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THE STORY SO FAR. 50 YEARS OF THE AMERICAN UNIVERSITY OF ROME

Table of contents PART 1: THE ORIGINS Introduction by Dr. Lisa Colletta Discovering AUR’s Origins Founder Fact Sheets Prominent Connections of AUR’s Founders PART 2: 50 YEARS OF HISTORY The AUR Identity Rome: A Classroom Without Walls From a Study Abroad Institution to a Resident-Based University in the Heart of Rome AUR Commencement Ceremonies A Hub of World Citizens According to Myth AUR Is its People AUR Chairs of the Board of Trustees AUR Presidents Honorary Degree Recipients Since 1994 People Who Have Left an Unforgettable Trace at AUR The Locations of AUR AUR’s Neighborhood PART 3: THE FUTURE Janus Conclusion by Dr. Richard Hodges: AUR’s Brave New World

Table of contents

PART 1: THE ORIGINS
Introduction by Dr. Lisa Colletta
Discovering AUR’s Origins
Founder Fact Sheets
Prominent Connections of AUR’s Founders

PART 2: 50 YEARS OF HISTORY
The AUR Identity
Rome: A Classroom Without Walls
From a Study Abroad Institution to a Resident-Based University in the Heart of Rome
AUR Commencement Ceremonies
A Hub of World Citizens
According to Myth

AUR Is its People
AUR Chairs of the Board of Trustees
AUR Presidents
Honorary Degree Recipients Since 1994
People Who Have Left an Unforgettable Trace at AUR

The Locations of AUR

AUR’s Neighborhood

PART 3: THE FUTURE
Janus
Conclusion by Dr. Richard Hodges: AUR’s Brave New World

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Published in Italy in 2019<br />

on the occasion of<br />

the <strong>50</strong>th Anniversary of<br />

The American University of Rome<br />

The American University of Rome<br />

Via Pietro Roselli, 4<br />

00153 – Rome, Italy<br />

www.aur.edu<br />

©The American University of Rome<br />

Cover Illustration and Design<br />

by Craig Coulthard<br />

Copy-edited by James R. Mathieu<br />

Design by Land Ho®<br />

Printed independently and bound<br />

by PixartPrinting Italy<br />

2


Flag bearers and current students<br />

at the 2017 Commencement<br />

Ceremony at Villa Aurelia.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

3


6<br />

(Image on previous page) AUR<br />

students at an Art History on-site<br />

class at the Arch of Constantine<br />

in 1997. Photo from AUR archives.


<strong>THE</strong> <strong>STORY</strong> <strong>SO</strong> <strong>FAR</strong><br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong><br />

<strong>THE</strong> <strong>AMERICAN</strong> <strong>UNIVERSITY</strong> <strong>OF</strong> <strong>ROME</strong><br />

By Laura Estrada Prada<br />

Art History, Class of 2016<br />

Alumni & Development Coordinator<br />

With contributions by<br />

Dr. Lisa Colletta<br />

Dr. Richard Hodges, OBE<br />

7


Foreword<br />

by Laura Estrada Prada<br />

It was an oddly warm November when<br />

I started working in the Alumni and<br />

Development Office of The American<br />

University of Rome (AUR). As a student,<br />

I had never really been to the President’s<br />

Office. In a heartbeat, I was now part of it:<br />

a familiar and yet completely alien place.<br />

A few weeks into my new job, Maurizia<br />

Garzia (AUR’s Chief of Staff) called me<br />

into her office and showed me four scruffy<br />

boxes that sat in a corner. “Whenever you<br />

have time, Laura, those boxes contain the<br />

photographic archives of AUR. It would be<br />

great if we could organize them. It’s not<br />

urgent, but when you can, here they are.”<br />

The task immediately sparked my curiosity,<br />

but the boxes lay there for months as other<br />

department tasks were always prioritized.<br />

Yet every time I glanced over at them,<br />

the desire to open them and delve into<br />

the stories contained there was a difficult<br />

temptation to ignore. Finally, after about<br />

a year, when talk of the <strong>50</strong>th Anniversary<br />

was initiated, I had a chance to push it<br />

up on the to-do-list. I was given a small<br />

room in Building B where I could spread<br />

out the material and start making some<br />

sense of it. I called the room “The Cave,”<br />

mainly because, very much like Alice in<br />

Wonderland, when I went down there, time<br />

stopped and I traveled through a rabbit<br />

hole, eager to understand and connect<br />

the apparently unrelated images.<br />

My first Friday at “The Cave” was both<br />

marvelous and frustrating. As I took<br />

the material out of the boxes, I realized<br />

two important things: 1) there was no<br />

apparent order or reasoning behind<br />

the documentation; 2) I was not the<br />

first to attempt the organization and<br />

understanding of it all. I decided to ignore<br />

my first realization with the hope that it<br />

was just an overwhelmed first impression.<br />

The second realization, though, gave<br />

me mixed feelings. A part of me felt like<br />

one of those epic knights at the mouth<br />

of a dragon’s cave, surrounded by the<br />

skeletons of those that had attempted<br />

the same foolish endeavor. Another<br />

part of me—the adult one—was keen to<br />

accept the challenge.<br />

My adventure started and as I grasped for<br />

any indications of time and space amongst<br />

the heaps, questions arose, answers slowly<br />

appeared, only to lead to more questions.<br />

Soon, as if I had been digging through<br />

my own family’s pictures, I started to<br />

understand the trajectory of AUR as if<br />

it were a long-lost cousin. Like a child,<br />

its first years were the most thoroughly<br />

8


documented: the first steps, the first faces,<br />

the first joys. From 1970 to the early 1980s<br />

there is an incredible amount of film strips<br />

and pictures taken by one of our founders,<br />

David T. Colin.<br />

In the late 1980s, “puberty” arrived<br />

and the pictures diminished. Bits and<br />

pieces of memories and Commencements<br />

here and there, but no actual visual story.<br />

It’s only with the new millennium that we<br />

start having a more thorough photographic<br />

documentation of the activities and<br />

people of AUR.<br />

In an attempt to coherently connect the<br />

dots, I also looked into the first documents<br />

available about the University. I had not<br />

anticipated that the story of AUR would<br />

turn out to be so much more interesting<br />

and complicated than the version of events<br />

that, until now, we believed to be true.<br />

So here we are. AUR is now in its <strong>50</strong>th<br />

year and this book is but a sketch of<br />

its growth and trajectory. May this book,<br />

and this celebratory year, be the initiation of<br />

a more thorough comprehension of our<br />

past, so that we can conscientiously<br />

embrace the future.<br />

Fontana di Trevi. Creative<br />

Commons CC0 1.0 Universal<br />

Public Domain Image.<br />

9


10<br />

AUR students with camera in<br />

1975. Photo from AUR archives.


This book would not have been possible without<br />

the many people that helped me gather<br />

and organize the information.<br />

Amy Baldonieri, who supported every step of it<br />

and facilitated both the research as well as the<br />

production. Dr. Richard Hodges, who believed<br />

I could do it, even when my anxieties seemed<br />

insurmountable.<br />

Ellie Johnson, who is my partner in crime with<br />

all the production and deciphering of AUR’s past.<br />

Harry Greiner, who is always immensely honest<br />

and directed me toward ideas that worked.<br />

I wrote the book with Harry’s voice in the back<br />

of my head telling me, “Don’t make it boring,”<br />

so I hope it’s not too dull of a read.<br />

Maurizia Garzia, who allowed me to delve into<br />

the archives to look for missing pieces.<br />

Alexandra Tesoro Miller, David Colin Jr.,<br />

Joan Carpenter, Margaret Melady, Andrew Palmieri,<br />

Rosa Fusco, Prof. Silvano Susi, Franziska Wallner,<br />

Mary Handley, and the many others who offered<br />

their time and memories.<br />

Dr. Roderick Bailey, Dr. Mauro Canali, Lisette Matano<br />

and Nathaly Campusano-Agüero for helping search<br />

and gather pivotal information for the reconstruction<br />

of historical facts. Last but certainly not least,<br />

Erin Chase, Abigail Hungate, and Mark Ozella,<br />

current students and Student Trainees in our office,<br />

who methodically organized and cataloged<br />

it all. Without them, this adventure would have<br />

lasted a century and I would have given up on it.<br />

11


Table<br />

of contents<br />

PART <strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

Introduction by Dr. Lisa Colletta<br />

Chapter 1: Discovering AUR’s Origins<br />

Founder Fact Sheets<br />

Prominent Connections of AUR’s Founders<br />

PART <strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

Chapter 2: The AUR Identity<br />

Rome<br />

A Classroom Without Walls<br />

From a Study Abroad Institution to a Resident-Based<br />

University in the Heart of Rome<br />

AUR Commencement Ceremonies<br />

A Hub of World Citizens<br />

According to Myth<br />

12


Chapter 3: AUR Is its People<br />

AUR Chairs of the Board of Trustees<br />

AUR Presidents<br />

Honorary Degree Recipients Since 1994<br />

People Who Have Left an Unforgettable Trace at AUR<br />

Robert Henry Evans<br />

Terry Rossi Kirk<br />

James Walston<br />

Seniority Honor Roll by Years of Service<br />

Chapter 4: The Locations of AUR<br />

Via della Mercede, 21 (Colin property)<br />

Viale delle Milizie, 6<br />

Via Marche, 54 (Scala B, 5th floor)<br />

Piazza Sallustio, 24<br />

Via Sallustiana, 1A<br />

Via Collina, 24<br />

Via Pietro Roselli, 4<br />

Chapter 5: AUR’s Neighborhood<br />

The Janiculum Hill and Monteverde<br />

PART <strong>THE</strong> FUTURE<br />

Chapter 6: Janus<br />

Conclusion by Dr. Richard Hodges:<br />

AUR’s Brave New World<br />

13


PART I.<br />

<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

<strong>THE</strong><br />

ORIGINS<br />

14


<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

PART I.<br />

Introduction<br />

Dr. Lisa Colletta<br />

15


PART I.<br />

<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

Introduction<br />

1.<br />

1969 was a year of tumult and change.<br />

The Apollo 11 space mission successfully<br />

landed the first man on the moon,<br />

and Neil Armstrong’s famous phrase,<br />

“That’s one small step for man, and one<br />

giant leap for mankind,” entered the<br />

world’s collective vocabulary. In America,<br />

Woodstock attracted more than 3<strong>50</strong>,000<br />

rock-n-roll fans, members of the cult<br />

led by Charles Manson murdered five people<br />

in Los Angeles, 2<strong>50</strong>,000 people marched<br />

on Washington to protest the Vietnam<br />

War, PBS was established, Seiko sold the<br />

first quartz wristwatch, the first Automatic<br />

Teller Machine was installed, and the<br />

microprocessor was invented, opening<br />

the way for the computer revolution<br />

that followed.<br />

16<br />

1. Image of the interior of the Banca<br />

Nazionale dell’Agricoltura in Milan,<br />

after the explosion - Piazza Fontana,<br />

12 December 1969. Image shot in Italy<br />

and declared Public Domain.<br />

2. Young David T. Colin<br />

in Capri in the late 1930s.<br />

Image courtesy of David<br />

Colin, Jr.


