include more rooms featuring kitchenettes,

eliminating in-room coffee, greater use of technology

and streamlined operations.

“The pandemic has accelerated the pace of change

on some of these fronts,” says Prince, who points to how

frequently rooms are cleaned during a stay as a key area

where shifts are taking place.

In fact, a U.S. customer survey conducted in May by Fuel,

a South Carolina-based software and marketing company,

revealed travellers have varying opinions when it comes to

the level of housekeeping service desired during their future

hotel stays. ‘Only when requested’ emerged as the most

popular response, being the preferred service level for 29 per

cent of respondents. However, this increased to 35 per cent

for the millennial cohort. Daily full-service housekeeping is

still preferred by 22 per cent of respondents, while another 22

per cent would like daily towel changes.◆

PHOTO BY STUART BISH (CHOICE HOTELS CANADA'S HOTEL PENTICTON)

INDUSTRY

INPUT

otels Canada's Hotel

n (above) and Fort

otel

WYNDHAM HOTELS & RESORTS:

“Though it has been a tumultuous time for all of us in our industry, our

teams continue to innovate with an eye towards the future, [and] with

an eye towards maximizing the value we provide to our franchisees. We

recently deployed three state-of-the-art initiatives aimed at increasing

bookings at our hotels and increasing overall franchisee profitability,”

Geoffrey A. Ballotti, president and CEO, Wyndham Hotels & Resorts said

during the company’s 2020 Q3 earnings call, highlighting its broadened

digital investment strategy, Wyndham Direct and the company’s updated

mobile app, which launched in September.

INTERCONTINENTAL HOTEL GROUP (IHG):

“We’re in partnership with our owners, so it’s hugely important to us that

our owners succeed. Many of them we have been in partnership with

for decades, so we’ll do everything we can to bring business into the

hotels — that is the most important thing that we can do right now,” Paul

Edgecliffe-Johnson, CFO, IHG PLC, said during the company’s Q3 2020

results call. “We can help them think about their manning models and

how they reduce costs. We can help them with any information they

might need for re-financing, et cetera, but the greatest benefit we can do

is deploy our systems and our outperformance to drive the greatest possible

level of revenue to their hotels.”

hoteliermagazine.com JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021 | 9


Open the door to more.

When looking for an investment opportunity that gives more of everything it takes to

help you succeed — open the door to the hotel business. No hotel experience is required.

Choice helps you every step of the way, from reservations, property support, marketing,

technology — we’re with you as you get ready to open for business and every day after.

With more than 25 years of dedicated Canadian expertise, and over 80 years of experience

internationally, we provide every franchisee with the resources it takes to succeed.

Open the door to more, today.

ChoiceHotelsDevelopment.ca

©2021 Choice Hotels Canada Inc. All Rights Reserved.


THE 2021

FRANCHISE

REPORT

AC HOTELS

Marriott International, Inc.

2425 Matheson Blvd. E., Ste. 100

Mississauga, ON L4W 5K4

905-366-5208

marriottdevelopment.com

Regional VP, Lodging

Development, Canada: Paul Loehr

VP, Lodging Development, Canada:

Aaron Laurie

Director, Lodging Development,

Canada: Duncan Chiu

History, Plans

- first AC Hotel opened in 2011

- one property in Canada; 173

outside of Canada

- one property in the pipeline

for Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee US$90,000

plus US$500/room in excess of 150

- royalty fee 5.5% of GRS

- program services contribution

3.85% of GRS (includes a

contribution to the marketing

fund of 2.5% of GRS); plus

US$10,000/year; plus US$220/

room/year

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- management

- purchasing

- staff training

- supplies

ALOFT HOTELS

Marriott International, Inc.

2425 Matheson Blvd. E., Ste. 100

Mississauga, ON L4W 5K4

905-366-5208

marriottdevelopment.com

Regional VP, Lodging

Development, Canada: Paul Loehr

VP, Lodging Development, Canada:

Aaron Laurie

Director, Lodging Development,

Canada: Duncan Chiu

History, Plans

- first Aloft Hotel opened in 2008

- three properties in Canada; 186

outside of Canada

- one property in the pipeline

for Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee US$75,000

plus US$500/room in excess of 50

- royalty fee 5.5% of GRS

- program services contribution

3.15% of GRS (includes a contribution

to the marketing fund of 1%

of GRS); plus US$10,000/year; plus

US$220/room/year.

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- management

- purchasing

- site location

- site review and analysis

- staff training

- supplies

ASCEND HOTEL COLLECTION

Choice Hotels Canada Inc.

5015 Spectrum Way, Ste. 400

Mississauga, ON L4W 0E4

905-206-7316

choicehotelsdevelopment.ca

President: Brian Leon

History, Plans

- established in Canada in 2009

- 23 properties in Canada; 300

outside of Canada (all franchised)

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee $300/room;

minimum $45,000

- advertising fee 1.25%

- royalty fee 4%

- reservation fee 1.25%

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- staff training

- supplies

AUTOGRAPH COLLECTION

Marriott International, Inc.

2425 Matheson Blvd. E., Ste. 100

Mississauga, ON L4W 5K4

905-366-5208

marriottdevelopment.com

Regional VP, Lodging

Development, Canada: Paul Loehr

VP, Lodging Development, Canada:

Aaron Laurie

Director, Lodging Development,

Canada: Duncan Chiu

History, Plans

- first Autograph property opened

in 2010

- five properties in Canada; 197

outside of Canada

- four properties in the pipeline

for Canada

Franchise costs

- initial application fee US$100,000

plus US$400/room in excess of 250

- royalty fee 5% of GRS

- program services contribution

2.02% of GRS (includes a contribution

to the marketing fund of

1.5% of GRS); plus US$40,000/year;

plus US$450/room/year

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- management

- purchasing

- staff training

- supplies

AVID HOTELS

InterContinental Hotels Group (IHG)

2 Robert Speck Pkwy., Ste. 600

Mississauga, ON L4Z 1H8

416-675-6644

avidhotels.com

Regional Director, Upscale and

Mainstream Development, Canada:

Stuart Laurie

History, Plans

- established in 2017

- 14 properties outside of Canada

- plans to add six properties in

Canada

Franchise Costs

- total investment $7,686,735

to $11,210,260

- royalty fee 5% GRR

- marketing fee 3% GRR

- application fee $500/room;

$50,000 minimum

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- management

- site selection

- staff training

- supplies

BAYMONT BY WYNDHAM

Wyndham Hotels & Resorts

22 Sylvan Way

Parsippany, NJ 07054

800-889-9710

wyndhamdevelopment.com

EVP and Chief Development

Officer: Chip Ohlsson

History, Plans

- established in 1974

- three properties in Canada (all

franchised); 522 outside of Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee: the greater of

$30,500 or $260 per/room for

conversion; $29,000 or $260 per/

room for new construction

- total investment $86,371 to

$7,026,711

- marketing fee 3.5% of GRR

(marketing contribution of 2%

and basic reservation fee of 1.5%)

- royalty fee 5% of GRR

Services

- advertising/marketing

- development/design

- financial assistance

- lease negotiation

- purchasing

- quality control

- reservation systems

- sales

- staff training

- supplies

- technical services

hoteliermagazine.com

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021 | 11


THE 2021

FRANCHISE

REPORT

BEST WESTERN HOTELS

& RESORTS

6557 Mississauga Rd., Unit D

Meadowvale Ct. 1

Mississauga, ON L5N 1A6

905-816-4787

bestwestern.com

President: David Kong

History, Plans

- established in 1946 in Long

Beach, Calif.

- 197 properties in Canada; 3,456

outside of Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee $49,000

minimum, plus $200/room

for properties with more than

50 rooms

- marketing fee 0.9% of GRR

- royalty fee $1.57/room/day based

on 100 room hotel

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- lease negotiation

- management

- purchasing

- revenue management

- site location

- staff training

- supplies

CAMBRIA SUITES

Choice Hotels International

1 Choice Hotels Cir., Ste. 400

Rockville, MD 20850

800-547-0007

choicehotelsdevelopment.com

President & CEO: Pat Pacious

SVP, Franchise Development,

Upscale Brands: Mark Shalala

History, Plans

- founded in 2007

- no properties in Canada; 53

outside of Canada

Franchise Costs

- application fee $5,000

- initial fee $500/room; minimum

of $60,000

- royalty fee 6% GRR

- system fee 3% GRR

CANADAS BEST VALUE INN

Red Lion Hotels Franchising, Inc.

1550 Market St., Ste. 425

Denver, CO 80202

866-437-4878

franchise.rlhco.com

EVP, Lodging Development &

Franchise Operations:

Harry Sladich

VP, New Development:

Christopher Slattery

History, Plans

- established in 1999

- franchised by Red Lion Hotels

Franchising Canada, Inc.,

since 2017

- 20 properties in Canada

- sister brand, Americas Best Value

Inn, franchised in the U.S., has

562 properties

Franchise Costs

- initial/application Fee $16,500 for

first 50 rooms; $150/room over 50

monthly membership fee:

(royalty) first 50 rooms $23.50/

room/month; 51 to 75 rooms

$19.50/room/month; 76+ rooms

$18.50/room/month ($860

monthly minimum)

- marketing fee $17/room/month

- no loyalty fees

Services

- advertising/marketing

- CRS and CRO

- guest-recognition program

- revenue-management assistance

- sales

CANDLEWOOD SUITES

InterContinental Hotels Group (IHG)

2 Robert Speck Pkwy., Ste. 600

Mississauga, ON L4Z 1H8

416-675-6644

candlewoodsuites.com

Regional Director, Midscale

Franchise Sales & Development,

Canada: Stuart Laurie

History, Plans

- established 1995

- two franchised properties in

Canada; 405 outside of Canada

- plans to add five properties

in Canada

Franchise Costs

- total investment $8,992,560

to $12,373,515

- royalty fee 5% GSR

- marketing fee 2.5 % GSR

- application fee: 500/guest suite;

$50,000 minimum

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- management

- site location

- staff training

- supplies

CLARION

Choice Hotels Canada Inc.

5015 Spectrum Way, Ste. 400

Mississauga, ON L4W 0E4

905-206-7316

choicehotelsdevelopment.ca

President: Brian Leon

History, Plans

- established in 1994 in Canada

- nine properties in Canada; 275

outside of Canada (all franchised)

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee $300/room;

minimum $35,000

- advertising fee 1.25%

- royalty fee 2.5%

- reservation fee 1.25%

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- staff training

- supplies

CLARION POINTE

Choice Hotels Canada Inc.

5015 Spectrum Way, Ste. 400

Mississauga, ON L4W 0E4

905-206-7316

choicehotelsdevelopment.ca

President: Brian Leon

History, Plans

- established in 2020 in Canada

- no properties in Canada; 20

outside of Canada (all franchised)

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee $300/room;

minimum $35,000

- advertising fee 1.25%

- royalty fee 2.5%

- reservation fee 1.25%

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- staff training

- supplies

COAST HOTELS

APA Hotel International Limited

700 - 535 Thurlow St.

Vancouver, B.C., V6E 3L2

604-642-4104

coasthotels.com/managementfranchise/

Vice-President, Development:

Mark Hope

History, Plans

- established in 1972 in Gold River/

Tahsis, B.C.

- 27 properties in Canada; 10

outside of Canada (28 franchised)

- continued expansion planned in

Western Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee $15,000

minimum or $150 per/room,

whichever is greater

- advertising fee 2%

- distribution fee 1.5%

(reservations fee)

- royalty fee 2%

- revenue management fee 1%

- other fees

Services

- accounting

- advertising/marketing

- design

- lease negotiation

- management

- purchasing

- revenue management

- reservations and distribution

- site location

- staff training

- supplies

12 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021 hoteliermagazine.com


THE 2021

FRANCHISE

REPORT

COMFORT

Choice Hotels Canada Inc.

5015 Spectrum Way, Ste. 400

Mississauga, ON L4W 0E4

905-206-7316

choicehotelsdevelopment.ca

President: Brian Leon

History, Plans

- established in 1989 in Canada

- 149 properties in Canada; 1,954

outside of Canada (all franchised)

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee $300/

room; minimum $40,000

- advertising fee 1.3%

- royalty fee 5%

- reservation fee 1.75%

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- staff training

- supplies

COUNTRY INN & SUITES

BY RADISSON

Radisson Hotel Group

701 Carlson Pkwy., Ste. 300,

MS 4001

Minnetonka, MN 55305

800-336-3301

countryinn.com

CEO: Jim Alderman

COO, Franchise Operations:

Aly El-Bassuni

Chief Development Officer:

Phil Hugh

History, Plans

- established in 1986 in

Minneapolis, Minn.

- eight properties in Canada;

476 outside of Canada

(465 franchised)

- plans to open a new property

in Ajax, Ont. and elsewhere

throughout Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee US$50,000

- total cost US$1,927,024

to $9,625,369

- royalty fee 5%

- advertising fee 2.5%

- distribution fee 1.25%

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- management

- purchasing

- staff training

- supplies

COURTYARD BY MARRIOTT

Marriott International, Inc.

2425 Matheson Blvd. E., Ste. 100

Mississauga, ON L4W 5K4

905-366-5208

marriottdevelopment.com

Regional VP, Lodging

Development, Canada: Paul Loehr

VP, Lodging Development,

Canada: Aaron Laurie

Director, Lodging Development,

Canada: Duncan Chiu

History, Plans

- established in 1983

- 34 properties in Canada; 1,230

outside of Canada

- 13 properties in the pipeline

for Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee US$90,000;

plus US$500/room in excess of 150

- royalty fee 6% of GRS

- program services contribution

3.35% of GRS (includes market

ing-fund contribution of 2%

GRS); plus US$10,000/year;

plus US$220/room/year.

