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Compendium Volume 6 Australia

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VOLUME VI

TRAVEL

BEGUILING

DESTINATIONS FOR

THE YEAR AHEAD

GASTRONOMY

CHEFS EXPLORE

AND EXPLAIN THEIR

INFLUENCES

INTERIORS

THE ENDURING

APPEAL OF

SCANDI CHIC

STYLE

SUSTAINABLE FASHION,

HIGH JEWELLERY,

ARTFUL WATCHES

PLUS

ARCHITECTURE,

YACHTING AND

FINE WINE

THE COMPENDIUM

2021

M M X X I

by


TABLE OF

CONTENTS

The Compendium by Centurion 2021

The

Overview

1

P 82

OUR SCANDINAVIAN SPACES P 58

Why mid-century Nordic designers continue to influence our homes

THE BIG AND THE BOLD P 64

Three women at the top of the yachting world on the benefits of building on a larger scale

URBAN STRATEGIST P 68

A conversation with architect Deborah Saunt about our evolving public sphere

THE FUTURE OF FASHION P 72

A tidal wave of ethical thinking is changing haute couture for good

BLACK TIE OPTIONAL P 76

The latest styles for dressing smart – no matter what the occasion

VIRTUALLY PERFECT P 82

Digital supermodel Shudu shows off the latest high-jewellery masterpieces

CHANGING TIMES P 90

Behind the scenes as leading watchmakers transition to online sales

6

PHOTO THE DIIGITALS


COLLECTION

Villeret

©Photograph: patriceschreyer.com

BEIJING · DUBAI · GENEVA · HONG KONG · KUALA LUMPUR · LAS VEGAS · LONDON · MACAU · MADRID

MANAMA · MOSCOW · MUNICH · NEW YORK · PARIS · SEOUL · SHANGHAI · SINGAPORE · TAIPEI · TOKYO · ZURICH


P 42 P 16

2T he

Digest

20 DESTINATIONS FOR 2021 P 16

Captivating locales where the focus is on the great outdoors

FROM THE MIND TO THE PLATE P 42

On the inspirations and influences of the world’s most creative chefs

CONTEMPORARY CLASSICS P 62

New and recent Scandi-inspired furnishings that are already collectors’ pieces

THE EXPANSION PACK P 66

The five most important superyacht launches – and their smart innovations

VISIONARY BUILDS P 70

This year’s architectural standouts are changing the way we live

NOUVELLE VOGUE P 74

Fashion designers and collections that put a premium on sustainability

EXTRAORDINARY EDITIONS P 92

These rare timepieces show off the remarkable artistry of their makers

SOMMELIER’S CHOICE P 96

Global wine experts pick emerging vintages from their own regions

PHOTOS FROM LEFT: © QUINTONIL, BACHIR MOUKARZEL

8


THE BENCHMARK

IN ULTRA-LUXURY CRUISING

Designed to deliver the experience of a lifetime, Scenic Eclipse, The World’s First Discovery Yachts, have set the

benchmark in ultra-luxury cruising. From the pristine beauty of Antarctica, to the magnificent Norwegian Fjords and

Arctic, the sun-drenched Caribbean and the history and cultures of Europe and the Mediterranean. Scenic Eclipse

will delight both the keen explorer and the sophisticated traveller with its truly all-inclusive philosophy.

Explore beyond the horizon by helicopters^ and let your expert Discovery Team introduce you to

the unique and diverse environments, by submarine^ or zodiac in 2022 or 2023.

Soar above

and beyond

Where luxury meets discovery

Dive deep below

To discover more, visit sceniceclipse.com

Contact The Centurion Travel Service

to book today.

^Helicopter and submarine at additional cost, subject to regulatory approval,

availability, weight restrictions, medical approval and weather and ice conditions.


k m'p ndI m/

a collection of concise but detailed information

Contributors who

made this issue possible

JONATHAN BELL

is an editor at Wallpaper*

magazine

THE DIIGITALS

created Shudu, the world’s first

digital supermodel, in 2017

Welcome to the sixth edition of The Compendium by

Centurion, our annual wide-angle assessment of the year

gone by and the one that lies ahead. We pride ourselves on

our ability to take the measure of the luxury world from top to bottom –

and this year is no different, though of course it is different in just about

every other way.

The challenges of the past months have affected all of us, humbling

the prognosticators and inspiring the creative visionaries. We were

proud to continue publishing for you, adapting our editorial focus to

match the moment across all four of our issues of Centurion Magazine.

The one thing we weren’t able to do in 2020 was to celebrate our 20th

anniversary – a significant milestone that, like so many occasions of the

past year, will be feted a little late. We look forward to doing so, in all

proper style, at the right time.

One aspect of the production of this issue of Compendium that we

think we hit at precisely the right time was our collaboration with Shudu,

the world’s first digital supermodel. Our high jewellery feature, on page

82, was crafted entirely on a computer – which meant that maintaining

social distance was no problem at all as we got an exceptionally lifelike

glimpse of what the future of modelling might hold.

Our incisive, long-form articles combine with trend-based shortlists

throughout the issue to keep you up to date on everything from

collectable interior design and sustainable fashion to ascendant young

winemakers and the world’s most creative chefs. There is much more

to discover, and be inspired by, across the issue: we wish you happy

reading and a good start to 2021.


Christian Schwalbach

SOPHIE DJERLAL

has written about fashion

for years, most recently for

Vogue Italia

HANNAH GEORGE

uses watercolour, pen and ink

to illustrate wine bottles as

well as children’s books

MELANIE GRANT

is a devoted horolophile and

is luxury editor of 1843

JEFFREY T IVERSON

is a Paris-based American who

covers food, wine and culture

JÖRN KASPUHL

illustrates for publications

ranging from The New Yorker

to GQ

BILL KNOTT

is a food critic and

restaurateur in London

CORNELIA MARIOGLOU

covers yachts and the people

behind them for Centurion

SEBASTIAN SABAL-BRUCE

was born in Chile and now

photographs in New York

ELISA VALLATA

has been the style director

of Centurion for more

than a decade

MELISSA VENTOSA MARTIN

consults on fashion

and style

CLAIRE WRATHALL

writes on design, art and travel

for a myriad of publications

10


THE COMPENDIUM

BY CENTURION

GROUP PUBLISHER /EDITOR IN CHIEF

CHRISTIAN SCHWALBACH

INTERNATIONAL EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

ART DIRECTOR

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY

INTERNATIONAL MANAGING EDITOR

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

DEPUTY EDITOR

STYLE & FASHION DIRECTOR

MANAGING EDITORS

INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATE EDITORS

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

DIGITAL EDITOR

DIGITAL EDITOR (CHINA)

PROJECT EDITOR JAPAN

PHOTO EDITOR

PRODUCTION MANAGER & SEPARATION

CHIEF SUB-EDITOR

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR, FASHION

YACHTING EDITOR

PROPERTY EDITOR

FASHION CORRESPONDENT, PARIS

THOMAS MIDULLA

ANJA EICHINGER

MARTIN KREUZER

CLAUDIA WHITEUS

JOHN McNAMARA

BRIAN NOONE

ELISA VALLATA

FRANZISKA SENG (Germany)

PERZ WONG (Hong Kong)

PAUL HICKS (Asia)

ISABEL ARESO (Spain & LatAm)

MITSUYO MATSUMOTO (Japan)

ANNE PLAMANN

TOM BURSON

DING XIALEI

HIROKO KAMOGAWA

TERESA LEMME

JENNIFER WIESNER

VICKI REEVE

AVRIL GROOM

CORNELIA MARIOGLOU

PETER SWAIN

KATRIN SILLEM

ASSOCIATE GROUP PUBLISHER

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER:

COMMERCIAL DIRECTOR

DIRECTOR OF DIGITAL AND

STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIPS

DIRECTOR OF PRODUCTION

& AD COORDINATION

DIRECTOR OF MARKETING

MARKETING EXECUTIVE

MARKETING COORDINATOR

SALES COORDINATION

CREATIVE CAMPAIGN MANAGER

ADVERTISING COORDINATION

MICHAEL KLOTZ

PETRA PRINZING

CHRISTOPH GERTH

LAURA TIVEY

ALBERT KELLER

CENTURION MAGAZINE

Edited, published and distributed by JI Experience GmbH

by permission of American Express Services Europe Limited,

London, United Kingdom

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CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

AND ILLUSTRATORS

JONATHAN BELL, SOPHIE DJERLAL,

MELANIE GRANT, JEFFREY T IVERSON,

BILL KNOTT, CLAIRE WRATHALL

HANNAH GEORGE, JÖRN KASPUHL,

SEBASTIAN SABAL-BRUCE,

THE DIIGITALS, CAMERON-JAMES

WILSON

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DISCOVER AN

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ONBOARD SILVER EXPLORER


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When you are ready to book, you don´t have to look far away. Join us, for

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20

THE

ESSENTIAL

DESTINATIONS FOR 2021

WHETHER THEY ARE FORTHCOMING, FAR-FLUNG

RESORTS OR LONG-LOVED REGIONS WITH EXTRA

BUZZ, THE PLACES ON OUR GLOBAL SHORTLIST

ARE SENDING OUT A SIREN CALL AS WE RETURN

TO TRAVEL

16


PHOTO © SONEVA

1

MALDIVES

TRUE BLUE

17

The Indian Ocean archipelago has long been the go-to place for those

seeking seclusion in sumptuous surrounds, as epitomised by the

groundbreaking Soneva, which opened its first resort there in 1995. While

2020 might have been a muted 25th anniversary, Soneva has kept growing

and innovating. In October, its original “no news, no shoes” resort Soneva

Fushi (above) unveiled the world’s largest overwater villas – a selection of

one- and two-bedroom retreats, all with their own water slides – while in

December, its sister property Soneva Jani launched its Chapter Two, with

27 new overwater villas, complemented by three new eateries, including

Swedish chef Mathias Dahlgren’s pescatarian and plant-based Overseas.

The island nation will soon also play host to a trio of new resorts in its

Fari Islands – a Ritz-Carlton, a Capella and a Patina, a new concept from

the Capella family of brands – alongside a marina and a first-of-its-kind

hospitality campus for local residents.


2

FINNISH LAPLAND

WINTER WONDER

Hauntingly silent, unyieldingly white and sparsely populated: the

bitter, foreboding yet awe-inspiring conditions of Lapland’s harsh

winter are its very draw. By day, this ethereal backdrop serves as a

blank-white canvas for adventure – from snowshoeing to crosscountry

skiing – while at night, high above a vast canopy of fairytale

forests, the aurora borealis illuminates the sky in a mind-bending

spectrum of multicoloured light. The year-old Octola Lodge and its

new two-bedroom private villa (above), not far from the provincial

capital of Rovaniemi, sets a new standard for accommodations in

this land of extremes. Designed in line with the local Sámi building

tradition, the well-appointed ten-suite chalet – which can be rented

in full or in part – offers plenty of après-outdoors respite, even in

the summer, when it’s the midnight sun that guests are fleeing.

PHOTO © OCTOLA

18


PHOTO LANCE GERBER

3

ALULA

DESERT BEAUTY

19

The Unesco World Heritage Site in the northwest deserts of Saudi Arabia

is the talk of the hospitality world. Aman has pledged to open three

new resorts in the sublime surrounds in coming years, and so too have

Banyan Tree, Habitas and Janu, a new hotel company from Aman.

Architect Jean Nouvel is planning to carve a hotel into the freestanding

sandstone pillars that give the sunwashed region its distinctive look

– some of which, nearby, have carvings of their own and have been

home to civilisations for millennia. Last year, Desert X AlUla (above), a

site-responsive art installation, became the first such exhibition in the

country, bringing in works from global artists in what promises to be an

annual, headline-making spectacle.


4

ARAN ISLANDS

BEWITCHINGLY BARREN

20

Austere, blustery and fringed by steep-faced limestone cliffs, this

trio of diminutive isles off Ireland’s western coast is imbued with a

deep sense of romantic desolation. A hike across any of the islands

– none of them longer than 14 kilometres – will take you past the

odd sleepy village, a smattering of lonely Celtic ruins and timeworn

chapels, and ponies that graze stone-walled pastures. Irish remains

the primary language for its 1,200 residents, adding to a time-capsule

feel that extends to Inis Meáin Restaurant & Suites, set on the

eponymous island – population 183. Sheathed in the traditional drystone

walls ubiquitous across the region, the rustic interior belies the

contemporary comforts of its five ocean-facing suites (think Philippe

Starck bathrooms and Japanese iroko beds), while its much-lauded

restaurant champions homegrown produce and seafood caught fresh

from around the coast.

PHOTO CHRIS HILL


5

BLACK FOREST

CULINARY QUEST

22

This vast swathe of dense woodland, fragrant meadows and softly

undulating hills in Germany’s southwest has long sparked the

collective imagination, from fairytales like Rapunzel and Hansel and

Gretel – said to have been based on local lore – to, more recently, a

gilded cachet of internationally feted chefs inspired by its rich bounty.

While the region’s culinary epicentre firmly remains the hamlet

of Baiersbronn – with a whopping eight Michelin stars, the biggest

little culinary capital few have heard of – in 2020, it was the lakeside

village of Schluchsee making waves. At Oxalis, rising young chef Max

Goldberg dreams up thoughtful locavore dishes with subtle Nipponese

influences, served kaiseki-style. The above creation is a medley of

homegrown flavours: peeled, lightly mottled tomatoes, wood-grilled,

vinaigrette-steamed artichokes from nearby Bötzingen and crisps and

cream made with fermented shallots and garlic.

PHOTO ENRICO MARKX


6

BOTSWANA

SPLENDOUR IN THE TALL GRASS

24

Long one of the world’s premier safari destinations, centred on the

Okavango Delta, the charismatic landlocked country has recently

expanded its wildlife opportunities across a range of landscapes.

Try Cookson Adventures for a bespoke itinerary and wildlife-guided

heli-safari accompanied by leading experts. Or go back to the

retro-styled but utterly revamped Jack’s Camp, which has just put

on a new face after 25 glorious years. Entirely new to the mix is

Xigera, a 12-suite camp that ticks all the boxes, from sustainability

to contemporary art – and is family-owned to boot. For a family stay,

try Little DumaTau from Wilderness Safaris, which has just four tents

and sits amid a private reserve.

PHOTO ISTOCK


PHOTO KARA ROSENLUND

7

SATELLITE

ISLAND

YOUR OWN PERSONAL SANCTUARY

25

As if Tasmania weren’t remote enough, the tiny, windswept speck of

land between its southern coast and Bruny Island broadcasts its siren

song louder than ever at the moment. Formerly a creative retreat just

45 minutes from Hobart, it’s now a private island for hire that feels on

the edge of the world. Not that it isn’t stylish: Australian designer Tess

Newman-Morris has seen to the effortlessly chic decor in both the

hilltop main house and the beachside boathouse. Slow living is the

goal – and inevitably a successful one, though a private chef can be

arranged for those who desire a bit of civilisation.


8

NEW ZEALAND

ANGLING FOR ADVENTURE

26

Rugged, rustic and ready to be discovered, the Land of the Long

White Cloud is an outdoor adventurer’s dream that offers increasing

opportunities to bond with nature. Poronui Lodge (above) in Taharua

Valley on the North Island offers one such irresistible option – helifishing

in some of the most challenging rivers in the world. Brown

and rainbow trout may be abundant but are never an easy catch,

though the difficult nature of a day’s angling can be offset in the

environs of the rustic, if quite comfortable, lodge – grand leather

armchairs provide strong support for weary bodies, an extensive

wine cellar proffers rejuvenation, and utter relaxation can be found

in the superb spa. For those wishing to explore the islands further,

DM Concierge can arrange private helicopter tours that take in

everything from Auckland to Queenstown, with activities including

fishing and golfing along the way.

PHOTO © PORONUI


PHOTO © ARCHIV APT SERVIZI REGIONE EMILIA ROMAGNA

9

EMILIA-ROMAGNA

LITERARY LEGACY

27

As a difficult year closes for the Bel Paese, 2021 remains cause for

celebration of poet Dante Alighieri and the rich oeuvre of works –

including the seminal Divine Comedy – he left behind upon his death

exactly 700 years ago. Some 100 events are set to draw culture vultures

to the northern region of Emilia-Romagna, among them a muchanticipated

collaboration with Florence’s Uffizi museum in Forlì, the

pretty city that gave refuge to the condemned poet in 1302. Scheduled

for a March to July run, Dante: The Vision of Art will showcase artworks

ranging from rarely seen portraits of Dante himself to Michelangelo’s

drawing of a doomed man in The Divine Comedy, while in Ravenna, the

newly restored Dante’s Tomb hosts daily readings of the poet’s magnum

opus and, nearby, a colourful Dante mural by enigmatic Brazilian street

artist Kobra (above).


10

MADAGASCAR

SURPRISE HAVEN

28

The fourth-largest island in the world has long charmed with its idyllic

setting in the turquoise waters of the Indian Ocean and unique flora and

fauna, though for years it lacked a truly standout luxe resort. Time & Tide

Miavana has changed that. Located on Nosy Ankao – a private island

in the Levens Archipelago, off the country’s northeastern coast and

only accessible by helicopter – Miavana consists of 14 villas, built from

hand-hewn rock and featuring private pools, sunken baths and butler

service. It’s surrounded by beautiful vegetation and fascinating wildlife,

and rather than intrude on the environment, Time & Tide has actively

enhanced it. More than 60,000 native plants have been restored to the

island, while five endangered crowned lemurs were introduced there in

2017 – the colony that has since grown to 11.

PHOTO RICHARD L‘ANSON


PHOTO BACHIR MOUKARZEL

11

DUBAI

PRINCE AMONG EMIRATES

29

Abu Dhabi may have risen to greater prominence in recent years

and the attractions of the five lesser-known emirates are gaining

more publicity, but, with 2021 marking the 50th anniversary of

the UAE’s foundation, Dubai is issuing plenty of reminders that it

was the first of the septet to come to global attention. No stranger

to grand gestures and large structures, such as the Dubai Frame

(above), the emirate will be centre stage again in October when

a 438ha site near the border with Abu Dhabi, designed by the

American firm HOK, will host the postponed World Expo 2020. The

theme is particularly apt: “Connecting Minds, Creating the Future”.

And Dubai will further burnish its credentials as both a travel hub

and destination du jour, with the imminent opening of a selection

of high-end hotels, including The Palm Jumeirah St Regis, Langham

Place and the Edition.


12

CHENOT PALACE

PRESCRIPTION FOR WELLNESS

30

Scientifically informed Alpine health retreats have been with us

for centuries, but they may have reached new heights with the

recently opened Chenot Palace in Switzerland. Perched alongside

Lake Lucerne in the picturesque hamlet of Weggis, the wellness

group’s flagship property has sensitively repurposed the handsome

space of the former Park Hotel and added a 5,000sq m state-ofthe-art

spa. Personalised, week-long treatments benefit from the

holistic Chenot Method, aiming towards one of three goals: detox,

rejuvenation or prevention and ageing well. Nutrition is a crucial

part of the programme and so too is the splendid setting, with

views out across the water to cascading hillsides and snow-capped

mountain peaks.

PHOTO ROBERTO PELLEGRINI


EXCELLENCE

by A&R

www.abeking.com


13

SEYCHELLES

SPLENDID ISOLATION

32

Home to white-sand beaches, pristine waters and vibrant

rainforests, the Seychelles archipelago has everything one might

seek in a secluded island paradise, but while there is no shortage

of choice, for the ultimate private rentals, some isles offer much

more than others. Take Cousine Island, which can be rented in

its entirety, allowing guests full access to the four villas and the

spacious Presidential Villa, which features two stylish master

bedrooms, an elegant study, gym room, lounge and infinity pool.

