A Whole Person Makes the Whole World Better

seanondes

It’s one thing to be a winner, someone who earns titles, trophies, and steps high onto the top of the podium. It’s another thing to be a whole champion -- a person who steps up as part of the whole, who gives more than they take, and who champions awareness and responsibility, and takes action to become a better person for a better world.


FIRST EDITION, SPRING 2020

EDITORIAL: TAYLOR VIENS, LAURA JOAKIMSON

BOOK DESIGN: KIM REIERSON



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

It is impossible to relay everything

that has gone into this book, and

what this book means to me.

Thank you for the abundance of

discussions, edits, strategy sessions

and responses to my millions of

questions. This small book, and its

big mission, would not be possible

without you.


Hilary Peterson

Foreste Peterson

Quinn Delaney

Karoliina Tiuraniemi

Sean Ondes

Suzanne Berens

Christine McCarthy

Peter Presley

Sophie Gormley

Carol Johnston

Jane Mitchell

Karen Mulvaney

Robin Milgrim

Devron Averett

Deb Shell

Daniela Bedoya

Lewis Ryan

Kim Reierson

Taylor Viens

Nicole Kaganowicz

Shifrah Devorah Witt

Kim Ligman

Catherine Bennett

Jill Ferguson

Audrey Washington

Jukka Valkonen

Pam Smilow

Bonnie Olmsted

Alexandra Sharova

Mindy Kaling

Zoe Crene

Laura Joakimson


The payoffs of courage and effort

to create change aren’t always

immediately obvious, but they work

as a mighty tectonic force that can

shift the future in fundamental ways.

-Yvon Chouinard, Patagonia


Dedication 9

Dear Reader 10

Personal Responsibility 28

Self-Love . Role Models . Habits

Social Responsibility 42

Environmental Responsibility 58

Igniting Global Change 78

A Whole Person 80

Whole Person Pledge 82

TABLE OF CONTENTS


FIGHT FOR THE THINGS

THAT YOU CARE ABOUT.

BUT DO IT IN A WAY

THAT WILL LEAD OTHERS

TO JOIN YOU.

-Ruth Bader Ginsberg

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DEDICATION

This book is dedicated to you.

I wrote each page with the hope of encouraging

you to become a whole person who makes the

world better. Being whole starts with caring

about yourself so you can flourish, and give more

to others and the planet. I want YOU to be more

aware of yourself, your relationships with others,

and the world we live in. Being a whole person

means being the best person you can be every day,

and leaving every day a little better than how you

found it.

The world is in a precarious state.

Conditions are dire. Challenges to humanity and

the environment are urgent. The near constant

escalation of hunger, disease, violence, social

injustice, corruption, crime, pollution, and climate

change must stop.

My hope is that each page will open

your eyes and heart, and ignite a sense

of awareness, responsibility and action.

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DEAR READER,

We are living in a time that is critical for

the survival of the planet. It’s a time of

extraordinary opportunities, but also a time of

intense challenges. Many people are thriving,

while too many others are barely surviving,

and have few opportunities. Poverty, hunger,

social injustice, air and water pollution, lack

of education, economic deprivation, political

disruption, corruption, violence, and abuse

threaten millions of people worldwide. And

due to the excessive consumption of natural

resources, to pollution, global warming, and a

general lack of conservation, the environment

is frightfully fragile. Oceans are no longer a

sanctuary.

According to a study conducted by Earth.org,

an organization committed to protecting the

deteriorating conditions of natural ecosystems

worldwide, only 3% of marine areas are

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free from overfishing, over-harvesting, and

pollution from metals, fertilizers, and plastics.

National Geographic found that 91% of all

plastic that has ever been made is not recycled,

and roughly 11 million tons of this plastic

makes its way yearly into our oceans, creating

plastic continents that harm wildlife and their

habitats. The climate crisis is accelerating at

an unprecedented rate, and humanity is not

ready for it.

Because of all of this, I have decided to live

differently, in a way that makes a positive

impact in my every step, conversation, and

action. I want to be part of necessary change,

and challenge the colossal issues facing

humanity and the environment. If we all

decide to take a stand in support of humanity

and the environment, and we band together,

it’s not too late to have a positive impact on

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climate change, social injustice, hate, disease,

hunger, poverty, pollution, and waste, etc.

Dear Reader, I am certain this is not new

news for you or anyone else, yet many people

still choose to do nothing. They don’t engage

or they think their own actions alone cannot

make a difference. Our world needs each and

every person to be an activist. I’ve chosen to

step up and I’m asking you to step up alongside

me, so that we become a whole force that

makes the whole world better.

Zoom out:

The world has 7.8 billion people. Each of us

calls Earth home. It is easy to look around

and see the many challenges—in your family,

in your community, in yourself, at home, at

school, in relationships, at work, in sports, or

in hospitals. Challenges are not confined to

remote villages, to cities, or to the wilderness.