<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

PART I.<br />

Around the world, the Beatles played<br />

their last public performance on the roof<br />

of Apple Records, the album Abbey Road<br />

was released, the first Concorde test<br />

flight was conducted in France, enormous<br />

student protests rocked cities around the<br />

globe, the PLO (Palestinian Liberation<br />

Organization) was founded, and a coup in<br />

Libya deposed King Idris.<br />

In Italy, 1969 was a year marked by tension<br />

and terrorism. Throughout that year, a<br />

series of explosives were detonated on<br />

trains and in stations. But, on December<br />

12, 1969, “la madre di tutte le stragi,” or<br />

“the mother of all massacres,” happened<br />

when a bomb exploded in the Banca<br />

Nazionale dell’Agricoltura in Milan, killing<br />

17 people and injuring 88. Orchestrated<br />

by Neo-Fascists to discredit the anarchist<br />

movement, the event ushered in the anni<br />

di piombo, the years of lead, definitively<br />

ending nearly two decades of economic,<br />

cultural, and creative growth in Italy. Before<br />

these tragic events, Italy was known for<br />

la dolce vita, the sweet life: a growing<br />

standard of living, elegant fashion, iconic<br />

products like the Vespa and Fiat, a thriving<br />

film industry, and a beautiful playground<br />

for celebrities and aristocrats.<br />

in, and a safeguard against the growing<br />

anxiety and polarization that threatened it.<br />

Popular lore has it that AUR was founded as<br />

a “school for spies,” and given the turbulent<br />

times in which it was established, one can<br />

understand how the story started. The<br />

United States was alarmed by Italy’s shift<br />

to the left during the sixties and seventies<br />

and was actively, albeit covertly, involved<br />

in preventing the country from going<br />

Communist. However, the factual evidence<br />

suggests that if there was a political<br />

motivation for establishing The American<br />

University of Rome (and surely there was),<br />

it had more to do with spreading American<br />

ideology and cultural values than actively<br />

training spies.<br />

Introduction<br />

In this combination of hope, energy, and<br />

fear, The American University of Rome<br />

(AUR) was born. The brain child of three<br />

individuals, who all had complicated<br />

wartime experiences and a love of Italy,<br />

AUR was the embodiment of the belief in<br />

progress that the post-war boom ushered<br />

2.<br />

17


PART I.<br />

<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

Introduction<br />

The three founders—David Tyrone Colin,<br />

Giorgio Alfred Tesoro, and Lisa Sergio—all<br />

shared the belief that education was the<br />

only way to prevent the world from tearing<br />

itself apart for a third time in a century.<br />

International understanding, firmly rooted<br />

in American democratic values, was the<br />

key to a peaceful and productive future.<br />

All three had also had fraught wartime<br />

experiences and knew intimately, though<br />

in varying ways, the realities of Fascist<br />

ideology and the trauma of war. Also,<br />

in varying ways, they all understood the<br />

shifting political sands in America and<br />

Europe after the end of World War II,<br />

when old allies become new enemies, and<br />

political opinions harden into blinkered<br />

thought, violence, and oppression. The<br />

creation of The American University of<br />

Rome was their positive response to the<br />

negative forces that had shaped their<br />

earlier lives and a way to “reclaim” the<br />

country they loved.<br />

American negotiations with Axis countries<br />

allowed him to secure a passage on the<br />

Swedish steamer Drottningholm, which<br />

sailed from Lisbon on May 22, 1942, and<br />

arrived in New York on June 1.<br />

3.<br />

David T. Colin was born in St. Louis, Missouri,<br />

with, according to his son, “an itch to see<br />

the world.” He traveled widely, working as a<br />

journalist and international correspondent<br />

for several US newspapers. In December<br />

of 1941, when Italy officially declared war<br />

on the United States, Colin was a civilian<br />

member of the US National Broadcasting<br />

Company in Rome.<br />

As an American on Italian soil, Colin was<br />

considered an “enemy alien” and was most<br />

probably interned in one of the pensioni<br />

or hotels where American journalists and<br />

diplomats stayed after December 11, 1941.<br />

3. David T. Colin in Rome in 1938.<br />

Image courtesy of David Colin, Jr.<br />

18


<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

PART I.<br />

Introduction<br />

4.<br />

4-5. David T. Colin’s account of the situation<br />

in Italy, just after his return to the United<br />

States. JTA Daily News Bulletin, Vol. IX – No.<br />

125, Jewish Telegraphic Agency, New York, NY.<br />

19


PART I.<br />

<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

Introduction<br />

5.<br />

20


<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

PART I.<br />

6.<br />

Introduction<br />

6. Swedish steamer SS Drottningholm,<br />

Courtesy of the Boston Public Library,<br />

Leslie Jones Collection.<br />

21


PART I.<br />

<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

Introduction<br />

7.<br />

22<br />

7- 8. Associated Press, “948 Axis Diplomats<br />

Sail for Portugal in Exchange Agreement,”<br />

The Evening Star, Washington, DC, May 8,<br />

1942. P. A-15. Source: NewspaperArchive.com.


<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

PART I.<br />

Introduction<br />

8.<br />

23


PART I.<br />

<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

Introduction<br />

After his return to the United States, Colin<br />

enrolled in the U.S. Army and was sent<br />

back to Italy as a member of the Office<br />

of Strategic Services (OSS). In October of<br />

1944, Colin was captured on the border<br />

between France and Italy and was sent<br />

to prison in Munich, Germany. After six<br />

harsh months in Munich, he was transferred<br />

to Fort Zinna, at Torgau, to await trial<br />

before the German Supreme Military<br />

Court for “crimes committed against the<br />

German Army.”<br />

The encounter between Soviet and<br />

American troops on the Elbe River near<br />

Torgau on April 25, 1945 saved his life.<br />

Aware that the Allied net was tightening,<br />

the Nazi guards deserted the prison<br />

camp, leaving many of the cells unlocked.<br />

After his liberation, Colin was sent back<br />

to the U.S., but when the war ended, he<br />

headed back to Rome, where he was to<br />

live out much of his life. His apartment on<br />

Via della Mercede, near the Spanish Steps<br />

and the place where John Keats took his<br />

last breath, was to become the site of the<br />

first American university in Rome.<br />

24


<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

PART I.<br />

Introduction<br />

9.<br />

9 -11. Newspaper article by Ann Stringer.<br />

“Bravo, Yells Red Soldier.” Winnipeg Free Press.<br />

Winnipeg, Canada. Vol. 51, No. 180-22. Pgs. 1<br />

and 5. Source: NewspaperArchive.com.<br />

25


PART I.<br />

<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

Introduction<br />

26


<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

PART I.<br />

Introduction<br />

27


PART I.<br />

<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

Introduction<br />

Giorgio Alfredo Tesoro was born in Rome<br />

in 1904. He studied law at La Sapienza,<br />

working closely with important scholars<br />

and eventually specializing in corporate<br />

and tax law. His ground-breaking work<br />

in the new field earned him esteemed<br />

scholarly and professional posts, but as<br />

a Jewish Roman and a politically engaged<br />

citizen, Tesoro watched with concern<br />

as Mussolini drifted closer and closer to<br />

Hitler’s views on race and ethnic purity.<br />

In 1938, with a thriving career, Tesoro was<br />

banned from teaching because of his<br />

Jewish origins. With a sense of what was<br />

to come, he left Italy and arrived in the<br />

United States on December 29, 1940.<br />

12.<br />

12. Giorgio Tesoro and his wife Gilda in Rome,<br />

September 1978. Photo from AUR archives.<br />

28


<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

PART I.<br />

13.<br />

Introduction<br />

13. “Background of Development of Foreign<br />

Broadcast Intelligence Service” Memorandum<br />

presented to Chief, Information Branch.<br />

Dated 6 March 1946. CIA file approved<br />

for release in 2003.<br />

29


PART I.<br />

<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

Introduction<br />

Tesoro immediately applied for US<br />

citizenship and to US government positions,<br />

while pursuing his academic interests.<br />

His first teaching job was at the American<br />

University in Washington, DC, where<br />

he wrote a detailed study of war finance,<br />

funded by the Rockefeller Foundation. This<br />

eventually led to his government posts<br />

as an economic analyst and officer with<br />

the Foreign Economic Administration,<br />

the State Department, and the US Mission<br />

in Geneva. When George (no longer<br />

Giorgio) Tesoro died in 2001, his obituary<br />

in The New York Times read: “97 years<br />

of kindness, loyalty and hard work.<br />

A beloved father, grandfather, uncle and<br />

friend. Esteemed lawyer, economist,<br />

professor, diplomat, Commendatore<br />

della Repubblica Italiana, founder of the<br />

American University of Rome.”<br />

30


<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

PART I.<br />

14.<br />

Introduction<br />

14. “Brother Now With University Staff.”<br />

The Chillicothe Constitution-Tribune. Vol. LI<br />

– No. 128. June 5, 1942. Chillicothe, Missouri.<br />

Source: NewspaperArchive.com.<br />

31


PART I.<br />

<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

15.<br />

Introduction<br />

Perhaps the most enigmatic of the<br />

three founders is Lisa Sergio, writer,<br />

broadcaster, activist, and philanthropist.<br />

Born in Florence in 1905 to Baron Agostino<br />

Sergio, and a wealthy American mother,<br />

Margherita Fitzgerald, Lisa Sergio grew<br />

up in the heady atmosphere of the city’s<br />

Anglo-Italian community. Rich in gossip<br />

and intrigue, the community included a<br />

mix of academics, intellectuals, artists,<br />

and wealthy aristocrats. In 1922, when<br />

she was 17, her parents divorced after her<br />

father attempted to shoot her mother.<br />

32<br />

15. Lisa Sergio’s Tesserino dei Giornalisti.<br />

Image from Lisa Sergio papers, Booth Family Center<br />

for Special Collections, Georgetown University Library,<br />

Washington, DC.


<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

PART I.<br />

As a young woman she claimed to have<br />

translated some works of Aldous Huxley<br />

and D.H. Lawrence into Italian. She<br />

eventually became the editor of Italian<br />

Mail, the only English language weekly in<br />

Italy. In 1929, she moved to Rome after<br />

falling in love with a much older man.<br />

female broadcaster in Italy and Mussolini’s<br />

official English translator. The position<br />

gave her access to high-ranking Fascist<br />

officials and inside information about<br />

the regime. In the spring of 1937, Sergio<br />

was fired from the Office of Press<br />

and Propaganda in Rome.<br />

In Rome, Sergio was in contact with<br />

individuals like Guglielmo Marconi,<br />

inventor of radio and known worldwide<br />

for his work in long-distance radio<br />

transmission. Marconi connected her with<br />

the Italian Fascist government and Sergio<br />

was eventually hired by the Italian Ministry<br />

of Propaganda to translate newspaper<br />

items into French and English for a<br />

15-minute daily news program. Known as<br />

“the golden voice of Rome,” Sergio became<br />

an international sensation as the first<br />

There are two different stories about<br />

how and why Sergio left Italy for the<br />

United States. Sergio’s version was that<br />

her dismissal was primarily due to her<br />

broadcasting omissions and ideological<br />

differences with the regime. However,<br />

according to Sergio’s FBI file, she lost her<br />

position because she was too vocal about<br />

her relationship with Galeazzo Ciano<br />

(Mussolini’s son-in-law) and other Fascist<br />

officials. Regardless of the true reason, Lisa<br />

Sergio left Naples for the United States<br />

on June 27, 1937.<br />

Introduction<br />

16.<br />

16. Lisa Sergio and her colleagues at the Ente<br />

Italiano per le Audizioni Radiofoniche (EIAR),<br />

Rome, 1936. Photo printed by Studio Vasari<br />

Roma. Image from Lisa Sergio papers, Booth<br />

Family Center for Special Collections,<br />

Georgetown University Library, Washington, DC.<br />

33


PART I.<br />

<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

17.<br />

Introduction<br />

By the time Lisa arrived in the United<br />

States, her political beliefs had shifted<br />

dramatically, and she became an advocate<br />

of democracy and a strong anti-Fascist.<br />

She explained her change of heart in a note<br />

from 1937: "Human beings are not born<br />

knowing. They are endowed, from birth<br />

with the capacity to learn. They learn to<br />

walk, to talk. We must also learn how to<br />

be free." Despite what is in her FBI file,<br />

Sergio’s ideological change of heart was<br />

genuine, and she spent the rest of her<br />

life fervently working for democratic<br />

ideals and against Fascism in all its forms<br />

even those that stalk democracies.<br />

She became a vocal supporter of<br />

education, women’s rights, and special<br />

target of Senator Joseph McCarthy.<br />

After moving to the United States, Sergio<br />

worked for NBC (National Broadcasting<br />

Company), but she quickly became<br />

frustrated because she believed that<br />

“NBC was not about to allow a woman to<br />

do news.” In 1939, she was hired by WQXR<br />

(an AM radio station licensed in New York<br />

City from December 1936 to November<br />

1992) as a news commentator, developing<br />

her program “Column of the Air,” which<br />

focused on the crisis in Europe. When asked<br />

about being a woman in a man’s world of<br />

news broadcasting, Sergio wrote, “Here,<br />

too, women can claim and hold a place.<br />

If men and women are equally needed<br />

in the war effort, as they indubitably are,<br />

if men and women the world over are<br />

bearing the tragic burden of a war without<br />

quarter, as they are, it follows that men<br />

and women can equally contribute to<br />

the understanding of issues at stake and<br />

of the sometimes baffling trend of the<br />

events which affect us.”<br />

34<br />

17. Lisa Sergio’s visa for entry into the United States in 1937.<br />

Lisa Sergio papers, Booth Family Center for Special Collections,<br />

Georgetown University Library, Washington, DC.