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- management

- purchasing

- staff training

- supplies

CROWNE PLAZA HOTELS

AND RESORTS

InterContinental Hotels Group (IHG)

2 Robert Speck Pkwy., Ste. 600

Mississauga, ON L4Z 1H8

416-675-6644

crowneplaza.com

SVP, Upscale Development:

Julienne Smith

Vice-President, Upscale

Development: Jim Erlacher

Vice-President, Upscale

Development (Western Canada):

Jeff Summers

development.ihg.com

History, Plans

- established in 1983

- seven properties in Canada

(all franchised); 418 outside

of Canada

Franchise Costs

- total investment $29,831,350 -

$64,324,700

- royalty fee 5% GRR

- marketing fee 3% GRR

- application fee $500/guest room;

$75,000 minimum

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- management

- site location

- staff training

- supplies

DAYS INNS. HOTELS. SUITES

Days Inns - Canada

Master Franchisor in Canada

Realstar Hotel Services Corp.,

Division of Realstar Hospitality

77 Bloor St. W., Ste. 2000

Toronto, ON M5S 1M2

416-966-8387

daysinn.ca

President and COO: Irwin Prince

History, Plans

- franchising in Canada since 1992

- 115 franchised properties in

Canada; 1,600-plus

outside of Canada

- plans to add five (+/-) properties

in Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee minimum

$45,000

- royalty fee 5%

- marketing fee 1.5%

- reservations fee 2.3%

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- global reservations

- national sales network

- operational support

- purchasing

- site review and analysis

- staff training

- tradeshow representation

DELTA HOTELS BY MARRIOTT

Marriott International, Inc.

2425 Matheson Blvd. E., Ste. 100

Mississauga, ON L4W 5K4

905-366-5208

marriottdevelopment.com

Regional VP, Lodging

Development, Canada: Paul Loehr

VP, Lodging Development,

Canada: Aaron Laurie

Director, Lodging Development,

Canada: Duncan Chiu

History, Plans

- acquired Delta Hotels and

Resorts in 2015

- 37 properties in Canada; 44

outside of Canada

- three properties in the pipeline

for Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial application fee US$100,000;

plus US$400/room in excess

of 250

- royalty fee 5% of GRS

- program services contribution

2.16% of GRS (includes marketing-fund

contribution of 1.5%

GRS); plus US$45,000/year;

plus US$380/room/year

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- management

- purchasing

- staff training

- supplies

hoteliermagazine.com

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021 | 13


THE 2021

FRANCHISE

REPORT

DOUBLETREE BY HILTON

Hilton

7930 Jones Branch Dr.

McLean, VA 22102

703-883-1000

hilton.com/en/corporate/

development/

President & CEO:

Christopher Nassetta

Senior Director, Development,

Canada: Jeff Cury

History, Plans

- established in 1969

- 18 properties in Canada (all

franchised); 592 outside of

Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee US$75,000

for the first 250 rooms; plus

US$400 per additional room

- royalty fee: 5% of GRR

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- loyalty program

- management

- purchasing

- site location

- staff training

- supplies

ECONO LODGE

Choice Hotels Canada Inc.

5015 Spectrum Way, Ste. 400

Mississauga, ON L4W 0E4

905-206-7316

choicehotelsdevelopment.ca

President: Brian Leon

History, Plans

- established in 1990 in Canada

- 40 properties in Canada; 792

outside of Canada (all

franchised)

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee $250/room;

minimum $25,000

- advertising fee 1.25%

- royalty fee 4%

- reservation fee 1.25%

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- staff training

- supplies

ELEMENT HOTELS

Marriott International, Inc.

2425 Matheson Blvd. E., Ste. 100

Mississauga, ON L4W 5K4

905-366-5208

marriottdevelopment.com

Regional VP, Lodging

Development, Canada: Paul Loehr

VP, Lodging Development,

Canada: Aaron Laurie

Director, Lodging Development,

Canada: Duncan Chiu

History, Plans

- first Element Hotel opened

in 2008

- five properties in Canada, 57

outside of Canada

- no properties in the pipeline

for Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee US$75,000

plus US$500/room in excess

of 150

- royalty fee 5.5% of GRS

- program services contribution

3.15% of GRS (includes marketing-fund

contribution of 1%

GRS); plus US$10,000/year;

plus US$220/room/year

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- management

- purchasing

- staff training

- supplies

EMBASSY SUITES BY HILTON

Hilton

7930 Jones Branch Dr.

McLean, VA 22102

703-883-1000

hilton.com/en/corporate/

development/

President & CEO: Christopher

Nassetta

Senior Director, Development,

Canada: Jeff Cury

History, Plans

- established in 1984

- four properties in Canada

(all franchised); 254 outside

of Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee US$75,000

for the first 250 rooms, plus

US$400 per additional room

- royalty Fee 3.5% of GRR year one;

4.5% year two; 5.5% year three

and thereafter

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- loyalty program

- management

- purchasing

- site location

- staff training

- supplies

EXECUTIVE HOTELS

AND RESORTS

1080 Howe St., 8th Fl.

Vancouver, BC V6Z 2T1

604-642-5250

executivehotels.net

President: Salim Sayani

History, Plans

- established in 1986 in Vancouver

- 11 properties in Canada, three

outside of Canada

Franchise Costs

- fees available upon request

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- lease negotiation

- management

- purchasing

- site location

- staff training

- supplies

FAIRFIELD INN & SUITES

Marriott International, Inc.

2425 Matheson Blvd. E., Ste. 100

Mississauga, ON L4W 5K4

905-366-5208

marriottdevelopment.com

Regional VP, Lodging

Development, Canada: Paul Loehr

VP, Lodging Development,

Canada: Aaron Laurie

Director, Lodging Development,

Canada: Duncan Chiu

History, Plans

- established 1987

- 25 properties in Canada; 1,083

outside of Canada

- 20 properties in the pipeline

for Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee US$75,000;

plus US$400/room in excess of

125

- royalty fee 5.5% of GRS

- program services contribution

3.85% of GRS (includes marketing-fund

contribution of 2.5%

GRS); plus US$7,000/year;

plus US$135/room/year.

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- management

- purchasing

- staff training

- supplies

FOUR POINTS BY SHERATON

Marriott International, Inc.

2425 Matheson Blvd. E., Ste. 100

Mississauga, ON L4W 5K4

905-366-5208

marriottdevelopment.com

Regional VP, Lodging

Development, Canada: Paul Loehr

VP, Lodging Development,

Canada: Aaron Laurie

Director, Lodging Development,

Canada: Duncan Chiu

History, Plans

- established 1995

- 35 properties in Canada; 256

outside of Canada

- seven properties in the pipeline

for Canada

14 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021 hoteliermagazine.com


THE 2021

FRANCHISE

REPORT

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee US$75,000;

plus US$400/room in excess of 150

- royalty fee 5.5% of GRS

- program services contribution

3.15% of GRS (includes a contribution

to the marketing fund of

1% of GRS); plus US$10,000/year;

plus US$220/room/year.

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- management

- purchasing

- staff training

- supplies

GUESTHOUSE EXTENDED STAY

Red Lion Hotels Franchising, Inc.

1550 Market St., Ste. 425

Denver, CO 80202

866-437-4878

franchise.rlhco.com

EVP, Lodging Development &

Franchise Operations:

Harry Sladich

VP, New Development:

Christopher Slattery

History, Plans

- franchising, Inc. since 2015

- re-launched as extended-stay

brand in late 2020

- 18 properties outside of Canada

- expansion planned for Canada

Franchise Costs

- application fee $20,000 for first

60 rooms; plus $150/room over 70

- flat membership fee $60/room/

month (includes royalty and

marketing)

- no loyalty Fees

Services

- advertising/marketing

- CRM

- CRS and CRO

- design

- guest recognition program

procurement

- revenue-management

assistance

- site selection

- supplies

- sales and support

HAMPTON BY HILTON

Hilton

7930 Jones Branch Dr.

McLean, VA 22102

703-883-1000

hilton.com/en/corporate/

development/

President & CEO: Christopher

Nassetta

Senior director, Development,

Canada: Jeff Cury

History, Plans

- established in 1984

- 62 properties in Canada (57

franchised); 2,583 outside

of Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee US$75,000

for the first 150 rooms, plus

US$400 per additional room

- royalty fee 6% of GRR

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- Hilton HHonors guest-reward

program

- management

- purchasing

- site location

- staff training

- supplies

HAWTHORN SUITES

BY WYNDHAM

Wyndham Hotels & Resorts

22 Sylvian Way

Parsippany, NJ 07054

800-889-9710

wyndhamdevelopment.com

EVP and Chief Development

Officer: Chip Ohlsson

History, Plans

- 110 properties outside of Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial fee for construction equal

to the greater of $44,500 or

$400/room; for conversion of

$40,000 or $400/room

- royalty fee 5.5% GRR

- marketing/reservation

contribution 2.5% GRR

Services

- architectural services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- development

- field support

- financial assistance

- lease negotiation

- management

- purchasing

- quality control

- reservation systems

- staff training

- supplies

HILTON GARDEN INN

Hilton

7930 Jones Branch Dr.

McLean, VA 22102

703-883-1000

hilton.com/en/corporate/

development/

President & CEO:

Christopher Nassetta

Senior Director, Development,

Canada: Jeff Cury

History, Plans

- established in 1996

- 27 properties in Canada (all

franchised); 861 outside of

Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee US$75,000

for the first 150 rooms, plus

US$400 per additional room

- royalty fee 5.5% of GRR

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- loyalty program

- management

- purchasing

- site location

- staff training

- supplies

HILTON HOTELS & RESORTS

Hilton

7930 Jones Branch Dr.

McLean, VA 22102

703-883-1000

hilton.com/en/corporate/

development/

President & CEO: Christopher

Nassetta

Senior director, Development,

Canada: Jeff Cury

History, Plans

- established in 1925 in Texas

- 13 properties in Canada (nine

franchised); 565 outside of

Canada

Franchise Costs

- Initial franchise fee: US$75,000

for the first 250 rooms, plus

US$400 per additional room

- Royalty Fee: 5% of Gross

Rooms Revenue

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- Hilton HHonors guest-reward

program

- management

- purchasing

- site location

- staff training

- supplies

HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS

InterContinental Hotels Group (IHG)

2 Robert Speck Pkwy., Ste. 600

Mississauga, ON L4Z 1H8

416-675-6644

holidayinnexpress.com

Regional Director, Midscale

Franchise Sales & Development,

Canada: Stuart Laurie

History, Plans

- established in 1991

- 106 Franchised Properties in

Canada; 2,720 outside of Canada

- Plans to add 30 units in Canada

hoteliermagazine.com

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021 | 15


THE 2021

FRANCHISE

REPORT

Franchise Costs

- total investment $7,881,597 to

$11,081,667

- royalty fee 6%GRR

- marketing fee 3% GRR

- application fee $500/room;

$50,000 minimum

Services:

- advertising/marketing

- design

- management

- site location

- staff training

- supplies

HOLIDAY INN HOTELS

AND RESORTS

InterContinental Hotels Group (IHG)

2 Robert Speck Pkwy., Ste. 600

Mississauga, ON L4Z 1H8

416-675-6644

holidayinn.com

Regional Director, Midscale

Franchise Sales & Development,

Canada: Stuart Laurie

History, Plans

- established in 1952

- 57 franchised properties in

Canada; 1,192 outside of Canada

- plans to add four properties in

Canada

Franchise Costs

- total investment $14,078,650

to $24,969,320

- royalty fee 5% GRR

- marketing fee 3% GRR

- application fee $500/room;

$50,000 Minimum

Services:

- advertising/marketing

- design

- management

- site location

- staff training

- supplies

HOME2 SUITES BY HILTON

Hilton

7930 Jones Branch Dr.

McLean, VA 22102

703-883-1000

hilton.com/en/corporate/

development/

President & CEO:

Christopher Nassetta

Senior Director, Development,

Canada: Jeff Cury

History, Plans

- established in 2009

- seven franchised properties in

Canada (all franchised); 441

outside of Canada

Franchise Costs

- US$75,000 flat franchise fee

- royalty fee: 5% of GRR

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- loyalty program

- management

- purchasing

- site location

- staff training

- supplies

HOMEWOOD SUITES

BY HILTON

Hilton

7930 Jones Branch Dr.

McLean, VA 22102

703-883-1000

hilton.com/en/corporate/

development/

President & CEO: Christopher

Nassetta

Senior Director, Development,

Canada: Jeff Cury

History, Plans

- established in 1989

- 21 properties in Canada (all

franchised); 491 outside of

Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee US$75,000

for the first 150 rooms, plus

US$400 per additional room

- royalty fee 3.5% of GRR year one;

4.5% year two; 5.5% year three

and thereafter

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- loyalty program

- management

- purchasing

- site location

- staff training

- supplies

HOTEL RL

Red Lion Hotels Franchising, Inc.