Equally exclusive, Fregate Island is just 15 minutes from the

Seychelles’ centre, Mahé, but a world away in terms of solitude

and can also be hired in full – all 16 residences and access to

amenities such as the Rock Spa and a professional dive club. And

with 11 accommodations hidden amid lush vegetation and eateries

with menus by Michelin-Star chef Akira Back, North Island also

embodies the isolation that Seychelles provides so perfectly.

PHOTO ANDREW HOWARD


5:28PM

The moment screen

time was the furthest

thing from their minds.

Since time immemorial, the Hawaiian

people have called Maui home. And at

Fairmont Kea Lani—or any of our 80+

hotels and resorts around the world—

we strive to be your home away from

home, with a relaxed lifestyle that helps

the whole family unplug and connect

with the essence of the destination.

Gateway to your moment of connection.

fairmont.com


14

COMPORTA

BAREFOOT CHIC

34

Portugal’s central coast – stretching from the spit of land due

south of the Lisbon metro area down to the dunes near Melides

– is the destination that no one wants to talk about too loudly.

It’s too wonderful, at least for now. Earmarked by several hotel

conglomerates over the past decade, nothing has yet come to

fruition, which means the longtime escape of the Lisbon elite has

maintained its warm, casual embrace. Quinta da Comporta is the

wonderful established hotel, but the best way to experience the

coast is in a private villa, whether it is the modern grace of 3 Bicas

or the picturesque, thatched-roof simplicity of Casas Na Areia.

PHOTO ROOM THE AGENCY / ALAMY


PHOTO JONTY WILDE

15

YORKSHIRE

SCULPTURAL LEANINGS

35

The arts have been central to this northern English county for

centuries – most famously in textile form, both before and after the

Industrial Revolution. But these days it is fine art that is making a

name for itself, creating one of Europe’s leading rural destinations

for those seeking an art fix. The place to go first is Yorkshire

Sculpture Park (which features Joana Vasconcelos’s Solitaire,

above) now 44 years old and still the largest in Europe. It is set in

the grounds of Bretton Hall, which mega-gallerist Hauser & Wirth

is currently in the process of renovating into an art-filled hotel. Not

far away, the Hepworth Wakefield is a jewel box of a museum led

by its collection of works by Barbara Hepworth, and farther north

still, the Henry Moore Institute in Leeds offers an in-depth look at

the career and sculptures of Hepworth’s contemporary, in addition

to other artists at the neighbouring Leeds Art Gallery.


16

ZAKYNTHOS

PRIVATE VILLA PERFECTION

36

The Ionian Islands, off Greece’s west coast, transcend Hellenic

stereotypes with their abundant greenery and towering rocky cliffs.

These are the isles of endless natural wonder and, if you find the

right spot, splendid isolation as well. Try the all-villa Porto Zante, on

Zakynthos, for the right blend of friendly, personal hospitality and

stunning beachside properties. Each of the villas is kitted out with

top-of-the-line amenities and works by leading Greek artists, while

both culinary and spa experiences are exceptional, whether you are

in the panoramic dedicated spaces or enjoying them in the privacy of

your villa. Watersports are the recreation of choice – and a cruise to

nearby islands puts Mother Nature on full display.

PHOTO ISTOCK


PHOTO CHRISTIAN HORAN

17

RIVIERA

NAYARIT

PARADISE FOUND

37

It seems like the central stretch of Mexico’s Pacific Coast has been on

the tip of everyone’s tongue in the past few years – and for good reason.

With its pristine beaches, untouched rainforests and an increasing

number of top-tier, ultra-private resorts, it feels light years away from the

clichés of coastal Mexico. Perched on a verdant cliffside, the One&Only

Mandarina is the past year’s standout newcomer, sleeping guests in

lavishly outfitted standalone treehouses and villas as well as offering

cuisine by Mexico’s chef du jour Enrique Olvera and spa treatments

inspired by pre-Hispanic remedies. Due south, another tropical oasis,

Costalegre, boasts likewise immaculate natural scenery, and now, the

Four Seasons Tamarindo joins with alluring accommodations adjacent to

the celebrated Robert Trent Jones Jr-designed 18-hole golf course.


18

WESTERN CHINA

EARTHLY DELIGHTS

The Danxia landforms’ strikingly blended swirls of eye-popping

yellow and sunset orange – like these at Danxia Zhangye National

Geological Park in Gansu province – count among Mother Nature’s

most brilliant paintings, a series of brushstrokes spurred by the

erosion of sandstone and minerals some six million years ago.

These unearthly behemoths are hardly the only awe-inspiring

geological spectacles in this stunning part of western China. In

Qinghai province, Chaka Salt Lake’s stark-white salt-crystal bed

and deep blue water render such clear reflections it’s been dubbed

the Mirror in the Sky; not far away, springtime in the handsome

surrounds of Qinghai Lake – China’s largest – is a postcard-perfect

study in contrasts, with vast fields of bright-yellow rapeseed fields

beautifully complementing the deep turquoise of the water.

PHOTO ISTOCK

38


PHOTO JORDAN ROBINS

19

GREAT BARRIER

REEF

A CORAL ESCAPE

39

The fragile ecosystem of Australia’s most revered natural treasure

demands respect and care but also the awe of those discovering it for

the first time or simply drawn back by its majesty. As popular as the

reef is, among its 344,400 square kilometres there are opportunities to

experience the splendid isolation we often crave – such as Wilson Island

(above). The natural coral cay is 80 kilometres off the Queensland coast

– only accessible from nearby Heron Island – and hosts just 18 guests

in its nine sumptuously equipped permanent tents. With no wifi or

phone signal, digital detox is enforced, but with ample activities – from

kayaking and snorkelling in the water, to birdwatching and, when the

season is right, catching a glimpse of turtle eggs hatching on land –

allied to the simple relaxation of a cocktail at sunset on the beach, the

cares of the modern world should feel a million miles away.


20

SETO

INLAND SEA

MASTER AT WORK

40

There will be an enchanting new addition this spring to the

almost-3,000 islands of Japan’s Setouchi region. The latest project

from Aman founder Adrian Zecha, Azumi (above) – named for a

seafaring tribe who settled in Japan – is a modern reimagining of

the traditional inn, or ryokan. Zecha has collaborated with Naru

Developments to create a blend of highly recognisable structures

with modern sensibilities, all the better to maintain the supreme

levels of hospitality for which the ryokans are renowned and to

create an intimate experience with the staff showing an innate sense

of what guests need to make them feel most at home. With Setouchi

an increasingly desirable destination – a well-regarded art triennial

and Tadao Ando’s stylishly designed seven-suite hotel in the region’s

eponymous capital are examples of its attractions – Azumi will add

the art of high-end hospitality to the reasons to visit.

PHOTO MAX HOUTZAGER


FROM THE MIND

TO THE PLATE

GOURMET GREATNESS COMES FROM A DIZZYING

VARIETY OF SOURCES, BE THEY GEOGRAPHY,

HISTORY OR CIRCUMSTANCES. BILL KNOTT

SPEAKS TO A SELECTION OF THE WORLD’S TOP

CHEFS ABOUT THE INSPIRATIONS THAT HAVE

LED THEM TO REACH – AND REMAIN AT – THE

PINNACLE OF THE CULINARY WORLD

Early in 1987, 24-year-old Ferran Adrià attended a

masterclass for young hospitality professionals in

Cannes. It was hosted by Jacques Maximin, the

renowned head chef of Le Chantecler, the restaurant in

Nice’s Hôtel Negresco.

Somebody asked Chef Maximin to define creativity.

“Creativity,” he replied, “means not copying.” Inspired

by this piece of advice, Adrià returned to El Bulli, where

he had just taken over as head chef, and started on the

path that would lead him to be feted as the best chef in

the world.

Even those who disagreed with that assessment

(and there were many) had to admit that Adrià was an

innovator. The rarefied world of gastronomy had not

felt such shockwaves since la nouvelle cuisine in the late

1960s: molecular, avant-garde, techno-emotional… call it

what you will, it influenced a whole generation of chefs.

Some embraced it completely, others reacted against it,

but nobody could deny Adrià’s influence.

But, to use a musical analogy, how does the conductor

become the composer? How do chefs, after years honing

their skills by cooking someone else’s dishes, make the

leap to creating their own menus and opening their own

restaurants? Adrià may have been inspired by Maximin’s

comment, but there were dozens of other chefs at that

masterclass who did not go on to revolutionise haute

cuisine or appear in The Simpsons.

For Virgilio Martínez, chef/proprietor of Central, the

critically acclaimed, ground-breaking Lima restaurant,

inspiration comes from nature: specifically, the

indigenous food culture of his homeland. He admits,

however, that he took a while to find his voice. “I’d served

my time in top European restaurants, from the pot

wash to the pass, and I’d come back to Lima to open my

restaurant. But what I realised was that I was serving an

international menu with Peruvian touches.”

Inspiration came during a week-long trip to the Andes,

staying with a local family. “It was only when I stood

on top of a mountain that I started to feel some kind of

connection.” Looking down, he could see ancient Incan

terraces, and started to form the idea that his menu could

be broken up by altitude, with each dish representing a

different culinary microcosm of Amazonia and the Andes.

Clare Smyth, the Northern Irish chef who cut her teeth

as head chef in Gordon Ramsay’s three Michelin-starred

flagship restaurant in Chelsea, draws inspiration from

what is best called confidence. “When you’re a young

42


“Maybe it’s just about having the guts to make

the jump and risk making a fool of yourself.

Nature is part of it – having a curious mind

when you’re a kid – but nurture, good teaching,

is what helps you to be fearless”

chef, you’re developing your skills and you copy what

you’ve been taught,” she explains. “Then you get to a

stage when you want to throw it all out and do your own

thing. It’s only when you have the confidence in your own

ability that the creative process really works.”

Smyth opened Core, in Notting Hill, in August

2017, and rapidly achieved two Michelin stars.

Perhaps her most celebrated dish at Core is a

potato: perfectly cooked, in a beurre blanc flavoured

with seaweed, and topped with trout roe – but still, in

the end, a potato. “My family are potato farmers: it’s a

dish that speaks of where I’m from.” As does her dish

of braised lamb and carrots: “It sounds a bit mad, but

I don’t want to hide behind luxury ingredients. With

humble ingredients, I’m setting a challenge for myself.

The conventional view in haute cuisine kitchens is that

British vegetables are crap: I know that’s not true. I apply

as much skill, labour, creativity and intricate technique

to a vegetable as I do to an expensive ingredient: maybe

more, because that’s the challenge.”

She encourages her staff to keep thinking, tasting,

training their palates – “some people tell chefs off if

they eat in the kitchen; I tell them off if they don’t” –

but doesn’t believe that everyone is creative. “I can tell

when someone is creative, but I personally think that

lots of chefs aren’t. I see them still cooking recipes from

Restaurant Gordon Ramsay ten years ago. I thought they

were good back then, but they haven’t moved on.”

Mehmet Gürs, chef/proprietor of Mikla in Istanbul

and a master of what has been dubbed New Anatolian

cuisine, wonders whether a fear of failure holds some

chefs back. “Why are there some super-talented chefs

working in restaurants but you’ve never heard of them?

They’re a bit like artists in their lofts,” he says. “Maybe

it’s just about having the guts to make the jump and risk

making a fool of yourself. Nature is part of it – having

a curious mind when you’re a kid – but nurture, good

teaching, is what helps you to be fearless.”

Gürs was born in Finland and grew up in Stockholm

and Istanbul, and much of his inspiration comes

from reconciling those two very different styles

of cooking. “Scandinavian cuisine is calmer, more

monochromatic – buttoned up in the frozen North –

whereas Turkish food is all about heat, spice, sunshine,

vivid colours and flavours. You might love or loathe

Turkish food, but it’s never bland: I take it, play with it,

43


efine it, distil it, calm it down … that’s the Scandi in me,

I suppose!”

As a committed internationalist, Gürs is scathing

about the rigidity of classic French training. “It’s absurd

that schools are teaching Chinese or Japanese kids

French techniques before anything else. The so-called

‘mother sauces’, for instance – béchamel, hollandaise

and the rest – I’m tempted to ask, ‘Whose mother are you

talking about? It’s not mine!’” Gürs balks at restrictions

of any kind. “I would happily throw away my passports

… except I need to travel.”

Back in Stockholm, chef and restaurateur Niklas

Ekstedt, whose eponymous restaurant specialises

in food cooked in, over and around fire, also muses

on the nature of culinary creativity. “Why do some

chefs think differently from others? I surround myself

with young chefs: maybe they can’t actually cook a fish

properly yet, but they can still be creative. My job is to

help them think freely and develop their own style.”

His style has developed from exploring ancient culinary

techniques. “I was kind of stuck in a corner with the New

Nordic cuisine, when Noma was at its peak and chefs like

René [Redzepi] were drawing their inspiration from the

environment, foraging in particular,” he says. “I started to

look at old techniques instead, scouring old cookbooks

for them: one 18th-century book has a recipe for oysters

cooked in hot fat from the spit, which we’ve adapted

and serve in the restaurant.” His researches have also

turned up long-forgotten techniques for curing salmon,

preserving game and fermenting vegetables.

He picks up a point also made by Gürs: that culinary

artistry is all very well, but a chef is also responsible for

the manufacturing process, and the two skills are very

different. “The most challenging thing in the future is to

find a venue to showcase your cooking: the competition is

enormous. I’d be terrified to start over again.”

It has been a tough year for restaurants around the world,

especially those that rely on an international clientele.

Gaggan Anand, the avant-garde Indian chef whose

Bangkok restaurant was voted the best restaurant in Asia

for four consecutive years, has been forced to adapt, but is

relishing the chance to create a new menu for a different

audience. “I’ve never spent so much time in my own

kitchen. Because we’re now cooking for a local clientele,

we have had to think differently.” Anand has halved his

prices and cut down on luxury ingredients “although some

of our diners want them – caviar, Spanish carabineros, sea

urchin,” he says, “so we offer them for a supplement.”

He continues, “It’s been really eye-opening to discover

more local produce, and to give diners the same experience

but without exotic ingredients. I’ll die before I cook a

lobster again.”

Mixing unexpected flavours has been a lifelong

preoccupation for the so-called “Picasso of Pastry",

Pierre Hermé. He is fascinated by the way they interact

and completely uninhibited about combining unlikely

ingredients to produce uniquely flavoured pastries and

desserts. A macaron flavoured with hogweed and lemon,

for example – “that one sprang from a meal I had at Marc

Veyrat many years ago” – or another made with lovage

and citrus: “lemon completely changes the strong celery

flavour of lovage. And I fill it with pineapple confit for

another twist of flavour.”

Hermé thinks about aroma like a sommelier or a

parfumier: he took wine lessons when he was

young, helping him to learn about flavours not

just in wine but in nature in general, and he has even

designed a range of fragranced products for his friend

Olivier Baussan, founder of L’Occitane en Provence.

“When you’re in a creative phase,” he says, mirroring

the thoughts of all six chefs, “you can have no constraints.

You need to think without boundaries, even if it throws

up a few problems: you can find the solutions to those

when you have the product in front of you. If you don’t

do that, if you let other factors affect your thinking, then

that isn’t creativity, it’s marketing.”

44


FRUITS OF THE SOIL

AGRICULTURE

CLARE SMYTH,

CORE, LONDON

Illustrations by JÖRN KASPUHL

Core, Clare Smyth‘s Notting Hill restaurant, was awarded two stars as a new entry in the 2019 Michelin Guide

and many pundits tip her to gain a third soon. After all, she held three stars as head chef of Restaurant Gordon

Ramsay, and the 42-year-old Northern Irish chef was named World’s Best Female Chef by the World's 50 Best

Restaurants in 2018, so she is no stranger to the rarefied world of haute cuisine. Smyth's menu at Core takes

her back to her roots … and her tubers: father William is a potato farmer, and her signature dish of potato with

herring and trout roe and dulse beurre blanc was inspired by her habit of eating a potato – “plain, with just salt

and pepper, and maybe a little butter” – each day before service, prompting her head chef Jonny Bone to say,

“You've got to put a potato dish on the menu.” Vegetables are the supporting cast in the classic French cookery

in which Smyth was schooled, but she has taken a leaf from L'Arpège chef Alain Passard's book and lets them

take centre stage. Jerusalem artichokes, carrots, onions – in Smyth's hands they become things of beauty.

“Taste everything,” she says, “and understand the matrix of flavours. Greed is good.”

46


2 3

WHERE THE PRODUCE IS STAR

PHOTOS FROM LEFT: EDUARDO TORRES, SANDRA DELPECH

1 ORA, HELSINKI

Finland’s short growing

season means that

pickling and preserving

are part of the country’s

DNA, as demonstrated

at Ora, chef/proprietor

Sasu Laukkonen’s

small, Michelin-starred

restaurant in central

Helsinki. Depending

on the season, the open

kitchen might serve up

pickled celeriac, spruced

up with Scots pine;

smoked lake fish with

turnip and trout roe; or

goose with fermented

rhubarb and crisped husks

of Jerusalem artichoke.

2 MIRAZUR,

MENTON

Argentinian Mauro

Colagreco’s gastro-palace

in the South of France

goes from strength to

strength: first, a third

Michelin star, then the

top spot on the World’s

50 Best list. Colagreco’s

gardens provide much of

his superb produce, and

his latest innovation is his

Mirazur Universe Menu,

compiled according to

biodynamic principles,

and divided into Roots,

Leaves, Fruit and Flowers.

Tours of the garden are

available on request.

3 L'ARPÈGE, PARIS

Alain Passard’s decision

in 2001 to take meat

and fish off his menus

at the three Michelinstarred

L’Arpège in

the French capitals

seventh arrondissement,

concentrating instead

on vegetables, was

controversial at the time:

now, it seems hugely

prescient. Passard has

three “kitchen gardens”

in different terroirs of

western France, producing

40 tonnes of organic fruits

and vegetables each year,

and his menus do them

full justice.

4 CASA MARCIAL,

ASTURIAS

Nacho Manzano was born

in the Asturian farmhouse

that is now his lovely, two

Michelin-starred restaurant,

and his menus are rooted

as firmly in the local soil as

he is. Located among rolling

hills in a picture-perfect

hamlet, between the ocean

and the mountains, Casa

Marcial offers a gastronomic

tour of the Spanish region

in every menu. Manzano’s

most celebrated dish is

pitu caleya (“road hen”,

literally) cooked in a rich

stock and served with

saffron rice.

47


ARTFUL APPROACH

THEATRICAL

GAGGAN ANAND,

GAGGAN, BANGKOK

The term “rock star chef” might have been invented for Gaggan Anand. Take a seat for dinner at the kitchen

table of his eponymous Sukhumvit restaurant and – as he cranks up the volume, and Prince belts out

Purple Rain – it will not surprise you to learn that, in his native Kolkata, a young Anand once earned his

living as a drummer. That he chose cooking as a career, not rock music, is something for which Bangkok's

visiting gourmets should be profoundly grateful. However, should your tastes run to steak frîtes, claret and

some gentle Vivaldi, this is not the place for you – and a menu written entirely in emojis won't help. But

for those who relish the avant-garde, watching Anand work his audience is spellbinding, with more licks

and riffs than Hendrix in his prime. Expect a dazzling series of dishes – spherified yogurt infused with curry

(Anand once worked at El Bulli), a psychedelic plate of spices, to be licked clean – and an equally offbeat

pick of matching wines from Vladimir Kojic (aka Vlad the Intoxicator). There might be, as Anand puts it, “75

other lunatics in my circus”, but the identity of the ringmaster is not in doubt.