<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

PART I.<br />

18.<br />

Introduction<br />

“Column of the Air” broadcast seven times<br />

a week from 1939 to 1946, when WQXR<br />

cancelled it. Sergio was blacklisted by the<br />

American Legion in 1949 and listed in the<br />

anti-communist publication Red Channels:<br />

The Report of Communist Influence in<br />

Radio and Television in 19<strong>50</strong>. During the<br />

McCarthy era she was unable to work<br />

in broadcasting, and she eventually<br />

became a visiting professor and lecturer for<br />

several universities. Sergio also became very<br />

active in human rights organizations and<br />

in The Society for the Prevention of World<br />

War III. For Sergio, the responsibility of<br />

learning how to think and the liberation<br />

that comes with knowledge would<br />

eventually inspire her to help found The<br />

American University of Rome.<br />

Rome met through connections in the<br />

political and cultural world, and their<br />

love of Italy certainly put them in the<br />

same orbit. More importantly though,<br />

their post-war commitment to building a<br />

better world, to promoting international<br />

understanding, and to educating young<br />

people to learn how to be free meant that<br />

they were involved in similar activities.<br />

Archival evidence shows that the three<br />

founders of The American University of<br />

18. Lisa Sergio (right), Eleanor Roosevelt (center)<br />

and friend. Lisa Sergio papers, Booth Family<br />

Center for Special Collections, Georgetown<br />

University Library, Washington, DC.<br />

35


PART I.<br />

<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

Introduction<br />

19.<br />

36<br />

19-21. The American University of Rome: a project in the making.<br />

A vision for the AUR project, prepared by Lisa Sergio based on<br />

her conversations with David T. Colin and Hon. Emilio Daddario.<br />

Source: AUR archives.


<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

PART I.<br />

Introduction<br />

20.<br />

37


PART I.<br />

<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

Introduction<br />

21.<br />

38


<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

PART I.<br />

Introduction<br />

22.<br />

22-25. Board of Trustees Secretary William De Paulo drafted a<br />

Memorandum regarding a personal meeting he had with Giorgio Tesoro<br />

in 1987. The Memo speaks of a prior document that lays out the history<br />

of AUR. Unfortunately, the prior document has been lost. This document,<br />

though, explains that it was, in fact, Lisa Sergio who connected Tesoro and<br />

Colin for the AUR project. Source: AUR archives.<br />

39


PART I.<br />

<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

Introduction<br />

23.<br />

40


<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

PART I.<br />

Introduction<br />

24.<br />

41


PART I.<br />

<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

Introduction<br />

25.<br />

42


<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

PART I.<br />

On the <strong>50</strong>th anniversary of the founding<br />

of The American University of Rome, it is<br />

important to remember the crucible of<br />

history in which it was born. Envisioned<br />

by committed individuals who had seen<br />

the violence and destruction of world<br />

war, AUR was an active step in educating<br />

a new generation of young people who<br />

grew up in a post-war world during the<br />

largest economic expansion in history. The<br />

University’s aim and mission is to educate<br />

students in an international context, to<br />

understand themselves and others, to<br />

work across boundaries, and to always be<br />

aware that freedom is a responsibility and<br />

education is the key to peace and progress.<br />

Introduction<br />

Fifty years later, we find ourselves on a<br />

similar historical precipice, where economic<br />

expansion has made the material lives of<br />

most people in the West more comfortable<br />

than ever before. But freedom and<br />

democracy cannot be taken for granted;<br />

they need a well-educated, thoughtful<br />

citizenry to thrive and to overcome the<br />

chaos of the current moment. The American<br />

University of Rome proudly carries on<br />

the legacy of its founders to help build<br />

a better world.<br />

Please join the AUR community in<br />

celebrating its past and embracing<br />

its future.<br />

43


PART I.<br />

<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

Chapter 1. Discovering AUR’s Origins<br />

Chapter 1:<br />

DISCOVERING AUR’S ORIGINS<br />

In order to better understand the present<br />

and prepare for the future, in this <strong>50</strong>th<br />

Anniversary of The American University<br />

of Rome, we have delved to the roots<br />

of the institution and started to put the<br />

puzzle pieces together. The journey has led<br />

us to exciting discoveries that had been<br />

swallowed by time and forgetfulness. The<br />

origins of AUR have proven to be an intricate<br />

web of connections and people. Here is a<br />

taste of a complicated, but fascinating<br />

story of a group of people who believed in<br />

the power of, and, more importantly, the<br />

need, for high-quality education.<br />

44


<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

PART I.<br />

Chapter 1. Discovering AUR’s Origins<br />

Speculum Romanae Magnificentiae: Plan of Ancient Rome,<br />

print of engraving by Pirro Logorio, 16th century, the Metropolitan Museum<br />

of Art, Rogers Fund, Transferred from the Library in 1941. Creative Commons<br />

CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Image.<br />

45


PART I.<br />

<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

Founder fact sheets<br />

Chapter 1. Discovering AUR’s Origins<br />

David T.<br />

Colin<br />

1.<br />

Full name:<br />

David Tyrone Colin<br />

(originally Cohen)<br />

D.O.B:<br />

June 9, 1912<br />

Citizenship: American<br />

Professional Information:<br />

Journalist, OSS member in the<br />

Research and Analysis Branch,<br />

Olivetti Corporation, Founder<br />

and President of The American<br />

University of Rome.<br />

Deceased: 1992<br />

46<br />

1. David T. Colin and his wife<br />

Joan Carpenter, December 1978.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.


<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

PART I.<br />

Giorgio A.<br />

Tesoro<br />

Lisa<br />

Sergio<br />

Chapter 1. Discovering AUR’s Origins<br />

2. 3.<br />

Full name:<br />

Giorgio Alfredo Tesoro<br />

D.O.B:<br />

February 6, 1904<br />

Citizenship: Italian - American<br />

Professional Information: Lawyer,<br />

Economist, Member of the State<br />

Department, Informant and<br />

Advisorfor the US Government,<br />

Italian Consultant for diplomatic<br />

agreements for the reconstruction<br />

of Italy and the Marshall Plan,<br />

Founder and Board Member of The<br />

American University<br />

of Rome.<br />

Deceased: 2001<br />

Full name:<br />

Elisa Maria Alice Sergio<br />

D.O.B:<br />

March 17, 1905<br />

Citizenship: Italian - American<br />

Professional Information:<br />

Archaeologist, Translator, Radio<br />

Broadcaster, Fundraiser, Political<br />

Commentator, Author and Lecturer,<br />

Founder and Board Member of The<br />

American University of Rome.<br />

Deceased: 1989<br />

2. Giorgio Tesoro in 1942. Image<br />

courtesy of the Tesoro Family.<br />

3. Lisa Sergio with microphone<br />

in 1941. Image available on the<br />

World Wide Web as an image<br />

of Public Domain.<br />

47


PART I.<br />

<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

Prominent connections<br />

of AUR’s founders<br />

Chapter 1. Discovering AUR’s Origins<br />

Compiled from interviews with<br />

relatives or people who knew<br />

them personally.<br />

Volterra<br />

Almagià<br />

Family<br />

1.<br />

David T. Colin is remembered to be a<br />

charming man. A charismatic American<br />

and a talented investigative journalist,<br />

he was known for his ability to make friends<br />

no sooner than entering a room. Indeed,<br />

he made very good friends in all types of<br />

social spheres. Although much research must<br />

still be done to connect all the missing<br />

links, it is useful to note certain friendships<br />

of Colin: friendships that duringAUR’s<br />

48<br />

1. Edoardo Volterra<br />

(second from right<br />

to left) with AUR students<br />

in 1975. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.


<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

PART I.<br />

3.<br />

early years, allowed students to meet<br />

and talk to important figures from a vast<br />

range of fields.<br />

2.<br />

Edoardo Volterra, scholar of Roman law and<br />

son of the famed Jewish mathematician<br />

Vito Volterra, was close friends with Colin.<br />

Their friendship, though, was not born from<br />

shared acquaintances. Edoardo and David<br />

met in the early 1940s, when Edoardo was<br />

leading anti-Fascist initiatives in Rome<br />

and David was working for the OSS. Colin,<br />

who had access to certain goods that were<br />

scarce in wartime, brought the Volterra<br />

Almagià family ice cream on Sundays.<br />

Joan Carpenter, former wife of Colin, also<br />

recalls how Colin proudly narrated the story<br />

of how after the war he gifted the family<br />

a hide of leather for shoes – a rare and<br />

valuable gift in a war-torn country.<br />

Jumping to the late 1970s, the friendship<br />

continued through AUR in two aspects.<br />

3.<br />

First, Roberto Almagià (a relative of<br />

Edoardo on his mother’s side) was a<br />

professor at the University for several years.<br />

Stefano Almagià was also a student at<br />

AUR, starting in the fall of 1975. Edoardo<br />

himself was a visiting professor, hosting<br />

AUR students at the Italian Constitutional<br />

Court in the late 1970s.<br />

The second link to AUR is a story worth<br />

telling. Edoardo’s father, Vito Volterra,<br />

had a collection of scientific texts and<br />

manuscripts that he had collected<br />

throughout the years. When the war broke<br />

out, fearing that the collection would fall<br />

into the hands of the regime, the Volterra<br />

family hid the collection at Palazzo Fiano<br />

on Piazza San Lorenzo in Lucina, which<br />

was owned by the Almagià family at the<br />

time. After the war, Colin sequestered the<br />

collection and returned it to the Volterra<br />

Family and, in 1981, it was Colin who found<br />

Bern Dibner to purchase the collection.<br />

Bern Dibner, a wealthy American bought<br />

the rare collection of science texts (valued<br />

at one million dollars at the time) and<br />

eventually donated it to Brandeis University<br />

in Waltham, Massachusetts. Mr. Dibner was<br />

also an AUR donor during the 1980s.<br />

Chapter 1. Discovering AUR’s Origins<br />

2. Edoardo Volterra<br />

(center) with AUR<br />

students and Joan<br />

Carpenter (far left)<br />

in 1977. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.<br />

3. Edoardo Volterra<br />

(on the right).<br />

Photo from AUR<br />

archives.<br />

49


PART I.<br />

<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

Egidio<br />

Ortona<br />

Chapter 1. Discovering AUR’s Origins<br />

1.<br />

In war-torn Italy, the efforts leading to the<br />

country’s reconstruction were of imminent<br />

importance. Egidio Ortona was one of the<br />

five men who went to the United States<br />

during World War II to negotiate the terms<br />

for the reconstruction of Italy. Together<br />

with Quinto Quintieri, Raffaelle Mattioli,<br />

Marco Morelli, and Enrico Cuccia, Ortona<br />

arrived in the U.S.A. in 1944 where they were<br />

able to negotiate aid for Italy with the U.S.<br />

government. He also played a pivotal role in<br />

the political and economic negotiations of<br />

the Italian diplomat Alcide De Gasperi who<br />

negotiated with the U.S. on the execution<br />

of the Marshall Plan. He later served as the<br />

Italian Ambassador to the United Nations<br />

(1958-1961) and as the Italian Ambassador<br />

to the United States (1967-1975).<br />

Egidio Ortona was very close to both<br />

Lisa Sergio and Giorgio Tesoro. While it is<br />

probable that he met Tesoro during his<br />

economic negotiations in the 1940s, archival<br />

evidence does not give any indication of<br />

when and where he met Sergio. He did,<br />

however, know Sergio well as demonstrated<br />

by the correspondence between Ortona, his<br />

wife Giulia, and Lisa Sergio. Within those<br />

archives, there is an autographed book<br />

by Dino Grandi (a high-ranking Fascist<br />

politician who opposed Italy’s alliance with<br />

Germany) dedicated to Ortona; probably<br />

a gift from Ortona to Sergio.<br />

2.<br />

<strong>50</strong><br />

1. Lisa Sergio and Egidio Ortona during the<br />

ceremony where Sergio was honored as<br />

Cavaliere of the Order of the Star of Italian<br />

Solidarity. Lisa Sergio papers, Booth Family<br />

Center for Special Collections, Georgetown<br />

University Library, Washington, DC.<br />

2. Egidio Ortona honoring<br />

Giorgio Tesoro with the<br />

Order of Merit of the Italian<br />

Republic. Image courtesy<br />

of the Tesoro family.