1550 Market St., Ste. 425

Denver, CO 80202

866-437-4878

franchise.rlhco.com

EVP, Lodging Development &

Franchise Operations:

Harry Sladich

VP, New Development:

Christopher Slattery

History, Plans

- franchised in the U.S. since 2014

- eight properties outside of

Canada

- expansion underway in Canada

Franchise Costs

- application fee $50,000

- royalty flat fee $83.33/room/

month; marketing program flat

fee $8,333.33/month for one to

150 rooms and $12,500/month

for 151+ rooms

- no loyalty fees

Services

- advertising/marketing

- CRM

- CRS and CRO

- design

- guest recognition program

procurement

- revenue-management

assistance

- site selection

- supplies

- sales and support

HOWARD JOHNSON

BY WYNDHAM

Wyndham Hotels & Resorts

22 Sylvan Way

Parsippany, NJ 07054

800-889-9710

wyndhamdevelopment.com

EVP and Chief Development

Officer: Chip Ohlsson

History, Plans

- established in 1954

- 26 properties in Canada (all

franchised); 296 outside of Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee the greater

of $35,000 or $350 per room for

conversion; $38,000 or $350/

room for new construction

- total investment $231,130 to

$9,733,080

- marketing fee 4% GRR

- royalty fee 4.5% GRR

Services

- advertising/marketing

- development/design

- financial assistance

- lease negotiation

- purchasing

- quality control

- reservation systems

- sales

- staff training

- supplies

- technical services

HYATT HOUSE

Hyatt Hotels Corporation

150 N. Riverside Plaza

Chicago, IL 60606

416-300-8215

hyattplace.com

Vice-President, Real Estate and

Development (Canada):

Scott Richer

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THE 2021

FRANCHISE

REPORT

History, Plans

- one franchised property in

Canada; 110 outside of Canada

franchised and managed)

- five in the pipeline for Canada

Franchise Costs

- application fee US$75,000; plus

US$500/room (over 150 rooms)

- royalty fee 5% GRR

- marketing fee 3.5% GRR

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- management

- purchasing

- site location

- staff training

- supplies

HYATT PLACE

Hyatt Hotels Corporation

150 N. Riverside Plaza

Chicago, IL 60606

416-300-8215

hyattplace.com

Vice-President, Real Estate and

Development (Canada):

Scott Richer

History, Plans

- established in/franchising

since 2005

- six franchised property in

Canada; 387 outside of Canada

16 in the pipeline for Canada

Franchise Costs

- application fee US$75,000; plus

US$500/room (over 150 rooms)

- royalty fee 5% GRR

- marketing fee 3.5% GRR

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- management

- purchasing

- site location

- staff training

- supplies

HYATT REGENCY

Hyatt Hotels Corporation

150 N. Riverside Plaza

Chicago, IL 60606

416-300-8215

hyattplace.com

Vice-President, Real Estate and

Development (Canada):

Scott Richer

History, Plans

- established in 1967; franchising

since 2006

- three managed properties in

Canada; 217 outside of Canada

- one property in the pipeline

for Canada

Franchise Costs

- application fee US$100,000 or

US$400/room (whichever is

greater)

- royalty fee 6% GRR; plus 3% F&B

- program fee availble to current

FDD

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- management

- purchasing

- site location

- staff training

- supplies

INTERCONTINENTAL

HOTELS & RESORTS

InterContinental Hotels Group (IHG)

2 Robert Speck Pkwy., Ste. 600

Mississauga, ON L4Z 1H8

416-675-6644

intercontinental.com

SVP, Development Upscale &

Luxury and Transactions & Asset

Management: Julienne Smith

development.ihg.com

History, Plans

- established in 1946

- three properties in Canada

(all managed); 207 outside

of Canada

Franchise Costs

- total investment $76,741,115

to $111,703,605

- royalty fee 5% GRR

- marketing fee 3% GRR

- application fee $500/room;

$75,000 minimum

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- management

- site location

- staff training

- supplies

KIMPTON HOTELS

& RESTAURANTS

InterContinental Hotels Group (IHG)

2 Robert Speck Pkwy., Ste. 600

Mississauga, ON L4Z 1H8

416-675-6644

kimptonhotels.com

Vice-President, Development:

Dan Thorman

development.ihg.com

History, Plans

- established in 1981

- one franchised property in

Canada; 71 outside of Canada

Franchise Costs

- total investment $49,789,087

to $70,127,050

- royalty fee 6% GRR; plus 2% of

gross food-and-beverage sales

- marketing fee 3% GRR

- application fee $500/room;

$75,000 minimum

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- management

- site selection

- staff training

- supplies

KNIGHTS INN

Red Lion Hotels Franchising, Inc.

1550 Market St., Ste. 425

Denver, CO 80202

866-437-4878

franchise.rlhco.com

EVP, Lodging Development &

Franchise Operations:

Harry Sladich

VP, New Development:

Christopher Slattery

History, Plans

- franchised by Red Lion Hotels

Franchising, Inc., since 2018

- 20 properties in Canada; 187

outside of Canada

- expansion underway in Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial/application fee $16,500 for

first 50 rooms; $150/room over 50

- royalty for first 50 rooms

$23.50/room/month; 51 to 75

rooms $19.50/room/month; 76+

rooms $18.50/room/month ($860

monthly minimum)

- marketing fee $17/room/month

- no loyalty fees

Services

- advertising/marketing

- CRM

- CRS and CRO

- design

- guest recognition program

- procurement

- revenue-management assistance

- site selection

- supplies

- sales and support

LA QUINTA BY WYNDHAM

Wyndham Hotels & Resorts

22 Sylvan Way

Parsippany, NJ 07054

800-889-9710

wyndhamdevelopment.com

EVP and Chief Development

Officer: Chip Ohlsson

History, Plans

- established in 1968 in San

Antonio, Texas

- two franchised properties in

Canada; 926 outside of Canada

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JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021 | 17


THE 2021

FRANCHISE

REPORT

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee $55,000

or $550/room

- total investment $3,663,491

to $12,590,023

- advertising fee 4.5%

- royalty fee 4.5%

Services

- advertising/marketing

- development/design

- financial assistance

- lease negotiation

- management

- purchasing

- quality control

- reservation systems

- sales

- staff training

- supplies

- technical services

LE MERIDIEN HOTELS

Marriott International, Inc.

2425 Matheson Blvd. E., Ste. 100

Mississauga, ON L4W 5K4

905-366-5208

marriottdevelopment.com

Regional VP, Lodging

Development, Canada:

Paul Loehr

VP, Lodging Development,

Canada: Aaron Laurie

Director, Lodging Development,

Canada: Duncan Chiu

History, Plans

- established in 1972

- one property in Canada; 110

outside of Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial application fee

US$100,000; plus US$400/room

in excess of 250

- royalty fee 5% of GRS, plus 2% of

gross food-and-beverage sales

- program services contribution

2.42% of GRS (includes marketingfund

contribution of 1%

GRS); plus US$50,000/year;

plus US$510/room/year

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- management

- purchasing

- staff training

- supplies

(THE) LUXURY COLLECTION

Marriott International, Inc.

2425 Matheson Blvd. E., Ste. 100

Mississauga, ON L4W 5K4

905-366-5208

marriottdevelopment.com

Regional VP, Lodging

Development, Canada:

Paul Loehr

VP, Lodging Development,

Canada: Aaron Laurie

Director, Lodging Development,

Canada: Duncan Chiu

History, Plans

- 118 properties outside of Canada

- one property in the pipeline

for Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial application fee

US$100,000; plus US$400/room

in excess of 250

- royalty fee 5% of GRS

- program service contribution

2.32% of GRS (includes marketingfund

contribution of 1%

GRS); plus US$40,000/year; plus

US$450/room/year

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- management

- purchasing

- staff training

- supplies

MAINSTAY SUITES

Choice Hotels International

1 Choice Hotels Cir., Ste. 400

Rockville, MD 20850

800-547-0007

choicehotelsdevelopment.com

President & CEO: Pat Pacious

SVP, Franchise Development,

Extended Stay: Ron Burgett

History, Plans

- founded in 1996

- one property in Canada; 74

outside of Canada (all franchised)

Franchise Costs

- application fee $5,000

- initial fee $300/room;

minimum of $50,000

- royalty fee 6% GRR

- system fee 2.5% GRR

MARRIOTT HOTELS & RESORTS

(INCLUDING JW MARRIOTT)

Marriott International, Inc.

2425 Matheson Blvd. E., Ste. 100

Mississauga, ON L4W 5K4

905-366-5208

marriottdevelopment.com

Regional VP, Lodging

Development, Canada:

Paul Loehr

VP, Lodging Development,

Canada: Aaron Laurie

Director, Lodging Development,

Canada: Duncan Chiu

History, Plans

- established in 1957

- 20 properties in Canada (3

JW and 17 MH); 638 outside of

Canada (87 JW and 570 MH)

- 661 properties outside of

Canada (97 JW and 564 MH)

- no properties in the pipeline

for Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial application fee

US$100,000; plus US$400/room

in excess of 250

- royalty fee 6% of GRS; plus 3% of

gross food-and-beverage sales

- program services contribution

1.62% of GRS (includes marketingfund

contribution of 1%

GRS); plus US$50,000/year; plus

US$510/room/year

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- management

- purchasing

- staff training

- supplies

MICROTEL BY WYNDHAM

Wyndham Hotels & Resorts

22 Sylvan Way

Parsippany, NJ 07054

800-889-9710

wyndhamdevelopment.com

EVP and Chief Development

Officer: Chip Ohlsson

History, Plans

- established in 1986

- 19 properties in Canada (all

franchised); 327 outside

of Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee is the

greater of $43,000 or

$400/room

- total investment $5,609,207

to $6,654,769

- advertising fee 2% GRR

- royalty fee 6% GRR

Services

- advertising/marketing

- development/design

- financial assistance

- lease negotiation

- management

- purchasing

- quality control

- reservation systems

- sales

- staff training

- technical services

18 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021 hoteliermagazine.com


TM

TM

THE 2021

FRANCHISE

REPORT

MICROTEL INN & SUITES

BY WYNDHAM

Master Territorial Developer in

Canada: MasterBuilt Hotels Ltd.

(Wyndham Hotels & Resorts)

1060 7th St. S.W., Ste. 200

Calgary, AB T2R 0C4

403-698-8528

masterbuilthotels.com

Executive Chairman: Marc Staniloff

Interim President: Marc Staniloff

History, Plans

- 19 properties in Canada

(seven franchised)

- properties under construction

in Kelowna, B.C. and Aurora,

Ont.; more than 15 in

development/planning stages

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee $40,000

- advertising fee 2%

- royalty fee 6%

- loyalty/rewards program fee 5%

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- lease negotiation

- management

- purchasing

- site location

- staff training

- supplies

Monte Carlo Inns

Your home away from home

MONTE CARLO INNS

Monte Carlo Hotel

Motel Innternational

218 Export Blvd., Ste. 601

Mississauga, ON L5S 0A7

888-564-6194

montecarloinns.com

VP of Operations: Justin Meffe

VP, Franchise Development:

Danny Pedone

History, Plans

- established in 1984

- eight properties in Canada

(all franchised)

- looking to expand in southern

Ontario

Franchise Report

- initial franchise fee $30,000

or $400/room

- advertising fee 2%

- royalty fee 5%

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- lease negotiation

- management

- purchasing

- site location

- staff training

- supplies

MOTEL 6

Master Franchisor in Canada

Realstar Hospitality Corp., Division

of Realstar Hospitality

(G6 Hospitality LLC)

77 Bloor St. W., Ste. 2000

Toronto, ON M5S 1M2

416-923-8387

motel6.com

President and COO: Irwin Prince

History, Plans

- franchising in Canada began

in 2003

- 30-plus franchised properties

in Canada; 1,400-plus outside

of Canada

- plans to add five (+/-) properties

in Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee $40,000

- royalty fee 5%

- program fees 3.5%

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- global reservations

- operational support

- purchasing

- site review and analysis

- staff training

MOXY HOTELS

Marriott International, Inc.

2425 Matheson Blvd. E., Ste. 100

Mississauga, ON L4W 5K4

905-366-5208

marriottdevelopment.com

Regional VP, Lodging

Development, Canada: Paul Loehr

VP, Lodging Development,

Canada: Aaron Laurie

Director, Lodging Development,

Canada: Duncan Chiu

History, Plans

- established in 2014

- 71 properties outside of Canada

- two properties in the pipeline

for Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial application fee US$90,000;

plus US$500/room in excess of 150

- royalty fee 5.5% of GRS

- program services contribution

3.85% of GRS (includes marketingfund

contribution of 2.5%

GRS); plus US$7,000/year; plus

US$135/room/year

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- management

- purchasing

- staff training

- supplies

NOVOTEL CANADA

Accor North & Central America

155 Wellington St. W., Ste. 3300

Toronto, ON M5V 0C3

416-874-2600

group.accor.com

SVP Development, North &

Central America: Greg Doman

History, Plans

- first Novotel in Canada established

in 1985 in Mississauga, Ont.

- six properties in Canada; 506

worldwide

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee $300/room,

$50,000 min.

- advertising fee 1.5%

- distribution fee 2%

- royalty fee 5%

PARK INN BY RADISSON

Radisson Hotel Group

701 Carlson Parkway, Ste 300,

MS 4001

Minnetonka, MN 55305

1-800-336-3301

parkinn.com

CEO: Jim Alderman

COO: Aly El-Bassuni

Chief Development Officer:

Phil Hugh

History, Plans

- established in 1986 in

Minneapolis, Minn.

- 4 properties in Canada; 142

outside of Canada (70 franchised)

- plans to open new properties

throughout Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee US$35,000

- total cost US$3,697,674 to

$20,956,027

- royalty fee 4.5%

- advertising fee 2%

- distribution fee 1.25%

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- management

- purchasing

- staff training

- supplies

QUALITY

Choice Hotels Canada Inc.

5015 Spectrum Way, Ste. 400

Mississauga, ON L4W 0E4

905-206-7316

choicehotelsdevelopment.ca

President: Brian Leon

History, Plans

- established in 1955 in Canada

- 97 properties in Canada; 1,896

outside of Canada (all

franchised)

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee $300/

room; minimum $35,000

- advertising fee 1.3%

- royalty fee 4%

- reservation fee 1.75%

hoteliermagazine.com

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021 | 19


THE 2021

FRANCHISE

REPORT

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- staff training

- supplies

RADISSON

Radisson Hotel Group

701 Carlson Pkwy., Ste. 300,

MS 4001

Minnetonka, MN 55305

800-336-3301

radisson.com

CEO: Jim Alderman

COO: Aly El-Bassuni

Chief Development Officer:

Phil Hugh

History, Plans

- established in 1962 in

Minneapolis, Minn.

- 13 properties in Canada; 162

outside of Canada (146

franchised)

- plans to open new properties

throughout Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee US$75,000

- total cost US$9,998,790 to

$52,337,635

- royalty fee 5%

- advertising fee 2%

- distribution fee 2%

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- management

- purchasing

- staff training

- supplies

RADISSON BLU

Radisson Hotel Group

701 Carlson Parkway, Ste 300,

MS 4001

Minnetonka, MN 55305

1-800-336-3301

radissonblu.com

Chief Executive Officer:

Jim Alderman

Chief Operating Officer:

Aly El-Bassuni

Chief Development Officer:

Phil Hugh

History, Plans

- established in 1994 in

Minneapolis, Minn.