They are everywhere, and they compound

and get worse year by year. In some cases,

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the problems become irreparable. Every day,

scientists speak out saying we are close to the

point of no return, but their pleas are met with

silence. My friends, a single hero is not on the

way, and neither science nor technology alone

can save the world. It’s people who must step

up, individually and as teams.

Zoom in:

As a whole person, I have a role to play in

today’s global crisis. I have seen enough, and

I am compelled to do my part and also inspire

others to get involved. I am impactful. You

are also impactful. Together, we are a powerful

force that can effect positive change. We are

purposeful. We carry intention. We know that

every action is important, from large to small.

We give and we listen. We choose helpful

actions again and again. We are champions

for the environment, and for personal and

social change, knowing this makes the world

better. We value our own and others’ wellbeing;

we live by kindness and inclusiveness.

We take action on behalf of equality, justice,

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and environmental safety for all. As a whole

person we each make the whole world better.

Zoom in further:

By nature, we each have the potential to be a

force for good wherever we are. I vow to work

alongside you to help create positive change

for a better world. Wherever you call home,

and regardless of your age, gender, race,

religion, ethnicity, interests, or physical ability,

you can be someone who greatly cares about

your own and others’ well-being. Someone

who gives more than you take. Someone who

inspires others to join in and be the change.

If you can help improve the world at the local

or global level, I urge you to do so. It starts with

awareness, responsibility, and action. A better

world is based on the power of three tenets of

a whole person:

Awareness

Responsibility

Action

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My Story

For most of my adult life, I strived to be a

champion, and in ways I could never have

imagined, I succeeded. I am a mother, a sports

psychologist, a motivational speaker, an

author, an artist, and an endurance athlete

with nine world championship titles in

off-road triathlon. I lived in a bubble that

allowed me to focus exclusively on my life: my

children’s well-being, their success in school

and sport, our family’s adventure travel, my

own work, my athletic pursuits, and being

a good mother and wife. While my life was

exhilarating and rewarding, something deep

within was not quite right. I was proud of my

accomplishments and loved competing, but I

felt empty.

In late 2010, while at the top of my game,

something shocking happened. As I was

packing my bags for a competition in

Switzerland, I climbed high into my closet

reaching for a gift I imagined the race director

would love—and I fell hard, breaking both

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heels. I was told I might never walk properly

again. Suddenly, the competitive world felt

beyond reach. But as it turned out, it was just

the right thing. The universe had other ideas

for me.

My recovery brought with it time for reflection.

I began to ask difficult questions. Was I a good

mother? A good citizen? A good person? Did

my focused intensity help those around me or

just help me? What motivated me to pursue

intense physical training through my 40s

and 50s? Why was competing so rewarding?

How long would I continue? I took an inward

journey to my most honest, raw self—a place

I hadn’t been in decades. When I met the

person I knew I could and should be, my “inner

champion,” I was overcome. Not by pride, but

by a tidal wave of shame.

I realized the person I was known to be—a

devoted mother, champion of sport, and

inspiration to others—had actually fallen short in

life. I now saw myself as someone who was too

singularly focused, living in a self-absorbed and

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self-indulgent bubble. I was embarrassed. I knew

better. My heels were broken, and now my heart.

I was raised in a privileged household where

we worried about the good life. At age 12, an

inner voice told me if everyone lived as we

did, our world would decline to the point of

no return. The realization led me to become a

vegetarian overnight.

In high school, I studied the prison system and

supported prisoners’ rights, helped develop

independent living skills to further rights for

developmentally disabled populations, engaged

in anti-war activism, and thrived on vegetarian

recipes from Frances Moore Lappé’s Diet for a

Small Planet. But it would be decades later, after

marriage and raising a family, and immersion in

a life of elite sport for our daughters and myself,

that I would once again open my heart and

transition from living the good life to valuing

being good in life.

After my accident, I started seeking out the

work of role models. As a sponsored athlete

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of Patagonia, I respected the work of founder

Yvon Chouinard. His stance on mixing social

and environmental activism with business

and consumer behavior influenced me to

think and live with greater social and

environmental impact. Another of my

sponsors, KIND Healthy Snacks, founded

by Daniel Lubetsky, introduced me to the

“and” philosophy. Lubetsky, like Chouinard,

commits to making a profit “and” being

socially and environmentally responsible. As

I watched these two companies, and other

B Corporations, work to change priorities of

the global corporate landscape, I recognized

that individuals can do the same.

I now realized that caring for myself and

my family in the best way possible means

caring for others. This larger sense of caring

urged me onward, to do everything in my

power to live with social and environmental

consciousness. My love and admiration

of Ruth Bader Ginsburg inspired me to

embrace the Jewish concept and law

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Tikkun Olan, which means to behave and

act constructively and beneficially, so as to

better the world. It was only by embracing

greater responsibility and action that I became

purposeful, effective, and therefore whole.

I know the load of global problems can feel

overwhelming at times, but everyone can do

something. And, if everyone committed to

doing something daily, think how much the

cumulative efforts could effect change!