48


7 8

WHERE DINNER IS THE SHOW

PHOTOS FROM LEFT: SCOTT WRIGHT, © TICKETS

5 L’ESCAMOTEUR,

KYOTO

Climb the narrow

staircase and walk into

L’Escamoteur (French

for “conjurer”), and you

may well feel you have

stumbled onto the set

of a Harry Potter movie.

Owner Christophe Rossi,

from Marseille, trained

as a magician and there

is much wizardry behind

the bar: plumes of smoke,

dry ice and the occasional

flame. Try the Smoky

Old Fashioned or the

Rossi Gin Fizz and admire

the steampunk decor

as your drink magically

disappears.

6 ITHAA

UNDERSEA

RESTAURANT,

MALDIVES

You have to feel sorry

for chefs who, however

spectacularly they plate

their dishes, will inevitably

be upstaged by shoals of

fish and panoramic views

of coral gardens. Five

metres below the ocean,

the dining room at Ithaa

(“mother-of-pearl”, in the

local language) is made

from transparent acrylic,

offering guests a stunning

270˚ view. The menu

deftly blends Western and

Maldivian cuisines, but it’s

the fish that steal the show.

7 ULTRAVIOLET,

SHANGHAI

A truly avant-garde

experience, especially

for a Michelin three-star

dinner. Meet for drinks

at Ultraviolet chef Paul

Pairet’s other Shanghai

restaurant, Mr & Mrs Bund,

then be taken by van

to a secret, nondescript

location on the city’s

outskirts. What follows

is a kind of gastronomic

son et lumière, featuring a

20-course, multisensory,

interactive menu, inspired

by Pairet’s “psycho-taste”

theories and delivered

by a team of wellchoreographed

waiters.

8 TICKETS,

BARCELONA

Albert Adrià’s delightful,

circus-themed Barcelona

restaurant in the vibrant

El Raval barrio builds on

the legacy he and brother

Ferran created at the

legendary El Bulli, but this

is gastronomy at its most

convivial. Now a decade

old, it still wows diners

with its witty, clever and

imaginative tapas-style

dishes, served among the

riotous exuberance of the

carnival decor. Choose à

la carte, or let your server

choose: the waiters will

bring you plates until you

tell them to stop.

49


BEST OF BOTH

FUSION

MEHMET GÜRS,

MIKLA, ISTANBUL

The son of a Turkish father and a Swedish/Finnish mother, Mehmet Gürs’s diet as a child was unusual: Turkish

feasts on Islamic holidays; herring and pig’s trotters at Christmas. For him, however, it is perfectly natural and

“the only reality I know, although sometimes I feel like a lunatic with a split personality”. On the plate, Gürs’s

food looks restrained, even minimalist – “I don't just throw colours all over the plate; my food looks like food” –

but its flavours are unmistakably, vibrantly Anatolian. His restaurant, Mikla, sits atop the Marmara Pera Hotel

and boasts panoramic views of Istanbul, the city that has become his home and his inspiration. In his hands,

for example, a rustic fish sandwich from the Galata Bridge is transformed into a dish of hamsi (Black Sea

anchovies) with a crisp wafer of olive oil-fried bread and an elegant lemon sauce. Further afield, he nurtures

relationships with scores of small producers throughout the region. Gürs loathes boundaries, whether cultural,

political, religious or geographical, and sees them as the enemies of creativity. He loves to travel, absorbing

ideas wherever he goes. “I think everyone has creativity in them,” he says, but sees it as a muscle that needs to

be exercised. “Some people are content with the landscape as it is. I like looking under stones.”

50


9 11

WHERE CULTURES MEET ON THE PLATE

PHOTOS FROM LEFT: © KEI, © JL STUDIO

9 KEI, PARIS

Kei Kobayashi is the first

Japanese chef to earn three

Michelin stars in France:

a protégé of Alain Chapel,

his restaurant near Les

Halles in Paris has become

a must-visit spot for the

city’s gourmets, offering

Kobayashi’s unique

interpretation of modern

cuisine, backed up by

extraordinary technique

and painterly presentation.

His sense of aesthetics

was honed in Japan and

his technical wizardry was

learned in France – but his

style is all his own.

10 MINGLES, SEOUL

Chef Kang Mingoo’s

influences come from

training under Basque

chef Martín Berasategui

and working at Nobu, but

also from Jeong Kwan, a

Buddhist nun and Korean

food expert, and Cho

Hee-sook, the godmother

of Korean cookery.

At Mingles, he melds

European technique with

traditional Korean cuisine

(hansik) to great effect,

winning two Michelin

stars for his interpretation

of his homeland’s rich

food culture.

11 JL STUDIO,

TAIWAN

Singaporean chef Jimmy

Lim grew up cooking at

his father’s street stall. In

2017, he opened JL Studio

in Taichung City, fulfilling

his dream of showcasing

modern Singaporean

cuisine in a gourmet

restaurant. Lim deconstructs

traditional Singaporean

dishes using fresh

Taiwanese ingredients: satay,

for instance, is reworked as

a peanut ice cream shaved

over frozen foie gras, with

crisped chicken skin,

cucumber and onion.

12 L'EFFERVESCENCE,

TOKYO

Shinobu Namae’s CV

includes a five-year stint at

Michel Bras and a year at The

Fat Duck. At L’Effervescence,

which he opened in

2010, his playful blend of

European and Japanese

cuisines has earned him

two Michelin stars. Standout

dishes include blowfish roe

matched with sushi rice

risotto, dried scallops and

white truffle, and oak-grilled

duck with red wine sauce,

pasta in brodo, and the

duck’s legs, offal and bones

with black truffle.

51


SUMMIT VIEW

GEOGRAPHY

VIRGILIO MARTÍNEZ,

CENTRAL, LIMA

Growing up in Lima, Virgilio Martínez knew very little of Peru’s indigenous food. “We were told that the Andes

and Amazonia were out of bounds, full of drugs and terrorists,” he says. He served his time at restaurants in

Europe, returned to Lima, opened Central, then – frustrated at not cooking what he considered to be “true

Peruvian food” – closed the restaurant, took a six-month break to travel around Peru, and started to discover

indigenous ingredients that most Peruvians had never seen before. Because of the country’s topography,

says Martínez, “our food culture is vertical, not horizontal. Discovering it changed the way I thought about

Peru.” He launched his Altitude menu in 2012: a series of 20 plates, each from a different altitude and with

its own culinary integrity. “Nobody had laid out Peru like that before,” he says. He stresses that his is a

collaborative approach to creativity: his wife, Pía León, and sister Malena are integral parts of his team, as are

anthropologists, researchers and biologists. “My inspiration comes from nature, from the wisdom of ancient

cultures, and I am spurred on by the things people in our team challenge me to do. Our philosophy is simple:

how many rules can we break today?”

52


13 15

WHERE DISHES ECHO PLACE AND PEOPLE

PHOTOS FROM LEFT: © QUINTONIL, ARTRA SARTRACOM

13 QUINTONIL,

MEXICO CITY

Head chef Jorge Vallejo’s

menu at Quintonil is a love

letter to Mexico’s culinary

heritage, celebrating the

country’s indigenous

ingredients: a disciple

of Enrique Olvera, with

whom he worked at Pujol,

Vallejo makes lavish

use of herbs (including

quintonil) and flowers

from his nearby garden.

Dishes might include

smoked tomatoes with

grasshoppers and Oaxacan

herbs, charred avocado

tartare with escamoles (ant

eggs), or a pickled mussel

tostada with fried beans.

14 DUKE’S BAR

& RESTAURANT,

ROTORUA

Dotted around the menu

at this clubby bar and

restaurant in Rotorua’s

Prince’s Gate Hotel, is

a koru, the traditional

Maori coil symbol. It

signifies dishes made

with Maori ingredients:

start with hupa kiko

nui, a classic boil-up of

pork, puha (sow thistle),

root vegetables and

dumplings, and follow

with te kainora paoa:

smoked venison with

horopito (a peppery

leaf), juniper and

manuka honey.

15 CHARCOAL

LANE,

MELBOURNE

A social enterprise

restaurant funded by

Mission Australia and

staffed by young Aboriginal

people, Charcoal Lane

showcases native

Australian ingredients on

its intriguing menu: slowcooked

wallaby shank with

pepperberry and pickled

peach, for example.

Executive chef Greg

Hampton is a passionate

advocate of local, seasonal

produce, fusing his topnotch

ingredients with

modern techniques to

winning effect.

16 FEAST,

WINNIPEG

The menu at chef/

proprietor Christa

Bruneau-Guenther’s

Winnipeg cafe and bistro

is firmly rooted in First

Nations cuisine: Manitoba

bison, for instance, slowroasted

with rosemary and

served with a compôte of

wild blueberries, or seared

lemon pepper pickerel

sliders. A member of

the Peguis First Nation,

Bruneau-Guenther has

become a leading light

in North America’s

indigenous cooking

movement, despite having

no training as a chef.

53


BLASTS FROM THE PAST

TRADITION

NIKLAS EKSTEDT,

EKSTEDT, STOCKHOLM

Niklas Ekstedt’s eponymous Stockholm restaurant, with its focus on food from fire, has a notably young and

enthusiastic brigade – “I like to surround myself with young people,” he says – but his cooking methods are

far older than his team of chefs. He has even designed what he calls “a Stone Age microwave” and enjoys

the challenge of working with a limited number of techniques. “It's like a painter restraining the number of

colours on his palette,” he explains. “It's more focused, it's easier to define your style. And I realised some time

ago that the period we've spent cooking with electricity is just a tiny fraction of the time we've spent cooking

without it; similarly, smoking, pickling and fermenting are methods that we have mostly forgotten, but add

so much flavour to food that refrigeration, freezing and canning can't.” Considering inspiration, he says “I

think it's a myth that you're born with creativity: it needs to be nurtured. The creative process is never-ending:

thinking, shopping, cooking… teaching young chefs to be creative thinkers is a huge part of my job, and very

rewarding. For me, creativity is a lot to do with happiness. You are more at peace if you have a creative mind.”

54


17 20

WHERE OLD BECOMES NEW AGAIN

PHOTOS FROM LEFT: EVAN SUNG, © BURNT ENDS

17 OX, PORTLAND

Opened by James Beard

Award-winning chefs Greg

Denton and Gabrielle

Quiñónez Denton, and

inspired by the arts of the

Argentinian parrilla, Ox

boasts a huge wood-fired

grill: order the Asado

Argentino – grilled short

rib, house chorizo, morcilla

sausages, skirt steak,

sweetbreads, fried potatoes

– and put it to the test.

Local Oregon pinot noirs

and Argentinian malbecs

dominate the wine list, and

there’s a good selection of

craft beers.

18 MARBLE,

JOHANNESBURG

There is nothing so

quintessentially South

African as meat meeting

fire, and chef David Higgs

– who also owns Saint, an

Italian joint in the north

of the city – makes the

most of it at Marble. His

kitchen boasts various

grills, including one

especially imported from

Michigan, and the menu

features steaks from

Japan and the USA, as

well as from South Africa.

Wash it all down with a

Stellenbosch cabernet.

19 HÄRG, TALLINN

The brainchild and second

restaurant of Estonian grill

masters Enn Tobreluts,

Hanno Kuul and Andres

Tuule, Härg opened

in 2018. A spacious,

contemporary space with

an open kitchen, the

restaurant’s speciality

is, unsurprisingly, meat

cooked over charcoal

– or, in the case of the

restaurant’s “dirty steak”

signature dish, actually in

the charcoal. There is some

nose-to-tail action, too,

with both ox tongue and

duck hearts on the menu.

20 BURNT ENDS,

SINGAPORE

Chef/proprietor Dave

Pynt’s pride and joy is his

four-tonne, wood-fired

brick kiln with two ovens

and four grills. It’s not

just meat that gets the

treatment: langoustines

feel the kiss of the flames,

to be served with kombu

beurre blanc; and grilled

leeks are smothered in

brown butter, capers and

hazelnuts. Flat-iron beef

with burnt onion and

bone marrow tempts

many, though – and

rightfully so.

55


SWEET MEDLEY

AVANT-GARDE

PIERRE HERMÉ, PARIS

Heir to four generations of traditional boulangers-pâtissiers from Alsace, Pierre Hermé has taken pastry

to a new level. His inspiration comes, he says, from many sources: “From something I have read, or a

picture, a journey, a memory.” The windows of his string of boutiques around the world sparkle with his

edible bijouterie, and behind each macaron, each mille-feuille, is Hermé's restless imagination, his ability

to create what he calls “scenarios of taste, the architecture of flavour”. While his sublime pastries and

chocolates have legions of admirers, it is macarons for which he is most famous: they have become

emblematic of the nouvelle vague of patisserie. Their shape and texture may resemble the macarons

of times past, but their flavours are often audaciously contemporary: “Since 1984, I have continuously

explored new flavours and techniques,” he says. “This is how I came up with macarons flavoured with lime

and basil, with hazelnut, and white truffle, or with olive oil and vanilla.” He identifies three characteristics

as vital to the creative process: “Curiosity, knowledge of ingredients and the constant ability to question

your own work. Only when you have these things can you let your imagination flourish.”

56


21 22

WHERE UNEXPECTED FLAVOURS MIX

PHOTOS FROM LEFT: THOMAS SCHAUER, © LASARTE

21 DOMINIQUE

ANSEL BAKERY,

NEW YORK

French-American pastry

chef Dominique Ansel

will forever be known

for inventing the cronut

– half croissant, half

doughnut – that provoked

huge queues outside his

tiny bakery in 2013. But

he is not the kind of chef

to rest on his laurels: his

Spring Street cafe offers

his version of the Breton

Kouign-amann, a kind of

caramelised croissant, as

well as madeleines served

warm from the oven and a

whole host of other treats.

22 LASARTE,

BARCELONA

As if Spanish uber-chef

Martín Berasategui’s threestar

menu were not enough

reason to visit Lasarte,

the Barcelona restaurant

can now boast the world's

finest pastry chef. Xavi

Donnay picked up his gong

at The Best Chef Awards

2020, recognition from

his peers for his superb,

often Asian-inflected

artistry in patisserie. His

desserts include ginger

and passionfruit sorbet

with coconut and carrot,

and chestnut cream with

smoked ice cream.

23 BACHOUR

CORAL GABLES,

MIAMI

Puerto Rico-born Antonio

Bachour’s love of all things

sweet was fostered by a

childhood spent in his

family’s bakery; since then,

he has worked his way up to

the very top of the culinary

tree, winning World’s Best

Pastry Chef in 2018 and

opening his flagship Miami

restaurant and bakery the

following year. His hugely

creative desserts include

the Bachour Brownie, with

cinnamon caramel and

cocoa nibs, and Paris-Brest

made with pistachios.

24 HET GEBAAR,

ANTWERP

Dutch chef and

restaurateur Roger van

Damme knew at the age

of 12 that he would be a

pastry chef. He opened Het

Gebaar, peacefully located

in Antwerp's botanical

garden, in 1994. It serves

a terrific steak tartare and

– this being Belgium –

exemplary frîtes, but most

diners are there for Van

Damme's extraordinarily

complex and precise

desserts: Black Jack, for

example, which features

edible playing cards,

printed on both sides.

57


OUR

SCANDINAVIAN

SPACES

DESIGNERS AND ARCHITECTS FROM NEW YORK TO

HONG KONG REMAIN ENCHANTED BY SCANDINAVIAN

MODERNISM. CLAIRE WRATHALL EXPLORES

THE ENDURING APPEAL – AND HOW IT’S ONLY

BLOSSOMED FURTHER IN THIS PAST YEAR

Leisure in the 21st century may be all about

experiences and adventures, but for the best part

of 2020 we found ourselves housebound, turning

our gaze inwards rather than outwards – and focusing our

attention on interiors like never before.

It’s a transformation that transcends socio-economic

status: Ikea’s ubiquitous Billy bookcases, designed by

the late Gillis Lundgren in 1979, sold at a rate of one

every 10 seconds in 2016; now, the brand estimates, it

sells one every five. But the embrace of interiors was

especially pronounced at the top of the market, where

collectors of important 20th- and 21st-century furniture

and lighting are bidding in force. “I think buying design

represents a kind of freedom in this strange period,” says

Flavien Gaillard, head of the 20th-century decorative arts

department at Christie’s in Paris, where business has been

brisk since it held its first pandemic-era design auction on

30 June. Needless to say, much of the bidding was remote.

Nordic designers are proving an enduringly fashionable

choice. “People just love that furniture and want it in their

homes,” says Marcus McDonald, UK director of modern

decorative art and design at the international auctioneer

Bonhams, speaking after its live Design sale in October,

the auction house’s first-ever such offering, at which

pieces by Alvar Aalto, Kaj Franck, Axel Einar Hjorth,

Frode Holm, Arne Jacobsen, Finn Juhl, Kai Kristiansen,

Flemming Lassen, Paavo Tynell, Tapio Wirkkala, among

others, changed hands, many of them for comfortably

above their estimates – a bounty for sellers that has also

been seen at recent sales at Sotheby’s in New York and

Dorotheum in Vienna.

No wonder manufacturers such as Artek in Finland,

Knoll in the US and Vitra in Germany continue to produce

so many classics of mid-century Scandinavian design.

Should you yearn for the PK52 Professor desk that Poul

Kjærholm designed for the Royal Danish Academy of Fine

Arts in 1955 or Hans Wegner’s elegant oiled-walnut and

stainless steel CH110 model from 1970, they can be yours

in a matter of weeks, the former priced at about €3,000,

the latter nearer to €10,000.

True collectors, however, tend to eschew box-fresh

versions of modern classics in favour of pieces

from the original edition, even if that requires

compromising on the condition. “The design is still great,

but they have no value in the secondary market,” says Victor

Gastou of the Parisian dealer Galerie Yves Gastou. (The

present auction record for a piece of Scandinavian design

stands at £602,500, realised by a 1952 oak-and-maple

dining table by Peder Moos that Phillips sold in 2015.)

However finely fabricated, newly constructed pieces “have

no patina, no marks that distinguish them, no story”, he

continues. “Objects are like people; they have experience.

It’s much richer to have something original. Pieces can

58


e a way into understanding the time in which they were

designed. They can carry emotion and memories. They

can be food for your spirit, for inspiration.”

Not that everyone necessarily desires emotion in,

say, a dining chair. Aesthetics aside, considerations

such as comfort, practicality and a seat that

complements the rest of your decor tend to carry more

weight with most homeowners, which perhaps accounts for

the enduring popularity of Wegner’s CH24 or Wishbone

dining chair (and the many imitations it has inspired), the

latter a bestseller more than 70 years after its launch.

“My Wegner Wishbone chair is one of my most treasured

possessions,” says the Hong Kong-based architect and

designer André Fu, whose interiors can be found in several

of the world’s leading hotels, notably The Upper House

Hong Kong, The St Regis Hong Kong, the Waldorf Astoria

Bangkok, The Berkeley in London, Villa La Coste in

France and the just-opened Hotel The Mitsui Kyoto. He

acquired an original while still a student at Cambridge

in the UK, and continues to “think of [Wegner] as a true

master. I particularly admire his ability to infuse oriental

joinery traditions into designs that are quintessentially

Western. His creations are pure, and genuinely timeless.”