- one property in Canada; 326

outside of Canada (126

franchised)

- plans to open new properties

throughout Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee US$100,000

- total cost US$21,414,010 to

$121,764,855

- royalty fee 5%

- advertising fee 2%

- distribution fee 2%

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- management

- purchasing

- staff training

- supplies

RAMADA BY WYNDHAM

Wyndham Hotels & Resorts

22 Sylvan Way

Parsippany, NJ 07054

800-889-9710

wyndhamdevelopment.com

EVP and Chief Development

Officer: Chip Ohlsson

History, Plans

- established in 1954

- 82 properties in Canada (all

franchised); 773 outside of

Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee $35,000 or

$350 per room for conversion,

$39,500 or $350/room for new

construction

- total investment $87,101

to $9,026,525

- advertising fee 4% GRR

(includes marketing

contribution of 2% GRR

and basic reservation fee of

2% GRR)

- royalty fee 4.5% GRR

Services

- advertising/marketing

- development/design

- financial assistance

- lease negotiation

- management

- purchasing

- quality control

- reservation systems

- sales

- staff training

- supplies

- technical services

RED LION HOTEL

Red Lion Hotels Franchising, Inc.

1550 Market St., Ste. 425

Denver, CO 80202

866-437-4878

franchise.rlhco.com

EVP, Lodging Development &

Franchise Operations:

Harry Sladich

VP, New Development:

Christopher Slattery

History, Plans

- franchised in the U.S. since 1999

- 29 properties outside of Canada

- expansion in Canada planned

Franchise Costs

- application fee $300/room;

minimum of $60,000

- royalty fee 5% of GRR

- marketing fee 3% of GRR

- no loyalty fees

Services

- advertising/marketing

- CRM

- CRS and CRO

- design

- guest recognition program

procurement

- revenue-management

assistance

- site selection

- supplies

- sales and support

RED LION INN & SUITES

Red Lion Hotels Franchising, Inc.

1550 Market St., Ste. 425

Denver, CO 80202

866-437-4878

franchise.rlhco.com

EVP, Lodging Development &

Franchise Operations:

Harry Sladich

VP, New Development:

Christopher Slattery

History, Plans

- franchised in the U.S. since 1999

- one property in Canada; 40

properties outside of Canada

- expansion under way in Canada

Franchise Costs

- application fee $300; minimum

of $40,000

- royalty fee 5% of GRR

- marketing (program) fee 3%

of GRR

- no loyalty fees

Services

- advertising/marketing

- CRM

- CRS and CRO

- design

- guest recognition program

procurement

- revenue-management

assistance

- site selection

- supplies

- sales and support

RENAISSANCE HOTELS

Marriott International, Inc.

2425 Matheson Blvd. E., Ste. 100

Mississauga, ON L4W 5K4

905-366-5208

marriottdevelopment.com

Regional VP, Lodging

Development, Canada: Paul Loehr

VP, Lodging Development,

Canada: Aaron Laurie

Director, Lodging Development,

Canada: Duncan Chiu

History, Plans

- acquired Renaissance Hotels

in 1997

- three properties in Canada; 173

outside of Canada

22 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021 hoteliermagazine.com


THE 2021

FRANCHISE

REPORT

Franchise Costs

- initial application fee

US$100,000; plus US$400/room

in excess of 250

- royalty fee 5% GRS

- program contribution services

2.12% of GRS and ClubSport

revenues (includes marketingfund

contribution of 1.5%

GRS); plus US$50,000/

year; plus US$510/room/year

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- management

- purchasing

- staff training

- supplies

RESIDENCE INN BY MARRIOTT

Marriott International, Inc.

2425 Matheson Blvd. E., Ste. 100

Mississauga, ON L4W 5K4

905-366-5208

marriottdevelopment.com

Regional VP, Lodging

Development, Canada: Paul Loehr

VP, Lodging Development,

Canada: Aaron Laurie

Director, Lodging Development,

Canada: Duncan Chiu

History, Plans

- acquired Residence Inn in 1987

- 26 properties in Canada; 838

outside of Canada

- four properties in the pipeline

for Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee US$90,000;

plus US$500/suite in excess

of 150

- royalty fee 6% GRS

- program services contribution

2.56% of GRS (includes mar

keting-fund contribution of 2.5%

GRS); plus US$6,000/year; plus

US$65/suite/year

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- management

- purchasing

- staff training

- supplies

RODEWAY INN

Choice Hotels Canada Inc.

5015 Spectrum Way, Ste. 400

Mississauga, ON L4W 0E4

905-206-7316

choicehotelsdevelopment.ca

President, Brian Leon

History, Plans

- established in 1993 in Canada

- 10 properties in Canada; 557

outside of Canada (all franchised)

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee $200/room;

minimum $15,000

- advertising fee 1.25%

- royalty fee 4%

- reservation fee 1.25%

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- staff training

- supplies

SHERATON HOTELS

& RESORTS

Marriott International, Inc.

2425 Matheson Blvd. E., Ste. 100

Mississauga, ON L4W 5K4

905-366-5208

marriottdevelopment.com

Regional VP, Lodging

Development, Canada: Paul Loehr

VP, Lodging Development,

Canada: Aaron Laurie

Director, Lodging Development,

Canada: Duncan Chiu

History, Plans

- 18 properties in Canada; 428

outside of Canada

- no properties in the pipeline

for Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial application fee

US$100,000; plus US$400/room

in excess of 250

- royalty fee 6% of GRS, plus 2% of

gross food-and-beverage sales

- program services contribution

2.42% of GRS includes marketing-fund

contribution of 1%

GRS); plus US$50,000/year;

plus US$510/room/year

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- management

- purchasing

- staff training

- supplies

SIGNATURE INN

Red Lion Hotels Franchising, Inc.

1550 Market St., Ste. 425

Denver, CO 80202

866-437-4878

franchise.rlhco.com

EVP, Lodging Development &

Franchise Operations: Harry

Sladich

VP, New Development:

Christopher Slattery

History, Plans

- relaunched 2018

- nine properties in the U.S.,

including Signature (midscale)

properties

- expansion underway in Canada

Franchise Costs

- application fee $20,000 for first

70 rooms; plus $150/room

over 70

- flat membership fee $50/room/

month (includes royalty,

marketing and PMS license)

- no loyalty fees

Services

- advertising/marketing

- CRM

- CRS and CRO

- design

- guest recognition program

procurement

- revenue-management

assistance

- site selection

- supplies

- sales and support

SLEEP INN

Choice Hotels Canada Inc.

5015 Spectrum Way, Ste. 400

Mississauga, ON L4W 0E4

905-206-7316

choicehotelsdevelopment.ca

President, Brian Leon

History, Plans

- established in 1996 in Canada

- four properties in Canada;

423 outside of Canada (all

franchised)

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee: $300/room;

minimum $35,000

- advertising fee 1.3%

- royalty fee 4%

- reservation fee 1.75%

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- staff training

- supplies

SPRINGHILL SUITES

BY MARRIOTT

Marriott International, Inc.

2425 Matheson Blvd. E., Ste. 100

Mississauga, ON L4W 5K4

905-366-5208

marriottdevelopment.com

Regional VP, Lodging

Development, Canada:

Paul Loehr

VP, Lodging Development,

Canada: Aaron Laurie

Director, Lodging Development,

Canada: Duncan Chiu

History, Plans

- established 1998

- two properties in Canada; 477

outside of Canada

- three properties in pipeline

in Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee US$75,000;

plus US$400/suite in excess of 150

- royalty fee 5.5% of GRS

- program services contribution

3.85% of GRS (includes marketing-fund

contribution of 2.5%

GRS); plus US$10,000/year; plus

US$220/suite/year

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- management

- purchasing

- staff training

- supplies

hoteliermagazine.com

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021 | 23


THE 2021

FRANCHISE

REPORT

STAYBRIDGE SUITES

InterContinental Hotels Group (IHG)

2 Robert Speck Pkwy., Ste. 600

Mississauga, ON L4Z 1H8

416-675-6644

staybridgesuites.com

Regional Director, Upscale and

Mainstream Development,

Canada: Stuart Laurie

History, Plans

- established in 1997

- 13 franchised properties in

Canada; 298 outside of Canada

- plans to add six more properties

in Canada

Franchise Costs

- total investment $15,532,595

to $22,436,565

- royalty fee 5% GRS

- marketing fee 2.5% GRS

(combined reservation and

training fee)

- application fee $500/suite;

$50,000 minimum

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- management

- site selection

- staff training

- supplies

STUDIO 6

Master Franchisor in Canada

Realstar Hospitality Corp., Division

of Realstar Hospitality

(G6 Hospitality LLC)

77 Bloor St. W., Ste. 2000

Toronto, ON M5S 1M2

416-923-8387

staystudio6.com

President and COO: Irwin Prince

History, Plans

- established in 1999

- one franchised property in

Canada; 100-plus outside of

Canada

- plans to add two (+/-) properties

in Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee $40,000

- royalty fee 5%

- program fees 3.5%

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- global reservations

- operational support

- purchasing

- site review and analysis

- staff training

SUBURBAN EXTENDED

STAY HOTEL

Choice Hotels International

1 Choice Hotels Cir., Ste. 400

Rockville, MD 20850

800-547-0007

choicehotelsdevelopment.com

President & CEO: Pat Pacious

SVP, Franchise Development,

Extended Stay: Ron Burgett

History, Plans

- founded in 2005

- no properties in Canada; 62

outside of Canada (all

franchised)

Franchise Costs

- application fee $5,000

- initial fee $225/room;

minimum of $30,000

- royalty fee 6% GRR

- system fee 2.5% GRR

SUPER 8 BY WYNDHAM

Wyndham Hotels & Resorts

22 Sylvan Way

Parsippany, NJ 07054

800-889-9710

wyndhamdevelopment.com

EVP and Chief Development

Officer: Chip Ohlsson

History, Plans

- established in 1974

- 125 properties in Canada

(all franchised); 2,800 outside

of Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee the greater

of $25,000 or $250/room for

conversion; $28,000 or $250/

room for new construction

- total investment $140,041 to

$4,715,442

- advertising fee 3% GRR

- royalty fee 5% GRR

Services

- advertising/marketing

- development/design

- financial assistance

- lease negotiation

- management

- purchasing

- quality control

- reservation systems

- sales

- staff training

- technical services

SUPER 8 BY WYNDHAM

Master Territorial Developer

in Canada: Superior Lodging

Development S8 Corp.

(Wyndham Hotels & Resorts)

#410, 211 – 11th Ave SW

Calgary, AB T2R 0C6

403-543-8800

super8.ca

EVP, Operations: Trevor Hagel

EVP, Franchising & Development:

Nigel Lucas

History, Plans

- established in 1975

- 125 properties in Canada

- plans to add four locations

in 2021

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee $21,000

- royalty fee 5%

- advertising fee 3%

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- lease negotiation

- management

- purchasing

- site location

- staff training

- supplies

THRIFTLODGE

Master Franchisor in Canada:

Superior Lodging Development

TL Corporation

(Wyndham Hotels & Resorts)

#410, 211 – 11th Ave SW

Calgary, AB T2R 0C6

800-646-2435

travelodge.ca

EVP, Operations: Trevor Hagel

EVP, Franchising & Development:

Nigel Lucas

History, Plans

- Canadian operations established

in 1992 in Alberta

- 10 franchised properties

in Canada

- plans to increase brand port

folio by 10% net growth,

concentrating on secondary

and tertiary markets

24 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021 hoteliermagazine.com


THE 2021

FRANCHISE

REPORT

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee $20,000

- royalty fee 8%

Services

- advertising/marketing

- annual conference

- loyalty program

- opening and training support

- partnership synergies

- purchasing

- quality assurance

- staff training

TAPESTRY COLLECTION

BY HILTON

Hilton

7930 Jones Branch Dr.

McLean, VA 22102

703-883-1000

hilton.com/en/corporate/

development/

President & CEO: Christopher

Nassetta

Senior Director, Development,

Canada: Jeff Cury

History, Plans

- established in 2017

- one property in Canada (all

franchised); 43 outside of

Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee US$75,000

for the first 250 rooms; plus

US$400 per/additional room

- royalty fee: 5% of GRR

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- loyalty program

- management

- purchasing

- site location

- staff training

- supplies

TOWNEPLACE SUITES

BY MARRIOTT

Marriott International, Inc.

2425 Matheson Blvd. E., Ste. 100

Mississauga, ON L4W 5K4

905-366-5208

marriottdevelopment.com

Regional VP, Lodging

Development, Canada: Paul Loehr

VP, Lodging Development,

Canada: Aaron Laurie

Director, Lodging Development,

Canada: Duncan Chiu

History, Plans

- established in 1997

- 18 properties in Canada; 430

outside of Canada

- 16 properties in the pipeline

in Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial application fee US$75,000;

plus US$400/suite in excess of 125

- royalty fee 5.5% of GRS

- program services contribution

3.35% of GRS (includes marketing-fund

contribution of 2%

GRS); plus US$7,000/year; plus

US$135/room/year

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- management

- purchasing

- staff training

- supplies

TRADEMARK COLLECTION

BY WYNDHAM

Wyndham Hotels & Resorts

22 Sylvan Way

Parsippany, NJ 07054

800-889-9710

wyndhamdevelopment.com

EVP and Chief Development

Officer: Chip Ohlsson

History, Plans

- established in 2017

- 10 hotels in Canada, 91 outside

of Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial fee $350/room (minimum

$39,500) for new construction;

$350/room (minimum $35,000)

for conversion

- total investment: $89,024

to $12,599,280

- membership fee 4% GRR

- marketing fee 2.5% GRR

Services

- advertising/marketing

- development/design

- financial assistance

- lease negotiation

- management

- purchasing

- quality control

- reservation systems

- sales

- staff training

- supplies

- technical services

- other

TRAVELODGE

Master Franchisor in Canada:

Superior Lodging Development

TL Corporation

(Wyndham Hotels & Resorts)

#410, 211 – 11th Ave SW

Calgary, AB T2R 0C6

800-646-2435

travelodge.ca

EVP, Operations: Trevor Hagel

EVP, Franchising & Development:

Nigel Lucas

History, Plans

- established in 1945 in the U.S.;

Canadian operations established

in 1992 in Alberta

- 97 franchised properties in

Canada

- plans to increase brand portfolio

by 10% net growth,

concentrating on secondary

and tertiary markets

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee $20,000

to $35,000

- royalty fee 5%

- advertising fee 3.50%

Services

- advertising/marketing

- annual conference

- loyalty program

- opening and training support

- partnership synergies

- purchasing

- quality assurance

- staff training

TRIBUTE HOTELS

Marriott International, Inc.