<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

PART I.<br />

Emilio Q. Daddario<br />

and His Wife Berenice<br />

3.<br />

Emilio Quincy Daddario was an Italian-<br />

American lawyer and politician who is<br />

credited to have captured Rodolfo Graziani,<br />

Mussolini’s Minister of National Defense<br />

since 1943. Daddario was a member<br />

of the OSS under Max Corvo – a Sicilian<br />

anti-Fascist who had been named as the<br />

head of the Italian faction of Strategic<br />

Services. In April 1945, Corvo sent<br />

Daddario to Switzerland to capture<br />

high-ranking Fascist officials, such as<br />

Benito Mussolini. His mission was to capture<br />

them before the Italian partisans did.<br />

Chapter 1. Discovering AUR’s Origins<br />

After the war, Daddario went back to<br />

the U.S., where he was eventually elected<br />

in Connecticut to the U.S. House of<br />

Representatives, where he served from<br />

1959 to 1971.<br />

As a member of the OSS, Daddario was<br />

a friend of AUR’s founders and actually<br />

introduced Lisa Sergio to David T. Colin.<br />

Within the AUR archives, his name first<br />

appears as the co-author with Lisa Sergio<br />

of the AUR “project in the making”—a first<br />

draft of a vision for an American university<br />

in the Eternal City.<br />

Daddario (or ‘Mim,’ as he was known to<br />

friends) and his wife Berenice were close<br />

to both David T. Colin and Joan Carpenter<br />

as well as Lisa Sergio.<br />

3. Emilio Q. Daddario<br />

in 1970. Photo by<br />

Michael Lein,<br />

The New York Times.<br />

51


PART I.<br />

<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

Lina<br />

Wertmüller<br />

Chapter 1. Discovering AUR’s Origins<br />

1.<br />

The very first cohorts of students at AUR<br />

remember quite vividly the high-caliber<br />

professionals they met on field trips. The<br />

well-connected David T. Colin took students<br />

to meet heads of companies such as<br />

Perugina, Olivetti, Honeywell, FIAT, and<br />

Gucci. He also introduced students to<br />

political leaders including Enrico Berlinguer,<br />

Venerio Cattani, and Giorgio Almirante.<br />

Yet it was not just through politics and<br />

business classes that AUR students<br />

were afforded the opportunity to mingle<br />

with notable people. Colin had many<br />

connections in the Italian cultural scene,<br />

especially within the movie business.<br />

Students were taken to the sets of Enzo<br />

Castellani (famous for his Spaghetti<br />

Westerns ) and Tinto Brass, and were<br />

introduced to producers such as Alessandro<br />

Tasca (who produced for Orson Welles) and<br />

Robert Haggiag.<br />

One of the protagonists of the Italian film<br />

industry who taught several cohorts of<br />

early students at AUR was Lina Wertmüller.<br />

Extravagant and fascinating, Wertmüller<br />

would host AUR students in her studio or at<br />

her home, screen films, and speak to them<br />

about cinema at the time. Screenwriter<br />

and film director Wertmüller was the first<br />

woman in history to be nominated for an<br />

Academy Award for Best Director (1977).<br />

Close friends with Marcello Mastroianni<br />

and Federico Fellini, Wertmüller indulged<br />

students with tales from the industry, her<br />

eyes bright behind her signature white<br />

glasses, her vast knowledge animated<br />

by her distinctive charm.<br />

52<br />

1. Always smiling<br />

and fascinating, Lina<br />

gives her lectures on<br />

cinema at her home.<br />

October 1979. Photo<br />

from AUR archives.


<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

PART I.<br />

Prince<br />

Alessandro<br />

Tasca di Cutò<br />

adapted into a film by Luchino Visconti).<br />

In October 1927, Tasca Junior emigrated to<br />

New York and worked as a car mechanic, a<br />

driver, a cashier at a racetrack, and a runner<br />

on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange<br />

during the Wall Street crash of 1929. After<br />

the outbreak of World War II, Alessandro<br />

returned to Rome in May of 1942 and<br />

was hired by the Ministry of Propaganda<br />

where he met Ezra Pound. Betrayed by<br />

Eddie Legiardi Laura, a colleague from<br />

the Ministry who he had helped when the<br />

Fascist downfall had started, Alessandro<br />

was arrested and interned in the British-run<br />

Prisoner of War camp of Certosa di Padula<br />

in southern Italy. He was liberated a couple<br />

of years later and he returned to Rome.<br />

Chapter 1. Discovering AUR’s Origins<br />

2.<br />

Prince Alessandro Tasca di Cutò was the<br />

son of Alessandro Tasca Filangeri di Cutò,<br />

known as the Sicilian “Red Prince” for the<br />

duality between his aristocratic background<br />

and his dedication to socialism. Tasca<br />

Senior, in fact, devoured his family fortune<br />

in support of his ideals, selling even the<br />

family estate of Santa Margherita Belice<br />

(described extensively by his cousin Prince<br />

Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa, author of<br />

the classic novel The Leopard, which was<br />

After the war, Tasca was hired by the<br />

United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation<br />

Administration (UNRRA). He later started<br />

working in the film industry, easing<br />

Anglo-American productions through<br />

the complications of Italian bureaucracy.<br />

Tasca met several protagonists of Italian<br />

and international cinema at the time,<br />

such as Vittorio De Sica, Roberto Rosellini,<br />

Pier Paolo Pasolini, John Huston, and<br />

Orson Welles, who was to become a<br />

lifelong friend.<br />

Alessandro Tasca was a visiting professor<br />

of AUR, leading seminars on cinematic<br />

production and inviting friends, such as<br />

the producer Robert Haggiag, to follow in<br />

his steps by sharing their knowledge and<br />

experiences with the students.<br />

2. Orson Welles<br />

and Alessandro Tasca<br />

on the set of Falstaff<br />

(Chimes at Midnight).<br />

1964-1965. Image from<br />

Panorama.<br />

53


PART II.<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong><br />

<strong>OF</strong><br />

HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

54


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

Chapter 2:<br />

The AUR Identity<br />

55


PART II.<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

Chapter 2:<br />

<strong>THE</strong> AUR IDENTITY<br />

AUR’s Mission<br />

The American University of Rome prepares<br />

students to live and work across cultures as<br />

skilled and knowledgeable citizens of an<br />

interconnected and rapidly changing world.<br />

AUR is a private, independent, not-for-profit<br />

institution of higher education, primarily<br />

offering undergraduate and graduate<br />

liberal arts and professional programs to<br />

degree seeking and study abroad students<br />

from around the world.<br />

Taking the best of the American approach<br />

to interdisciplinary, student-centered<br />

learning, our international faculty and<br />

staff use Rome as our classroom and Italy<br />

and Europe as invaluable resources. AUR’s<br />

innovative programs promote intellectual<br />

excellence, personal growth and an<br />

appreciation of cultural diversity in an<br />

international environment.<br />

56


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

57


PART II.<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

1.<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

FOTO<br />

Rome<br />

Roma Caput Mundi… There is no doubt<br />

that all roads lead to Rome. It is not by<br />

chance that The American University<br />

of Rome was founded in a city that has<br />

claimed its strategic importance, in<br />

different times and for different reasons,<br />

throughout the centuries. AUR, like Rome,<br />

is a place of layers: high-caliber education,<br />

real life experiences, relationships… all<br />

joined to define who we are, what we do,<br />

and what differentiates us from other<br />

universities.<br />

But, let us start at the beginning. Rome, as<br />

the saying goes, is considered the capital<br />

of the world. The actual “navel of the<br />

world,” however, is located precisely on<br />

the Capitoline Hill, on the southeast side<br />

of Piazza Venezia. Around <strong>50</strong>0 BC, the<br />

Capitoline Hill was the site of three grand<br />

temples: the Temple of Juno Moneta, the<br />

Temple of Virtus, and the Temple of Jupiter<br />

Optimus Maximus Capitolinus. Some<br />

centuries later, a Tabularium that held<br />

the Roman State Archives also claimed<br />

its spot atop the hill. The ceremonial and<br />

religious grandeur of the Capitoline did not,<br />

however, survive the advent of Christianity<br />

and for most of the Middle Ages, the site<br />

was emptied and left in nature’s grip. It<br />

was even named Monte Caprino at one<br />

point, for goats and sheep were taken to<br />

pasture there.<br />

It was only in the 11th century that the<br />

Capitoline Hill was established as the civic<br />

government center of Rome. Since then,<br />

it began to be the site of civil resistance<br />

to the Papal hold on Rome. Several revolts<br />

against the Pope and the aristocracy<br />

58<br />

1. Speculum Romanae Magnificentiae: View of<br />

the Roman Capitol, by Etienne DuPérac, 1569.<br />

Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public<br />

Domain Image from The Metropolitan Museum<br />

of Art. Vol 41.72.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

took place atop the Capitoline, including<br />

those of Cola di Rienzo in the 1300s. By<br />

the 16th century, when Michelangelo was<br />

commissioned to design and restructure<br />

the Capitoline, the site has conspicuously<br />

distanced itself from its pasturing past.<br />

Michelangelo’s project for the piazza<br />

was quite ambitious. Pope Paul III wished<br />

to impress King Charles V and hence<br />

commissioned Michelangelo with a<br />

project that would highlight the grandeur<br />

of Rome with a monumental civic center.<br />

Michelangelo modified the facades of the<br />

existing buildings, designed the square<br />

and the Cordonata staircase, and shifted<br />

the orientation of the civic center, so that,<br />

rather than facing the Roman Forum, the<br />

Capitoline now faced the Vatican and<br />

Saint Peter’s Basilica. Michelangelo did<br />

not live to see the completion of his design,<br />

but the construction followed his plans<br />

faithfully. The architectural opulence of the<br />

Capitoline Hill, regardless of one’s creed or<br />

political stance, is undeniable still today.<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

In the late 1980s AUR adopted<br />

Michelangelo’s twelve-pointed geometry,<br />

and the world’s navel, as its logo. Its<br />

reference to planets and constellations<br />

and its slightly curved surface make it<br />

the architectural materialization of Roma<br />

Caput Mundi. AUR identifies itself with the<br />

symbolism and multiple layers that this<br />

statement encompasses: a place that is<br />

marked by history, a community of people<br />

from all over the world, a milestone in the<br />

lives of our students, and a site where<br />

wonderful memories are born.<br />

2.<br />

2. Piazza del Campidoglio,<br />

Rome. Photo by Jensens.<br />

July 7, 2008. Creative<br />

Commons CC0 1.0<br />

Universal Public Domain<br />

Image.<br />

59


PART II.<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

A Classroom<br />

Without Walls<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

Since its inception, The American University<br />

of Rome has been resolute in providing its<br />

students with a hands-on experiences in<br />

their subject of study. It is in this way that<br />

on-site learning and academic field trips<br />

have been an important pillar of the AUR<br />

curriculum and the AUR experience. David<br />

T. Colin, co-founder and the first president<br />

of AUR, is remembered for having the<br />

vision of AUR as a “classroom without<br />

walls.” The phrase stuck and since 1969<br />

these “wall-free” experiences have been<br />

the hub of unforgettable moments of<br />

schooling and comradery for all the young<br />

minds that have passed through AUR.<br />

3.<br />

60<br />

3. AUR students with<br />

Marcello Mastroianni<br />

(far left), world famous<br />

Italian actor and<br />

protagonist of Fellini’s La<br />

Dolce Vita, in June 1975.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

4.<br />

5.<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

6.<br />

4. AUR students with<br />

Enzo G. Castellari<br />

(center) on the set<br />

of his film Cipolla Colt<br />

in 1975. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.<br />

5. Visiting professor Prince<br />

Alessandro Tasca di Cutò<br />

(right, seated), producer<br />

and close friend of Orson<br />

Welles, with a group of AUR<br />

students in his studio in 1975.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

6 Film producer<br />

Roberto Haggiag<br />

(right, seated)<br />

with AUR students<br />

in 1975. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.<br />

61


PART I.<br />

<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

7.<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

62<br />

7. Kinetic artist Albert J. Friscia (far right) speaking to AUR<br />

students about art and sculpture in his studio in 1975.<br />

Friscia is remembered for the bronze altar he made for the Bernini<br />

apse of Saint Peter’s Basilica and the bronze doors of the Holy<br />

Name Cathedral in Chicago. Photo from AUR archives.