Question a handful of the world’s leading interior

designers about their principal influences, and the

chances are, they’ll all name a Nordic designer. Take

Martin Brudnizki – the visionary behind hotels such

as The Beekman in New York and the Villa Kennedy in

Frankfurt, not to mention the occasional residence – who

nominates a fellow Swede Gunnar Asplund, the Nordic

father of functionalism. “I grew up in Stockholm around

the corner from Asplund’s Stockholm Public Library,” he

says. “It’s a behemoth of early 20th-century modernist

design and it sits on Sveavägen, not far from Adolf Fredrik

Church, another Stockholm landmark but one that was

constructed two centuries earlier. “These two buildings

are not just on the same road, but at a crossroads in

architectural history: the church coming at a moment

when Sweden looked to reinterpret the classicism of

ancient Rome, and Asplund’s library referencing and

reducing classical antiquity to abstract geometric forms,

as the Neoclassical movement morphed into Modernism.

And that became a huge influence on my thinking.” He

cites Asplund’s design for Gothenburg City Hall as the

direct inspiration for the light-filled interiors of the

Michelin-starred, Swedish-owned London restaurant

Aquavit, a vision in warm timber panelling, richly veined

Swedish marble and rose-gold mirror. “The way Asplund

harnessed the history of classical design into something

so contemporary made me realise not only the impact

that architecture and design have on a person, but also

how history can shape that journey.”

Indeed, the recent history of Scandinavia, it transpires,

in part explains the dominance of its design culture. By

the early 20th century, newly independent of Norway,

“Sweden wanted to put itself on the world map,” says

Andrew Duncanson, co-founder of the Stockholm gallery

Modernity. And its pavilion at the 1925 International

Exhibition of Modern Decorative and Industrial Arts

in Paris, where Asplund’s furniture caught particular

attention, did just that. Denmark, too, having had

Northern Schleswig restored to it in 1920, also sought

to assert itself as a modern forward-thinking socialdemocratic

nation at that fair.

As Duncanson continues, “The philosophy

behind Swedish design of this time was that

it should be for the masses, not just for the

rich.” The political concept folkhemmet, literally “the

people’s home”, put the idea of home squarely at the

centre of Sweden’s nascent social-democratic culture.

A sommarstuga, or summer cottage, a second home in

the mountains, the forest or by the sea, should belong

to every Swede. The nation was going to need a lot of

furniture.

Neighbouring Denmark, however, was, says Duncan,

“less socialist. There wasn’t the same pressure to

produce inexpensive pieces in, for instance, pine.” Its

Cabinetmakers’ Guild, an exhibition of whose members’

creations was held every year in Copenhagen, promoted

increasingly rarefied skills and designs. “This is probably

why we got Ikea, and Denmark got [the premium

furniture makers] Fritz Hansen and Carl Hansen,”

both of which continue to produce now-classic Nordic

designs from the past.

It’s no surprise then that influence of these designers

began to spread. “The Italian Rationalist school from

the 1930s up to the 1960s was basically a synthesis

of all the European modern movements, and it was

particularly influenced by Nordic design,” says the

Italian interior architect and furniture designer Achille

Salvagni, citing specifically the work of Aalto, Asplund

and Sigurd Lewerentz, “who took a softer approach

than [Swiss-French and German] architects such as

Le Corbusier and Mies van der Rohe.”

59


Having trained as an architect in Rome – “where

whenever you try to move towards Rationalism, in through

the window jumps Classicism”, he says – Salvagni moved

to Stockholm to continue his studies in an effort “to

refresh my mind and get rid of all the Imperial Roman,

Renaissance and Baroque history”, that he had grown up

with and which “had always dominated my thinking. Going

to Sweden was a way for me to cool down stylistically, a

way to learn to think internationally, not locally.”

He is not the only Italian designer to have felt

its influence. “The Nordic style,” he continues,

“was much more organic. Designers such as Gio

Ponti, Paolo Buffa and Tomaso Buzzi took the essence

of the main Rationalist message but tempered it further

in their consideration for Classicism and Italy’s own

history and heritage.”

Nordic designers have also influenced the New World:

New York-based Giancarlo Valle cites Swede Axel Einar

Hjorth as a key influence. “I love how freely he moved

between styles at a time – the 1930s – when Swedish

design was particularly mature and well defined,” says the

architect, who specialises in residential interiors, most

celebratedly a home on Rhode Island that subsequently

sold for $17.6 million, just a shade less than Taylor Swift

paid for the altogether larger property next door.

“While Hjorth is probably best known for bringing

Swedish decorative arts to the US in the late 1920s, he

also started to experiment with new, highly primitive

functionalist forms that had strong chunky silhouettes

and playful decorative elements. Later, he began to

incorporate these designs, which he would make

in pine.” Designs which, Andrew Duncanson notes,

remain highly sought-after despite the modesty of their

materials. “It’s ironic but these once-inexpensive pieces

are now among the most expensive.” (In 2014, Phillips

sold a snail-shaped nickel-plated aluminium-and-glass

ceiling light designed for a bakery in Stockholm for

£122,500.)

“Hjorth created a kind of functionalist Modernism,”

says Valle, “well before many of the better-known French

Modernists” – figures such as Le Corbusier, his colleague

Charlotte Perriand and his cousin Pierre Jeanneret –

“began to define their own work in such a way”.

You’ll find a Perriand console and a Jeanneret sofa and

chairs in the elegant apartment of the Parisian designer

Joseph Dirand, whom The New York Times has called

“arguably the most sought-after talent of the design

world”. Pressed for his influences, he mentions another

Nordic name, the Finnish-born architect Eero Saarinen

– whose iconic buildings include the TWA Flight Center

at JFK International Airport and the Gateway Arch in

St Louis – whom he praises “for his global vision”.

“I love minimalist architecture,” he says. Its “precise,

clear vocabulary and the detail” is why he put Saarinen’s

1954 Conference chairs in the exquisitely beautiful

guest rooms at the Four Seasons at the Surf Club in

Miami as well as in the Palais de Tokyo’s Monsieur Bleu

restaurant, and his 1957 Tulip chairs in Loulou, the

restaurant at Paris’s Musée des Arts Décoratifs. Both

models are still made by Knoll. You can even buy a Vitra

1:6 scale miniature of the latter in the museum gift shop.

Saarinen’s motivation in designing these iconic chairs

was to resolve what he called “the ugly, confusing,

unrestful world” of chair and table legs. By placing an

upholstered seat, or a tabletop, on a pedestal, there is

more space for the diners’ legs, which makes them more

comfortable. And comfort is essentially what great

design should be driven by.

According to research conducted by Meik Wiking,

founder of the Happiness Research Institute, an

independent think tank in Copenhagen, “It really

matters that we feel comfortable [at home because] 73

per cent of those who are happy with their homes are

happy with their lives.” A truism borne out by the rising

demand, notes Duncanson, for pairs of upholstered

lounge chairs, and dining tables “even though people

aren’t entertaining at home”.

Homes, Wiking has discovered, “are three times as

important as income when it comes to happiness. But it

isn’t size that’s important; it’s the feeling of space.” Not,

he stresses, that this is a prescription for Minimalism or

a call to declutter. “Some well-chosen keepsakes can be

very hyggelig,” he says, using the adjectival form of hygge,

the ubiquitous and untranslatable Danish word that

connotes an atmosphere that is cosy and convivial.

Etymologically, hygge shares a root with the English

word hug, which perhaps explains everything. Because

ultimately, aren’t hugs what we’ve missed most this past

pandemic year? Deprived of physical contact with family

and friends, it’s no wonder we crave the warm embrace

of an ideal home, a haven of comfort and calm, safety and

order in a world full of dangers we cannot control.

60


1

2

CONTEMPORARY

CLASSICS

These midcentury-inspired pieces

from across the globe are keeping

Scandinavian design principles as

fresh as ever. By Claire Wrathall

3

1 FLOWER BENCH BY

SANAA FOR VITRA

The Pritzker Prize-winning

architects Kazuyo Sejima

and Ryue Nishizawa, known

as SANAA, first worked for

Vitra when they designed an

extraordinary oval factory

building for the German

furniture manufacturer’s

campus in Weil am Rhein

in 2010. Their Flower bench

went into production the

same year, an experimental

seat they had conceived for

the Istanbul Biennial intended

to accommodate three

people, who can look at each

other or face each other’s

backs, making it the perfect

perch for social distancing.

62


4

6

5

PHOTOS COURTESY THE DESIGNERS AND COMPANIES

2 ANDRÉ FU

INTERLOCK

LAPTOP TABLE

No one needs a desk at

home any more, says

André Fu. You can work

anywhere, as long as

there’s somewhere to rest

your MacBook. The name

of his table is a reference

to the intricate way the

components are joined,

resulting in a reassuringly

solid, stable surface

supported by three legs so

that it can be drawn close.

Available in grey or brownstained

oak and two heights

to suit most seating, it is

part of his furniture range,

André Fu Living.

3 ANTINOO BY

ACHILLE SALVAGNI

Marguerite Yourcenar’s

1951 novel Memoirs of

Hadrian may seem an

unexpected source of

inspiration for a credenza,

but this piece is named

after Antinous, sequestered

lover of the first-century

Roman emperor Hadrian.

Hence the narrow panel of

bronze, plated in 24kt gold,

on which two eyes and an

elongated nose have been

etched, a face reminiscent

of a Cycladian head or

the visor on a Roman

helmet, caught within the

“embrace” of its sculptural

curved doors.

4 ESSAY TABLE BY

CECILIE MANZ FOR

FRITZ HANSEN

When considering the

design of a table, the

Danish designer Cecilie

Manz has said, “I let my

ideas run wild in the

beginning, but as they

take shape I begin to

minimise as much as

possible.” Hence this essay

in minimalism, designed

in 2009, which comprises

just three elements: a pair

of reinvented trestles and

a solid oak or walnut top

(available in four lengths),

that can be extended with

black laminate leaves that

attach to both ends.

5 WASHINGTON

SKELETON CHAIR

BY DAVID ADJAYE

FOR KNOLL

To mark its 75th anniversary in

2013, US furniture maker Knoll

approached Ghanaian-British

architect David Adjaye, who

had won the commission

to design the Smithsonian

National Museum of African

American History, to create

his first-ever collection of

chairs and a table. Constructed

in die-cast aluminium, the

audaciously cantilevered

Washington Skeleton chair was

conceived, he says, “to mimic

the form of a seated person

in elevation so that it almost

disappears when in use”.

6 ARP CHAISE

BY PATRICIA

ANASTASSIADIS

FOR ARTEFACTO

Inspired by the sensuous

abstract forms that define

the art of Jean Arp, São-

Paulo-based architect

Patricia Anastassiadis

has created a seductively

voluptuous chaise longue,

an antidote to the angularity

of most contemporary

sofas. But then, curves are

increasingly a defining

form in her work: witness

the admittedly more

conventional seating she

designed for her reinvention

of three restaurants at the

Hotel du Cap-Eden-Roc.

63


THE BIG AND

THE BOLD

AS THE SIZE OF SUPERYACHTS INCREASES, SO

DOES THE RESPONSIBILITY TO THE OCEANS.

CORNELIA MARIOGLOU TALKS TO A TRIO

OF INFLUENTIAL WOMEN IN THE YACHTING

WORLD ON HOW BUILDING BIG CAN HAVE

POSITIVE EFFECTS

In uncertain times, from the financial crisis of 2008

to the current pandemic, the yachting industry has

demonstrated perhaps surprising resilience by finding

ways to reinvent itself and to improve the quality and

sustainability of the vessels it creates. This surge of

innovative ideas has come, in part, because the onceconservative

coterie of yacht builders has been open

to new voices, including those of a growing number of

women who have central roles in the evolution of the

industry. Compendium by Centurion talked to three such

trailblazers about this new era of superyachts and the

challenges of balancing the aspirations for ever bigger

builds with a desire throughout the yachting world –

from designers, charter companies and shipyards to the

potential owners – to protect the oceans on which these

incredible vessels set sail.

There may be no fresher, outside-the-box perspective

than that of Nina Jensen, CEO of REV Ocean. Her

background is in marine biology, and for 15 years she

worked for the World Wildlife Foundation, which

gives a remarkable texture to what might be the most

unusual project in the yachting world. “My passion has

always been for the ocean – making a difference for

life in the ocean is the one thing I am fighting for,” she

says. And the 182.9m REV Ocean will play a vital role

in this. The brainchild of Norwegian businessman and

philanthropist Kjell Inge Røkke, REV Ocean will be part

research vessel, part expedition yacht and part once-ina-lifetime

charter opportunity. Built at Vard in Norway,

with a design by the esteemed Espen Øino and interiors

by H2 Yacht Design, she is the biggest yacht of her kind,

capable of carrying 55 scientists and 35 crew members

to perform a primary objective of exploring and sampling

biodiversity and repairing damage to the ocean. Yet for

a third of the year, she will also provide the chance for

up to 28 guests to explore the polar seas, South Pacific

islands or the southern Indian Ocean in an onboard

experience that can also include lectures from scientists

and participation in data-gathering activities.

Since 2018, Jensen has worked closely with Røkke

to create something truly special, and, coming

from outside the industry, Jensen was able to

bring fresh eyes to many areas of design. “We had many

‘That’s not possible’s’, or ‘It can’t be done’s’. I challenged

that. Of course it can be done – it just hasn’t been done

before. By showing that it is actually possible to create,

for example, wooden decks that are 100% sustainable,

FSC-certified and that look great – it shows anything is

possible if you just ask the right questions and if you are

willing to go that extra mile.”

One of the factors, perhaps paradoxically, that made

the project possible was its sheer size, which allowed

designers the scope to really dig into new possibilities

64


that would be impractical on a smaller vessel. Øino

– the designer of some of the most remarkable and

recognisable yachts on the planet – has described REV

Ocean as one of the most important projects he will work

on, and Jensen sees the project as lighting the way in the

yachting community. “A lot of time and effort has gone

into reducing our environmental footprint – through

the entire construction phase of the ship, and from the

materials that are being selected to the propulsion,

the shape of the ship to reduce drag and friction, the

food, the uniforms, the interior, to all the operational

procedures, and more,” she says. “And we are hoping

that this will be something to showcase to the rest of the

yachting community.”

One notable piece of that yachting community, the

shipyards of the Netherlands, has another

increasingly prominent female voice: that of Rose

Damen, managing director of Damen Yachting the yacht

builder behind Amels shipyard. With sailing deeply woven

into her DNA – she is the third generation to be involved

in her family’s eponymous firm, which acquired Amels in

1991 – she is now tasked with overseeing its largest project

to date, its first 100m-plus yacht. She is conscious that with

great size comes great responsibility. “The environment is

an important topic for us, for our employees and for many

of our stakeholders, including our clients,” she says. “We

are focused on assessing the total footprint of the yacht.

Most of our new designs have hybrid propulsions, but it

is not just about propulsion, it is also about, for example,

total load – it is the full picture.” And that picture starts

with potential owners – and like REV Ocean, many have

exploration in mind. “It is a very personal decision that

the client is trying to achieve. One thing we see is that

clients really want to explore the ocean, or see their yacht

as a platform for research, and in that case to launch

submarines. For this, you need a larger platform.”

For many, though, megayachts still embody floating

palaces on the sea, a source of sumptuous indulgence

and bountiful fun, but this can go hand in hand with

an awareness for the environment, according to Julia

Stewart, director of Imperial Yachts since 2009.

Over the past decade, Stewart has helped make the

Monaco-based firm one of the preeminent charter

and management companies in the world – a standing

confirmed by the latest addition to its fleet, the 136m

“We had many ‘That’s

not possible’s’, or

‘It can’t be done’s’. I

challenged that. Of

course it can be done –

it just hasn’t been done

before. Anything is

possible if you just ask

the right questions and

if you are willing to go

that extra mile”

motor yacht Flying Fox, built by German shipyard

Lürssen. “With 11 cabins for 25 guests, she is the largest

charter yacht on the market,” Stewart says. “It is not just

the sheer size, but it is about what the client can enjoy

onboard. From the most amazing diving centre, you can

dive deep, you can see an amazing marine environment

– without damaging it. It is very educational for kids

— and also very educational for grown-ups. It is simply

highly enjoyable, also thanks to the state-of-the-art

water toys.” But for all the talk of the indulgences and

pleasures onboard, Stewart is also concerned with

sustainability. “We are a supporter of the Blue Marine

Foundation, an organisation dedicated to seeing at least

30% of the world’s oceans under effective protection

by 2030 and the other 70% managed in a responsible

way,” she says. “It is a subject that is constantly under

development – a team effort between the builders

of superyachts and the designers, who optimise fuel

consumption and reduce emissions.”

These efforts are undoubtedly part of industry-wide

measures to reduce carbon footprint and take better

care of our seas, for even as superyachts get larger

and larger it’s the Big Blue that remains the ultimate

fascination.

65


1

2

3

1 BENETTI

M/Y LUMINOSITY

Recipient of the Passenger

Yacht Code (PYC)

certification, enabling her

to carry more than the

12-passenger limit usual on

yachts, this 107.6m 2020

delivery has six decks,

allowing up to 27 guests on

board in 12 cabins, along

with 37 crew. She has a range

of 8,000nm at a cruising

speed of 10 knots and is easy

on the ears thanks to the

ultra-quiet diesel electric

Azipod drives.

2 LÜRSSEN

M/Y NORD

Announced in 2005

as project Redwood,

this 142m motor yacht

embarked on sea trials

from Lemwerder to the

Baltic Sea in November.

Instantly recognisable from

the nameplate on the tip of

the bow, Nord is also built

to PYC standards and will

accommodate 36 guests in

20 cabins. The construction

and handover processes are

overseen by Moran Yacht

& Ship.

THE EXPANSION

PACK

4

3 LÜRSSEN

M/Y SCHEHERAZADE

Fittingly named after the

weaver of remarkable tales

in the Arabian folklore

classic One Thousand

and One Nights, the

former Project Lightning is

something of an enigma.

What we do know is that

her maiden voyage took

her to Norway in 2020 and

the 140m build has great

features that come in pairs,

such as the helicopter

landing pads, and outdoor

jacuzzis and firepits.

When contemplating the future of yachting and the

directions in which the industry will travel, it is impossible

to ignore the impact that the increasing size of the new

projects from adventurous shipyards is having. For as

much as the demand for vessels of smaller dimensions

remains high, it is potential owners’ demands for yachts

of around 100 metres in length – and in some cases much

longer – that are pushing things to the next level. New

technologies are developed for the fulfilment of these, as

shipyards adapt to the novel challenges posed by these

supersized builds. The creative minds within the industry

are continually innovating, producing solutions that have

a considerable influence on all new yachts. Of course, there

are certain names that are synonymous with builds of this

size – the likes of Lürssen, Fincantieri, Feadship, Nobiskrug,

Benetti and Oceanco have been building megayachts and

impressing aficionados for some time now. But among our

five standout superyachts recently delivered or hitting the

water soon is a relatively new name, the Greek yard Golden

Yachts, with its O’Pari. More will join them in the pantheon

of large-scale builders in the years to come, including the

Dutch-based Amels, which in September signed a deal for

the construction of the 120m Project Signature, designed by

renowned Norwegian Espen Øino and due for delivery in

2025. Further proof that in yachting, size truly does matter.

By Cornelia Marioglou

4 FEADSHIP

M/Y MOONRISE

Just dipping below the

100m range, at 99.95 metres

this displacement yacht

was unveiled last year at

Feadship’s Makkum facility

in the Netherlands. With

a sleek exterior design by

Studio De Voogt and interior

by Rémi Tessier, Moonrise

cruises at a top speed of 19.5

knots, accommodates up to

16 guests in eight cabins, with

32 crew, and offers abundant

natural light through long

hull windows.