2425 Matheson Blvd. E., Ste. 100

Mississauga, ON L4W 5K4

905-366-5208

marriottdevelopment.com

Regional VP, Lodging

Development, Canada: Paul Loehr

VP, Lodging Development,

Canada: Aaron Laurie

Director, Lodging Development,

Canada: Duncan Chiu

History, Plans

- one property in Canada; 44

outside of Canada

- one property in the pipeline

for Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee US$100,000;

plus US$400/room in excess

of 250

- royalty fee 5% of GRS

- program services contribution

2.42% of GRS (includes

marketing-fund contribution

of 1.5% GRS); plus US$40,000/

year; plus US$450/room/year.

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- management

- purchasing

- staff training

- supplies

hoteliermagazine.com

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021 | 25


THE 2021

FRANCHISE

REPORT

TRU BY HILTON

Hilton

7930 Jones Branch Dr.

McLean, VA 22102

703-883-1000

hilton.com/en/corporate/

development/

President & CEO:

Christopher Nassetta

Senior Director, Development,

Canada: Jeff Cury

History, Plans

- established in 2016

- one property in Canada

(franchised); 170 outside

of Canada

Franchise Costs

- US$75,000 flat franchise fee

- royalty fee 5% of GRR

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- loyalty program

- management

- purchasing

- site location

- staff training

- supplies

TRYP BY WYNDHAM

Wyndham Hotels & Resorts

22 Sylvan Way

Parsippany, NJ 07054

800-889-9710

EVP and Chief Development

Officer: Chip Ohlsson

wyndhamdevelopment.com

Services

- advertising/marketing

- development/design

- financial assistance

- lease negotiation

- management

- purchasing

- quality control

- reservation systems

- sales

- staff training

- supplies

- technical services

THE UNBOUND COLLECTION

BY HYATT

Hyatt Hotels Corporation

150 N. Riverside Plaza

Chicago, IL 60606

416-300-8215

hyattplace.com

Vice-President, Real Estate

and Development (Canada):

Scott Richer

History, Plans

- established in/franchising

since 2016

- one franchised property in

Canada; 23 outside of Canada

Franchise Costs

- application fee US$100,000

or US$300/room (whichever is

greater)

- royalty fee 7% GRR

- program fee: 3.5%GRR

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- management

- purchasing

- site location

- staff training

- supplies

WESTIN HOTELS & RESORTS

Marriott International, Inc.

2425 Matheson Blvd. E., Ste. 100

Mississauga, ON L4W 5K4

905-366-5208

marriottdevelopment.com

Regional VP, Lodging

Development, Canada: Paul Loehr

VP, Lodging Development,

Canada: Aaron Laurie

Director, Lodging Development,

Canada: Duncan Chiu

History, Plans

- established in 1941

- 15 properties in Canada; 210

outside of Canada

- one property in the pipeline

in Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial application fee

US$100,000; plus US$400/room

in excess of 250

- royalty fee 7% GRS, plus 3% of

gross food-and-beverage sales

- program services contribution

3.02% of GRS includes marketing-fund

contribution of 1.325%

GRS); plus US$50,000/year; plus

US$510/room/year

Services

- advertising/marketing

- design

- management

- purchasing

- staff training

- supplies

WINGATE BY WYNDHAM

Wyndham Hotels & Resorts

22 Sylvan Way

Parsippany, NJ 07054

800-889-9710

wyndhamdevelopment.com

EVP and Chief Development

Officer: Chip Ohlsson

History, Plans

- established in 1996

- nine properties in Canada (all

franchised); 172 outside of Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee the greater

of $40,500 or $360/room

- total investment $290,815 to

$10,979,071

- advertising fee 2.5% GRR

- royalty fee 6% GRR

Services

- advertising/marketing

- development/design

- financial assistance

- lease negotiation

- management

- purchasing

- quality control

- reservation systems

- sales

- staff training

- supplies

- technical services

Franchise Costs

- initial fee $39,500 or

$350/room

- royalty fee 5% GRR

- marketing and reservation fee

4% GRR

26 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021 hoteliermagazine.com


THE 2021

FRANCHISE

REPORT

WOODSPRING SUITES

Choice Hotels International

1 Choice Hotels Cir., Ste. 400

Rockville, MD 20850

800-547-0007

choicehotelsdevelopment.com

President & CEO: Pat Pacious

SVP, Franchise Development,

Extended Stay: Ron Burgett

History, Plans

- founded in 2015

- no properties in Canada; 285

outside of Canada (all franchised)

Franchise Costs

- no application fee

- initial fee $50,000 (if more than

122 rooms, additional $300/room)

- royalty fee 6% GRR

- system fee 2.5% GRR

WYNDHAM

Wyndham Hotels & Resorts

22 Sylvan Way

Parsippany, NJ 07054

800-889-9710

wyndhamdevelopment.com

EVP and Chief Development

Officer: Chip Ohlsson

History, Plans

- initial franchise fee the greater

of $54,500 or $500/room

- total investment $702,500 to

$66,790,765

- advertising fee 3% GRR

- royalty fee 5% GRR

Services

- architectural services/design

- advertising/marketing

- conventions and area meetings

- development & design

- field support

- financial assistance

- group tour material

- group savings

- lease negotiation

- purchasing

- quality assurance audits

- quality control

- reservation systems

- staff training

- supplies

- technical services

- worldwide sales

WYNDHAM GARDEN

Wyndham Hotels & Resorts

22 Sylvan Way

Parsippany, NJ 07054

800-889-9710

wyndhamdevelopment.com

EVP and Chief Development

Officer: Chip Ohlsson

History, Plans

- first Wyndham Garden

opened in 2012

- three properties in Canada;

124 outside of Canada

Franchise Costs

- initial franchise fee the greater

of $39,500 or $350/room

- total investment $294,398 to

$13,900,097

- advertising fee 3% GRR

- royalty fee 5% GRR

Services

- advertising/marketing

- development/design

- financial assistance

- lease negotiation

- management

- purchasing

- quality control

- reservation systems

- sales

- staff training

- supplies

- technical services

WYNDHAM GRAND

Wyndham Hotels & Resorts

22 Sylvan Way

Parsippany, NJ 07054

800-889-9710

wyndhamdevelopment.com

EVP and Chief Development

Officer: Chip Ohlsson

History, Plans

- initial franchise fee the greater

of $54,500 or $500/room

- total investment $251,717 to

$67,283,170

- advertising fee 3% GRR

- royalty fee 5% GRR

Services

- advertising/marketing

- development/design

- financial assistance

- lease negotiation

- management

- purchasing

- quality control

- reservation systems

- sales

- staff training

- supplies

- technical services

DON'T

SEE YOUR

COMPANY

LISTED?

CONTACT US TO BE

INCLUDED IN NEXT YEAR'S

FRANCHISE REPORT

abostock@kostuchmedia.com

hoteliermagazine.com

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021 | 27


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TRENDS

AN

Canadians are ready and willing to travel

AFTER an alarming and

unwelcome stretch of stillness, the

winds are blowing across the tarmac at

last and a post-pandemic travel scene

is taking shape in the clearing. We will

travel again, say the experts, and likely

with the same enthusiasm as before.

The differences to the experience will

be both vast and subtle.

“People love to travel, explore the

world and create lifelong memories,”

says Craig Reaume, general manager of

W Toronto, set to open this Spring. “I

believe, when the time comes, travellers

will be more than ready.”

Broadly speaking, says Jonathan

Newbury, executive vice-president of

Preferred Hotels & Resorts, the first

wave is going to be about “revenge

travel,” a phenomenon in which people,

sick to death with cancelling plans, will

fill the planes and hotel rooms with

their exuberance for being anywhere

but within their own four walls.

Leisure travel, everyone concurs, will

be the first to bounce back. Pent-up

travellers, liberated by a vaccine, will

take to the skies in big numbers, “I

see hotels through the eyes of friends

and family,” says Newbury. “They get

to a hotel, it’s an escape, they can be

something different, they can change

for a while and be someone [else], an

hoteliermagazine.com JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021 | 29


idealized version of themselves. And,

we, as an industry cater to that — and

that’s not going to change. That’s what

people want and that’s what we deliver

in a hotel.”

Slower to rebound will be corporate

and group travel, as companies and

organizations grapple with liability issues

around sanctioning trips to places where

danger has so recently lurked. “Business

travel is down enormously,” says Peter

Gaudet, vice-president of Horwath

HTL, a global leader in hotel, tourism

and leisure consulting, articulating what

legions of hoteliers know too well, though

no one has precise numbers to account for

it. “It’s very tough to think of [sending]

massive amounts of employees out on the

road when, if they get sick because they’re

travelling for your company, you may end

up responsible for their health.”

Meetings, conventions, events, sporting

groups and association meetups have

been severely hit by the pandemic, the

victims of governmental restrictions

limiting the number of people allowed

in gatherings, to say nothing of the

buffets and sit-down meals of which

they’ve been deprived in convention

centres, event venues and hotels since

mid-March. But short-term corporate

travel restrictions haven’t precluded

innovation in that market. W recently

launched WxW Meetings, a program

that gives companies in

Toronto the

opportunity to

“meet” with

their

counterparts

in Montreal.

Here, small teams can

meet (and stay) at W Toronto

and connect to their teammates

at W Montreal. One point of contact

handles everything — from the technology

and catering to a single bill, along

with all the special touches that go into

holding a meeting at W.

And, hotels have turned their

corporate business on its head, promoting

the idea of guests staying in hotel rooms

during the day to work and going home

at night to sleep — the opposite

of convention.

But, the business-travel norm will

return, Danny Hughes, EVP & president

of the Americas for Hilton, asserts —

even if it does so slowly. “There’s only

so much business you can get done in

a two-dimensional world. People need

to see clients, to connect, to drum up

business, to recruit people.”

From the current vantage point,

following almost a year of volatile

occupancy levels and Average Daily Rates

(ADR), this all sounds a bit fantastic.

But those with their eye on the suffering

industry insist that not only will travel

resume, but the alterations to the experience

will be negligible once it does.

Post-pandemic hotels will be clean — but

that’s not new. “That level of cleanliness

has always been an issue in hotels,” says

Gaudet. “They’ve just kicked it up a notch

in 2020. I don’t think they ever thought

they’d be steaming shower curtains. Some

of that may stay. Clients may get into

that. But if you look at how we are in our

homes, we [were] washing our groceries at

the beginning, but in time fell back into

what we knew. I think it’ll be the same

with travel.”

“We’ll see a lot of the [introduced]

standards remain, because there’s a

psychological barrier for people,

they’ve become a lot more

conscious of hygiene,” says

Newbury. Specifically, he

foresees the endurance of the

sanitization station, but also

the return of buffets. The

plexiglass separating guest

and staffer will hang in for a bit,

he predicts, but fall away as the virus

subsides and vaccinations surge.

Hughes believes the global pandemic

simply accelerated existing trends,

including one toward increased personalization

of hotel stays, whether that be in

guests choosing rooms, customizing what

they want in them or checking in and

opening doors with their mobile devices.

SAFE

Travels

BY NICHOLAS RAHMON

According to Airports Council International,

passenger traffi c volume

at Canadian commercial airports

decreased by approximately 78 per

cent in the fi rst half of 2020 as a

result of pandemic restrictions. But,

as people continue to travel, airlines

and airports admitting domestic and

international travellers are working

in tandem to introduce new safety

measures in an effort to curb the

spread of COVID-19, resulting in

increased operating costs.

As of Sept. 23, temperature

screening came into effect at

Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto and

Montreal airports, along with 11

additional Canadian airports.

On Jan. 6, 2021, Toronto Pearson

International Airport rolled out the

Ontario government’s COVID-19 testing

program, offering international passengers

landing in Canada free COVID-19

testing. Those eligible for the program

include returning Canadian citizens or

permanent residents and international

travellers, such as immediate and

extended family members.

Airports across the country also established

safety measures for both travellers

and employees, from baggage

check-in through the boarding process,

including the mandatory use of face

coverings within the airport, keeping

a distance of two metres from others

and cleaning at two-hour intervals

for high-touch-point areas such as

escalators and bathrooms.

30 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021

hoteliermagazine.com


ISTOCK.COM

The big, leather menu binders at

restaurants have been replaced by

elegant QR codes, part of the digital

movement overseeing the merging of

physical and digital experiences. “These

were trends that were very much part of

travel and, now, in a world where we’re

all trying to get used to contactless

experiences, digitalization is going to be

rapidly accelerated.”

In truth, the industry had a taste

of the return in summer 2020, when

infection counts flattened a bit and

official constraints slackened. Indeed,

says Horwath, some hotels were busier

than usual last summer, accommodating

a rush of giddy travellers, loosed at

last from their lockdowns and keen to

re-visit life when they could roam freely

and in comfort.

“Here in the U.S., some of our

hotels had the best summer season

ever because people couldn’t get to the

Caribbean, so they ended up going to

New England or down to Florida,” says

Newbury. Resorts, where guests arrived

in their own cars and had plenty of

space and fresh air when they did, were

the obvious beneficiaries of this impulse.

“We’ve actually been doing quite well

in this pandemic, compared to the city

hotels, which you would normally see

very busy, but are still struggling and

will continue to struggle until the fear

of the virus goes away.”

Along with reliable statistics tracking

pandemic-plummeting occupancy

and ADR rates, measures of how hotel

valuation has weathered the virus are

in short supply. “It’s a tough subject

for everybody right now,” says Gaudet,

“with Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver

running at occupancies we’ve never seen

and would never have guessed we’d see

in our lifetime. Everyone’s very hesitant

to valuate hotels because, when we open

that Pandora’s box, pretty much every

hotel in Canada will see some loss in

2020. Let’s go as long as we can without

having to do a valuation.”

Bankers financing hotels at 60 per

cent, with owners kicking in 40 per cent

are now looking at properties worth

between 70 and 80 per cent of their

starting values, which could knock their

60-per-cent stake up to 75 per cent or

higher. “Bankers have all these rules and

regulations and magic numbers they

have to meet and none of the ratios

are working right now — not on the

financing side, not on the owners’ side.