<strong>THE</strong> ORIGINS<br />

PART I.<br />

8.<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

9.<br />

8. Enzo G. Castellari<br />

(center) with Grand Valley<br />

State College students,<br />

leading his film class<br />

in 1975. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.<br />

9. Seminar with Leone<br />

Cattani (far right, back<br />

row), Italian lawyer,<br />

politician, and anti-Fascist<br />

activist in 1973. Photo<br />

from AUR archives.<br />

63


PART II.<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

“TELL ME AND I’LL FORGET;<br />

SHOW ME AND I MAY REMEMBER;<br />

INVOLVE ME AND I’LL UNDERSTAND.”<br />

Chinese proverb<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

10.<br />

64<br />

10. Film director Tinto Brass (left)<br />

with AUR students on the set of his<br />

movie Salon Kitty, released in 1976.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

11.<br />

12.<br />

11. AUR students with<br />

Dr. Franco Ferrari<br />

(second from left)<br />

at the Olivetti plants<br />

in April of 1977. Photo<br />

from AUR archives.<br />

12. AUR students<br />

at the Acropolis in<br />

Athens in October<br />

1977. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.<br />

65


PART II.<br />

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Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

13.<br />

66<br />

13. Joan Carpenter (second from<br />

left) and AUR students at<br />

Piazza del Campidoglio in 1977.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

“EDUCATING <strong>THE</strong> MIND<br />

WITHOUT EDUCATING <strong>THE</strong> HEART<br />

IS NO EDUCATION AT ALL.”<br />

Aristotle<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

14.<br />

14. Session with Italian<br />

novelist and journalist<br />

Alberto Moravia (center,<br />

seated) in his apartment<br />

in November 1977. Photo<br />

from AUR archives.<br />

67


PART II.<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

15.<br />

68


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

15. Drawing<br />

and study session<br />

at the Colosseum<br />

in 1977. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.<br />

69


PART II.<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

16.<br />

“EDUCATION IS <strong>THE</strong> MOST POWERFUL<br />

WEAPON WHICH YOU CAN USE TO<br />

CHANGE <strong>THE</strong> WORLD.”<br />

Nelson Mandela<br />

70<br />

16. Session with Giorgio Almirante<br />

(third from left) leader of the<br />

Movimento Sociale Italiano in 1977.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

17.<br />

17. AUR students with NBC<br />

Bureau Chief David Teitelbaum<br />

(right seated) in 1977.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

71


PART II.<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

18.<br />

19.<br />

72<br />

18. Chantal Skibinski<br />

(second from left),<br />

Head of Public Relations<br />

for GUCCI, in March 1978.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

19. AUR students visiting<br />

the American Embassy<br />

in Rome in 1978. Photo<br />

from AUR archives.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

20.<br />

21.<br />

20. AUR students in a<br />

seminar on labor and<br />

industry at the Unione<br />

Industriale (Industrial<br />

Union) of Turin in April<br />

1978. Photo from AUR<br />

archives.<br />

21. AUR students with<br />

Pietro Giustina (center)<br />

President and CEO<br />

of Giustina Spa, in<br />

1978. Photo from AUR<br />

archives.<br />

73


PART II.<br />

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Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

22.<br />

74<br />

22. AUR students attending<br />

a seminar at the beverage<br />

company Cinzano in 1978.<br />

Cinzano was bought by<br />

the Campari group in 1999.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

23.<br />

23. Session at the<br />

Milan headquarters<br />

of Honeywell in 1978.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

75


PART II.<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

24.<br />

76


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

24. Joan Carpenter (right)<br />

and AUR students getting<br />

ready to head out to<br />

on-site experiences<br />

in December 1978.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

77


PART II.<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

25.<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

26.<br />

78<br />

25. AUR students at the<br />

train station in 1978.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

26. Enrico Berlinguer (center)<br />

with AUR students in 1978.<br />

Berlinguer was a charismatic leader<br />

of Italy’s Communist party (1972-84)<br />

and a staunch opponent of Fascist policy<br />

in Italy. Photo from AUR archives.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

27.<br />

28.<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

29.<br />

27. Prof. Enzo Amorini<br />

(center) conducting his<br />

Italian lesson with AUR<br />

students in Perugia in 1978.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

28. AUR students at<br />

the entrance of Pompeii<br />

before a lesson with<br />

Prof. Almagià in<br />

December 1978.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

29. Heading back<br />

from Pompeii with<br />

Prof. Almagià (far left)<br />

in April 1979. Photo<br />

from AUR archives.<br />

79


PART II.<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

30.<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

31.<br />

80<br />

30. AUR students<br />

attending an on-site class<br />

with Prof. Reboli (center)<br />

at Saint Peter’s in July 1979.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

31. Prof. Peggy Craig<br />

(far left) giving an art<br />

history lesson to students in<br />

the Roman Forum in 1978.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

32.<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

33.<br />

32. AUR students<br />

and Prof. Nicholas Reboli<br />

(third from left) ready to<br />

depart for a fieldtrip in 1978.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

33. AUR students heading<br />

out to Perugia, Assisi,<br />

and Spoleto in September 1981.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

81


PART II.<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

“A WELL-EDUCATED MIND<br />

WILL ALWAYS HAVE MORE QUESTIONS<br />

THAN ANSWERS.”<br />

Helen Keller<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

34.<br />

82<br />

34. Driving from<br />

Olympia in Greece in<br />

October 1981. Photo<br />

from AUR archives.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

35.<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

36.<br />

35.<br />

35. AUR students<br />

boarding the airplane<br />

back to Rome at the<br />

Athens airport in<br />

October 1981. Photo<br />

from AUR archives.<br />

36. AUR students<br />

at Herculaneum<br />

in 1983. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.<br />

83


PART II.<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

37.<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

84


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

37. AUR students<br />

on a field trip with Prof.<br />

Eduardo Almagià (right)<br />

May 1978. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.<br />

85


PART II.<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

38.<br />

“<strong>THE</strong> MIND IS NOT A VESSEL<br />

TO BE FILLED,<br />

BUT A FIRE TO BE KINDLED.”<br />

Plutarch<br />

86<br />

38. AUR students<br />

with Prof. Amorini<br />

(top row, second<br />

from right) in 1982.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

39.<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

39. Visit to the Perugina<br />

chocolate factory in the 1990s.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

87


PART II.<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

40<br />

88


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

40. AUR students at the Fiera<br />

di Milano with Mary Handley<br />

(top row right) in 1994.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

89


PART II.<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

41<br />

42<br />

90<br />

41. Fieldtrip to Esso<br />

Refinery in Augusta, Sicily,<br />

with Prof. Aldo Patania<br />

(second from right)<br />

in the early 2000s.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

42. Fieldtrip to the Vatican<br />

State headquarters<br />

with Prof. James Walston<br />

(fourth from left) in 2009.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

43<br />

44<br />

43. Kosovo fieldtrip with<br />

Prof. James Walston<br />

(first row, center) in 2009.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

44. AUR and Sapienza<br />

University students digging<br />

at the Colosseum with Prof.<br />

Valerie Higgins (far right)<br />

in 2014. Photo from AUR<br />

archives.<br />

91


PART II.<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

From a Study<br />

Abroad Institution<br />

to a Resident-Based<br />

University in the<br />

Heart of Rome<br />

1<br />

Although not originally conceived as such,<br />

AUR operated mainly as a Study Abroad<br />

institution during its first years, offering<br />

American students an experience abroad in<br />

collaboration with their home universities.<br />

Initially, AUR received students from<br />

Pitzer College (California), Grand Valley<br />

State College (Michigan), and American<br />

University in Washington, DC.<br />

92<br />

1. Grand Valley State College<br />

students arriving at the airport<br />

in 1975. Photo from AUR archives.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

Slowly, AUR expanded its reach and created<br />

affiliations with other universities in the<br />

United States. Today, AUR is affiliated with<br />

more than 40 universities and institutions<br />

across the U.S.<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

2<br />

In the late 1970s, the leadership that<br />

succeeded the founding team took<br />

a significant step towards expanding<br />

AUR and making it a degree-granting<br />

institution. In 1986, with an articulation<br />

agreement with CUNY College of Staten<br />

Island, AUR was granted the authority to<br />

confer degrees in Business Administration,<br />

Interdisciplinary Studies, and International<br />

Business. Italian Studies and International<br />

Relations were added to the curriculum<br />

in the early 1990s, while Communication<br />

arrived in the latter part of the decade.<br />

Thus, AUR steadily grew into the higher<br />

education institution it is today, now<br />

offering ten undergraduate programs and<br />

three graduate programs.<br />

2. Pitzer and Pomona students<br />

with Prof. Enzo Amorini<br />

(far right, standing) in Perugia<br />

in 1978. Photo from AUR archives.<br />

93


PART II.<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

3<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

4<br />

94<br />

3. AUR barbecue with<br />

President Melady (front<br />

row, third from right)<br />

in 1992. Photo from AUR<br />

archives.<br />

4. Group of AUR<br />

students in the early<br />

1990s. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

AUR granted its first degree<br />

in 1987. Where in these<br />

early days graduating<br />

classes held between<br />

12 to 20 students,<br />

it now graduates some<br />

80 students each year.<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

5<br />

5. Cohort of the<br />

Class of 1996 walking<br />

through the AUR<br />

garden. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.<br />

95


PART II.<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

AUR Commencements<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

Rome has long been a crossroads of the world, a city<br />

that lies between Europe and Asia, a meeting point<br />

of ideas, cultures, and nationalities. AUR is, for many<br />

of our students, the crossroads between adolescence<br />

and adulthood. As the procession through Rome’s<br />

triumphal arches signified victory and celebration<br />

millennia ago, the Commencement ceremony serves<br />

as a celebratory rite of passage for all AUR graduates<br />

as they launch themselves into the world and the<br />

next chapter of their life’s journey. In the early 1990s,<br />

1<br />

96<br />

1. Graduates of 2001 at<br />

the Commencement<br />

ceremony at Palazzo<br />

Brancaccio. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

2<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

some commencements were held on the<br />

campus of Via Pietro Roselli, in the style of<br />

American universities in the United States.<br />

With increasing class sizes over time, AUR<br />

commencements moved to Villa Miani (on<br />

the Via Trionfale in northern Rome) and<br />

Palazzo Falconieri (near Campo dei Fiori).<br />

Eventually, the ceremony moved to the<br />

majestic Villa Aurelia (five minutes from<br />

the current AUR campus).<br />

3<br />

While the locations changed, the spirit of<br />

Commencement remained the same: an<br />

occasion for staff, faculty, families, and<br />

students to come together in celebration.<br />

For students and parents, the event<br />

means the end of one chapter and the<br />

beginning of another. For staff and<br />

faculty, the celebration is a reminder of<br />

why we do what we do at AUR: we work<br />

with students, and for students, to foster<br />

informed citizens and better leaders.<br />

2. The Class of 1999<br />

at the Commencement<br />

ceremony at Villa Miani.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

3. Graduates of the<br />

Class of 1995 sitting in<br />

the AUR garden of Via<br />

Pietro Roselli. Photo<br />

from AUR archives.<br />

97


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4<br />

98


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PART II.<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

4. Graduates-to-be<br />

of the Class of 2004<br />

getting ready for the<br />

ceremony at Villa<br />

Aurelia. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.<br />

99


PART II.<br />

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Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