For me, competing will always be an

adrenaline rush. It is empowering to stand on

a podium and receive a medal. I love being a

winner, but now it is far more important for

me to use my talents, drive, and dedication to

make a positive difference.

Today, I take pride in myself as a person who

is aware, responsible, and takes action by

contributing every day to a better world. I

now identify as a whole person whose lifetime

goal has nothing to do with a trophy or title;

rather, my aim is to live by best practices and

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I created a list of some of the things I do

to benefit myself, my family, humanity,

and the environment. I encourage you to

create your own list. This is a life-affirming

experience that you can share to inspire and

enlist others.

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Commit to 100% ecologically

formulated household products.

Drink water and coffee from a

designated re-usable container.

Subscribe to “Who Gives a Crap”

for all toilet paper and other paper

product needs, supporting the

building of toilets worldwide.

Walk, run, or bicycle rather

than drive to do errands.

Organize paperless billing, online

banking, and all digital news

and magazine subscriptions.

Compliment, smile at, or help a family

member, neighbor, or stranger daily.


Exercise every day to self-energize,

uphold fitness, and generate well-being.

Wear jackets and socks in the house

to keep warm, to prevent using heat.

Turn off all lights until they are needed.

Reduce laundry and dishwasher cycles.

Shop locally vs. online.

Shop Fair Trade.

Eat organic foods.

Reduce or eliminate use of plastic

wrap, containers, and bags.

Eliminate paper napkins and towels.

Use cloth napkins and dish towels

(and then wash those in cold water).

Re-use glass jars for storage.

Consume fewer material

things and focus on upcycling

or donating possessions.

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Grow a drought-resistant garden.

Volunteer at a local food bank.

Give blood.

Mentor someone through the

local school or organizations, such

as Big Brother, Girls Inc., etc.

Proactively request all local

dry cleaners to use non-toxic

cleaning products, and no wire

hangers or plastic covers.

Ask people to turn off their

engines if they’re not driving.

Request local restaurants to replace

large plastic take-out containers

with recyclable containers/boxes, or

supply my own reusable container.

Inspire/encourage conscientiousness

to drive awareness, responsibility,

and action for a better world.

See wholechampion.org.


A WHOLE PERSON

UNDERSTANDS THERE IS

LITTLE SEPARATION

BETWEEN PERSONAL,

SOCIAL, AND

ENVIRONMENTAL

RESPONSIBILITY.

CARING

A B O U T

THE WORLD

IS NOW OUR

RESPONSIBILITY.

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IGNITING

GLOBAL CHANGE

UNLESS SOMEONE LIKE YOU CARES A

‘‘

WHOLE AWFUL LOT, NOTHING IS

GOING TO GET BETTER. IT’S NOT.

- DR. SEUSS ”

YES! WE REALLY

CAN IGNITE CHANGE!

Change happens one person at a time, one

cause at a time, one day at a time. In her book,

Superman’s Not Coming, environmental activist

Erin Brockovich suggests that rather than waiting

for heroes, each one of us has the opportunity and

the responsibility to create positive change.

Change might be choosing healthy food at the

market, and teaching your children the values of

clean diet and regular exercise. Or you might speak

at your kids’ school about gardening and nutrition.

Change might be starting a neighborhood recycled

clothing store that gives 1% for the planet.

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Change might be eating a plant-based diet,

composting to eliminate waste and enrich the

Earth, and having a regular exercise program that’s

inspiring others to change from the inside out.

Change means white parents teaching their

children about racism and Black Lives Matter.

Change means you have the power to encourage

and inspire others, especially those closest to you!

Change builds when one person’s positive habits

and choices inspire a way of life that others adopt.

When one person is open, caring, healthy, and

believes in making a difference, an extraordinary

chain reaction happens.

EVERY PERSON HAS THE

POWER TO IGNITE CHANGE.

ONE PERSON AT A TIME

ONE CAUSE AT A TIME

ONE DAY AT A TIME

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IT

NEEDS

TO BE

US

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IT

NEEDS

TO BE

NOW27


PERSONAL

RESPONSIBILITY

Personal responsibility begins with caring

for yourself. It means being accountable to

yourself. It’s the first step in the incredible

journey called life.

Personal responsibility is awareness, and

wellness in body, mind, and spirit. It generates

self-respect. It means knowing the difference

between right and wrong. Personal

responsibility is self-care, and it fosters selflove

and reinforces consciousness, mental

fortitude, and drive.

Personal responsibility is based on compassion

for one’s self. When we experience compassion

for our self, we extend compassion to others.

Personal responsibility is cultivated—it is not

innate, an evolutionary adaptation, or a simple

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survival response. It is an ability, learned

and constantly honed. It helps us function

optimally by:

Caring about ourselves and others

Making decisions that don’t hurt

other people or the environment

Being accountable to ourselves and

to others in our lives

PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY IS

PERSONAL INTEGRITY, AND EACH OF US

EXPRESSES THIS DIFFERENTLY. IT IS OUR

COMPASS FOR MANAGING OURSELVES.

PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY GUIDES

EVERY RELATIONSHIP WITH

THE OUTSIDE WORLD, BEYOND

FAMILY AND LOCAL COMMUNITY,

AND GUIDES US TO INTERACT IN OUR

COMMUNITIES WITH GRACE, RESPECT,

GENEROSITY, AND PURPOSE.

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Personal responsibility is personal growth,

shaping our relationship to the whole world. It

is a vessel for core values including awareness,

health and well-being, generosity, happiness,

and love.

Personal responsibility is absorbed

throughout our lives from role models,

relationships, experiences, and life

lessons.

PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY

IS NOT RELATED TO

PERFECTION.

RATHER,

IT’S ABOUT EFFORT AND

GIVING TO THE BEST OF OUR

CAPABILITY.

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“before you call yourself

a christian, buddhist,

muslim, hindu or

any other theology,

learn to be human first. ”

-Shannon L. Adler


PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY IS

THE BASIS FOR OTHER ACTIONS

THAT EFFECT SELF, HUMANITY,

AND THE ENVIRONMENT.

These are the elements in my life that I

discovered improve my physical well-being

and ability to thrive. I encourage you to identify

which of these or other elements work for you.

▶ Managing allergies

▶ Basic first aid

▶ Exercise

▶ Fresh air

▶ Hygiene

▶ Hydration

▶ Nutrition

▶ Safety

▶ Self-Defense

▶ Skincare

▶ Sleep

▶ Sunshine

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IT IS THE PATH TO HEALTH,

HAPPINESS, SELF-CONFIDENCE,

SELF-RESPECT, AND AN ABILITY

TO MAKE BETTER LIFE DECISIONS.

These are the elements in my life that I

discovered improve my mental well-being and

ability to thrive. I encourage you to identify

which of these or other elements work for you.

▶ Accountability

▶ Apology

▶ Authenticity

▶ Balance

▶ Boundaries

▶ Choice

▶ Communication

▶ Compassion

▶ Conscientiousness

▶ Discipline

▶ Family

▶ Forgiveness

▶ Friendship

▶ Integrity

▶ Introspection

▶ Joy

▶ Judgment

▶ Kindness

▶ Love

▶ Nature

▶ Nurture

▶ Passion

▶ Potential

▶ Resiliency

▶ Respect

▶ Self-love

▶ Trust

▶ Willpower

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DECISION-MAKING

Our choices have an enormous influence on

our life path, and how we influence others.

HOW DO YOU WANT TO LIVE?

DO YOU CHOOSE TO:

Complain

Blame

Be stuck in the past

Behave as a victim

Feel insecure

Be angry

Hate

Be naïve

Be thoughtless

Be apathetic

Be selfish

Be critical

Be self-destructive

Be passive aggressive

Feel stuck, isolated

Be indifferent

OR DO YOU CHOOSE TO:

Be present

Be positive

Forgive yourself

Forgive others

See your value

Find empathy

Love

Be aware

Care

Take action

Give, share

Be compassionate

Practice self-acceptance

Be honest and direct

Release and believe

Take a stand

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IGNITING

GLOBAL CHANGE

WILL HAPPEN ONE

INSPIRED PERSON

AT A TIME.

All 7.8 billion people

worldwide have their own

particular struggles and

life circumstances. Yet we

can each make a difference

by cultivating awareness,

taking responsibility, and

knowing that our actions

count.

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HABITS

Habits are formed the same way muscles

are trained—through repetition.

It takes roughly twenty-one days to

form a new habit. The brain is a muscle.

It needs training, consistency, and time

to grow. Habits are the building blocks

of your day, your life, and the way you

interact with the world around you.

If you want to create lasting change,

turn your positive actions into habits and

watch the effects multiply.

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IT SEEMS IMPOSSIBLE

UNTIL IT’S DONE. ”

-Nelson Mandela


SELF-LOVE

Self-love is a critical aspect of self-care

and personal responsibility.

Self-love requires you to accept your

individuality. It is knowing your

boundaries and having respect for your

value system. Self-love means showing

compassion toward yourself when you fail

to live up to your ideals. Self-love means

finding grace in hardship. It guides you

when facing life’s toughest challenges.

Self-love means letting inspiration rather

than apathy light your path.

SELF-LOVE IS AUTHENTIC

ACCEPTANCE OF THE BODY, MIND,

AND SPIRIT.

SELF-LOVE HONORS THE

WHOLE PERSON.

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YES!

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PERSONAL

RESPONSIBILITY

LOOKS ...

LIKE THIS

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SOCIAL

RESPONSIBILITY

Once you are grounded with an understanding

of personal responsibility and self-compassion,

you can step outside yourself to extend

that care to other human beings. Social

responsibility is using our best talents and

abilities to champion causes we know will

help other people.

Kindness, compassion, and a desire for justice

for those experiencing oppression are great

ways to begin. Generating awareness about

the needs of other people might start with

a simple question: How are you doing? How

are you feeling? Is there anything I can do to

help? Can I show you something I learned that

helped me and also might help you?