The definition of a market value is you

put your hotel up for sale in a free and

open market, but there’s nobody buying,

because there’s no free and open market.

Right now, the buyer has all the leverage,

the owner has no leverage. It’s a very

interesting time in the hotel industry.”

Hoteliers, meanwhile, are

looking to make it less interesting with

loud efforts to convince people their

hotels are safe. Hilton has partnered

with Lysol in a campaign highlighting

cleanliness at every turn, from disinfected

remote controls to steamed bed linen

and door stickers that certify a pristine

environment behind the seal. Where

hotel operators used to tuck their

cleaning efforts into the back of the

house, largely undertaken when

people weren’t awake, now they do the

opposite, showily cleaning during the

day so the consumer might witness the

unabashed level of their handiwork.

“This is all pre-planning,” says Gaudet.

“The consumer can’t travel right now

because of all the restrictions, but when

we come out of this, they want people

feeling re-assured about brands’ certain

levels of cleanliness. Pop-ups on almost

every independent hotel’s website

account for their COVID-19 efforts, a

clear message to the consumer: we’re

ready for you. So, it’s not the consumer

that changed, but the industry reaction.”

“I’m incredibly hopeful,” says Hughes,

adding once a vaccine is rapidly deployed,

“I’m positive business will bounce back.

Every single one of us has cancelled

something in the last nine months — a

family reunion, a concert, a trip to

Niagara Falls. We’re all burnt out with

Zoom fatigue, and are desperate for the

human reaction that only comes with

seeing people together. We’re social

animals and we want those interactions

with humans. When we can, it’ll pick up

quickly. People want to travel. And

people have to travel. Travel is still an

unstoppable force.” ◆

hoteliermagazine.com JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021 | 31


SF P

EDITORIAL

THE

PANELISTS

Hotel leaders dis

are impacting all

INTERVIEW BY: ROSANNA CAIR

Wayne Carrington,

director of Housekeeping,

The Hazelton Hotel

Ally Wesson,

vice-president, Marketing,

Realstar Hospitality

Vito Curalli,

executive director,

International and

Industry Relations,

Sales, Hilton Worldwide

Laura Pallotta,

VP Sales and Distribution

– Canada, Marriott

International

Brian Leon

president, Choice Hotels

Stephanie Snowball,

director of Sales, IHG

Canada

Andrea Torrance,

senior vice-president,

Guest Experience, Accor,

Rosanna Caira How has the pandemic changed the

mindset of operators when it comes to health and

well-being in hotels?

Brian Leon: The health and the

well-being of our guests has always

been a top priority for us. But it’s

clear the pandemic has elevated

the concerns and the awareness

around health and safety for our

hotels and the concerns from guests.

[We see this as] something that’s

going to endure in the future, long

after the pandemic is behind us.

From a brand standpoint, and from

our perspective as a franchisor,

one of the most important things

was a collaborative approach with

our franchisees, so we worked

really closely with our franchisees

across the country to develop rate

solutions and best practices. Early

in the pandemic [we formed] a

GM taskforce that was intended to

build-out cleanliness best practices

and ensure we rolled out processes

that were going to be not only

effective, but were going to work

operationally for our hotels, so that

adoption would be maximized. On

a positive note, [COVID-19] has,

in many ways, enhanced the view

of our hotels collectively across the

country. In the early stages, there

was some question about whether

hotels were going to be designated

32 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021

hoteliermagazine.com


SAE

cuss how safety protocols

aspects of their operations

A AND AMY BOSTOCK

an essential service — and they weren’t

in all parts of the world — but after

seeing the role hotels have played,

that’s never going to be questioned.

It should never be questioned — our

hotels have been so supportive of their

communities across the country and

that built a stronger relationship with

those communities. That’s something

that will serve us all well in the future.

Laura Pallotta: Travel, for us, will

always remain focused on the overall

guest experience — a new city, great

service, a comfortable bed, exciting

food and beverage. But, right now,

the focus is mainly on cleanliness and

abiding by government regulations and

mandates. Back in April, when all of

this started, we created the Marriott

Global Cleanliness Council, which

benefi ts from the in-house knowledge

we had, but also leaned on outside

experts. From there we launched our

Commitment-to-Clean program and

that’s where the enhanced cleaning

standards were put in place, [such as]

higher frequency, disinfection protocols,

special focus on high-touch areas.

Cleanliness, and all of these standards,

are the new amenities and will be here

forever. And, that’s a very positive step

because it creates confidence for our

guests — that will be what brings our

guests back to us in due time.

Ally Wesson: As an industry and as

a hotel, we’ve always been clean, but

now cleanliness is next to safety and

never have those two really been so

linked together in the public eye. It’s

top of mind for all of our operators,

regardless of the brand — whether it’s

them making sure they have proper

PPE for all of their staff that need it

or ensuring they’re following the local

municipal, provincial and national

health guidelines. Cleanliness and

safety have never been more important

than [they are] today.

Andrea Torrance: We’ve always

maintained high standards of hygiene

and cleanliness, however, the pandemic

demands we elevate these standards

even further. We never pretended we

were scientists or hygiene experts, so

we partnered with a team of expert

advisors to develop these new healthand-safety

measures — not just in

ISTOCK.COM/DARWEL

hoteliermagazine.com JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021 | 33


TI HS CERY BE QIE A

YA. I FE LK W’E AL BE

I A WR TGTE

this region, but also globally.

Through this, we’ve

maintained that if we say

we’re going to do something,

it has to be true — it can’t

be smoke and mirrors. And,

as an industry, we’ve never

been under so much scrutiny.

So, each hotel developed

a business-continuity plan

and we would validate that.

It wasn’t as simple as just

sending in a checklist, we

wanted to see evidence,

so we would look for job

descriptions; we’d look for

videos, we’d look for images

of the employee arriving,

what it looks like for the

guests to arrive at the front

desk and, from that, we do

feel that we’ve got a lot

of consistency and rigour

around what we’re doing.

Then, the hotels have to

be audited by operational

experts and third-party

auditors. We’ve always had

clean hotels, but we’re under

tremendous scrutiny, so now

we’ve had to elevate that

to ensure what we say we’re

doing is true.

Vito Curalli: Operators of

our hotels are experts in the

business, but COVID-19 put

all of the operators in a very

diffi cult position. No different

than the other brands,

we launched our own version

of a clean program called

Clean Stay [in partnership

with] Lysol. We also took the

research and findings from

BIN LO, COC HTL

the Mayo Clinic to guide

us through this process and

give back to the operators

in terms of the support that

they needed to make sure the

overall health and wellness

of not only our customers,

but our team members were

taken care of.

Stephanie Snowball: Our

industry was significantly

disrupted and we’ve all had

to step up around all the new

protocols and procedures

that have been implemented

from the different governments.

We have had to

establish our own cleanliness

board, with external partners

and new collaborators like

the Cleveland Clinic to help

our operators implement

this. But, one of the most

consistent things I hear

across the board is that, as

an industry, our customers

are confi dent in what we’re

doing. We’re advertising it,

we’re talking about it, we’re

very transparent about it,

which is building trust. But,

the critical thing is that

we’re inspecting what we

expect. Those inspections are

so critical [for] holding our

hotel operators accountable

to what we’re asking them

to do and giving them the

right tools and resources and

training. And, if they don’t

follow suit, they’re given an

opportunity to fi x it — and if

they don’t, if they’re unable

to, then they’re hit with

fi nes. That helps build that

trust with our guests and our

consumers that what we’re

doing is actually happening

consistently on property.

Wayne Carrington:

Because we’re a smaller

hotel, trust is significant. We

need to understand that this

situation is fluid, so whatever

plans we have also have to

be fl uid. We came up with an

eight-point plan that focused

on screening and physical

distancing, as well as

communication. But it took

a lot to build that rapport

with not only our guests, [as

well as] our team, to figure

out what their anxieties are

and to get other perspectives

of what they were looking

for and how we can elevate

our sanitization processes

to make them feel more

comfortable.

Amy Bostock: What are

you are doing, from both

a guest and an employee

perspective, when it

comes to health and

safety?

WC: The fi rst thing

that comes to mind is

the screening processes —

ensuring communication

of the expectations of the

guests coming in, as well as

what you’re doing as a hotel

from that point. There’s a

waiver sent out that [outlines

protocols], such as wearing

masks, social distancing,

what would be in the room.

There are screening

processes, temperature

checks at every checkpoint

(for both employees and

guests) through the spa

(which is now closed),

the restaurants, the front

desk. Then we ensure the

guestrooms have been

vacated prior to [housekeeping]

service. Guests

can’t be in the room when

we’re servicing the room.

There’s contactless service

for guest deliveries and

in-room dining, as well as

increased and documented

planning and sanitization

rotations. [We’ve also

removed] anything that can’t

be sanitized and menus are

digital. All these different

processes have been altered

in order to give our guests

and staff some ease and

ensure we’re following all of

the protocols that are set by

the government.

BL: The focus of consumers

used to be on clean and

comfortable. Now it’s around

clean and safe — it’s a shift

in the way our guests are

looking at their space. So,

we introduced Commitment

to Clean with all sorts of

protocols and cleaning

practices — specific to

COVID-19, but that will

carry on indefinitely — and

focused on staff safety, as well

as consumer safety and building

confi dence in the brands.

From a staff standpoint, we

use a platform called Nudge

to be able to communicate

directly with our hotel-level

staff. One of the things that’s

always a challenge for us as

franchisors, is that we can

communicate to our hotels

at the general-manager

level and effectively at the

franchisee level, but it’s not

so easy for us to be able to

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communicate directly to staff

at the hotel level. This app

allows us to communicate

to them about cleanliness

protocols and make sure that

they’re feeling comfortable

with what we’re doing from

a guest standpoint. We’ve

also got onsite signage to

let guests know what they

can expect and what actions

we’ve taken, as well as all

sorts of information and

alerts on our website.

AW: We were fortunate

in the early days of the

pandemic to be part of the

"Count on Us" program,

which is a clean-commitment

program. And then

Motel 6 and Studio 6 have

the "Clean @6" program.

These all come with safety,

security and cleanliness

protocols we’ve been following.

[Pre-COVID-19], operators

would schedule lobby

cleaning at a time when you

weren’t going to be full of

check-ins and check-outs,

but now, you want to make

sure that not only are your

guests seeing you cleaning

the lobby more frequently,

but that your staff feel safe

as well.

SS: I don’t think there’s one

step of the guest journey

that hasn’t been impacted

with the new processes and

procedures. Across all of

our hotel brands, we’ve had

to help our guests feel like

their environment is safe,

but also within their control.

[Ensuring] visibility is really

critical, that they can see that

it’s happening [and aren’t] just

reading about it or expecting it.

But, some of the more noticeable

changes that many of

our operations include are the

sanitizer stations, socialdistancing

markers on the

fl oor, restrictions on elevator

use and more grab-andgo

food options than ever

before. They’ve also removed

extras in the guestrooms that

are high touch.

VC: For us, the big one

actually happened a couple

of years ago, when we started

to shift more to contactless

check-in and check-out

through our Hilton Honors

app, [which] allowed guests

to choose their room 24

hours ahead of their arrival

and bypass the front desk.

That helped us a great

deal during the start of the

pandemic. The other big

change — one the operators

were very supportive of and

the guests really like — is

the seal on the door. We

now seal the door so every

guest knows this room has

been fully cleaned. The

moment that you break that

seal, you’re the first person

in that room after it being

cleaned. We’ve actually

extended that program into

our meeting space as well,

just to let those people know,

when they do meet, they’re

the fi rst ones into the room

after it’s cleaned. The other

part of that was getting rid

of all the clutter — all of the

paperwork. Unfortunately,

the rooms look a little bit

barer than most guests are

accustomed to. And then,

of course, changes at the

front desk — you’ll notice

a lot more Plexiglas and a

lot more distancing space.

The last part is an increased

focus on areas like the spa,

the fi tness centres, the pools

— they were clean, but we’re

talking like super clean, deep

cleaning now.

AT: When we first started

out doing this [last] year, we

thought maybe by June it

will be over. So, we wanted

to look to the future, and

not just the now, when we

started going through this

process and built out a more

holistic and evolving view

of how we care for our guests

and how we think of our

employees. The most critical

thing we can do is to prevent

the spread of COVID-19, so

we launched ALLSAFE —

an interactive platform that

takes guests on a journey

throughout the hotel. But,

we also did that with our

employees to really understand

what they’re going

through, how they’re feeling

as they come to work, as they

interact with their colleagues

and how they do their work.

And, at the end of the day,

our care for our guests runs

much deeper than chemicals

and cleaning protocols.

As a society, I think we’re

more aware of the fragility

and the importance of our

health, more than ever

before. It may be a little bit

impossible to know exactly

how this will manifest in a

post-COVID-19 world, but

we believe there’s a growing

desire to live healthier and it

will evolve with a powerful shift

to a societal norm of how the

travel industry adapts to this

shift and how it will directly

impact our ability to serve.

LP: At Marriott, we’ve taken

a total-hotel approach —

enhanced cleaning, especially

at these high-touch areas,

public spaces, high-traffic

spaces and the guestroom.

[We’re also striving for] less

contact, more connection

[through] our movement into

digital and increased usage

of our Bonvoy app — so

you can now check in and

get your key through the

app — as well as physical

distancing and new equipment

such as our electrostatic

spraying. With respect to the

associates, mandatory face

coverings for both associates

AUDIENCE

QUESTION:

With the everchanging

government

regulations,

what sources are you

trusting to ensure you

have the most current

guidelines to follow?

ALLY WESSON:

The Hotel Association

of Canada (HAC)

has been a great

resource throughout

this entire pandemic.

It’s launched a great

website that has so

much information.

Basically, anything

that you would need

to know is on that

website. Obviously,

check in with Health

Canada and your local

health resources, too.

Health Canada and

HAC are great

resources for

hoteliers out there.

and guests has been in place

since early in the summer.

We’ve set up individualized

hotel plans, where each

hotel goes through how

they’re cleaning, how they’re

disinfecting, how they’re

mitigating transmission.