5

5 GOLDEN YACHTS

M/Y O’PARI

At 95 metres, the Greek

shipbuilder has presented

its largest build yet: O’Pari

will carry 12 guests in 14

cabins with a crew of 29.

The luxurious interiors

are by Rome-based Studio

Vafiadis and among the

superlative features on

board are a massage room,

warm Turkish hammam

and dry Finnish sauna. On

the forward deck, a touchand-go

helipad provides

easy access and exits.

PHOTOS COUNTER-CLOCLWISE FROM TOP: NICO FULCINITI , TOM VAN OOSSSANEN, GIOVANNI ROMERO / THEYACHTPHOTO.COM, © FEADSHIP, JEFF BROWN / BREED MEDIA

66


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URBAN

STRATEGIST

LONDON-BASED ARCHITECT DEBORAH SAUNT IS

AT THE FOREFRONT OF HER PROFESSION WITH AN

APPROACH THAT VALUES PUBLIC SPACES AS MUCH

AS IT DOES THE STRUCTURES WITHIN THEM.

JONATHAN BELL SPOKE TO HER ABOUT THE

FUTURE OF OUR BUILDINGS – AND OUR CITIES

On the south bank of the Thames, the once

splendid, if licentious, Vauxhall Pleasure

Gardens are being transformed from the British

capital’s leading 18th- and 19th-century amusement

grounds into a contemporary park for the whole

community. It’s the brainchild of local architecture firm

DSDHA, and it epitomises the award-winning studio’s

unusual approach – which combines architecture, urban

design and spatial research to create everything from

modest private homes to the large-scale revitalisations of

some of London’s prime public spaces and buildings.

Deborah Saunt, who founded the firm with husband

David Hills in 1998 (the all-caps moniker is short

for Deborah Saunt David Hills Architects), is more

than an architect – she is an educator, lecturer and

broadcaster, all of which bolsters DSDHA’s focus on

research-driven work.

At a time when public space has been restricted

like never before – and the role of the conventional

office hangs in the balance – Saunt’s all-encompassing

vision of the changes in the architectural profession is

especially relevant. “We’re a research-led practice,” she

says. “Architecture school is all about designing amazing

projects and the journey to become a professional

somehow seems to diminish that imagination. What we

try and do is keep it going, by blurring the boundaries

between architecture, research and projects.”

DSDHA’s portfolio is varied, but at the heart of

everything is the idea that behaviours within the built

environment should be studied, mapped and analysed

before embarking on design. At a time of plummeting

retail footfall, restrictions on private and public

transportation and the upending of traditional office

culture, landowners, agents and local authorities all

want ways to make cities work again. New approaches

are needed. As Saunt points out, “You can’t have

innovation unless you invest in research. This is what

grounds us as a practice.”

Right at the start of the pandemic, once it was

obvious that seismic cultural shifts were playing

out, DSDHA seized the opportunity. “We started

a self-initiated project looking at the cultural impact of

the pandemic,” Saunt says. “Part of this was creating a

68


“ I think that listening skill is really

taking root in the younger generation

of architects. We all see ourselves as

agents of change for the public good”

toolkit that responded to the evolving needs of cities

and spaces.” This was partly driven by concern for the

future of cities – “it showed our clients we were on their

side” – but more than anything else it acknowledged that

disruption need not be negative. The report was shown

to a select few clients and professionals (it has not yet

been published) but one immediate upshot, according

to Saunt, was that “it made us a bit more optimistic”.

DSDHA’s clients include The Crown Estate, which

is a collection of more than £14bn of property holdings

owned by the British monarchy, including much of

central London’s prime retail space, such as Regent

Street and large parts of St James’s. “We’re doing a new

building for The Crown Estate on Piccadilly,” Saunt

says, “and they wanted to know if their building would

still work.” She uses the project to illustrate how the

pandemic accelerated long-term plans. “We’d originally

designed the scheme with opening windows, but new

offices rarely have these nowadays, especially with traffic

noise and pollution. But social distancing and hygienic

ventilation aside, you have to realise that in 20 years or

so the way we travel will change, all cars are planned to

be electric in the UK by then, so all that traffic noise is

going to go.” So now the opening windows are happily

being reinstated.

Other elements that future-proof urban design

include a closer integration with the wider

context, from promoting cycling to proliferating

green space. These have long been integral to DSDHA’s

work but are now much more prominent in everyone’s

minds. “The ultimate aim is positive behaviour change,”

the architect says. “How can you slow down the pace

of the city to let it breathe? People clearly need more

space, but the short-term solutions to widen pedestrian

areas often end up just looking unfinished.” Saunt and

her team are longstanding advocates of incorporating

this space from the outset. “The pandemic has allowed

us to go beyond iterative innovation to a period of very

intense, disruptive innovation,” she muses. “It has made

the connection between people and nature very explicit

and more critical.”

Her vision is, in many ways, representative of how

the approach of architecture more generally is

changing. “Ultimately, it’s an architect’s duty to

listen and not impose,” Saunt says. “I think that listening

skill is really taking root in the younger generation of

architects. We all see ourselves as agents of change

for the public good.” Even the image of the architect

is being transformed. “There was a point in history

where one person could really hold all the knowledge

of how to build a cathedral; now that’s just not the case.

It’s not so simple any more, the scale of spatial issues

and challenges we are dealing with are beyond that,

as technology and the environment demand more

sophisticated solutions. Instead, we have a collaborative

role, enabling a consensus that everyone agrees with,”

Saunt says. Pandemic-induced considerations aside,

DSDHA’s remit and approach are increasingly pertinent.

“We’re working on what’s known as ‘spatial justice’,”

Saunt explains. “What does the city feel like for different

people? What is the ongoing appeal of London’s West

End?” Current projects include several landscape-led

masterplans and a proposal to overhaul the area around

London’s Liverpool Street Station, including a new

park over the railway tracks and ground-level planting.

“It’s proven that people follow nature – they’ll always

walk down a street with trees on it, even if it takes them

slightly out of their way.” Recently, David Hills has been

appointed to the UK’s High Streets Task Force, looking

at ways to bring businesses and city centres back to life.

“We’re not traditional architects,” Saunt concludes.

“Instead, we consider ourselves spatial strategists. And

this is a really inspiring time to be working on public

spaces as well as buildings.”

69


VISIONARY

BUILDS

1

1 La Samaritaine, Paris

Built in 1870, this

department store is one of

the world’s foremost retail

palaces, long renowned for

its huge range of goods and

spectacular architecture.

The historic site has been

owned by LVMH since 2010

and is undergoing a lengthy

restoration and extension,

overseen by Japanese firm

SANAA. The old-meetsnew

project, with a facade

of rippling glass, ties an

entire city block together,

incorporating the original

structure, Henri Sauvage’s

Art Deco extension and

a sliver of historic 17thcentury

streetscape. A new

72-key Cheval Blanc hotel,

with interiors by Peter

Marino, will also open on

the site this year.

If there’s one thing that architects and engineers have always known, it’s that the best-laid plans and

most calculated predictions count for nothing in the face of unexpected events. Many major cultural,

commercial and infrastructure projects have been delayed or, worse, indefinitely shelved in the past

year. But the recent changes wrought on urban planning – promoting neighbourhood hubs, flexible

workspaces and a determination to minimise unnecessary travel and congregation – dovetail neatly

with long-term plans to cut emissions and create a more equitable, inclusive urban environment.

An optimist might say we’ll emerge from 2021 with a better world, starting with these forthcoming

landmarks across the globe – and one major event . By Jonathan Bell

2

3

2 Hotel GSH Extension,

Bornholm Island, Denmark

This modest project has farreaching

potential. Designed by

3XN Architects as an extension to

its 2015 project, the Hotel Green

Solution House on Bornholm

Island, the wooden structure

consists of 24 new rooms and a

rooftop spa. The material is the

star here: almost every facet of the

new building is rendered in timber,

including furniture made from

offcuts and stone finishes formed

from the debris of local quarries.

Natural ventilation will add to the

structure’s sustainable credentials..

3 130 William, New York City

Architect David Adjaye’s most recent

American project is a radical rethink of

the supertall apartment complex. Taking

inspiration from the old warehouses

of New York’s midtown, the structure

features an exterior of recessed concrete

arches, forming loggias for the apartments

and giving the building a strong, almost

brutalist urban presence. High-end

facilities and amenities come as standard,

and five of the upper-floor apartments

have been created in collaboration with

Aston Martin, each supplied with a

special-edition DBX SUV, the interiors of

which will be designed by the 2021 RIBA

Royal Gold Medal-winning architect.

PHOTOS CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: PIERRE-OLIVIER DESCHAMPS/AGENCE VU‘, CHRIS COE, COURTESY 3XN

70


PHOTOS CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: COURTESY BJARKE INGELS GROUP, COURTESY FOSTER + PARTNERS, COURTESY TATIANA BILBAO ESTUDIO, COURTESY T B A, MOHAMED ABD EL GHANY/ REUTERS/PICTURE ALLIANCE

4

4 88 Market Street,

Singapore

The Southeast Asian city-state

continues its quest to become

the world’s most prominent

garden metropolis with this new

tower by Bjarke Ingels Group

and Carlo Ratti Associati. The

hulking structure rises 280 metres

above the heart of the Central

Business District, with the tower’s

ostensibly conventional high-rise

aesthetic given a tropical twist

thanks to the inclusion of several

sky gardens, where plantings spill

invitingly out of perforations in

the facade, creating a tower that

looks as if it is being taken over

by the jungle.

5 Datong Art Museum, China

A history-rich major city in

Shanxi Province, Datong will soon

have an art museum that will

put it firmly on the global map.

Foster + Partners has pulled out

all the stops to create an almost

incomprehensibly large gallery

space for truly monumental

art. Beneath a sawtooth roof of

cascading, interlocking triangular

forms clad in pre-weathered steel

is a main gallery with a ceiling

height of 37 metres and a span

of 80 metres, the centrepiece

of a museum that spans 32,000

square metres and is one of

four new buildings in the city’s

cultural plaza.

6 Grand Egyptian

Museum, Cairo

When your neighbours are 4,500

years old, a few years’ delay is

nothing. The seminal institution

is a career-defining project for the

Dublin-based studio Heneghan

Peng. Won in competition way

back in 2003, the 100,000sq m

structure is on a scale with the

work of the ancients. Defined by

its monumental geometric facade,

composed of translucent stone

triangles, the building is intended

to be the defining global centre of

Egyptology, housing the famous

Tutankhamun collection as well as

extensive conservation galleries.

7 Venice Biennale of

Architecture 2021

Having torn up its biannual

calendar (and pushed the art

biennale back to 2022), this 17th

edition promises a fresh look at

what we build and why, curated

by Hashim Sarkis, a Lebanese

architect and MIT professor. The

theme takes the form of a question

– "How will we live together?" –

which has become more pertinent

during the past 12 months. More

than 100 practices will explore

architecture’s role in creating a new

“spatial contract”, and there will

6 7

8

5

be increased representation from

Africa, Latin America and Asia,

with an emphasis on the practical

rather than the conceptual.

8 Mazatlán Aquarium,

Mexico

Created by Mexican architect

Tatiana Bilbao, the research

centre is a dramatic architectural

statement that matches its

spectacular site along the Sea of

Cortez. The building incorporates

research, marine conservation and

a publicly accessible aquarium,

with vast tanks set deep within the

gridded complex. From outside,

the structure looks like a vast

abstract sculpture, with a series

of interlocking cubes, cylinders

and spheres interspersed with

thick vegetation. The winding,

maze-like interior is designed to

create a voyage of discovery to the

spectacular tank rooms.

71


THE FUTURE

OF FASHION

A FRESH GENERATION OF CONSUMERS AND

PURVEYORS IS SPURRING A PERMANENT

SHIFT TOWARDS A KINDER AND GENTLER

FASHION WORLD. SOPHIE DJERLAL REPORTS

ON AN INDUSTRY IN FLUX

The world of fashion is approaching a dramatic

transformation, caught as it is between a host of

vanishing traditions and norms and a sustainable

and ethical future that is still in the process of being built. It

should come as no surprise that this mirrors wider trends

in society: clothes have always reflected the changing times

– and they’ve done so in the guise of a personal choice that

helps wearers feel good. There is something empowering

about looking in the mirror and saying, “What am I going

to wear today?”

But at the moment there is also something a bit

uncomfortable, almost controversial, about that question,

as the personal has become increasingly political – and

fashion, both as a concept and an industry, is in disarray.

“Consume less but better” is the near-ubiquitous mantra of

our moment, but it sits in tension with how we have long

conceived of fashion: creative, captivating, dynamic, a beau

monde fundamentally disengaged from sustainability and

constantly renewing itself each season.

The coming fashion revolution, best summed up by the

phrase “Ethic is Aesthetic”, is not a trend, but a movement,

led by consumer-citizens who insist on monitoring the

environmental, social and economic impact of their

purchases – and of the companies they buy from. It is a

change that appears to be permanent rather than fleeting,

and it is affecting the fashion industry from top to bottom.

“Young people today are independent, angry and, in some

ways militant. They no longer want to buy objects produced

without respect for people and the planet, looking only at

profit,” says Marina Spadafora, an expert in the sector and

author, with Luisa Ciuni, of La Rivoluzione Comincia dal

Tuo Armadio (The Revolution Starts with Your Wardrobe,

published in April 2020). “We must get involved, talk,

march, shout if necessary. I think of Jane Fonda, who was

arrested at a protest on the eve of her 82nd birthday.”

If Spadafora’s perspective sounds extreme, it is less so

than the young brands that are populating the fashion world.

“Sustainable natives” is what Carlo Capasa, president

of the National Chamber for Italian Fashion, calls them.

“They were founded with the concept of sustainability,” he

explains, “and they might even make it the central value of

their brand identity”.

We are replacing an era of storytelling with

one of “story-proving”, where brands are

fact-checked and audited to guarantee

that each product carries within it a true story about

the manufacturing process. “Sustainability is an

increasingly important issue”, Capasa continues. “We

conducted research with the US company Salesforce

and Bocconi University in Milan which showed that 90%

of Generation Z consumers believe that sustainability

should be integrated into a brand, and that companies

have a responsibility to address environmental and social

issues. I believe fashion houses today are aware that

sustainability needs not only to be a fundamental ethical

value but also an important factor in their operations.”

The longtime pioneers on this front are British designers

Vivienne Westwood and Stella McCartney, who have

made slow fashion their signature. Climate change and the

72


pandemic are accelerating changes in this direction and,

at this point, it’s harder to find a brand that hasn’t taken

action. The two leading luxury conglomerates, Kering

and LVMH, each have their own sustainability initiatives

(Care and LIFE, respectively), while Chanel’s Mission

1.5° targets our carbon footprint; Hermès supports the

UN Global Compact; Prada, Gucci, Armani all recycle and

actively promote both ecological and humanitarian ends;

and no less than 200 brands signed The Fashion Pact at

the G7 summit in Biarritz in 2019.

For some, however, a deeper commitment is

needed. For instance, following the virtual

fashion weeks of 2020, Dries Van Noten wrote an

open letter to the industry, signed by some 40 designers,

which proposed an overhaul of the system that relies on

collections and seasonality. Other designers are taking

a different approach, using existing garments as their

raw materials and transforming them into new pieces.

Ronald Van der Kemp has often used repurposed

materials in recent collections, and Philippe Guilet,

president and artistic director of the Renaissance

Project, took the concept to another level when he held

the first Upcycling Couture fashion show last February.

“We have professionalised upcycling,” he says. “The

formula: zero waste along with social impact and

knowledge transfer via donations from our ambassadors

of luxury and ready-to-wear clothing. We deconstruct

the garments, and the recovered material is used to

create new pieces with techniques from haute couture.”

Summing up his philosophy Guilet says, “If fashion is

ephemeral, then luxury is, in contrast, supposed to be

sustainable – but it is possible to reconcile the two."

This reconciliation is one that many brands are trying

to do for themselves, often by integrating sustainability

into the promise of style. Gucci’s Antonella Centra, who

serves as EVP General Counsel, Corporate Affairs and

Sustainability, puts it this way: “We have an opportunity

and the responsibility to influence the fashion industry,

and we take this very seriously. For Gucci, the future of

fashion must include sustainability at every step of the

supply chain to reduce our industry’s impact on nature, and

beyond, to ensure the protection and restoration of nature

more broadly. For us, empowering our Gucci community

and young people will also help define the way we all treat

our planet and each other into the future.”

Bénédicte Epinay, CEO and General Delegate of the

Comité Colbert, which is dedicated to the promotion of

the luxury industry and French savoir faire, also sees the

concepts of luxury, fashion and sustainability as being

increasingly intertwined: “In an era of mass manufacturing

beyond what people can consume, luxury is on the side of

rarity, of lastingness, of heritage, of the culture of beauty, of

those who respect people and the environment,” she says.

“The pandemic has taught us a lesson: we don't need more,

we need beauty.”

This approach to sustainability is not confined to

clothing either: Manuel Mallen, founder of jewellerymaker

Courbet, has centred the prestige brand – which

is located in Paris’s Place Vendôme – on laboratorygrown

diamonds. They are cultivated to have the same

properties and qualities as mined diamonds (think the

four Cs), and the maison also uses recycled gold that

comes from obsolete industrial and computer equipment.

“Our commitment to environmental impact is essential to

our brand,” he says. “Our slogan speaks for itself: ‘Without

goodness, beauty means nothing’.”

Courbet’s diamonds demonstrate that the key to

a sustainable future involves the whole supply

chain, not just the final stiches. Pascaline Wilhelm,

fashion director of the Première Vision international

textile trade fair, is keenly aware of her position in this

respect: “We are upstream from the realities of the

market,” she says. “The textile industry is already in the

future. Science and technology are opening up what’s

possible: textiles are a living material and innovative

processes are presenting us with new ways to approach

a bespoke garment.” Uniqueness and personalisation

are, she says, built into the 3D manufacturing process.

“The garment is becoming a second skin, interactive,

intelligent, connected, virtuous, protective.”

And yet, despite Wilhelm’s hi-tech optimism, it is

undeniable that the industry requires a conscious

evolution of both customers and producers to move

beyond its consumerist orientation. “Crisis is the main

driver of evolution,” says Tom Van Der Borght, Grand

Jury Prize winner of the 35th International Fashion

Festival in Hyères, and as we enter 2021 we indeed find

ourselves in a moment of crisis. Visionaries like Van Der

Borght may have clear ideas of what is to come – “the

future is a durable, precious, tactile garment,” he says

– but with so much changing so rapidly, the only certain

perspective is that the future of the fashion world will be

different from its past. It is Carlo Ducci, longtime features

director at Vogue Italia and founder of Accademia de La

Felicina, who puts it best: “Evolution is in fashion’s DNA,

and sustainability is an added value. We are all entering

the Age of Awareness and we welcome the so-called ‘buy

better’ attitude,” he says. “It is a step forward towards

overcoming utilitarian consumerism and ensuring

gratification long beyond the act of buying.”

73


NOUVELLE VOGUE

3

2

1

The latest couture styles that pair sustainability

in all its forms with high style. By Sophie Djerlal

1 TOM VAN DER BORGHT

Emerging onto the scene with a

bang by winning the grand prize

at last year’s Hyères Festival, the

Belgian designer started in fashion

late, in his thirties, and has proven

uncompromising in his commitment

to one-of-a-kind silhouettes

combining upcycled materials in a

playful, provocative way.