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Support can be shown in many different

ways: lending a hand, spending time, and

active listening.

Social responsibility is exploring the many

ways to champion change, which means

staying informed of current events as well as

local and global issues. Social responsibility

is turning awareness into action. It is getting

involved with a meaningful cause. It is

knowing that a little help is better than none.

Social responsibility is demonstrated by

individuals who use their voice, platform,

and influence for the greater good and

recruit others to get involved as well.

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Social Responsibility is building an

awareness of and contributing to global issues

as they affect humanity and society. Donating

your time, sharing resources (materials,

information, financial contributions), speaking

out, voting, or doing whatever you can do

to turn your passion into positive change is

practicing social responsibility!

The world needs everyone to live more

consciously and to care about their own

and others’ well-being. The world needs

every child, mother, father, sister, brother,

student, teacher, athlete, coach, doctor, artist,

scientist, lawmaker, celebrity, police officer,

steel-worker, truck driver, janitor, technician,

firefighter, entrepreneur, explorer, and leader

to be a champion of change for a better world...

TO BE KIND.

TO PAY ATTENTION.

TO TAKE RESPONSIBILITY.

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OUR LIVES BEGIN TO END

THE DAY WE BECOME SILENT

ABOUT THINGS THAT

MATTER.

-Martin Luther King


Social Responsibility is the willingness to feel,

behave, and contribute to the benefit of society

at large. Do you have the energy, awareness,

life force, i.e. purpose, and commitment to

inspire best practices for the benefit of a better

world? Do you contribute in a positive and

productive way to the larger society? There

are a multitude of challenges in our society,

today we must all be aware of the challenges

and find a cause(s) to champion.

Be informed. Read newspapers, connect to

online media, and listen to local public radio

stations to be aware of current events in the

world.

Take Action. Find a cause you are passionate

about, and get involved. Learn to turn your

passion into a contribution.

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Examples of pressing social issues

affecting humanity today:

▶ Animal rights

▶ Cyberbullying

▶ Depression

▶ Domestic violence

▶ Gender discrimination

▶ Gender roles

▶ Gerrymandering

▶ Human trafficking

▶ LGBTQ rights

▶ Obesity

▶ Police brutality

▶ Racial discrimination

▶ Refugee crises

▶ Religious freedom

▶ School-to-prison pipeline

▶ Separation of immigrant families

▶ Substance abuse

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ROLE MODELS

A whole person is a natural role model and

someone who has integrated simple yet

powerful ways to create a better world. A

role model is a positive force—someone who

lives with little separation between personal,

social, and environmental responsibility, who

inspires others by their example of how to

give back and how to save the planet. Our

aspirations may be global, but each of us

starts with a drive towards self-development

and making conscious choices.

Role models are everywhere!

They are you, me, athletes, actors, singers,

writers, innovators, business icons, and

spiritual leaders. Role models can also be

children.

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Role models learn how to use their unique

circumstances and abilities to best impact the

world. A whole person accepts responsibility

for both finding positive role models, and

living as a role model to others.

DO WHAT YOU

CAN DO...AS

LONG AS YOU

ARE DOING!

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MALALA YOUSAFZAI

As a teenager in Pakistan, Malala took a stand

against the Taliban’s banning of girls’ education.

After surviving a violent attack, Malala continues to

fight for every girl’s right to receive an education.

NELSON MANDELA

A civil-rights leader in South Africa who spent

twenty-seven years in prison. He fought for people

of all races to have basic human rights, and later

became president of South Africa from 1994 to 1999.

MARY TERESA BOJAXHIU, “MOTHER TERESA”

This Catholic saint dedicated her life to

compassionately serving those suffering from

disease, poverty and starvation.

MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.

Known for his contributions to the American

civil rights movement. His most famous work

is his “I Have a Dream” (1963) speech, in which

he spoke of his dream of a United States that

is void of segregation and racism. King also

advocated for nonviolent protest.

GRETA THUNBERG

A teenage Swedish climate activist responsible

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for leading an international movement to

fight climate change.

YVON CHOUINARD

He changed American business by using his

company, Patagonia, as a model of “sustainable

industry” that neither harms the environment

nor grows so quickly that its own viability is

jeopardized. Fully committed to a healthier

planet, he founded 1% for the Planet, an

international organization whose business and

individual members contribute at least one

percent of their annual sales or personal income

to environmental causes.

RICHARD BRANSON

As the founder of the Virgin companies, multiple

non-profits, and as one of the pioneers of the

B Corporation movement, he stands at the helm of

corporate social and environmental responsibility,

where activism is integral to business.

STEFANI GERMANOTTA, “LADY GAGA”

Leveraged her musical fame to found Born This

Way, a non-profit organization that supports

the mental health of young people and aims to

create a more kind and brave world.

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SOCIAL

RESPONSIBILITY

LOOKS ...