5<br />

6<br />

100<br />

5. The Class of 2003<br />

at the Commencement<br />

ceremony at Palazzo<br />

Brancaccio. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.<br />

6. The Class of 2004<br />

graduation procession<br />

led by Prof. James Walston<br />

at Villa Aurelia. Photo<br />

from AUR archives.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

7<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

7. Graduates of 2010<br />

at Villa Aurelia. Photo<br />

from AUR archives.<br />

101


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Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

8<br />

9<br />

102<br />

8. Honorary Degree<br />

Recipient Joseph Plumeri<br />

(far left, standing)<br />

addresses the Class of 2018<br />

at the Commencement<br />

ceremony at Villa Aurelia.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

9. Prof. Kathleen Fitzsimmons<br />

(third from right) with students at<br />

the Commencement ceremony<br />

of 2012 at Villa Aurelia.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

10<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

11<br />

10. Master’s Degree<br />

Graduates of 2018 at<br />

the Commencement<br />

ceremony at Villa<br />

Aurelia. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.<br />

11. Graduates of<br />

the Class of 2015<br />

taking a selfie at<br />

the Commencement<br />

ceremony at Villa<br />

Aurelia. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.<br />

103


PART II.<br />

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12<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

13<br />

14<br />

104<br />

12. The Class of<br />

2000 hat toss at the<br />

Commencement<br />

ceremony at Villa<br />

Miani. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.<br />

13.The Class of 2006<br />

hat toss at the<br />

Commencement<br />

ceremony at Villa<br />

Aurelia. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.<br />

14. The Class of<br />

2007 hat toss at the<br />

Commencement<br />

ceremony at Villa<br />

Aurelia. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

15<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

16<br />

15. The Class of<br />

2016 hat toss at the<br />

Commencement<br />

ceremony at Villa<br />

Aurelia. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.<br />

16. The Class of<br />

2015 hat toss at the<br />

Commencement<br />

ceremony at Villa<br />

Aurelia. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.<br />

105


PART II.<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

A Hub<br />

of World Citizens<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

In a world that is often inclined towards<br />

the building of walls, AUR seeks to build<br />

bridges.Education, in an environment<br />

that fosters intercultural exchange, is<br />

crucial if we are to see a world that favors<br />

collaboration instead of exclusion.<br />

Together with Michelangelo’s geometry at<br />

the Piazza del Campidoglio, AUR’s motto<br />

reads inter gentes trans orbem, translating<br />

as “between peoples, across the world”.<br />

A paramount element of the AUR identity<br />

is, in fact, its multicultural nature. AUR<br />

prides itself on having students from<br />

all parts of the world who enrich the<br />

community with their diverse cultures and<br />

experiences. It is this cultural richness that<br />

has made this University a hub of world<br />

citizens and cultural exchange since its<br />

inception <strong>50</strong> years ago, right up until the<br />

present day, standing atop the Janiculum<br />

Hill. Alumni testimonials consistently<br />

identify AUR’s element of cultural diversity<br />

as one of the highlights of their university<br />

experience, and they truly value the global<br />

network that they become a part of,<br />

having kept in touch with friends from AUR<br />

after graduating.<br />

The abounding multiculturalism at AUR<br />

combines with its high caliber academic<br />

offerings to create the AUR experience.<br />

The University provides its students<br />

with a strong knowledge base, while<br />

simultaneously endowing them with<br />

significant cultural experiences that foster<br />

awareness of the past and the present, to<br />

better face the challenges of the future.<br />

1<br />

106


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

1. Film students<br />

shooting at EUR<br />

neighborhood in<br />

1975. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.<br />

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PART II.<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

2<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

3<br />

108<br />

2. Students relaxing at CIVIS<br />

in 1975. The Casa Italiana Viaggi<br />

Internazionali Studenti (CIVIS) is<br />

Loyola University’s headquarters<br />

in Rome. Photo from AUR archives.<br />

3. Group of students in front<br />

of Spoleto Cathedral in 1979.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

4<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

5<br />

4. AUR Orientation for freshmen<br />

and sophomores in 1980. Photo<br />

from AUR archives.<br />

5. Group of students in<br />

Napflion, Greece in 1981.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

109


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Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

6<br />

110


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

6. Group of students in front<br />

of Spoleto Cathedral in 1982.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

111


PART II.<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

7<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

8<br />

9<br />

112<br />

7. Tie dye in the AUR<br />

garden in 2017. Photo<br />

from AUR archives.<br />

8. AUR group photo after<br />

Board of Trustees’ event<br />

at the Majestic Hotel<br />

in Rome in 2009.Photo<br />

from AUR archives.<br />

9. AUR students on the<br />

terrace of Building A.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

10<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

11<br />

10. AUR students<br />

in Piazza Navona.<br />

Photo from AUR<br />

archives.<br />

11. Group of AUR<br />

students in the<br />

campus garden<br />

in 2008. Photo<br />

by Julie Williams,<br />

from AUR archives.<br />

113


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<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

According to myth...<br />

Romulus<br />

and Remus:<br />

The wolf and our mascot<br />

No history is complete without the myths<br />

that accompany it. Like Rome, AUR proudly<br />

carries a myth about its founding.<br />

The first and most significant myth of<br />

Rome is that of Romulus and Remus, and<br />

of course, the she-wolf. AUR adopted the<br />

wolf as its official mascot in celebration<br />

of Rome and the myth, so it is only suitable<br />

to start there.<br />

Legend tells that Rome was founded on<br />

April 21, 753 BC by Romulus and Remus,<br />

sons of Rhea Silvia. The question of<br />

paternity varies greatly from version to<br />

version. Some attribute the pregnancy to<br />

Mars, the god of War, others to the hero<br />

Hercules. The more rational would take<br />

the stance of Livy, who attributed the<br />

conception to rape. Regardless of who the<br />

father was, as a Vestal Virgin, Rhea would<br />

have faced dire consequences for infringing<br />

her vow of chastity.<br />

When the twins are born, they are<br />

abandoned in a basket on the River Tiber,<br />

either by order of King Amulius or by the<br />

114


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

hand of a frightened and desperate<br />

mother. The story goes that at the<br />

foot of the Palatine Hill, the basket gets<br />

caught in the roots of a fig tree. There,<br />

the children are found by a she-wolf,<br />

1<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

who feeds them and protects them as if<br />

they were her cubs. When fully grown, the<br />

twin brothers decide to establish a city.<br />

Disagreeing, as all siblings do, things get a<br />

little out of hand. Romulus kills Remus and<br />

calls the new city Rome.<br />

All roads do lead to Rome, and no amount<br />

of words or images can prepare for the<br />

sense of awe that this wonderfully chaotic<br />

city inspires in all who come here. You could<br />

spend a lifetime in Rome and it would<br />

never stop surprising you with its endless<br />

intricacies and fragments of history that<br />

are woven into the very fabric of the city.<br />

1. Illustration of the Capitoline she-wolf with<br />

young Romulus and Remus. Page 102 from<br />

Speculum romanae magnificentiae, 1575,<br />

by Antoine Lafréry (1512-1577). Typ 525.75.<strong>50</strong>9.<br />

Houghton Library, Harvard University.<br />

115


PART II.<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

The American<br />

University of Rome:<br />

A School for<br />

American Spies<br />

The founding myth regarding The American<br />

University of Rome is that it was set-up as<br />

a school with tight links to the American<br />

intelligence services. After World War<br />

II, it is rumored that American overseas<br />

universities were set up as surveillance<br />

hubs and information centers, especially<br />

in Europe. Within the American narrative<br />

of the “communist enemy,” Italy was of<br />

particular interest. Italian socialist groups<br />

were known to sway more towards the<br />

ideals of Soviet Communism instead of<br />

those of a more democratic socialism, as in<br />

other parts of Europe. Therefore, Rome was<br />

in theory one of the best places to establish<br />

a University that would serve as a cover for<br />

intelligence missions.<br />

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<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

2<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

2. Wellman, Walter J., Memorandum presented<br />

to the Office of General Counsel OASW,<br />

SSU. Dated 26 October 1945. Declassified file.<br />

Office of Strategic Services Personnel Files<br />

from World War II. The U.S. National Archives<br />

and Records Administration.<br />

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PART II.<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

This myth has been part of AUR since its<br />

beginnings. I have heard it from different<br />

sources and at different times, but I will<br />

do my best to transcribe it as faithfully as<br />

possible and not forget any of the details.<br />

The American University of Rome was<br />

founded in 1969 by David T. Colin, a<br />

member of the American intelligence<br />

services. Colin had been an undercover<br />

spy during World War II, Sergeant of the<br />

American military and listed as a soldier<br />

of Operation PAPAYA of October 1944: a<br />

five-man mission led by Major John Tozzi<br />

that aimed at entering Italy from France.<br />

In the mid-1960s, he was sent to Italy to<br />

set up a school that would help keep an<br />

eye on the intellectual left-wing groups.<br />

A classified operation with an academic<br />

façade, The American University of Rome<br />

was brimming with trained spies that<br />

taught the courses offered. In keeping<br />

under the radar, the programs lasted only<br />

four months, as most spy professors had<br />

to return to their U.S. base regularly. Colin,<br />

a spy himself and the head of the Rome<br />

operation, was very well connected among<br />

the political circles of Rome and the Italian<br />

government. Taking AUR students on<br />

fieldtrips, it is rumored that Colin did “spy<br />

work” on the side, gathering information<br />

as part of his mission with U.S. intelligence<br />

services. Some accounts of the myth also<br />

say that some of the students were junior<br />

spies in training.<br />

The roots of this myth—apart from the<br />

historical context that would seem to<br />

support it—probably lie in the founders’<br />

involvement with the State Department<br />

and the U.S. Foreign Service. Although<br />

AUR’s founding group was closely involved<br />

with politics and both the U.S. and Italian<br />

governments, there is no real proof that<br />

the University was in fact a cover for<br />

espionage activities. Records show that<br />

David Colin was discharged from the OSS<br />

(predecessor to the CIA) in October 1945. If<br />

he was doing undercover espionage during<br />

the early years of AUR in the 1970s, we have<br />

yet to find the documents to confirm it.<br />

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<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

3<br />

Chapter 2. The AUR Identity<br />

3. Colin, David. Letter presented to 1st Lt.<br />

James D. Walsh. Dated 30 November 1945.<br />

Declassified file. Office of Strategic Services<br />

Personnel Files from World War II. The U.S.<br />

National Archives and Records Administration.<br />

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PART II.<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

Chapter 3. AUR Is Its People<br />

Chapter 3:<br />

AUR IS ITS PEOPLE<br />

History is nothing but a narration of<br />

those who live, work, believe in a vision,<br />

and make it happen. AUR is only as strong<br />

as its people. It is thanks to the people—<br />

from all constituencies, throughout<br />

the years—that AUR is what it is today.<br />

Students, staff, faculty, alumni, trustees,<br />

donors, volunteers, and friends, all make<br />

up that worldwide AUR community that<br />

will always call Rome, home.<br />

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<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

1<br />

Chapter 3. AUR Is Its People<br />

1. Group of AUR<br />

students in 2005.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

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PART II.<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

AUR Chairs of the<br />

Board of Trustees:<br />

Chapter 3. AUR Is Its People<br />

George A. Tesoro<br />

(1969-1984)<br />

Joseph T. Ventura<br />

(1984-1989)<br />

Margaret J. Giannini<br />

(1989-2003)<br />

Joseph V. Del Raso<br />

(2003-2013)<br />

Gabriel A. Battista<br />

(2013-Present)<br />

122


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

2<br />

Chapter 3. AUR Is Its People<br />

3<br />

2. Current Chair of the Board<br />

of Trustees, Gabriel A. Battista<br />

addressing the graduating class<br />

at Commencement.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

3. Current Board of Trustees,<br />

with Dr. Richard Hodges, OBE<br />

(second row, third from left).<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

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PART II.<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

AUR Presidents:<br />

Chapter 3. AUR Is Its People<br />

David T. Colin<br />

(1969-1985)<br />

John V. Falconieri<br />

(1985-1989)<br />

Gregory O. Smith<br />

(Acting)<br />

(1989-1990)<br />

Robert Severino<br />

(1990-1993)<br />

Amb. Alessandro<br />

Cortese de Bosis<br />

(1993-1995)<br />

Angela Iovino<br />

(1995-1996)<br />

Peter Alegi<br />

(Acting)<br />

(1996-1996)<br />

Margaret Melady<br />

(1997-2003)<br />

Robert H. Evans<br />

(2003-2005)<br />

Robert Marino<br />

(2005-2011)<br />

Andrew Thompson<br />

(Acting)<br />

(2011-2012)<br />

Richard Hodges, OBE<br />

(2012-Present)<br />

124


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

4<br />

Chapter 3. AUR Is Its People<br />

4. Founder and first President<br />

of AUR, David T. Colin (front left),<br />

with students in 1977.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

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PART II.<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