2 ARMANI

R-EA is an upcycled collection

focused on urban aesthetics.

Materials are recycled, regenerated,

or organic certified: the wool used

in this line, for instance, is “zero

kilometre”, having been recycled

from textile waste and scraps, while

the nylon and polyester fibres come

from plastic waste.

3 STELLA Mc CARTNEY

There are not many designers who

can match the sustained ethical

credentials of McCartney, who has

been a pioneer of industry upheaval

since she began her own label in

2001. Famed for her firm stance as a

vegetarian, here the dress and shorts

are in recycled lace, a repurposing of

an old collection.

4 THE MODERN ARTISAN

A partnership between The Prince’s

Foundation and Yoox Net-a-Porter,

the collection was inspired by

Leonardo da Vinci. All materials are

natural and organic – the culotte skirt

is cashmere, the petrol-blue dress is

silk with mother-of-pearl buttons –

and the profits go to Prince Charles’s

sustainability initiatives.

74


4

5

6

8

PHOTOS COURTESY THE COMPANIES AND DESIGNERS

7

5 AELIS COUTURE

German dancer Anne Jung wears an

organic silk satin dress (A/W 20-21)

from Sofia Crociani’s haute couture

brand, which focuses on slow fashion

and sustainable values and has

become a byword for looking beyond

the anthropocentric viewpoint to

a world where we are not taming

nature but rather a part of it.

6 PRADA

The Re-Nylon gabardine pinafore

dress is made using ECONYL

regenerated nylon, which is created

in partnership with Italian textile firm

Aquafil by taking residue from the

oceans – from fishing nets to industrial

waste – and transforming it through a

chemical depolymerisation process

into a new, durable material.

7 GUCCI

The Gucci Off The Grid rucksack is

also made using ECONYL, part of

the Italian brand’s drive towards

sustainability in all ways. Leather

pieces in the collection, for instance,

were upcycled as part of the Gucci-

Up recycling programme – which

has upcycled more than 20 tonnes of

such offcuts in the past three years.

8 RENAISSANCE PROJECT

This summer ballgown is made

with recycled silk scarves from

the uniforms of the Paris airports

operator, Groupe ADP. The top

is draped in Madame Grès style

with interlacing of bands and

pagoda shoulders and linked to

the billowing skirt with coppercoloured

brass chains.

75

Additional reporting by Davide Bussi


CHRISTIAN DIOR bustier

and trousers PIERS

ATKINSON Upturned Breton

with ostrich feathers ERDEM

gloves TIFFANY & CO tennis

bracelet VAN CLEEF &

ARPELS Snowflake bracelet;

opposite: ALEXANDER

McQUEEN jacket, shirt

and trousers ROGER

VIVIER loafers

76


Black Tie

Optional

This season's eveningwear is best

served with a twist – even if it's just

at home and à deux

Photography by SEBASTIAN SABAL-BRUCE

Styled by MELISSA VENTOSA MARTIN

77


FENDI velvet dress with

pleated skirt CAROLINA

AMATO gloves

78


Left: BRIONI tailcoat

with waistcoat, shirt and

bow tie TIFFANY & CO

1837 Makers watch and

Cobblestone necklace;

above: CELINE velvet

jacket, collared shirt, velvet

Bermudas and bow tie

CALZEDONIA tights


BRIONI dinner jacket

LOEWE silk gathered

apron dress; opposite:

TOD’S dinner jacket

and trousers DOLCE &

GABBANA dinner shirt

and silk bow tie LOEWE

silk dress and pumps

HAIR BY LEDORA FOR ORIBE. MAKE-UP BY AI YOKOMIZO USING CLÉ DE PEAU BEAUTÉ. MANICURE BY ELINA OGAWA AT BRIDGE USING CHANEL. MODELS: VICTORIA MASSEY AT ELITE; ROCKWELL HARWOOD AT IMG

80


81


VIRTUALLY

PERFECT

VIVID GEMSTONES IN MESMERISING HUES MAY BE

NATURE'S BOUNTY, BUT THESE TIMELESS HIGH-

JEWELLERY MASTERPIECES – WORN BY THE WORLD'S

FIRST DIGITAL SUPERMODEL – SHOWCASE HUMAN

INGENUITY AND ARTISTRY AT THEIR VERY FINEST

Photography by CAMERON-JAMES WILSON

3D Visualisation by THE DIIGITALS • Styled by TOM LOCKYER

82


CHOPARD white-gold

earrings set with turquoise,

tourmalines and diamonds

from the Red Carpet

Collection DIOR JOAILLERIE

white-gold Tie & Dior

ring set with sapphires,

tsavorites garnets, emeralds,

Paraiba-type tourmalines

and one pistachio cultured

pearl CHAUMET white-gold

Perspectives de Chaumet ring

set with one cabochon black

opal, sapphires, diamonds,

tsavorite garnets and lapis

lazuli TIFFANY & CO.

Schlumberger yellow-gold

and platinum Epine Starfish

brooch set with turquoise

and diamonds

83


84

HARRY WINSTON platinum

Fifth Avenue necklace set

with sapphires and diamonds

PIAGET white-gold Wings of

Light Dazzling Cascade ring

set with diamonds and one

sapphire


BULGARI white-gold High

Jewellery earrings set

with onyx, diamonds and

a cultured Akoya pearl

CHANEL white-gold Tweed

de Chanel necklace set with

diamonds and onyx

85


ADLER white-gold High

Gardens earrings set with

diamonds and rubies

BOODLES platinum,

yellow- and rose-gold Poppy

Meadow necklace

set with multicoloured

diamonds and rubies, from

the Secret Garden collection

BOGHOSSIAN white-gold

Remarkable bracelet set with

diamonds and morganites

86


87

About the Model

She has no surname, no

nationality and no past; in

fact, our model Shudu isn’t

technically a person. She’s the

industry-shattering invention

of British photographer

Cameron-James Wilson, a

hyper realistic digital persona

that, since her 2017 debut on

Instagram, has sky-rocketed to

international fame, whether it’s

making a hologram cameo at

the Bafta awards or appearing

in shoots for Ferragamo and

Fenty. “Each of the images

represents roughly two days'

work,” explains Wilson, whose

agency Diigitals now boasts

a line-up of seven virtual

models. “We carefully craft

each layer to make sure

when it all comes together it

looks as real as possible.” The

inherent benefit of creating

stunning visuals with a

minimal carbon footprint

has only been bolstered in

our current moment, with its

premium on social distancing.

“The pandemic has made it

more apparent than ever that

fashion needs to embrace 3D,”

says Wilson. “Digital models

play a huge part in this, and

their usefulness has never been

more clear.” thediigitals.com


VAN CLEEF & ARPELS whitegold

Merveille d’Emeraudes

earrings set with one emerald

and diamonds GRAFF

white-gold necklace set with

diamonds and emeralds

CINDY CHAO THE ART

JEWEL white-gold Ribbon

ring set with diamonds and

tsavorites from the White

Label Collection

88


MIKIMOTO white-gold

earrings set with cultured

Akoya pearls, one tanzanite

and diamonds CARTIER

platinum High Jewellery [Sur]

Naturel necklace set with

kunzite, opals and diamonds

BOUCHERON white-gold

Murmure d’Étoiles cuff set

with cabochon tanzanite,

aventurine glass and

diamonds

89


CHANGING

TIMES

THE RAREFIED WORLD OF HIGH HOROLOGY MAY ERR

ON THE CONSERVATIVE SIDE, BUT WHEN IT COMES

TO PRESENTING THE FINEST WATCHES ON THE

MARKET, BRANDS ARE INCREASINGLY EMBRACING

THE INNOVATIONS THAT NEW TECHNOLOGY HAS TO

OFFER, DISCOVERS MELANIE GRANT

One summer evening last year in the cigar room

of Ten Trinity Square, a private members’

club in London, I was relaxing with a couple of

watch collectors who were waxing lyrical about the best

watches of all time. One impeccably groomed barrister

was wearing an Alexandre Meerson D15, and the other,

I learned, had so many Pateks in his collection that his

Apple Watch was intended as a sardonic statement piece.

As plumes of smoke swirled around the room amid the

mentions of their prized timepieces and prospective

purchases, it became clear that the treasures they now

coveted were to be found online in the new digital hunting

ground of horology.

Digitalisation is par for the course in the Covid-19

era, but for these Londoners – and for watch collectors

more generally – the pandemic has only accelerated the

transformation of one of the world’s most tradition-laden

industries. Long dependent on personal relationships

and in-store visits, the high priests of horology are

increasingly connecting with clients through laptops and

smartphones. It’s a brave new world at the intersection

of personalisation and online ubiquity – and it’s one that

watchmakers are meeting with a remarkably disparate

array of strategies.

Luxury brands have generally been late adopters when

it comes to digital strategy, preferring to tempt customers

within the confines of their exquisitely curated showrooms

and events. The golden trio in terms of design cred – Rolex,

Patek Philippe and Audemars Piguet – still, in fact, don’t

sell online themselves, relying on a network of retailers

and their own salons. They are dipping a toe into the

pool, just not diving into the deep end yet. In November,

Audemars Piguet launched the Royal Oak Selfwinding

Flying Tourbillon on a private livestream video from its

new museum. It was presented by CEO François-Henry

Bennahmias, who had memorised biographical details

of the members of the digital audience, each of whom

was sent a personalised hamper for the occasion. Daniel

Compton, general manager of AP UK, says the brand sees

its biggest challenge not in personalised communication,

but in managing disappointment when clients call and

demand outstrips supply. “It’s important for us not to be

arrogant when there is a scarcity of product – but still to

forge relationships even if we can’t satisfy everyone.”

In contrast, brands like Zenith are pursuing younger,

digital-native collectors. One recent model, the Defy

El Primero 21 Carl Cox, a chronograph with a carbon

bezel, saw the Swiss manufacturer turn tech into techno

by collaborating with DJ Carl Cox. Owners of the new

timepiece can access playlists created by Cox and talk

to him remotely, a very personal interaction that never

requires being in the same time zone, let alone room. “We

must be innovative, but not just in the mechanics,” says

Zenith CEO Julien Tornare, who is one of the youngest

chief executives in the industry.

Generation Z is undoubtedly the future, and to reach

it, the digital experience must be both highly curated

and Instagrammable. “Expectations are higher, which is

definitely a good thing for the evolution of luxury, whether

90


in terms of innovation, quality or global responsibility,”

says Marc Hayek, president of Breguet. Because there is

so much information online and clients now have such

a deep knowledge, anyone obsessed by a Breguet or

Blancpain timepiece (another brand Hayek oversees)

must be so totally immersed in brand DNA on every

channel that they can come to a personal relationship

with the object without ever touching it.

As if to emphasise this in the auction world, recent

livestreamed sales have seen prices go through

the roof. Phillips sold a Patek piece in November

for CHF 4,991,000 to an online bidder, the house’s

highest-ever online watch sale. Revenge spending – the

phenomenon where buyers splurge as they come out of

lockdown – saw 2,300 people bid online during a single

auction recently at Phillips. Arthur Touchot, head of

digital strategy, puts into words what everyone is thinking

about this digital evolution: “We aren’t going back.”

Collectors are even drilling down and buying

unique items – like signed pieces by master craftsman

Gérald Genta – at the online auctions of Antiquorum,

where virtual valuation days take place via Zoom.

“Traditionally, client tastes changed depending on

location,” says CEO Romain Rea, “but with digitisation

we are witnessing a globalisation, an international

standardisation of the market.” It is this shift that has

enabled Sotheby’s, for instance, to begin its Watches

Weekly, a programme of four-times-a-week digital

auctions which ostensibly take place in New York, Hong

Kong, Geneva and London, but are, given their online

nature, available everywhere to everyone.

There is a downside to all this visibility. “You can now

see every watch on the market,” says Jorn Werdelin, cofounder

of the independent Swiss-Danish watchmaker

Linde Werdelin. “Rarity is out the window.” A certain

mystique – and genuine scarcity – have been essential

aspects of the watch market for decades, carefully

cultivated by the manufacturers to pique curiosity at

the right times and in the right places. The new digital

ubiquity has fewer of these qualities – and is leaving

many watchmakers unsure about what repercussions

will follow.

What all watchmakers agree on is that gratuitous tech

shouldn’t be the aim. “When we launch a new initiative

or digital campaign,” says Jasmina Steele, director of

international communication and public relations for

Patek Philippe, “we know we are doing it for a purpose,

doing what is right for Patek Philippe and its clients.” In

an online marketplace where uncertainty reigns, there is

value is controlling everything you can.

The nuts and bolts of a purchase are not always easier

online, despite the simplicity of so many of our digital

transactions. Across all virtual platforms, engagement

is the key. “Digital is a great way to connect, but the

voice within it has to be true and sincere,” says Raynald

Aeschlimann, president and CEO of Omega, which

has been meticulously building its #SpeedyTuesday

Speedmaster community since 2012. The brand’s firstever

watch to be sold exclusively online came in 2017 as a

result of this community; all models were snapped up in

just over four hours.

It’s more commonplace than ever before to, say, spend

£76,000 on a Roger Dubuis Excalibur Blacklight Limited

Edition Automatic Skeleton while shopping for a pair of

trainers on Mr Porter, but not every watch flies off the

virtual shelf. Bell & Ross created the BR-X1 Skeleton

Tourbillon Sapphire in electric blue as an exclusive for

the e-boutique in 2019, retailing at £355,000. But it

didn’t budge online, selling only later in a brick-andmortar

store. “Luxury is a state of mind,” says Carlos-

Antonio Rosillo, co-founder and CEO of Bell & Ross,

with philosophic wisdom. And sometimes in this new

digital landscape, experimentation is the key.

The CEO of A Lange & Söhne, Wilhelm Schmid,

is in the enviable position of being able to sell

high complications such as the Tourbograph

Perpetual Honeygold sight unseen. Beyond launching

a few pieces at the digital version of Watches and

Wonders, one of the industry’s leading fairs, this year

he is staying resolutely focused on “being a source

of joy”, and he, too, is curious about the possibilities

presented by the increasingly digital landscape: “How

do you stay a secret but share it with a few more

people?”

There is, of course, no simple answer – but there’s no

putting Pandora back in the box either. More than 80

per cent of watch lovers are cruising online before they

even get to a store, says Brian Duffy, CEO of Watches

of Switzerland. Digital presentation has become our

new normal, especially for the younger generations,

and the race is on to make the most of it. For Duffy

and other forward-thinking brands, that involves not

only finding ways to reach connoisseurs in London

members’ clubs, but also introducing newcomers to

the world of fine timepieces – a task for which digital

presentation might be well suited. “Everyone wants a

watch, whether they know it or not,” says Duffy with

a laugh – and you can be sure that when that moment

of realisation comes, the watch world will be waiting

across a plethora of digital channels.

91


EXTRAORDINARY

EDITIONS

By ELISA VALLATA

Rare complications

and superlative

artwork come

together in these

singular timepieces

BLANCPAIN

Métiers d’Art Formosa

Clouded Leopard Boutique

Edition 45mm red-gold

case; hand-decorated and

engraved, gold-damascened

shakudō dial depicting the

Formosa clouded leopard, a

symbol of Taiwan; sapphire

crystal caseback; handwound

movement; alligator

leather strap

92


1 2

3 4

PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE WATCHMAKERS

1 A LANGE & SÖHNE

Tourbograph Perpetual

Honeygold “Homage to FA

Lange” 43mm case in the

brand’s proprietary honeygold;

black-rhodiumed,

honey-gold dial; hand-wound

movement; tourbillon;

chronograph with rattrapante

function; perpetual calendar;

moon-phase; leather strap

2 AUDEMARS PIGUET

[Re]master01 Selfwinding

Chronograph 40mm stainless

steel case and lugs; pink-gold

bezel, crown and pushpieces;

yellow gold-toned dial;

blue tachymetric scale and

chronograph hands; pink-gold

hour, minute and second

hands; hand-stitched brown

calfskin strap

3 BOVET

Récital 26 Brainstorm

Chapter Two 47.8mm sapphire

case with titanium lugs and

caseback; blue quartz dial;

hand-wound movement;

world time with indexable

second-timezone with

hemispherical city indicator;

3D moon-phase indicator;

alligator leather strap

4 BREGUET

Tradition Quantième

Rétrograde 7597 40mm

rose-gold case; silvered

gold dial at 12 o’clock;

open-tipped Breguet hands

in blue steel; self-winding,

openworked movement;

retrograde date display;

alligator leather strap with

pin buckle in gold

93


5 6

7 8

5 CHOPARD

LUC Skull One A tribute

to the Mexican Day of the

Dead; 40mm beadblasted

DLC-coated steel case; black

dial with lacquered-finished

skull motif; self-winding

movement; calfskin leather

strap with tone-on-tone

stitching

6 JAQUET DROZ

Grande Seconde Paillonnée

From the Ateliers D’Art

Collection; 43mm red

gold case; blue Grand Feu

paillonné-enamelled and

silver opaline dial with red

gold appliqué; self-winding

movement; alligator

leather strap

7 JAEGER-LECOULTRE

Master Grande Tradition

Grande Complication

45mm pink-gold case;

black dial with golden

laser-welded structure; handwound

movement; 24-hour

indication; orbital flying

tourbillon; minute repeater;

alligator leather strap

8 HARRY WINSTON

Ocean Moon Phase Automatic

44mm white gold case;

bezel and lugs set with

baguette-cut diamonds;

openworked and 3D dial with

carbon inserts; self-winding

movement; moon-phase

and retrograde date; alligator

leather strap

94


9 10

11

12

PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE WATCHMAKERS

9 MB&F

Legacy Machine Perpetual

Evo 44mm zirconium case

with bezel-free design;

orange CVD dial plate;

openworked, hand-wound

movement fitted with

FlexRing shock-absorbing

system; perpetual calendar;

rubber strap

10 PATEK PHILIPPE

5270J – Grand Complications

41mm yellow-gold case; silvery

opaline dial with tachymeter

scale and gold applied hour

markers; hand-wound

movement; chronograph with

instantaneous 30-minute

counter; perpetual calendar;

alligator leather strap

11 VACHERON

CONSTANTIN

Traditionnelle Tourbillon 42mm

pink-gold case; case, bezel and

lugs decorated with a handengraved

cloud motif; handguilloché

gold dial finished

with a black galvanic treatment

and decorated with two handengraved

Qilin figures

12 LAURENT FERRIER

Grand Sport Tourbillon

44mm stainless steel case;

gradient blue opaline dial;

white-gold hour and minute

hands featuring orange Super-

LumiNova; hand-wound

movement; tourbillon visible

through the sapphire caseback;

stainless steel bracelet

95


SOMMELIER’S

CHOICE

ACROSS THOUSANDS OF YEARS AND HUNDREDS

OF CULTURES, WINEMAKING HAS ALWAYS BEEN

AN ART FORM IN SEARCH OF THE SUBLIME.

THIS DREAM CELLAR OF EMERGING VINTAGES –

HANDPICKED BY 15 GLOBAL SOMMELIERS – SHOWS

OFF THE BEST OF 21ST-CENTURY VITICULTURE.

BY JEFFREY T IVERSON

Illustrations by HANNAH GEORGE

The Ritz Paris has hosted innumerable galas in

its history, but doubtless the most consequential

of recent times came in 2016 when the hotel

reopened after a four-year, multimillion-euro renovation.

For this legendary institution, it was a chance to unveil

to the crème of high society all the ways it had redefined

luxury once again. Everything was to breathe elegant

modernity – the rooms, the spa – even the champagne.