LIKE THIS

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BE

THE

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CH

AN

GE

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ENVIRONMENTAL

RESPONSIBILITY

Environmental issues are defined as problems

with the planet’s systems (air, water, soil, etc.)

that have developed as a result of human

interference or mistreatment of the planet. Our

planet is on the brink of a severe environmental

crisis, making all of us vulnerable to existing

and potential disasters.

Here are the challenges: The Earth’s natural

resources are being depleted faster than they

can be replenished. Humans are increasingly

polluting the oceans with plastic, exploiting

the land in search of fossil fuels, and releasing

toxic chemicals and greenhouse gases into

the air from our factories, our homes, and

methods of transportation. These gases wrap

around the planet like a blanket and make

everything hotter. A hotter planet leads to

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RESPONSIBILITY

IT’S TIME TO WAKE UP THE

HERO WITHIN YOU,

AND NOW IS THE TIME TO

START. ULTIMATELY, IT’S WE,

THE PEOPLE, WHO WILL

SAVE THE DAY..

-Erin Brockovich


rising temperatures of the oceans and the

Earth’s surface causing natural disasters that

include unnatural patterns of precipitation

such as flash floods, hurricanes, wildfires,

drought, excessive snow or desertification,

and melting of polar ice caps. This can cause a

rise in sea levels and make it harder for animals

to find places to live. The huge production of

waste due to our hyper-consumption is also a

major threat to the environment.

It’s time to take responsibility for our messes

NOW! Environmental Responsibility is

essential. We can each do our part and make

a positive difference.

ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY

IS CREATING A LIFESTYLE THAT

INCLUDES ECOLOGICALLY-MINDED

HABITS.

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In 2000, the movie Erin Brockovich featured then

unknown a legal assistant who helped to win a

major environmental lawsuit against PG&E. Since

then, thousands of Americans have written letters

to Brockovich asking them for support in fighting

for cleaner drinking water in their communities.

She built a website where she maps drinking water

pollution across the United States. Although she

is now a well known environmental activists who

travels across the United States shining a light

on water safety issues, she writes that today’s

environmental challenges are so enormous no

one person can solve them.

RESPONSIBILITY

IT IS OUR COLLECTIVE AND

INDIVIDUAL RESPONSIBILITY

TO PRESERVE AND TEND

TO THE ENVIRONMENT IN

WHICH WE ALL LIVE.

She writes “I was a broke, single mom with

dyslexia trying to make ends meet. I was -The the least Dalai Lama

likely person to become anyone’s hero, but I was

willing to listen to other people’s stories and use

common sense to guide me.”

Here’s the challenge: humans are increasingly

polluting the oceans with plastic, exploiting the

land in search of fossil fuels, and releasing toxic

chemicals into the air – and at a rate so high, the

’s natural resources are being depleted faster

than they can be replenished. As a result, we are


Examples of ecologically-minded habits:

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▶ Reduce, reuse, recycle, repurpose.

▶ Think hard before you

discard. Even clothing!

▶ Donate, share, resell unwanted

and unworn clothing.

▶ Replace all single-use coffee

cups with a reusable mug.

▶ Eliminate plastic bottles from

the home, from your life.

▶ Live life without plastic.

▶ Unplug electronics that aren’t in use.

▶ Turn lights out when you leave a room.

▶ Install LED light bulbs.

▶ Go paperless.

▶ Use cloth napkins, not paper.

▶ Opt out of paper billing.

▶ Use email and don’t print.

▶ Clean up your surroundings.

▶ No litter, no dumping, no open sewage,

no car exhaust, no dirty smoke or fires.

▶ Turn off the faucet when brushing

teeth and washing face and hands.

▶ Trade in your fuel burning car.


▶ Choose electric or manual: ride

a bike, scooter, carpool, walk,

Rollerblade, skateboard.

▶ Drive ecologically: to spare the air

and to conserve gasoline. (50 mph

uses 30% less fuel and produces

40% less emissions than 70 mph)

▶ Use public transportation.

▶ Fly less. Or buy carbon offsets.

▶ Purchase ecological appliances: water

conscious shower-head, washerdryer,

dishwasher, toilet, etc.

(Products bearing the Energy Star

label are reliably efficient).

▶ Avoid aerosols for deodorant, hair

spray, or cleaning products.

▶ Make your own cleaning products: kitchen

cleaners, toothpaste, facial cleansers, etc.

Obtain alternatives for shampoo, toothpaste,

deodorant, and cleaning bottles.

▶ Support organic farmers by

eating seasonal foods.

▶ Shop locally. Go to Farmers’ Markets.

▶ Support sustainable brands.

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64


RECYCLING ISN’T

ENOUGH

Sometimes people think that because they

separate their trash, glass, metals, plastics,

paper, and household vegetative waste and

put it on the curb weekly or bi-weekly for

municipal pick-up, that they are sufficiently

contributing to a healthier planet.

Recycling does have some tangible ecological

benefits. But the fact is, if that’s all you are

doing, it really isn’t enough. Recycling should

be just one tool in your environmental toolbox

to fight against overconsumption, pollution,

and global warming.