Chapter 3. AUR Is Its People<br />

Honorary degree<br />

recipients since 1994:<br />

1994<br />

Rev. Donald Harrington<br />

Former President<br />

of St. John’s University<br />

1995<br />

Edward D. Re<br />

Chief Judge, Professor<br />

of St. John’s University<br />

1997<br />

Cipriana Artom Scelba<br />

Former Exec. Director, Italian<br />

Fulbright Commission<br />

(1948-1988)<br />

1997<br />

Antonio Marinelli<br />

Businessman, and former Member<br />

of the Board of Trustees<br />

of The American University of Rome<br />

1998<br />

Corinne Claiborne Boggs<br />

American Politician and former<br />

Ambassador of the U.S.<br />

to the Vatican<br />

1998<br />

Hage Geingob<br />

Politician and current President<br />

of the Republic of Namibia<br />

1999<br />

Stephen A. Fausel<br />

Philanthropist, Environmentalist,<br />

Businessman, Humanitarian<br />

1999<br />

Rexhep Meidani<br />

Physics Professor and Diplomat,<br />

former President of the Republic<br />

of Albania<br />

2000<br />

Francesco Rutelli<br />

Italian Politician and former Mayor<br />

of the City of Rome<br />

2001<br />

Boris Biancheri<br />

Italian Diplomat and Author, former<br />

President of Ansa<br />

(Italian Press Agency)<br />

2001<br />

Catherine Bertini<br />

Leader in International Organization<br />

Management, former Executive<br />

Director of World Food Program<br />

(1992-2002)<br />

2002<br />

Patricia de Stacy Harrison<br />

U. S. Assistant Secretary of State,<br />

Educational & Cultural Affairs,<br />

former Member of the Board<br />

of Trustees of the American<br />

University of Rome<br />

2002<br />

Lawrence E. Auriana<br />

Co-founder and Portfolio Manager,<br />

Federated Kaufmann Fund<br />

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<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

2003<br />

Dr. Margaret J. Giannini<br />

Director, Office of Disability,<br />

Department of Health and Human<br />

Services, former Member of the<br />

Board of Trustees of The American<br />

University of Rome<br />

2004<br />

Lilli Gruber<br />

RAI Television Journalist<br />

2005<br />

On. Franco Frattini<br />

Italian Politician<br />

and EU Commissioner<br />

2005<br />

John F. Scarpa<br />

Entrepreneur, Former co-founder<br />

and president of American Cellular<br />

Network Corporation, as well as<br />

former co-founder of Unitel Wireless<br />

Communications Systems<br />

2005<br />

Robert H. Evans<br />

Educator, Scholar of Politics<br />

and International Relations,<br />

former President of The American<br />

University of Rome<br />

2006<br />

Pier Francesco Guarguaglini<br />

Italian Engineer, Businessman<br />

and Educator, former Chairman<br />

of Finmeccanica (2002-2011)<br />

2006<br />

Adriano La Regina<br />

Italian Archaeologist and former<br />

President of the Instituto Nazionale<br />

di Archeologia e Storia dell Arte<br />

and President of Zetema-Progetto<br />

Cultura (1976-2004)<br />

2007<br />

Sean Lovett<br />

Director of English Programs,<br />

Vatican Radio<br />

2007<br />

Sylvia Poggioli<br />

Senior European Correspondent<br />

for NPR’s Foreign Desk<br />

2008<br />

Ronald P. Spogli<br />

American Venture Capitalist<br />

and Diplomat, former US<br />

Ambassador to Italy<br />

2009<br />

Giuliano Amato<br />

Italian Lawyer and Politician,<br />

President of the American<br />

Studies Center<br />

2009<br />

Vincent Viola<br />

Senior Strategic Advisor New York<br />

Mercantile Exchange<br />

2010<br />

Piero Angela<br />

Writer and RAI Journalist<br />

2010<br />

Robert Carlucci<br />

Businessman and Philanthropist<br />

Founder of R&R Ventures<br />

and Affiliates.<br />

2011<br />

David H. Thorne<br />

American Businessman and former<br />

US Ambassador to Italy<br />

2012<br />

Francesco Guccini<br />

Italian Singer, Poet and Songwriter<br />

Chapter 3. AUR Is Its People<br />

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Chapter 3. AUR Is Its People<br />

2012<br />

Emmanuele F.M. Emanuele<br />

Honorary Chairman<br />

Fondazione Roma<br />

2013<br />

Donna Shalala<br />

US Congresswoman and former<br />

President of the University of Miami<br />

2013<br />

Adele Chatfield Taylor<br />

Prominent Arts Administrator<br />

and former President of American<br />

Academy in Rome (1988-2013)<br />

2013<br />

Salvatore Mancuso<br />

President Equinox;<br />

Former Vice President of Alitalia<br />

2013<br />

Andrea Camilleri<br />

Novelist<br />

2014<br />

Roger Waters<br />

Pink Floyd Lead Singer<br />

and Philanthropist<br />

2014<br />

Mary Beard<br />

Classicist<br />

2014<br />

Aurelio De Laurentiis<br />

Film Producer and Chairman<br />

of Napoli Football Club<br />

2015<br />

Paolo Sorrentino<br />

Film Director and Producer<br />

2015<br />

Alice Waters<br />

Chef, Author, Food Activist<br />

2016<br />

Oscar Farinetti<br />

Founder of Eataly<br />

2016<br />

Harry Shindler, MBE<br />

Author and campaigner<br />

for veterans of WWII<br />

2017<br />

Laura Boldrini<br />

President of the Italian Chamber<br />

of Deputies<br />

2017<br />

Lynn Meskell<br />

Professor, Department<br />

of Anthropology, Stanford University<br />

2017<br />

Rula Jebreal<br />

Journalist, Author and Foreign<br />

Policy Analyst<br />

2018<br />

Charles K. Williams II<br />

Philanthropist and Archaeologist<br />

2018<br />

Joseph J. Plumeri II<br />

Philanthropist and Entrepreneur<br />

128


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

5<br />

Chapter 3. AUR Is Its People<br />

6<br />

5. Honorary Degree recipient<br />

Roger Waters (center) with<br />

AUR Board Chair and Senior Staff<br />

in 2014. Photo from AUR archives.<br />

6. Honorary Degree recipient<br />

Rula Jebreal (center) with Syrian<br />

scholarship recipients in 2017.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

129


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Chapter 3. AUR Is Its People<br />

8<br />

130<br />

7. Honorary Degree recipient<br />

Paolo Sorrentino (front left),<br />

with AUR students in 2015.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

8. Honorary Degree recipient<br />

Vincent Viola (left), with AUR<br />

students in 2009.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

People who have left<br />

an unforgettable trace<br />

at AUR:<br />

Robert Henry<br />

Evans<br />

President 2003-2005<br />

Robert Henry Evans was born in Bristol,<br />

England, on April 1, 1937. He grew up<br />

mainly in France, becoming a fluent French<br />

and Italian speaker, graduating from the<br />

Institut des Etudes Politiques in 1959. He<br />

then taught geography and history in<br />

France for two years before going to the<br />

University of Denver where he received his<br />

master’s degree in 1961 and his Ph.D. in<br />

1966. During this period, he continued to<br />

work at the Bologna Center as Assistant<br />

to the Director. He then returned to the<br />

U.S., where he taught at the University<br />

of Notre Dame and later at the University<br />

of Virginia as a Professor of Government<br />

and Foreign Affairs, as well as serving as<br />

Chair of the Department at the latter from<br />

1982-1987. In 1992, he returned to Bologna to<br />

direct the Johns Hopkins University School<br />

of Advanced International Studies.<br />

In 2003, he moved to Rome to become<br />

President of AUR.<br />

During his lifetime, he received several<br />

awards for his work in the field of education<br />

and international relations. Among these<br />

were the Turrito d’Oro from the Mayor<br />

of Bologna, the Sigillo d’Ateneo from the<br />

University of Bologna, the Distinguished<br />

Alumnus Award from Johns Hopkins<br />

University, and, along with his wife, the<br />

Founder’s Award from the Paul H. Nitze<br />

School of Advanced International Studies<br />

in Washington, DC.<br />

A scholar, political scientist, educator, and<br />

revered academic leader, Robert Evans<br />

believed that international education<br />

allowed for better world citizens and<br />

more mindful leaders. He stated: “You<br />

put 30 nationalities together, each with<br />

its point of view, and by the end of the<br />

year each person has learned to listen to<br />

another point of view, and ponder it, and<br />

even agree with it.” He was, undeniably, a<br />

perfect fit for AUR and it is saddening that<br />

he was not able to see the growth of the<br />

University as he had once envisioned it. In<br />

2005, Evans passed away prematurely due<br />

to illness. In honor of his memory, the SAIS<br />

department of Johns Hopkins University<br />

in Bologna dedicated library in his name.<br />

The American University of Rome named<br />

its library after him and his wife, who both<br />

made great contributions to the growth<br />

and vision of the University, despite the<br />

brevity of the time they spent there.<br />

Robert H. Evans will always be remembered<br />

by the AUR community as a kind and<br />

visionary man and a leading voice of AUR<br />

that has echoed throughout the years.<br />

Chapter 3. AUR Is Its People<br />

Robert H. Evans<br />

in 2003.<br />

Photo from<br />

AUR archives.<br />

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Chapter 3. AUR Is Its People<br />

Terry Rossi<br />

Kirk<br />

Professor of Art History<br />

1988-2009<br />

“IMPOSSIBLE WORDS,<br />

WONDROUS<br />

NECESSARY WORDS,<br />

WORDS LONGING TO BE<br />

MORE THAN WORDS,<br />

LONGING TO<br />

BE MORE LIKE SILENCE<br />

OR LIKE ACTION,<br />

WORDS IN <strong>THE</strong> FACE<br />

<strong>OF</strong> UNSPEAKABLE BEAUTY,<br />

<strong>OF</strong> UNSPEAKABLE<br />

ANGUISH,<br />

WORDS <strong>OF</strong> SHAME<br />

AND <strong>OF</strong> HOPE<br />

BLUSHING<br />

AT <strong>THE</strong>MSELVES.”<br />

Poem by Paul Murray,<br />

shared by Prof. Breda Enis<br />

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PART II.<br />

Chapter 3. AUR Is Its People<br />

Terry Rossi Kirk was born on August 30,<br />

1961, in Florida. He attended Université de<br />

Genève in Switzerland, Universität Wien<br />

in Austria, and Università per Stranieri<br />

in Perugia, Italy. He received a B.A. with<br />

distinction in Art History at Yale College,<br />

New Haven, in 1984. Kirk completed three<br />

additional degrees at Columbia University,<br />

New York, in the Department of Art<br />

History: an M.A. in 1986, an M.Phil. in 1987,<br />

and a Ph.D. in 1997. During his lifetime, he<br />

collaborated with the National Endowment<br />

for the Humanities, the Institut de l’Histoire<br />

de l’Art, the Deutsches Archaeologisches<br />

Institut, the Yale University School of<br />

Architecture, the University of Lund, the<br />

Savannah College of Art and Design,<br />

and the Wagner Society of Rome.<br />

Wanderer Above the<br />

Sea of Fog,<br />

by Caspar David<br />

Friedrich circa 1817.<br />

Oil on canvas.<br />

Kunsthalle Hamburg.<br />

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Chapter 3. AUR Is Its People<br />