Or so intended Ritz’s chief sommelier at the time, Estelle

Touzet. “The Ritz clientele has always been very attached

to tradition, and used to being served wines from France’s

biggest, most illustrious champagne houses,” she says.

“But for the reopening, I decided to serve a champagne

that was completely unknown to the general public

– a blanc de blancs by a 31-year-old, first-generation

vigneron named Etienne Calsac.” Why? Because for

Touzet, Calsac – a self-made, haute-couture winemaker

who cut his teeth in New World wineries from Canada

to New Zealand before beginning to produce champagne

on a tiny, organically farmed estate in Avize – represents

the future of French wine. And nowadays, divining that

future is the crux of her profession.

Being a sommelier in 2021, says Touzet, means making

sense of a wine world in movement. “Vignerons of my

parents’ generation made wine like their fathers did, and

didn’t leave their region. Whereas those of my generation

now seek training abroad – in Germany, Australia – to

learn how winemakers in other countries are adapting

today, and to acquire new techniques they can bring back

and apply to their terroirs and their grape varieties.” While

Old World winemakers are seeking inspiration abroad

and bringing home fresh ideas and innovations, New

World winemakers continue to experiment with novel

techniques, styles and vineyard locations. “The profession

of sommelier has never been more interesting than in

recent years,” says Italy’s Enrico Bernardo, 2004 Best

Sommelier of the World, “and it’s because of the evolutions

taking place all around the world now, with new estates,

new appellations and new generations of winemakers.”

Which is why, for this year’s Compendium, Centurion

magazine invited leading sommeliers from all across

the planet to paint us a portrait of this evolving world,

with each sharing a remarkable bottle from one young,

emerging estate that points to the future of wine.

96


1 2

3

1 ARGENTINA

Andrés Rosberg

PerSe, La Craie 2017

Today, new high-altitude vineyards are

being planted around the world by pioneering

winemakers seeking greater freshness

and elegance in their wines. Andrés

Rosberg, former president of the International

Sommelier Association, brings us a

wine from Argentina, home to the greatest

concentration of high-altitude vineyards in

the world. “After only six vintages, lifelong

friends Edy del Popolo (viticulturist) and

David Bonomi (winemaker) have established

their PerSe project as one of the

brightest stars in Argentinian wine. Their

recipe was clear: find a Grand Cru-quality

site, plant it with the varieties best suited to

that terroir, and then let nature talk. They

say simplicity is the ultimate sophistication,

and PerSe’s La Craie is a stunning cuvée

indeed, named for the abundant limestone

of their vineyard in Gualtallary – an increasingly

prized sub-appellation of Mendoza’s

Uco Valley. The combination of high

elevation (1,450 metres), cool, dry weather

and chalky soils give this brilliant malbec

and cabernet-franc blend unique finesse

and depth. Barely 900 bottles are made annually,

yet its personality and purity make it

well worth seeking out.”

2 AUSTRALIA

Bhatia Dheeraj

Traviarti, Nebbiolo

Given Australia’s history of Italian

immigration, it’s no surprise that

winemakers there would long to

cultivate nebbiolo, Italy’s most noble

– and notoriously difficult – grape.

Sommelier Bhatia Dheeraj, a Decanter

wine judge and director of the Coogee

Wine Room in Sydney, introduces us to a

rapidly growing wine region that is now

being touted as an ideal location for the

grape. “I was recently in Victoria visiting

the wine region of Beechworth when I

happened upon a very small producer

few people know about called Traviarti.

There, I tasted a nebbiolo that shocked

me. Nebbiolo doesn’t like the Australian

sun and heat. But in 2011, the couple

behind Traviarti decided to plant it at

600m altitude, on the theory you would

lose some of the heat extremes there.

The result is a wine that would be a beast

in a tasting. Drinking it, you’re struck by

the inherent contradiction of nebbiolo.

Delicacy, prettiness and floral aromas

together with robust, savoury tannins

drawn out by acidity … it’s enough to

make this the most moreish variety

striving in Beechworth, Victoria today.”

97

3 BELGIUM

Stéphane Dardenne

Domaine La Falize, Chardonnay

In the balmy Middle Ages, Belgium

was covered with vineyards. And today,

with global temperatures on the rise,

Belgians are making wine once again.

Sommelier Stéphane Dardenne of the

two-Michelin-starred l’Air du Temps (and

Gault&Millau’s 2020 Best Sommelier in

Belgium) couldn’t be happier. “About

ten kilometres from the restaurant l’Air

du Temps is a wine estate which, in my

opinion, has currently set the bar for

winemaking in Belgium – Domaine

La Falize. Launched in 2012 by one of

the owners of the AB InBev brewing

company, it now has a few hectares of

chardonnay and pinot noir in production,

and are already producing world-class

wines. The owner has invested in state-ofthe-art

equipment, has hired Belgium’s

most famous winemaker, Peter Colemont

– known for his Clos d’Opleeuw

Chardonnay – while Sylvain Pellegrinelli,

vineyard manager at Domaine Leflaive in

Burgundy, is supervising the biodynamic

viticulture. Today, the precise, Burgundian

approach in the winery is yielding

chardonnay reminiscent of the most

beautiful expressions of the Côte d’Or.”


4 5

6

4 FRANCE

Estelle Touzet

Champagne Etienne Calsac,

“Les Revenants”

What does the future of French wine

taste like? Probably like Etienne Calsac’s

champagne, says Estelle Touzet, former

chief sommelier of the Ritz who today

runs her eponymous consultancy firm.

“In France, many vignerons rested on

their laurels for generations with an

unchanging model of wine. Today they’re

starting to imitate foreign winemakers

by embracing innovation. Take Etienne

Calsac, a 36-year-old vigneron of less

than three hectares in Champagne. He

didn’t inherit a grand estate with beautiful

chalk cellars. He built his own winery

in an industrial area in Avize, using

intelligence, open-mindedness and new

ideas from his travels abroad. Low yields,

horse-ploughing, biodynamic viticulture,

Burgundy-style vinification – everything is

made-to-measure. Recently he released

a cuvée called Les Revenants, made only

with old champagne varietals – arbane,

petit-meslier and pinot blanc. It’s an

extraordinary wine, boasting purity,

precision and abyssal depth. We’re so

used to chardonnay and pinot noir, we

forget champagne can be more fine and

delicate. It’s a wine that reminds us that

building the future begins by looking to

our past.”

5 GERMANY

Markus Del Monego MW

Weingut Korrell Johanneshof,

Paradies Riesling trocken

Demand today for lighter wine styles

is raising the profile of German

winemakers who are vinifying riesling

in new ways – not for sweetness, but

for dry wines that are low in alcohol

yet bursting with aromatics. Markus

Del Monego, Master of Wine, 1998

Best Sommelier of the World, and

today the head of a consultancy firm

in Essen, introduces us to a young

German winemaker breathing new

life into his family estate. “Martin

Korrell represents the new generation

of German vintners. He is keen on

sustainability and organic viticulture,

for which he just started the conversion.

His wines are crystal clear and show

tremendous ageing potential. Paradies

is the name of his best vineyard, which

offers heavenly riesling with fragrant

fruit reminiscent of ripe apricots,

juicy peaches, lemon zest and fresh

mirabelle, blending with hints of

tropical fruits and white blossoms

in the background. An outstanding,

savoury riesling with discreet spiciness,

slightly earthy minerality, flavourful

depth, length and balance. A perfect

match with turbot in beurre blanc,

scallop sashimi or vegetable tempura.”

98

6 INDIA

Bhatia Dheeraj

Vallonné Vineyards, Riesling

It’s generally accepted that only

countries situated between 30 and

50 degrees latitude are capable of

producing fine wine. But today in

India, where wine consumption has

continually grown in recent years,

pioneering winemakers are proving

this axiom wrong by identifying

cool, high-altitude vineyard sites

and developing specialised farming

practices. We asked Bhatia Dheeraj,

sommelier and Decanter Asia Wine

Awards judge, to share the most recent

discovery from his native India. “There

are a number of promising Indian

producers today, such as KRSMA

Estates, whose picturesque vineyards

are located on the hills near the

Unesco World Heritage Site of Hampi.

Its premium sauvignon blanc, cabernet

sauvignon and syrah wines are wines

to watch for. Another awesome wine

– and I mean it, try it blind – is the

stunning dry riesling first produced

in 2017, from Vallonné Vineyards in

Maharashtra. It’s crafted from grapes

grown 2,100 feet [640 metres] above

sea level on south-facing slopes

benefiting from the cooling influence

of the waters of the Mukhne Reservoir.

In a word, it’s a mind-blowing wine.”


“I like wines made by people who believe in the

soul of the land, wines made in the vineyards

rather than the cellar, wines made with heart that

remind us being imperfect is perfectly human”

7 8

9

7 ITALY

Enrico Bernardo

Passopisciaro, Contrada G

In the last decade, no region in Italy has

captured the imaginations of oenophiles

(and investors) like Sicily’s Mount Etna,

an active volcano where professional

viticulture had been mostly abandoned

after World War II. Italy’s Enrico

Bernardo, 2004 Best Sommelier of the

World, shares a wine that encapsulates

Etna’s allure. “For me, the wines of

Mount Etna are the quintessential

‘terroir wines’ of Italy today. It’s a

magical place – the volcano’s basalt

soil is jet black, the vineyards of

nerello mascalese grapes are planted

at 600-1,000 metres altitude, and

include ungrafted pre-phylloxera vines.

As in Burgundy, there are crus, called

contradas – walled, terraced vineyard

sites. Among my favourites is Domaine

Passopisciaro’s Contrada Guardiola,

planted at 1,000 metres. Wine lovers

see Sicily as an extremely southern

wine region, and expect very rich,

concentrated wines. Yet these are fresh

and floral, perfumed, almost light like a

Burgundy pinot, not dense but delicate,

with very seductive aromas – blood

orange, thyme, dried mint, cherries,

even salty notes. They are refined and

luscious, good young or old, and always

bring you pleasure and emotions.”

8 MOLDOVA

Raimonds Tomsons

Castel Mimi, Cabernet

Sauvignon Reserve 2012

With a winemaking renaissance

under way in eastern Europe, Latvian

sommelier Raimonds Tomsons, the 2017

Best Sommelier of Europe and Africa,

recently visited an estate whose wine

embodies the revival in Moldova: Castel

Mimi. “This historic winery and castle

was founded by Constantin Mimi, a

politician who drove the development

of Moldovan viticulture in the 19th and

early 20th centuries. In 2011, the castle

was renovated, and the winery upgraded

with the newest equipment. Today, its

2012 Cabernet Sauvignon Reserve boasts

an intense and opulent nose, showing

a plethora of ripe dark plums, cherries

and cassis jam complemented by very

fine toasted oak notes – cedar, vanilla,

Christmas spices – while also beginning

to reveal evolution notes of balsamic,

forest floor and dried mint. The palate

is rich and dense with expressive but

ripe and silky tannins and mild acidity, a

great concentration of flavours with dried

dark cherries and prunes, blackberries

and blackcurrant jam complemented

by sweet oak flavours of vanilla, sweetspices

and toast, fresh notes of mint and

capsicum followed by mild earthiness. A

very polished and balanced wine.”

99

9 PORTUGAL

João Pires MS

Vinhos Imperfeitos, I, Branco 2018

The current buzz over top-shelf

Portuguese wines reached new heights

in 2020 when the Vinhos Imperfeitos

I Branco 2018 became Decanter

magazine’s highest-scoring dry white

Portuguese wine ever, at 97 points.

Master sommelier João Pires recently

visited the producer. “I like wines made

by people who invest and believe in

the soul of the land, wines made in the

vineyards rather than the cellar, wines

made with heart that remind us being

imperfect is perfectly human. To my

surprise, I recently discovered a wine

project named Vinhos Imperfeitos

(imperfect wines), launched in June

2018 by the talented 36-year-old

Portuguese winemaker Carlos Raposo,

whose dream is to make the best –

and most expensive – white wines in

Portugal. His 2018 vintage includes a

vinho verde, a Dão and Verde blend

called D&V, and his crown jewel, the

Vinho Imperfeitos/I, from 100% Dão

region grapes. I was blown away by

their sapid, mouthwatering quality,

their salty umami character and their

lingering tension – there’s an emotional

strain, a never-ending suspense … as

a jazz lover, it reminds me of ‘Peace

Piece’ by Bill Evans.”


10 11

12

10 SOUTH AFRICA

Tinashe Nyamudoka

Kumusha, Cabernet Sauvignon

& Cinsault 2019

One of the most anticipated launches

in South African wine of recent times

was the Kumusha Wines project

by Zimbabwean-born Tinashe

Nyamudoka, former sommelier of

Cape Town’s acclaimed Test Kitchen

restaurant. Kumusha is Nyamudoka’s

paean to South Africa’s terroirs, but

it’s also a means to promote black

voices within an industry still rife

with inequality. “Kumusha Wines is

my source of livelihood, but it’s also

a vehicle to open opportunities for

the marginalised in South Africa and

Africa as a whole. I want it to serve as

a blueprint for aspiring young people

in the industry on how to unlock the

wine value chain. Since launching in

2017, I now export to the United States,

the Netherlands, Zimbabwe and Kenya.

I make my wines at Opstal Wine Estate

in the Slanghoek Valley. My cabernet

sauvignon and cinsault blend is an

ode to South African cabernet/cinsault

blends of the 1960s and 1970s – gems

which are still drinking well. I wanted

to emulate this style in the modern era.

I went for elegance more than power

and created a wine that is drinkable in

its youth yet will age gracefully.”

11 SPAIN

David Seijas

Bodegas Viñátigo, Elaboraciones

Ancestrales Blanco

After 11 years as El Bulli’s top sommelier,

David Seijas’s nose for emerging wine is

faultless. So what does he thi-nk is one

of the world’s most alluring, mysterious

wine-growing areas today? The Spanish

Canary Islands. “The Canaries have a

unique, spectacular landscape. Being

free of phylloxera, there are countless

wine varieties there that travelled

from Spain, Portugal and Italy, many

of which have now disappeared in

their places of origin, and thus can

be found nowhere else on the planet

today. The different islands, of volcanic

origin, also boast a great diversity of

soils from successive erosions, and a

multitude of microclimates – more

than five just on the island Tenerife

– making them a paradise for bold,

passionate winegrowers. And few

know the islands, their varieties and

climates better than Juan Jesús Méndez

of Bodegas Viñátigo, a talented,

erudite winegrower who with his

wife, Elena Batista, has recovered

and revived numerous nearly extinct

grape varieties. Their Elaboraciones

Ancestrales Blanco, made from the

gual variety, is a delight. Exuberant fruit

and thrilling texture. A bomb!”

100

12 SWITZERLAND

Marc Almert

Weingut Adank, Fläscher Pinot

Noir Alte Reben

Though the Swiss would be content to

keep it all to themselves, the quality

and diversity of Switzerland’s wines

is no longer a secret. Marc Almert,

head sommelier at Zurich’s Pavillon

and reigning Best Sommelier of the

World, reveals the last Swiss pinot

to make him swoon. “After working

in prestigious wine regions from

Burgundy to New Zealand, Patrick

Adank recently came home to work

with his parents, Rezia and Hansruedi,

who founded their winery in the

village of Fläsch 35 years ago. In 2020,

he was named Gault&Millau wine

guide’s rookie of the year. Adank is

making exciting wines that are true

to their origins and grapes, from

sparkling wine (one of the few truly

excellent ones in Switzerland) to a

great selection of mineralesque whites.

But his pinot noirs are particularly

outstanding – wines that can easily

compete with their famous French

counterparts. The Alte Reben –

German for ‘old vines’ – has especially

taken my heart with its intriguing fruit

and spice on the nose followed by its

longevity and minerality on the palate.

One to watch.”


“Before prohibition, Lake County had more

grapevine acreage than either Napa or Sonoma.

Today the county is on the rise once again”

13 14 15

13 UNITED KINGDOM

Clive Barlow MW

Gusbourne Estate, Barrel

Selection Pinot Noir

If global warming is altering the fortunes

of wine regions everywhere, England

ranks among the winners. Having

conquered critics with their sparkling

wines, now English winemakers are

chasing the holy grail – great pinot – says

Clive Barlow, Master of Wine and buyer

for the online English wine specialist

Corkk. “When I started working in wine

in the late 1980s in a small vineyard

near the coastal town of Lymington,

we dreamed of achieving 10% alcohol.

This year, pinot noir from one vineyard

in Crouch Valley, Essex was harvested

at 14.7%. Also a fabulous year was

2018, allowing a number of growers to

produce very good pinot noir, especially

in Kent. The star was Gusbourne Estate’s

Barrel Selection Pinot Noir, a jawdroppingly

hedonistic wine with deep,

dense, ripe fruit, exuding flavours of

morello cherries, star anise, blackberries

and cedar smoke. Silk-smooth tannins,

beguiling texture, a long sapid finish

… it’s a thing of beauty and shows all

that’s possible. Alas, only a few hundred

bottles were produced. Yes, ‘One

swallow does not a summer make’, but

one swallow brings the promise of a fine

future for pinot noir in Kent.”

14 UNITED STATES

Chad Walsh

Komorebi Vineyard Pinot Noir 2016

For decades, big California brands

have often overshadowed the quality

boutique wineries that first created global

excitement for American wine in the

1970s. That’s changing, says sommelier

Chad Walsh, US Portfolio Manager for T

Edward Wines. “In recent years, we’re

really moving away from American

wines with a sense of style – as in a

‘California chardonnay’ – towards wines

with a sense of place. Take Matt Taylor,

one of the winemakers developing a new

appellation on the West Sonoma Coast –

a cool, foggy area that’s climatically very

different from the rest of the Sonoma

Coast. After working for famed wineries

from California’s Araujo to Burgundy’s

Domaine Dujac, Taylor created his

tiny estate here called Komorebi. It’s

a labour of love: he uses dry-farming

and biodynamics, produces very small

quantities, and the wines are incredible.

In 20 years, few California wines have

blown my mind like Matt’s pinot noir. It’s

100% whole cluster, very similar to the

Dujac style. It has this wonderful texture

and structure, and incredible aromatic

complexity, from warm red fruits to that

‘sous bois’ earthiness you find in great

burgundies, which to me is the pinnacle

of the expression of pinot noir.”

101

15 VOLCANIC WINE

John Szabo MS

Obsidian RidgeVineyards,

Half Mile Proprietary Blend

In an era when belief in the primacy

of terroir has spread around the wine

world, a unique, international movement

has emerged of producers who literally

define their wines by their soils. Master

sommelier John Szabo, founder of the

annual International Volcanic Wines

Conference, shares one of these rising, fiery

estates. “Before prohibition, Lake County,

the most recently active volcanic AVA in

Northern California, had more grapevine

acreage than either Napa or Sonoma.

Today the county is on the rise once again,

helped by both the quality potential there

and its more down-to-earth land prices,

with big names coming north to get in on

the action. Obsidian Ridge Vineyards is a

leading producer, with 40 hectares planted

high up on volcanic Mount Konocti on

soils littered with obsidian – black volcanic

glass. Brothers Peter and Arpad Molnar

produce a dense and brooding Estate

Cabernet Sauvignon, while their The Slope

cuvée from the steepest, highest-elevation

cabernet parcels is more finely etched and

intricately woven. Their top cuvée, Half

Mile, is made in suitable vintages from top

vine blocks, yielding a cabernet sauvignon/

petit verdot blend that could almost be

called elegant and refined.”