The first thing to remember is that recycling is

a business and industry, not a service—which

means that the business will only do what is

most cost-effective. Many of the things that

go to recycling centers are contaminated and

then end up being sent to landfill sites. Or

take the example of glass, which is in theory,

65


infinitely recyclable. It costs less to make

new glass than it does to make things from

recycled glass, so many manufacturers won’t

bother with it. This is how glass and other

recyclable materials end up in landfills.

Recycling takes a lot of energy, including fossil

fuels, as some of the recycled products (like

plastics) end up being burnt. Recycling is a

greener way of dealing with waste but it should

be used as a last resort, after cutting down

on consumption and supporting sustainable

manufacturing in what we do consume.

So please continue to separate your trash,

glass, metals, plastics, paper, and household

vegetative waste (or compost it yourself), and

do it well. But don’t stop there.

REMEMBER THE 3R’S: REDUCE, REUSE, RECYCLE.

That’s the order of importance. Reducing your waste

should always be the top priority! Next, reusing an

item—even once—before disposing of it makes a

huge difference. Lastly, recycle responsibly once

you have exhausted all other options.

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THERE IS NO SUCH THING

AS ‘AWAY.’ WHEN WE THROW

ANYTHING AWAY IT MUST

GO SOMEWHERE..

-Annie Leonard


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CLIMATE CHANGE

IS REAL

An industry that has not been discussed as often

as it should be for its role in climate change

is fashion. The environmental impact of fast

fashion strains our world. An overproduction of

cheap clothing relies on fossil fuels, produces

toxic chemicals, causes water pollution, and

adds to landfills.

Consumer habits around fashion also continue

to pressure the industry to cut costs and time

for production, creating unhealthy working

environments. Companies like Patagonia, Worn

Wear, ThredUP, Allbirds, Athleta, Eileen Fisher,

and Prana have led the charge in educating

consumers on the ecological need for

sustainable clothing options. We can all rethink

new ways to refresh our wardrobe and stay

fashionable: share, resell, trade, and shop your

closet. If you have the financial means, support

whole or sustainable companies. Everyone

can do their part: share, resell. Don’t waste.

Today, every whole company and consumer

recognizes the importance of doing their part.

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70


RE-THINKING

WATER USAGE

Water is the single most important nutrient of

life. The human body is approximately 70 percent

water. Brain tissue is 70 percent water. Blood is

70 percent water. Earth’s surface is 70 percent

water.

Without water, metabolic and physiological

processes within the body cannot occur. All

biochemical reactions in the body require

water. Therefore it’s important to conserve this

precious resource and support the right to safe

drinking water for everyone.

Only 2.5% of Earth’s water is fresh, so this makes

it important to consider how to conserve water

in your daily habits. Consider short showers

and turning off the water when you brush

your teeth or wash your face. You can make a

difference by making water-efficient choices

when purchasing shower heads, faucet heads,

toilets, dishwashers and washing machines.

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ENVIRONMENTAL

RESPONSIBILITY

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THESE CONCEPTS MAY

NOT BE ENTIRELY

NEW, BUT OUR ACTIONS

CAN BE.

There’s no better way to ignite global change

than by example. Take care of yourself. Eat

well. Exercise. Give more than you take.

Establish purposeful habits. Care no matter

what.

Why? When you champion life, you

champion the whole world. Embracing

greater responsibility and action leads to

a sense of wholeness.

A whole person understands and respects

the escalating threats to humanity and to the

environment.

A whole person finds a way to step up, and

that benefits the whole world.

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ABOVE ALL ELSE,

A WHOLE PERSON:

1.

Seizes opportunities to take

positive action in one’s own life

and the lives of others.

2.

Chooses to act to benefit humanity,

the environment, and whole world.

3.

Is constantly growing in awareness

that there is little separation between

personal, social, and environmental

responsibility.

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IGNITING CHANGE ONE W

Dear Reader, after reading this book, you know

as well as I do that you are a whole person when

you learn to cultivate personal responsibility,

stay authentic to yourself, become accountable

for your actions, embrace self-love, and love for

others.

A whole person champions positive activity and

inspires everyone around them to do the same.

You are a whole person when you share your

journey with others and act with compassion

and generosity to help those in need.

A whole person uses their platform not just

to benefit themselves, but to champion other

people and the environment.

A whole person inspires their family, community,

and culture to become whole, too.

78


HOLE PERSON AT A TIME

How does a whole person make the

whole world better?

Through awareness, responsibility, and

action.

Through care, intention, and purposeful

action.

A whole person grows in awareness of

escalating threats to humanity and the whole

world.

A whole person takes responsibility to

help the greater good, by making conscious

choices.

A whole person takes action that inspires

others to make a better world, too.

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A WHOLE PERSON

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A WHOLE PERSON

MAKES THE WHOLE

WORLD BETTER

We hope this book inspires conviction and

ignites global change. The world needs people

who are aware, who care, and who are ready

and willing to take action to help.