And, in fact, every hotel

has a cleanliness champion

[who] is 100-per-cent focused

on ensuring all protocols

are being followed. In the

guestrooms, we’re using

hoteliermagazine.com JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021 | 35


AUDIENCE

QUESTION:

Looking forward to

face-to-face meetings,

what are you doing to

keep attendees safe?

VITO CURALLI:

We introduced a

program called Event

Ready and we’ve got a

list of protocols around

meetings, whether it’s

new food-and-beverage

requirements

and how we handle

the food-and-beverage

delivery for

the customer; social

distancing in terms

of how we set up the

rooms; the actual

meeting rooms

themselves — we’ve

actually re-configured

all of our hotels’

meeting-space quantities

to ensure they’ve

changed to reflect

social distancing in

those rooms (sitting

or standing); and then

that sort of flows into

AV equipment and

how we’ve placed the

AV equipment in the

rooms. And, as the

restrictions change in

jurisdictions in terms of

the number of people

who can be in those

rooms, we’ve got to

adjust to that as well.

There’s a lot of work

going into that space

right now.

hospital-grade disinfectant

on all surfaces, including

door handles, tables, nightstands,

furniture, telephone

keypads, et cetera.

AB: How has the check-in

process changed in light

of COVID-19 protocols?

SS: It’s using technology

we have today and evolving

that technology to help us

minimize physical interaction,

as well as doing as

much as we can through

mobile check-in. Mobile

check-in/check-out has

actually become a brand

standard for IHG in the

Americas, so all hotels

participate in that. And,

we’re piloting all types

of other mobile-enabled

improvements, such as

in-room dining ordering,

real-time pay with points and

how to interact with guests

via mobile.

LP: This desire for a more

contactless experience at

our hotels continues to be

the theme and that will

continue to grow over time

for a variety of reasons. We

launched mobile check-in

through our app back in

2013 at just 31 Marriott

hotels around the world and,

since then, we’ve had steady

uptick from members in

terms of participation. Right

now, we’re at about 4,000

hotels worldwide and, as of

the end of October 2020, in

Canada, 59 per cent of our

hotels have mobile key available.

Another thing that we

recently rolled out to address

the demand we’ve seen from

leisure travellers staying at

our hotels, many of whom are

not yet Bonvoy members, is a

new ‘check-in now’ [button]

on the confirmation page of

our desktop and our mobile

experiences. It’s proven to be

very popular with guests and

we will have that functionality

available at every single

hotel by early 2021.

RC: In this new world

that we’re living in, the

housekeeping department

has become more

important than ever.

What does that mean,

in terms of ensuring you

can do the job you need

to do? Will robotics play

a role?

BL: We haven’t done a

lot on robotics, but it’s

something the industry is

going to see more of, from

the standpoint of repetitive,

predictable tasks. In our

hotels, a lot of the tasks our

teams have are not repetitive

and predictable — they

might be repetitive in some

cases, but they’re not predictable.

So, it’ll be interesting to

see how robotics plays out in

the broader term.

AT: The housekeeping team

is quite traditional, so I relish

the notion of robotics and

re-imagining how to clean

guestrooms. When I think

of our partnerships with the

scientists and you think of

how hospitals clean, I know

that robotics are quite prevalent,

on the hospital side,

in operating theatres. Now,

on our hotel side, we still

have the sticky coffee-cup

rings, dust and debris and

we have to remember that

somebody still has to do that

mechanical work. I relish

the notion of how we [could]

re-invent some of this and

the best people to help us do

that, apart from scientists,

is actually our housekeeping

team themselves.

WC: I can’t say that we

dabbled a lot within the

technology aspects of things,

but with regard to enhancing

our communication between

the team and the housekeeping

hub in the hotel,

then yes, we’re coming up

with apps to highlight issues,

rooms that are completed,

need to be done or pending

issues. But, in terms of actual

cleaning, no, we continue

with the old-school methods.

In terms of chemicals, everything

is hospital grade.

AW: For Days Inn, Motel

6 and Studio 6, we’ve been

using the Clean-Trace

luminometer for years now to

help us with our housekeeping

efforts and really support

our housekeeping teams.

This year, in the height of

the pandemic, we launched

a franchise portal that had

housekeeping checklists

to help our housekeepers.

I don’t think robotics or

technology are something

we’ve really dabbled a lot

into right now, but there are

certain things that we are

doing to move us forward

within housekeeping.

AB: What challenges

do you face as you try

to implement these

protocols across not

only your Canadian

properties, but internationally

as well?

VC: The biggest challenge

I can tell you is that there

are medical officers in every

province, city, country and

state jurisdiction and our

hotels have had to keep up

with all of the changing

protocols that come with

operating hotels in all of

these jurisdictions. For an

operator or a general manager,

not only do they have to

ensure the cleanliness and

the health and safety of the

guests and the team members

in those hotels, they also

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have to adhere to what’s

happening right outside of

the hotel, in terms of the

changes in those jurisdictions

[and how they impact] how

we operate the business, how

we operate food and beverage

and how we make sure that

we are an ongoing business

through this crisis. From our

perspective, it’s just keeping

up with all of those changes,

which are literally happening

on a day-to-day basis.

AT: We have a global council

and we meet on a weekly

basis to make sure we’ve got

some consistency across the

board. One of the things that

is challenging, and we’re

seeing it more in the luxury

hotels, is that the guest is

actually wanting those touches

— they’re coming to the

luxury hotel, paying a lot of

money and wanting rabbits

out of hats. That really is a

challenge for us, globally.

SS: We have 5,900 hotels

around the world and they’re

all mainly represented by

small, individually owned

businesses, so there’s a really

big challenge for these owners

in light of the crisis. Revenue

has dropped to historic lows

and yet we have to invest all

of this money and resources

and training into making

sure that they’re brought up

to speed — it’s a lot to ask of

them and we’ve really had

to stand beside them. At the

peak of it all, we had 1,000

hotels closed during the crisis

and, through a tremendous

amount of support, we’re

now down to just 200. We’ve

really had to hold their hand

through all of this re-training

and education. One of the

priorities, and I’ll speak to

Canada specifically for a real

example, is about keeping

costs down while maintaining

that consistency.

RC: Since COVID-19 hit,

hotels have had to spend

a huge amount of money

on additional protocols

and measures to combat

this pandemic. How

sustainable is that for

the long term?

LP: Marriott’s point of view

is everything we can do to

instill confi dence so that

people can travel again is

imperative to our business.

We’ve all learned a tremendous

amount over the last

several months and continue

to evolve the protocols

and do it better and align

ourselves with experts and

suppliers and partners that

can help us do that. But, we

believe it’s just an essential

part of our service — the

cleanliness, the safety

precautions, everything that

we’re doing — so we haven’t

been charging an additional

cost for that because it’s part

of doing business.

VC: We need to have this

right now — you’ve got to be

at the forefront of cleanliness

and safety. Sure, there’s some

additional costs, but we’re

working with our operators

to offset some of those costs

right now. Do we think it’s

around for the long haul?

Absolutely. It’s going to be

around for a while, certainly

what we’re living through

right now isn’t going to go

away tomorrow, even with

the vaccine. We’re going to

support our franchisees from

that perspective and the

customer will continue to

have that confidence longterm

to continue to come

back and stay.

AB: Which segments

do you feel are

best equipped to

handle operating in a

post-COVID-19 world?

BL: The majority of our

hotels are limited service, so,

by the nature of the assets,

have fewer touch points and

we think that’s what a lot of

guests are looking for right

now. These types of properties

are also better equipped

to be able to operate really

efficiently at lower occupancies

and that’s probably why

the vast majority of our hotels

have been able to stay open

through the pandemic. Part of

it is location related, because

we know it’s a lot of a major

urban markets that have been

hit the worst. But, some of it

is asset based as well; just look

at how efficiently you can run

a 70- or 80-room limited-service

property as opposed to a

full-service property that has

a whole lot of amenities that

need to be open irrespective

of what occupancy you may

have. Clearly, none of us are

immune to the overall devastation

that has hit our industry,

but I think our hotels have

absorbed the impact with a

little bit more resilience.

LP: Our select-service

brands have been pivoting

very quickly in order

to meet the needs of our

transiting customers. Our

Residence Inn has done a

marvelous job, just by virtue

of that style of hotel, it’s

able to step up. Our suite

product is going to continue

to be a really important

amenity in order to manage

all of the different safety

requirements and the ability

to social distance. When

I talk about the meeting

space, in our convention

business, struggle isn’t the

right word. I would say it’s a

very comprehensive job that

needs to be done to instill

confi dence, to demonstrate

the expertise we have to be

able to manage large groups

and make people understand

our capabilities — how

to handle that customer

from the time they arrive

through to their trade show

or through food-and-beverage

needs. But, candidly, we

need to do the same thing

with our government stakeholders

so that they can see

how comprehensive a job

we’ve done, how thoughtful

our work is. We’ve aligned

ourselves with the best

in the business and we’ve

thought through fl oor plans

and technology and the

path of the customer and all

of that. I would say there’s

more work to be done in

that regard.

SS: Mainstream and extended-stay

travel has fared better

than some of our other

segments. And, thankfully,

70 per cent of our open hotels

are in our mainstream brands,

Holiday Inn and Holiday Inn

Express. We’ve seen that those

brands, as well as our extended-stay

brands like Staybridge

Suites and Candlewood, have

been faring much better for

longer length of stay, projectstyle

and essential-work

business. So, we’ve been well

positioned there and I think

that will continue throughout

the first and maybe second

quarter of 2021. But, what

Laura was touching on is a

really important point to

make, which is advocating to

our government bodies to help

our hotels get through this on

a bigger scale. ◆

You can watch the entire webinar,

Hotel Safety Protocols in the

COVID-19 Era, HERE.

hoteliermagazine.com JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021 | 37


Fishing

WHERE

THE

REVENUE MANAGEMENT

EDITORIAL

ARE

Revenue teams should

access non-traditional data

sources when looking for

demand clues

BY BONNIE BUCKHIESTER

Fish

Over the past months, I’ve

witnessed with almost

incomprehension the

changes the COVID-19

pandemic has forced

upon our industry. From operational

standards to accounting practices,

forecasting methodologies to budgeting

scenarios, multiple segments to one

dominating segment and remote sales

efforts to heavy reliance on digital

marketing — nothing is the same.

And so, it’s no surprise that traditional

revenue-management approaches are

no longer sufficient.

I continue to be impressed by so

many organizations that have made

it their mission to find ways to help

us all better understand consumer

sentiment and buying behaviour. The

wealth of information available is

staggering and kudos to the countless

companies that have gone out of their

way to provide stay-safe guidelines and

planning-for-recovery roadmaps, not to

mention the 24/7 statistical overviews

that help us understand today’s reality

and tomorrow’s challenges.

But, in all of this is the reality of

information overload — as if we

didn’t already have a lot of data from

which to make better decisions. So,

as I continue to wade through what

seems like an ocean of information, I’ve

tried to isolate those pieces of market

intelligence that will most effectively

support decision making. Although

this is different for every hotel, there’s a

globally applicable approach to search

out resources. I see these data sets in

concentric circles, going from macro to

micro; the outer-most ring representing

macroeconomic trends and the inner-

ISTOCK.COM/USENG

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I CONTINUE TO BE

IMPRESSED BY SO MANY

ORGANIZATIONS THAT

HAVE MADE IT THEIR

MISSION TO FIND WAYS

TO HELP US ALL BETTER

UNDERSTAND CONSUMER

SENTIMENT AND BUYING

BEHAVIOUR

most ring what’s happening in your backyard.

Let’s start with that outer-most ring. For example, at the

recent virtual Hotel Data Conference, one presenter shared

valuable insights on U.S. travel spending, GDP statistics,

unemployment figures and recovery forecasts. Although no

one has a crystal ball, the data presented will most certainly

assist in the 2021 budgeting process. I’m not suggesting that, as

revenue managers, we don’t pay attention to macroeconomic

information, but we really have to be “glued to our screens”

this year when it comes to understanding the bigger picture.

For example, we keep reading about phases of how business

will return — the initial phase being domestic-leisure drive

and domestic-leisure fly, et cetera. As a lens on the broader

picture, that makes sense. But I, for one, certainly didn’t

know the details around the U.S. balance of travel; that

there were some 97.5-million outbound departures in 2019

and 78.9-million inbound arrivals. The presenter suggested,

if Americans aren’t making international trips because of

border closures and COVID-19 restrictions, then there are

potentially about 19-million more U.S. travellers who may

take a domestic trip. That figure certainly makes for interesting

demand clues.

Now, let’s take a step into the next concentric circle and

ask what’s happening in my region? I recently attended a

weekly revenue meeting during which the team examined

feeder markets in detail. They asked and answered questions

about COVID-19-related travel restrictions to/from those

markets; shifts in school-break schedules; weather patterns;

airlift; and TSA statistics. They accessed travel-pattern data

from the U.S. Travel Association and traveller-sentiment

survey data from South Carolina-based Fueltravel.com.

They also took a look at Skift’s Recovery Index, which

accesses and consolidates data from 10 different sources, six

of which are not in wide use by revenue teams. For example,

one data source is Arrivalist, which uses

“mobile location datasets to provide

actionable insights on consumer

behaviour, competitive share, media

effectiveness and market trends and has

been tracking driving behaviour of U.S.

residents.” There are lots of demand

clues there, too.

Finally, let’s examine that inner most

concentric circle — the one that applies

specifically to your own backyard. The

traditional data sets certainly form

part of the clues to demand trends.

Reports such as room-night production

by channel, market-segment trends,

rate shops, STR market-share reports,

lead-time statistics, length-of-stay

patterns and regrets/denials.

But now, in these COVID-19-induced

times, this revenue team was

also paying much more attention to

search stats, for what dates, for what

lengths of stay and with what level of

conversion? They examined rate progression over time to

determine if there was rate stabilization and paid particular

attention to shifts in booking lead times, so as not to inadvertently

make “knee-jerk” reactions to demand levels that had

not yet fully materialized. They looked at average rate and

average spend by zip code and, at one point, compared search

statistics year over year to see just how different consumer

research was being conducted pre-COVID-19 compared to

post-COVID-19.