Unique experiences, glamorous locations, exquisite cuisine and,

of course, sumptuous rooms, suites and villas are all hallmarks of

this curated selection of luxury accommodation worldwide

Dear

Readers,

One of the silver linings of this difficult past

year has the been the opportunity to reflect on

the role of travel in our lives. As we’ve taken

fewer journeys, we’ve been able to recognise

and relish the central place that travelling plays

in so many of our fondest memories – and

also to renew our anticipatory joy about the

destinations on our bucket lists. The Fine Hotels

+ Resorts handbook on the following pages

highlights some of the hotels, restaurants and

destinations that we hope prove inspirational

both in the year ahead and beyond. Maintaining

the highest safety standards, these partners are

nevertheless governed by national restrictions,

so please do check property openings and

availability, either on the websites or by calling

Centurion Travel Service. And please remember

to consult the latest government advice before

booking travel and departing on any trip, as this

may affect the travel insurance cover provided

with your card account (if held).

– The Centurion Editorial Team


Huka Lodge, Taupo, New Zealand

Otahuna Lodge, Tai Tapu, New Zealand

Jackalope Hotel, Victoria, Australia

InterContinental Hayman Island Resort, Hayman Island, Australia

When you’re ready to travel,

we’ll be here with inspiration

With Fine Hotels + Resorts your hotel stays become memorable experiences.

Stay somewhere you won’t soon forget. Escape closer to home at hotels

that are destinations unto themselves. When you’re ready to relax, enjoy an

unforgettable experience with Fine Hotels + Resorts, and rest assured that

American Express Travel will be here every step of the way.


Blanket Bay, Glenorchy, New Zealand

ROOM UPGRADE

UPON ARRIVAL, WHEN

AVAILABLE †

NOON CHECK-IN,

WHEN AVAILABLE

Book your Fine Hotels + Resorts stay with Centurion Travel Service

and receive the following complimentary suite of benefits:


COMPLIMENTARY WI-FI


UNIQUE AMENITY

VALUED AT US$100,

TO SPEND ON DINING,

SPA, AND RESORT

ACTIVITIES §


GUARANTEED 4 P.M.

LATE CHECK-OUT

DAILY BREAKFAST

FOR TWO

AND STAY TWO OR MORE NIGHTS at participating Aman, Belmond, Mandarin Oriental Hotel

Group, Oetker Collection, The Peninsula Hotels, Rosewood Hotels & Resorts, St. Regis Hotels &

Resorts, and Waldorf Astoria Hotels & Resorts properties AND RECEIVE AN ADDITIONAL

US$100 OR US$200 FOOD AND BEVERAGE OR SPA CREDIT §


†Certain room categories are not eligible for upgrade. §Special amenity and Centurion benefits vary by property.

Valid only for new Fine Hotels + Resorts bookings made through Centurion Travel Service at participating Aman, Belmond, Mandarin Oriental Hotel Group, Oetker Collection, The Peninsula

Hotels, Rosewood Hotels & Resorts, St. Regis Hotels & Resorts, and Waldorf Astoria Hotels & Resorts properties. Payment must be made in full with an American Express Card in the Centurion

Member’s name. Available for Centurion Members only. Centurion Member must travel on itinerary booked to be eligible for benefits described. Noon check-in is based on availability

and is provided at check-in. Room upgrade will be confirmed at time of reservation subject to availability, and will replace Fine Hotels + Resorts room upgrade at time of check-in. Breakfast

amenity varies by property, but will be, at a minimum, a continental breakfast. Complimentary In-Room Wi-Fi is provided. In the case where a Property includes cost of Wi-Fi in a mandatory

resort fee, the Cardmember will receive a daily credit from the Property in the standard amount that the Property charges for Wi-Fi. The credit will be issued on the Cardmember’s final

statement upon check-out. Benefit restrictions vary by Fine Hotels + Resorts property and cannot be redeemed for cash, and may not be combined with other offers

unless indicated. Certain participating Fine Hotels + Resorts properties will offer with a minimum paid two consecutive night stay a Centurion benefit of (1) a $200

food & beverage or spa credit; (2) a $200 food & beverage credit only; or (3) a $100 food & beverage or spa credit. Call Centurion Travel Service for details. Credit is

applied in dollars or equivalent in local currency based on the exchange rate on the day of check out. Unused credit will be forfeited at check-out. Advance reservations

are recommended for services such as spa, dining or golf in order to take advantage of the Fine Hotels + Resorts special amenity during your stay. Benefits are only

applied at checkout and expire at checkout. Limit one benefit package per room, per stay. Three room limit per Centurion Member, per stay; back-to-back stays within

a 24-hour period at the same property considered one stay. Participating Fine Hotels + Resorts Fine Hotels + Resorts properties and benefits are subject to change.


The Chedi Andermatt

Oasis of the Far East at the heart of the Swiss Alps

Come in, take a deep breath, relax. The word “Chedi”

means “temple” in Thai, and guests of this five-star deluxe

hotel should feel as well cared for and heavenly as if they

were in a temple. It’s a place of peace and reflection,

nestled at the heart of the Swiss Alps. Within easy reach

of Zürich, Munich and Milan, Andermatt has become

a hotspot in the Alps for visitors from Switzerland and

further afield. Small boutiques, cafés and new restaurants

are transforming what was once a sleepy little village into

a popular year-round destination for discerning travellers

seeking something new, while the village streets and

historic buildings maintain their charm. Waterfalls, alpine

lakes and over 180 kilometres of slopes make the area a

paradise for hikers, mountain bikers and skier. With its Ski

Butlers and the “Magic Belt”, which takes guests almost

directly from the hotel to the ski lift, The Chedi Andermatt

offers an extraordinary ski-in/ski-out experience. In the

hotel Asian flair meets Alpine elegance and the open plan

design and generous spaces reflect the relaxed style of

hospitality here. Five outstanding restaurants and bars

along with a 2,400sq m spa make this deluxe hotel a place

of indulgence.

GOTTHARDSTRASSE 4, 6490 ANDERMATT, SWITZERLAND - THECHEDIANDERMATT.COM

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO MAKE A BOOKING, PLEASE CONTACT YOUR CENTURION TRAVEL SERVICE


Raffles Seychelles

An unrivalled paradise

One of the world’s most far-flung destinations, Praslin is the

launch point for a myriad of activities and is also home to natural

wonders, including amazing Unesco World Heritage Sites. Raffles

Seychelles has been thoughtfully placed near the most charming

islands in the Seychelles, allowing travellers to seamlessly embark

on island-hopping adventures by boarding their private boat or

helicopter directly at the resort.

The resort boasts 86 private pool villas which are stretched

out along the hillside, offering stunning views of the opal-hued

Indian Ocean and Curieuse Island. Designed in a contemporary

style, the villas feature a bedroom flooded with natural daylight,

a strategically placed bathtub to soak up incredible views, an

outdoor pavilion and a spacious terrace with a private plunge pool

— the perfect place to refresh and take in the magnificent scenery.

The Raffles Spa is steps away from the coastline of Anse

Takamaka, amidst stunning surroundings and verdant gardens.

It has been carefully designed to calm the spirit and awaken

the senses. The luxurious spa features outdoor pavilions, each

showcasing spectacular views of the blue ocean, tropical

gardens and dramatic granite boulders. A pair of couple’s spa

suites are fitted with steam showers, Japanese soaking tubs and

observation decks, where residents can enjoy stunning vistas in

privacy.

Experience a gastronomic selection of culinary experiences

in four restaurants bringing you not only a taste of delicious local

cuisine but also dishes from around the world.

ANSE TAKAMAKA, PRASLIN, SEYCHELLES - RAFFLES.COM/SEYCHELLES

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO MAKE A BOOKING, PLEASE CONTACT YOUR CENTURION TRAVEL SERVICE


Fairmont Banff Springs

No Better Place

From the snowcapped Canadian Rockies to Sydney’s bustling waterfront, Accor’s

global resorts offer both a front-row seat to some of the most jaw-dropping settings

on the planet, and ample opportunity to unwind, indulge and relax in style

Fairmont Pacific Rim, Vancouver

This ultramodern hotel boasts multi-award-winning

culinary and cocktail destinations, the indulgent Willow

Stream Spa, a rooftop pool, lavish guest rooms and some

of Vancouver’s most luxurious suites. The property’s close

proximity to the mountains and wilderness, as well striking

cityscapes, make it easy to get lost in the charm of this

metropolis on the sea.

Fairmont San Francisco

World-renowned, this sumptuous retreats presents the

grandeur of the best luxury hotel in the city coupled with

a reputation for impeccable service, promising a truly

memorable experience for visitors from around the globe.

Guests staying in its 606 individually styled rooms and suites

can look forward to immersive in-house dining as well as

fitness and wellness opportunities aplenty.

Fairmont Pacific Rim

Fairmont San Francisco


Fairmont Orchid Hawaii

Fairmont Orchid Hawaii

Nestled amidst 13 oceanfront hectares of lush tropical

gardens, cascading waterfalls and a tranquil white-sand

beach and lagoon, this rarified resort is a temple of wellbeing.

The Four Diamond hotel commands over an award-winning

spa, a 930 sq m oceanfront pool, six restaurants, a beach

club, a year-round children’s programme as well as a fitness

centre and tennis pavilion.

Fairmont Kea Lani Maui

Set on the sunny southern shores of Wailea, a chic oceanfront

community, this nine-hectare resort features spacious onebedroom

suites and private villas, a state-of-the-art fitness

centre, indoor and outdoor spa experiences and islandinspired

cuisine. Hawaiian cultural activities along with the

resort’s three lagoon pools and prime beachfront access offer

guests their choice of active adventures and restful respites.

Fairmont Banff Springs

Strong body, clear mind, full spirit: this is the leitmotif at

the idyllic property at the foot of Rundle Mountain, in the

very heart of the Canadian Rockies. With 757 guest rooms

and suites, seasonally inspired fare and the expansive

Willow Stream Spa, it’s the perfect home base for countless

outdoor activities.

Sofitel Sydney Darling Habour

Revel in a world of relaxation and luxury in Darling Harbour,

with Sydney’s playground and natural wonders on your

doorstep. Enjoy five-star service, world-class hygiene

protocols and facilities unmatched across the city,

including 590 spacious rooms and suites with floor-toceiling

windows, French bathroom amenities, a stunning

gym, an outdoor infinity pool and four vibrant bars and

restaurants.

Fairmont Kea Lani Maui

Sofitel Sydney Darling Harbour

Fairmont Pacific Rim, 1038 Canada Place, Vancouver, BC V6C 0B9, fairmont.com/pacificrim ∙ Fairmont San Francisco, 950 Mason St, San Francisco,

CA 94108, fairmont.com/sanfrancisco ∙ Fairmont Orchid Hawaii, 1 N. Kaniku Drive, Kohala Coast, HI 96743, fairmont.com/orchid-hawaii ∙ Fairmont

Kea Lani Maui, 4100 Wailea Alanui Dr, Wailea, Maui, HI 96753, fairmont-kea-lani.com ∙ Fairmont Banff Springs, 405 Spray Ave, Banff, AB T1L 1J4,

banff-springs-hotel.com ∙ Sofitel Sydney Darling Harbour, 12 Darling Drive, Sydney NSW 2000, sofitelsydneydarlingharbour.com.au

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO MAKE A BOOKING, PLEASE CONTACT YOUR CENTURION TRAVEL SERVICE


Bvlgari Resort Bali

An exclusive and intimate destination for guests seeking privacy and luxury

Traditional Balinese forms and high Italian style meet in

the sophisticated contemporary design of Bvlgari Resort

Bali, blending perfectly with the breathtaking natural

beauty of the island’s coastline.

Uniquely positioned at more than 150 metres above the

seashore, the resort’s 59 villas and five mansions offer

unrivalled views across the Indian Ocean and have access

to exceptional features: Italian and Indonesian restaurants;

a spa offering a complete range of Balinese, Asian and

European therapies; and the cliff-edge pool among them.

Shopping figures highly, too, with a Bvlgari and Balinese

antiques store, while there are also business, conference

and wedding facilities, as well as the first Bvlgari wedding

chapel in the world. An impressive Hindu temple rises on

the highest point of the property to complete the resort’s

remarkable appeal.

With its incomparable backdrop, contemporary

interpretation of Balinese style and distinctive Italian

flair, Bvlgari Resort Bali is an exclusive destination for

discerning travellers.

JALAN GOA LEMPEH, BANJAR DINAS KANGIN, ULUWATU, BALI 80364, INDONESIA - BULGARIHOTELS.COM/BALI

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO MAKE A BOOKING, PLEASE CONTACT YOUR CENTURION TRAVEL SERVICE


The Legian Seminyak, Bali

A time to treasure

Set on an idyllic stretch of Seminyak beach, The

Legian Seminyak, Bali is an iconic hotel renowned for its

extraordinary location, authentic culture and beautiful

design, set in peaceful, tropical gardens overlooking the

ocean – and just a few minutes from the island’s bustling

shopping and nightlife.

Every one of our elegant suites has premium ocean views,

with terraces or balconies looking onto the golden beach

and rolling waves beyond. Styled by legendary Indonesian

designer Jaya Ibrahim, the suites have separate living and

dining areas and sumptuous bathrooms, along with original

art and artefacts from around the Indonesian archipelago.

The Club by The Legian Seminyak, Bali is set a discreet

distance from the hotel, with luxurious pool villas surrounded

by private, tropical gardens.

Within the grounds, the elegant surrounds of The

Restaurant feature a signature dining experience overlooking

the infinity pool. The menu, created by Michelin-starred

executive chef Stephane Gortina, is an enticing fusion of

European and Southeast Asian flavours using the finest

local and organic ingredients cooked with modern French

techniques. Meanwhile, Wellness by The Legian is an awardwinning

spa offering locally inspired treatments.

JALAN KAYU AYA, SEMINYAK BEACH, BALI 80361, INDONESIA – LHM-HOTELS.COM

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO MAKE A BOOKING, PLEASE CONTACT YOUR CENTURION TRAVEL SERVICE


Emirates One&Only Wolgan Valley

Discover fresh air adventures, wholesome dining, blissful private villas and inspiring

wellness. Immerse yourself in the majesty of the Greater Blue Mountains

Nestled in more than 2,800 hectares of protected

wilderness among dramatic cliffs and valleys carved

by time, Emirates One&Only Wolgan Valley is a chic

conservation retreat that immerses you in the majesty

of Australia’s Greater Blue Mountains. 40 freestanding

villas are crafted to showcase spectacular views. Beside

your crackling fireplace, on your peaceful veranda, in your

indulgent bathtub, around your private pool, you’ll find

secluded sanctuary to unwind with loved ones.

The resort’s unique blend of dramatic landscapes

and heritage can be explored through a range of outdoor

activities: hiking, mountain-biking and horseback-riding

along hidden trails, sparkling creeks, and epic ridgelines;

encountering iconic Australian wildlife on 4WD safaris by day

and night; stargazing around the atmospheric campfire; and

getting hands-on with our important conservation work.

And, feeling at one with nature, there’s no better

place to simply reconnect with yourself. Harness the

power of native flora in holistic spa treatments. Amplify

the thrill of yoga, swimming and tennis with rolling

mountain backdrops and the freshest air. Inspired by this

environment, our food philosophy celebrates seasonal,

organic produce sourced from regional farms and vintners

with country-style breakfast spreads, gourmet picnics

and mouthwatering barbecues as well as à la carte dining

and wine tastings. Experience Australia at its finest.

2600 WOLGAN ROAD, WOLGAN VALLEY, NEW SOUTH WALES 2790, AUSTRALIA - ONEANDONLYWOLGANVALLEY.COM

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO MAKE A BOOKING, PLEASE CONTACT YOUR CENTURION TRAVEL SERVICE


Shangri-La Hotel, Sydney

Perfectly positioned in the dress circle of Sydney Harbour, the panoramic views

enhance the luxurious glamour of Sydney’s destination hotel

Shangri-La Hotel, Sydney boasts an extraordinarily beautiful

view of Sydney’s international icons – Sydney Harbour

Bridge, Sydney Opera House and Sydney Harbour.

Nestled in the heart of the historic Rocks District, the

contemporary hotel features 565 elegantly appointed guest

rooms and suites, reflecting the vibrant hues of Sydney

Harbour and beyond. The hotel stands alone in the city for its

unparalleled personal service, and its elevated, unobstructed,

270-degree views of Sydney’s glittering jewels. The Horizon

Club on Level 30 is Australia’s most sophisticated guest

lounge in a five-star hotel. The sumptuously decorated

space has 13m-high windows spanning four storeys, as

Sydney’s sweeping vistas glisten below. Altitude takes dining

experiences to new heights. Nowhere else in Sydney will

you find such an award-winning restaurant hovering high

above the city. The renowned Blu Bar on 36 serves creative

cocktails in a sleek space at the very top of the hotel. And

for those seeking a tranquil escape, CHI, The Spa is an urban

oasis which draws inspiration from ancient Asian healing

philosophies and offers more than 20 specialised treatments.

Let the breathtaking beauty of Sydney envelop you in its

magic at Shangri-La Hotel, Sydney.

176 CUMBERLAND STREET, THE ROCKS, NEW SOUTH WALES 2000, AUSTRALIA - SHANGRI-LA.COM/SYDNEY

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO MAKE A BOOKING, PLEASE CONTACT YOUR CENTURION TRAVEL SERVICE


Shangri-La Hotel, Singapore

A luxurious tropical sanctuary in the city with lush gardens, unparalleled culinary

experiences and family facilities to suit every indulgence

Celebrating it’s 50th Anniversary in 2021, this flagship

property, is where the Shangri-La Group’s legendary Asian

hospitality took root in 1971. Discover a world of luxurious

indulgence at Shangri-La Hotel, Singapore the moment you

step into the striking lobby oasis. Nestled within six hectares

of tropical landscaped gardens, the property comprises

three distinctive wings that house 792 guestrooms and

suites — Zen-inspired interiors at the Tower Wing, a

nature-inspired resort experience at the Garden Wing,

and quintessential luxury at the Valley Wing. Interspersed

between the three wings are lush, open gardens that house

more than 110 varieties of plants, flowers and trees. A mustvisit

is The Orchid, a seven metre-tall, open-air greenhouse

dedicated to Singapore’s national flower. Located in the

heart of the city, the hotel boasts an extensive range of 11

restaurants and bars offering diverse culinary experiences,

unique family facilities including buds by Shangri-La, an

interactive play area for children to explore and learn through

play, and Splash Zone, a new outdoor water playground

and pool, and Chi, The Spa for divine pampering moments.

Escape to this urban sanctuary to indulge in the best of

everything or simply unwind and let the world go by.

22 ORANGE GROVE ROAD, SINGAPORE 258350 - SHANGRI-LA.COM/SINGAPORE/SHANGRILA

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO MAKE A BOOKING, PLEASE CONTACT YOUR CENTURION TRAVEL SERVICE


Luxurious getaway on the iconic Opatija Riviera, Croatia.

Indulge in pure hedonism in the exclusive privacy of Ikador hotel. 16 lavish rooms and suites, impeccable design, state-of-the-art

facilities and bespoke personalised service offer the most unforgettable curated experiences. Discover the exquisite health &

wellness programmes of the luxurious Ikalia Spa centre, savour the unique gastronomic specialties in the famous Nobilion restaurant

and their prestigious Riva Privée chef's table, or simply relax by the pool sipping on signature cocktails at the Riva Lounge.

Level up your experience and embark on an adventure of a lifetime, exploring the Kvarner bay archipelago with Ikador's private

Riva Aquariva yacht! The indulgence beckons you!

www.ikador.com | info@ikador.com | +385 51 207 020


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