This philosophy can benefit every person,

ocean, river, lake, mountain, glacier, meadow,

and forest. We have the opportunity to

live purposefully and to make a difference.

Participating in whole practices helps to

create a global community of individuals and

organizations championing positive change.

82


PLEDGE

I recognize that our world requires a

monumental shift, and being a whole person

makes the whole world better through

greater awareness, responsibility, and action.

I understand the time is now to champion the

well-being of myself, other people, and the

whole planet.

I PLEDGE TO DO MY BEST

TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

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WHOLE PERSON GLOSSARY

ACCOUNTABILITY:

Holding yourself to the truth, your word, promise,

or commitment.

AUTHENTICITY:

Being true to yourself by acting according to your

personal values. Applying your unique internal

vision to the external world.

AWARENESS:

Consciousness, or knowledge of existence, is

like light—it illuminates a situation or state of

mind. From this springs awareness (knowing the

difference between right and wrong). A whole

champion’s awareness motivates them to fight

wrong in the world, and to work for well-being on

a personal, local, and global scale.

CARE:

Attention to providing what’s necessary for the

health, welfare, maintenance, and protection of

others. Care is taking time to complete something

correctly and a focus on avoiding needless damage

or risk.

CHAMPION:

A champion stands up for a cause and sees it

through to completion. To champion a sport,

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a cause, or an ideology, you need to be an

unstoppable force until your goal is achieved.

A whole champion is driven to achieve, and is

unrelenting in accomplishing good for humanity

and the environment, not just the self. A whole

champion leverages their achievements and most

compelling ideas to support the greater good.

KINDNESS:

The quality of being friendly, generous, and

considerate. Kindness is the foundation for making

positive, whole change.

ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY:

A conscious mindset that the planet needs care,

protection, recovery, and an opportunity to

flourish in its natural state. Embrace a lifestyle

that nourishes and champions the environment.

Purposeful effort to do one’s part for planet Earth:

Minimize your ecological footprint through

sustainable, recyclable, “green” practices and

products that protect Mother Nature. Treat

the environment the way you would a family

member or a friend.

INCLUSIVITY:

An open attitude welcoming all people,

regardless of age, gender, race, ethnicity, religion,

85


socioeconomic background, or geographic

location. Inclusivity means practicing openmindedness,

respect, tolerance, social justice,

and love for other human beings.

MOTIVATION:

An inner force that moves you physically, mentally,

and spiritually. It can come from a voice in your

head, emotion in your heart, or drive in your gut

to do the right thing.

NETWORK:

A system or group of people. If we zoom out, we

can see that through interconnectivity, everything

around us is potentially a network that can be

used in positive ways to improve the world.

PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY:

Caring for oneself by holding oneself accountable.

It’s self-love, self-care, and self-work—an

investment in personal development. It’s

awareness and balance of mind, body, and spirit.

Personal responsibility leads to the pride and

empowerment that result from doing one’s best.

RESPONSIBILITY:

A decision to start thinking, feeling, and acting

with awareness and intention. It is a conscious

effort to do the right thing, in large or small ways,

for the greater good.

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SELF-CARE:

Kindness, acceptance, and confidence in yourself

throughout life. Understanding your unique

qualities and characteristics. Practicing self-care

means becoming a champion of yourself through

love, compassion, patience, and authentic,

passionate pursuits.

SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY:

Caring for oneself and others; taking action to

benefit other people. Awareness, compassion, and

action—social responsibility means giving more

than you take. It could be as simple as offering

to carry someone’s groceries, or as involved as

participating in a food drop to a village stricken

by natural disaster or war. It can manifest as

organizing a peaceful march to benefit a worthy

cause.

UPCYCLING:

A form of creative recycling centered around

reusing items in your everyday life to decrease

your ecological footprint.

WHOLE:

A state of harmony, completion, or resolution

ultimately achieved by a group effort that begins

with a single person. Wholeness means practicing

awareness, responsibility, and taking action for

a better world. It’s taking personal, social, and

environmental responsibility for the planet.

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“BE KIND WHENEVER POSSIB


LE. IT IS ALWAYS POSSIBLE.”

-THE DALAI LAMA



WHOLE CHAMPION

FOUNDATION

Whole Champion Foundation, a 501c3 non-profit

organization, has been granted full permission by the

author, Barbara Edelston Peterson, to borrow content

from this book.


As a sports psychologist, motivational speaker,

author, and former marketing executive,

Barbara Edelston Peterson understands the power of

education, leadership, and human momentum. She

is a nine-time world champion in cross triathlon, and

recently founded a non-profit, the Whole Champion

Foundation, to promote global change. Her mission is

to revitalize the concepts of whole and champion so

they may be embraced globally to help the planet and

its inhabitants prosper. By influencing networks of

people championing positive action, a whole person

helps to heal the whole world.

ISBN 990 7-0-3233309-22-0

9 9077011 3233309

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