The team determined that, for many arrival dates, conversion

ratios remained strong, so they knew price was not the

issue. They utilized a heat map in Power BI to further identify

booking trends and accessed market intelligence from both

Airdna and Transparent to enhance their understanding of

the impact of alternative accommodation. Finally, with a

recent subscription to ForwardKeys, they examined data that

predicts travel patterns based on booking transactions, so

that they might better monitor and anticipate shifts in traveller

intent.

I have to emphasize that by mentioning several vendors by

name, I’m not inferring advocacy — I’m simply saying that

during these unimaginable times, we have to broaden our

scope when searching for demand clues. The bottom line is to

research the available data sources and determine which ones

make the most sense for your market and your hotel. Clearly,

there are myriad resources choices; the ultimate objective is

to fish where the fish are. And, finding the best fishing spots

means searching comprehensively for demand clues.

Bonnie Buckhiester is the principal of Buckhiester Management,

a North American revenue-management consulting firm serving

the hospitality industry.She was recently named one of the Top 25

Extraordinary Minds in Sales, Marketing & Revenue Optimization

by HSMAI. She can be reached at buckhiester.com.

hoteliermagazine.com JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021 | 39


EDITORIAL F&B

HAS COVID-19 KILLED THE

BREAKFAST

BUFFET?

Minimizing risk in the hotel sector has also

meant suspending one of its most trusted lures

BY JENNY FEBBRARO

ISTOCK.COM/802290022

THE IMPACT OF COVID-19

on the local and global hospitality

industry has been undeniable.

According to the Ottawa-based Hotel

Association of Canada (HAC), not

only have thousands of jobs been lost,

but small hotels in particular have

found themselves in dire straits. Yet,

for those consumers who still frequent

hotels under pandemic conditions,

operators are struggling to replace a

mainstay of the midscale property —

the breakfast buffet.

Brian Leon, president of Choice

Hotels Canada, says there has been

a huge impact on its complimentary

breakfast offerings. “Balancing breakfast

expectations of the midscale

consumer with safety can really be

a challenge,” he says. “Consumers

have come to expect the plentiful

buffet with options they can peruse

and pick from. But, current safety

measures need to take priority —

though this can have a negative

impact on the guest experience.”

While Leon notes there really is

no comparable replacement to the

breakfast buffet, he says ‘grab-and-go’

options given out by front-desk staff

have become the alternative. These

options include beverages, fruit,

a bakery item (such as a croissant

or muffin) and a hot item — such

as a breakfast burrito or breakfast

sandwich. While the choice for

consumers is still there, Leon says

overall demand for grab-and-go

remains relatively low.

The other ubiquitous complimentary

offering — coffee — still

remains available with the breakfast

options, though Choice Hotels has

had to suspend the 24-hour coffee in

the lobby. “This was simply to reduce

the lobby touch point,” says Leon.

“And, running a clean hotel is all

about being extremely vigilant about

what those touch points are.”

“As business eventually picks

up post-COVID-19, we do see the

breakfast room returning, likely

around 2022,” says Leon. “Generally,

customers understand what is at stake

— their own health and wellness.”

Jessica Twine, co-ordinator of

Corporate Communications for IHG

Resorts and Hotels, says meeting guest

expectations has been difficult. “We

know how important it is to get breakfast

right for guests. But, at the same

time, it’s our responsibility to follow

the various COVID-19 restrictions

— which have a huge impact on our

breakfast buffets,” says Twine. “But,

despite the challenges, we’re working

closely with owners to offer a number

of safe, cost-effective and high-quality

guest options as an alternative.”

Twine says Holiday Inn and extended-stay

limited-service brands offer

three possible solutions to the removal

of their breakfast buffets. The first is a

grab-and-go continental breakfast that

owners can choose from. “This might

include a baked food, fruit, yogurt

and beverage, plus an additional item

that can be changed depending on

what individual owners prefer and on

what the occupancy levels are at any

one particular time,” explains Twine.

“The second option is a grab-and-go

range of hot sandwiches alongside a

selection of continental items and the

third option is a hot breakfast served

by a host.”

In contrast, the full-service IHG

brands provide a wider range of

choice. Twine says working with

owners helps to customize these

options to meet customer needs.

“There will be an expanded range of

table service breakfast choices,” says

Twine. “However, these enhanced

options vary depending on brand and

40 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021

hoteliermagazine.com


market. Some offer a ‘breakfast-in-bed’

option or ‘chef’s table in your room’ as a

more upscale option.

Both Leon and Twine attest to guests’

appreciation of operators’ adherence to

safety procedures and the feedback has

been positive. Choice has implemented

a “Commitment-to-Clean” program

where each property has a captain,

a staff member who has engaged in

additional training and is taking the

lead on bringing elements of the

program to life at the hotel level.

“The captains also are part of administering

a clean and safe breakfast experience,”

says Leon. Analyzing touchpoints

and ensuring a safe grab-and-go program

are crucial to maintaining guests’ customer

loyalty. “Overall, our hotels have been

coping well and our guest- satisfaction

scores are actually growing.” In part, this

can be attributed to guests viewing the

frequency of cleaning in public areas such

as the lobby and around the front desk.

When buffets do return however —

likely within the next two years — Leon

says they won’t necessarily return to

‘normal’. “From this point on, there

will always be that drive to reduce

touchpoints, for example, there may

be pre-portioned options to reduce the

use of items such as spoons, tongs and

ladles,” says Leon. “I can also see menus

being adjusted to feature more grab-andgo

items that reduce congestion at the

buffet, as well as the implementation of

sustainable, single-use items to reduce the

repeated use of silverware and china.”

He also notes that the buffet set-up

might be designed differently too

— with a side section with take-out

containers for consumers who wish to

easily transport food to consume in

their rooms or even to take with them

when they check out. “While reducing

our touchpoints might be essential

today — many of these practices will

carried into the future,” says Leon.

“But, the breakfast buffet is definitely

set to return — we just don’t know

when exactly.” ◆

hoteliermagazine.com JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021 | 41


TECHNOLOGY

EDITORIAL

STREAMLINED S

HOTELS AND GUESTS ARE EMBRACING MOBILE CHECK-IN

IN OUR REDUCED-CONTACT WORLD

BY DANIELLE SCHALK

ISTOCK.COM/LIGHTCOME

The past year has shifted

operators’ focus to providing

streamlined, low-contact

hotel experiences for guests

in a big way. While the

industry was already headed

towards technology that achieves these

goals, the pandemic and related safety

concerns fast-tracked implementation

and adoption of solutions such as

mobile check-in.

“Since the rise of COVID-19, we’ve

seen a growing interest in a contactless

experience at our hotels,” says Don

Cleary, president at Marriott Hotels of

Canada. “Guests want more control

and functionality in the palm of their

hands to personalize their stay and

provide a seamless experience —

especially with the global pandemic.”

While Marriott has offered mobile

check-in through its Marriott Bonvoy

app since 2013, Cleary explains that

the company has now expanded the

offering beyond its loyalty program. “In

October, to accommodate the demand

of leisure travellers staying at our

hotels — many of whom were not yet

members — we launched a new ‘checkin-now’

button on the confirmation

page of the desktop and mobile web

experiences. It’s proven very popular,

with tens of thousands of guests using

this functionality every month, and

we’ll have this available at all our

hotels in Canada by early 2021.”

Stuart Butler, Chief Operating

Offi cer, at South Carolina- based Fuel,

which provides software and marketing

solutions to the hospitality industry,

points out hotels catering largely to

business travel had been seeing continuous

increases in demand for mobile

check-in prior to the pandemic. “But

there was never really a major demand

from leisure consumers,” he explains,

adding recent health concerns have

changed that.

“Living through this pandemic,

everyone has seen digital adoption

accelerate,” says Jessica Davidson, SVP,

Digital at Wyndham Hotels & Resorts,

which recently launched a re-designed

mobile app.

While the pandemic wasn’t in

Wyndham’s sightline when it began

developing the app, Davidson says

its launch in September allowed the

company to introduce new features when

they were needed, including a rollout of

mobile-check-in/out to approximately

6,000 economy and midscale Wyndham

properties in the U.S.

“[This] took a lot of careful planning

42 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021

hoteliermagazine.com


TAYS

with our operations and technology

teams,” adds Davidson, which included

starting with a smaller property set in

order to receive feedback and iron out

the kinks, as well as providing training

modules, prior to the large-scale rollout.

“Hotels overwhelmingly want this type

of technology during a pandemic,” shares

Butler. “Our inquiries have increased

more than 400 per cent on the product

since the pandemic started.”

However, guests’ comfort level with

new technologies has been shaping

adoption of contactless experiences.

Fuel has introduced functionality to

support completely contactless checkin,

which allows ID verification to

be completed through the app. But,

Butler explains, “The vast majority of

guests and properties still want guests

to come to the front desk.” He notes

a reduced-contact check-in, where-

by guests can fill out

forms digitally and

complete the process

by picking up their

key at the front desk,

is desirable for a large

number of customers.

“We’ve seen a lot

of people, especially

Wyndham Hotels

& Resorts reported its

new mobile app saw sizable growth in

downloads and engagement between its

launch in late September and the end of

2020. Ratings also increased to 4.6 out

of fi ve in the Apple App store and 4.7

out of fi ve in the Google Play store.

young people, who are willing to do a

good amount of that process [digitally],”

Butler adds. “The key is providing

choice to the guests to do what they

feel comfortable doing.”

And, moving even a part of the

process online can create more efficient

operations. As Butler explains, “You

can dramatically reduce the time it

takes to check-in. Even if the guest still

comes to the front desk, you’re taking a

10-minute process and turning it into a

30-second to one-minute process.”

“Mobile and web check-in has

enabled our front-desk associates to

spend less time on routine tasks and

more time providing an even higher

level of personalized service,” agrees

Cleary. “Historically, the mobile-app

experience has even helped lift overall

guest-satisfaction scores.”

Butler also points to customer data

as a key benefit to taking this process

digital, explaining, when forms are

completed digitally, the data is more

readily available and easily leveraged,

as it can be uploaded directly to a

hotel’s CRM or PMS. “But, where the

value proposition has always been with

mobile technology, once a guest is

checked-in on their mobile device, you

now have a way to individually address

them with communication on a one-toone

level,” he adds, noting in-app

messages are less intrusive than options

such as SMS/text messaging.

And, while apps are a key focus

when looking at low-contact solutions,

Butler reiterates the importance of

giving guests choice. He explains that

Fuel recommends its clients offer both

an app and mobile-friendly website.

“It should all tie together,” he says.

“But, there’s an inherent advantage to

encouraging people to download the

app, because now you have them in

your own walled garden.”◆

Fuel's solutions include

options for completely

contactless check-in

Customer Adoption

A U.S. customer survey conducted by Fuel in May app than at the front desk. However, when asked if they

revealed travellers have mixed feelings about using were willing to check in using a mobile app, 81 per cent

technology to bypass the front desk. While fear of close of respondents said yes. For millennials, that percentage

interaction with other guests (50 per cent) and common increased to 89 per cent. But, it’s important to note that

areas (42.5 per cent) ranked among the top reasons that a willingness to check-in via app does not translate to a

would prevent a hotel stay, respondents rated checking willingness to use digital keys to access rooms — only

in at the front desk as the most popular way to checkin

59.9 per cent of respondents indicated a willingness to

for their next vacation. This wasn’t the case for all use this technology. This stat jumps to 72 per cent when

groups. Millennials were more inclined to check-in via an looking specifi cally at the millennial subset.

hoteliermagazine.com JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021 | 43


HOTELIER

AHEAD

OF THE

CURVE

The Annex’s GM Ryan

Killeen uses technology to

keep guests and staff safe

during the pandemic

BY ROSANNA CAIRA

Having a mother who worked in the hotel

industry means Ryan Killeen’s been

hooked on hospitality since he was 10

years old. “I was intrigued by everything

that went on behind the scenes,” says

Killeen, who was born in Hong Kong four years before

rule in the region was returned to China.

After completing two years of a Hospitality

Program at Vancouver Community College, Killeen

landed his first job as a housekeeping attendant at the

Fairmont Pacific Rim. And, after working in Dubai

for a year, he returned to Canada to further hone his

skills in a variety of integral roles.

These days, while the COVID-19 pandemic has

wreaked havoc on the hospitality industry, Killeen’s

role as GM of The Annex in Toronto, a 24-room,

micro-boutique hotel outside the city's downtown core — has taken on new dimensions.

The pandemic may have accelerated many hoteliers’ use of technology, but at The Annex,

tech has always been a part of its DNA. “We’ve eliminated task-oriented work via technology.

We don’t have a front desk, rather guests complete their check-in process digitally. Upon arrival,

they head straight to their room where they enter using a room code provided. iPads loaded

with online streaming services replace TVs. Self-serve closets on each floor have eliminated

30-minute waits for extra towels.”

Killeen says “COVID-19 has been the ultimate test of high-tech, low-touch operations. We’ve

been able to accommodate our guests and deliver the level of service they’ve become accustomed

to from a safe distance. In fact, with the exception of the housekeeping team, the hotel

is able to operate remotely and has been doing so since its opening in 2018. Our monitoring

systems also play a large role in keeping our building safe and secure. The business has thrived

somewhat in this environment.”

From a protocol perspective, the hotel’s reduced team of eight (previously 25) has made

safety its top priority.

And, the hotel has been able to re-purpose rooms to serve as offices. While the world

continues to battle the pandemic, Killeen says The Annex will continue to “double-down

on the use of technology, fine-tune aspects of the guest experience and forge even tighter

local relationships and partnerships that will benefit our neighbourhood, as well as provide an

‘authentically local’ experience for guests.” ◆

QUICK

QUIPS

Hotel Philosophy

“Creating a true local

experience that doesn’t

come with a hefty price

tag.”

Advice to Aspiring

Hoteliers:

"Take chances, make

mistakes and get messy.”

Management style:

“Direct. Period. I hold my

team to a high level of

service. It’s crucial that I’m

willing to jump in on the

fly and demonstrate those

expectations.”

PHOTO BY ADAM DEYELL

44 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021

hoteliermagazine.com


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