Terry Kirk started working at The American<br />

University of Rome in 1988, teaching an<br />

introductory course entitled “The Art<br />

of Rome.” He worked closely not only<br />

with the faculty in his department, but<br />

with professors from all AUR’s academic<br />

departments, and formed strong bonds<br />

with students, professors, and staff alike.<br />

He left in his wake that most significant<br />

and profound legacy that any teacher can<br />

hope for: he changed lives. His students<br />

remember his lectures as engaging and<br />

inspiring, his marvelous way with words<br />

bringing the art and architecture of<br />

Rome to life. A singer and a performer,<br />

he imbued his classes with theatricality,<br />

leading students through the streets<br />

of Rome on expeditions to plume its stories<br />

and secrets. His dedication and enthusiasm<br />

as a professor is extant, still today.<br />

The students who had the honor of<br />

meeting him continue to treasure their<br />

memories of his dedication and enthusiasm<br />

as a professor.<br />

On October 17, 2009, Terry Kirk left<br />

this world prematurely. His death was<br />

a tremendous loss for the entire AUR<br />

community, the field of Art History, and<br />

academia at large. He will always be<br />

remembered for his unfaltering smile and<br />

joie-de-vivre, one of the greatest professors<br />

Rome and AUR ever had.<br />

134<br />

Prof. Kirk (second from<br />

left) with his students<br />

at Parco del Colle Oppio,<br />

near the Colosseum.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

“Terry loved a painting entitled wanderer<br />

above the sea of fog by the German Romantic<br />

landscape painter Caspar David Friedrich<br />

– a haunting vision of a lonely figure standing<br />

on a rocky peak confronting the grandeur<br />

of nature in astonished reverence.<br />

In the distance – through the swirling fog<br />

– rises a triangular shaped mountain which<br />

seems to dialogue with him across the vast open<br />

spaces inhabited by hills, trees,<br />

and of course the fog.<br />

Chapter 3. AUR Is Its People<br />

Terry climbed up to the rocky peak for a final<br />

communion with nature’s great distances<br />

and vast spaces.<br />

We, all of us, want to spiritually go up<br />

the mountain with him.<br />

We want to Acknowledge his loneliness<br />

and his solitude – a loneliness that is desiring<br />

and which lent a dignity to the poem of his life.<br />

His last word to us is silence-------that silence coming<br />

from the mystery of the human condition.<br />

Again ------his last word is silence – a silence having<br />

within it an element of the tragic and the heroic.<br />

It brings us to contemplate our own inner<br />

spaces and solitude.<br />

Terry went into the enormous beauty of nature<br />

to solace his soul, a soul that yearned for what<br />

the mountain would say to him.”<br />

Prof. Breda Ennis<br />

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<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

Chapter 3. AUR Is Its People<br />

James<br />

Walston<br />

Professor of International<br />

Relations 1991-2014<br />

James Walston was born in Dublin, Ireland,<br />

on July 18, 1949. He was raised in England,<br />

where he studied at Eton and Jesus College,<br />

Cambridge University (B.A. 1975 and<br />

Ph.D. 1986). In the early 1970s, he taught in<br />

Milan, and, in 1974, he moved permanently<br />

to Rome.<br />

Walston taught mainly in U.S. higher education<br />

institutions abroad, including the<br />

University of Maryland, Middlebury College<br />

in Vermont, and various U.S. programs<br />

in Rome, including Temple, Trinity, and<br />

Loyola. In 1991, he joined the AUR community,<br />

teaching history, politics, and international<br />

relations. An expert in contemporary<br />

Italian politics, conflict resolution issues,<br />

and modern history, Walston published extensively<br />

and was called to comment on<br />

politics and economy by important news<br />

outlets, such as The Guardian, CNN, ABC,<br />

136<br />

Professor Walston at<br />

the 40th Anniversary<br />

picnic in 2009. Photo<br />

from AUR archives.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

and the BBC. In 1997, he became the first<br />

European Union citizen to stand for election<br />

to the Rome City Council.<br />

From 2002 to 2008, Walston was the Chair<br />

of the International Relations Department<br />

at AUR. During this time, he took students<br />

on regular fieldtrips to sites like Brussels,<br />

Geneva, and Vienna, as well as to conflict<br />

resolution sites like the Basque Country,<br />

Northern Ireland, Montenegro, and Kosovo.<br />

During this period, Walston also established<br />

an annual Ghana trip and the brief, but<br />

influential, Ghana Scholarship for Ghanaian<br />

students to spend a semester abroad at<br />

AUR. Since 2004, and until his premature<br />

passing, he also taught and directed the<br />

University of Rome La Sapienza’s Eurosapienza’s<br />

international relations module in the<br />

master’s program in State Management<br />

and Humanitarian Affairs.<br />

James Walston changed the lives of his students.<br />

With his passion and dedication to<br />

teaching, he is remembered by all as a pillar<br />

of The American University of Rome. In the<br />

words of President Richard Hodges, “Over<br />

the course of a quarter century, Professor<br />

Walston was not only a founding father of<br />

The American University of Rome, but its<br />

most distinguished, gracious, and charismatic<br />

public champion. He was a beloved<br />

professor who provided his students with<br />

fascinating classes and real-world experiences,<br />

always combined with a habitually<br />

gentle wisdom.”<br />

James Walston passed away in May 2014.<br />

Following his death, several memorial<br />

initiatives were launched in his memory.<br />

The James Walston Fund was launched by<br />

alumnae Sallie Pisch (International Relations,<br />

2010) and Caitlin Bagby (International<br />

Relations, 2009). The fund supports<br />

the International Relations fieldtrips that<br />

Walston so strongly believed in. To Professor<br />

Walston these trips were an essential<br />

component of an International Relations’<br />

education because they provided students<br />

the possibility to experience theoretical and<br />

historical training on the ground.<br />

Chapter 3. AUR Is Its People<br />

Professor Walston at<br />

the Commencement<br />

procession of 2010.<br />

Photo from AUR<br />

archives.<br />

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PART II.<br />

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Chapter 3. AUR Is Its People<br />

Through these academic fieldtrips, students<br />

do not just gain knowledge of the<br />

real world but create bonds as a community<br />

by sharing a common passion of international<br />

affairs. Furthermore, the annual<br />

James Walston Memorial Lecture was established<br />

in commemoration of the various<br />

guest lecturers that Walston brought to<br />

AUR during his years as a professor.<br />

The premature passing of James Walston<br />

was a great loss to AUR, but he will always<br />

be remembered, commemorated,<br />

and honored as one of the great people<br />

that changed AUR forever.<br />

“Professor Walston was a true teacher<br />

and an incredible academic mind.<br />

His devotion to AUR stemmed from<br />

his relationships with the students,<br />

his love of Italy, and Rome in particular,<br />

and an unflappable drive to be a force<br />

for good in the world. He had a very<br />

strong belief that he could contribute<br />

to students’ world views through teaching<br />

and through practical exposure to<br />

the political realities of any given<br />

situation. I believe that he found a perfect<br />

confluence of inspirations at AUR,<br />

in that he could incorporate his workstudy<br />

trips into a rigorous academic<br />

program and truly teach people about<br />

politics and the world.”<br />

Bliss Holloway, International<br />

Relations and Global Politics, 2004<br />

Chair, AUR Alumni Council<br />

138


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

Chapter 3. AUR Is Its People<br />

AUR students at an on-site<br />

class at the Pantheon.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

139


PART II.<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

SENIORITY HONOR ROLL<br />

by years of service<br />

Chapter 3. AUR Is Its People<br />

27 years of service<br />

Rosa Fusco, Director of Computer Services<br />

22 years of service<br />

Franziska Wallner, Senior Librarian<br />

21 years of service<br />

Giovanna Agostini, Adjunct Faculty, Fine Arts<br />

Anna Balzarro, Adjunct Faculty, History<br />

Paolo Crocchiolo, Adjunct Faculty, Biology<br />

Lucy Delogu, Adjunct Faculty, Italian Studies<br />

Valentina Dorato, Adjunct Faculty, Italian Studies<br />

Alessandro Liberto, Adjunct Faculty, Poetry and Literature<br />

Josephine Luzon, Adjunct Faculty, Accounting<br />

Timothy Martin, Adjunct Faculty, Italian Studies/Fine Arts<br />

Ida Passarelli, Adjunct Faculty, Italian Studies<br />

Silvano Susi, Adjunct Faculty, Business Administration<br />

140


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

18 years of service<br />

Marita Luzon, Finance Office Manager<br />

17 years of service<br />

Katherine Bemis, Student Life Coordinator,<br />

Community Service & Engagement Specialist<br />

Daria Borghese, Adjunct Faculty, Art History<br />

Chiara Lino, Student Life Coordinator & Intercultural<br />

Relations Specialist<br />

David A. Pollon, Adjunct Faculty, Business Administration<br />

Robert G. Sonnabend, Adjunct Faculty, Business<br />

Administration<br />

Chapter 3. AUR Is Its People<br />

15 years of service<br />

Kathleen Fitzsimmons, Associate Professor,<br />

Director of Business Administration<br />

Paul Gwynne, Full Professor of Medieval<br />

and Renaissance Studies, Director of Interdisciplinary Studies<br />

Valerie Higgins, Associate Professor of Archaeology,<br />

Director of Sustainable Cultural Heritage MA<br />

Jens D. Koehler, Adjunct Faculty, Archaeology and Classics<br />

Marshall Langer, Adjunct Faculty, Business Administration<br />

Catherine Ramsey-Portolano, Associate Professor,<br />

Director of Italian Studies<br />

Stefano Stoppaccioli, Dean of Students<br />

& Director of Affilliate Programs<br />

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<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

Chapter 4:<br />

<strong>THE</strong> LOCATIONS <strong>OF</strong> AUR<br />

When you walk onto the campus<br />

of The American University of Rome<br />

today, it seems inconceivable that AUR<br />

started in an apartment in the center<br />

of Rome. And yet, it did. With its legal<br />

headquarters at the Colin residence,<br />

AUR rented two apartments in the<br />

vicinity of Via Veneto, where most classes<br />

were held. The American University<br />

of Rome, as envisioned by its founders,<br />

was in fact a University without—or<br />

with very few—walls. David T. Colin and<br />

Joan Carpenter took students all around<br />

Rome, and Italy, to learn from high profile<br />

professionals in business, art, cinema, and<br />

politics. It was not until 1993, when the<br />

dislocated buildings became insufficient to<br />

hold the number of students it had, that<br />

AUR was forced to look for a new campus.<br />

142


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

Giovanni Battista Piranesi. The Piazza di Spagna<br />

(Veduta di Piazza di Spagna). Etching. Ca. 17<strong>50</strong>.<br />

Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain<br />

Image from The Metropolitan Museum of Art.<br />

143


PART II.<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

Via della Mercede, 21<br />

Colin property<br />

144


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

When The American University of Rome was<br />

founded, David T. Colin generously offered<br />

his property in the center of Rome as the<br />

official headquarters of the University. The<br />

two-bedroom apartment near the Spanish<br />

steps hosted the administrative offices<br />

of AUR, the Student Union, and a small<br />

classroom space. Convivial events that Joan<br />

Carpenter (Colin’s wife and Dean of Students)<br />

organized—usually Sunday pizza parties—were<br />

held at the Colin residence on Via Cassia.<br />

Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

1<br />

1. Front of CIVIS.<br />

Photo from AUR<br />

archives.<br />

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PART II.<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

Thanks to Colin’s contacts, AUR<br />

classes and dorms were located in the<br />

Montemario neighborhood at the then<br />

CIVIS (Casa Italiana Viaggi Internazionali<br />

Studenti) center. CIVIS, Loyola University’s<br />

headquarters in Rome since 2009, was<br />

founded in 1962 by Reverend John P.<br />

Felice, a Maltese Jesuit who served as an<br />

intelligence officer in the British Eighth<br />

Army during World War II.<br />

Between 1969 and approximately 1980,<br />

The American University of Rome shared<br />

CIVIS spaces with other American and<br />

International universities that offered study<br />

abroad programs in Rome.<br />

2<br />

146<br />

2. AUR students at<br />

the CIVIS dorms in<br />

1974. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

3<br />

4<br />

Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

5<br />

3. Students at the<br />

CIVIS dining hall in<br />

1975. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.<br />

4. Pizza party at the<br />

Colin residence on Via<br />

Cassia in 1975. Photo<br />

from AUR archives.<br />

5. Pizza party at the<br />

Colin’s residence on<br />

Via Cassia in 1975.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

147


PART II.<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

Viale delle Milizie, 6<br />

148


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

1<br />

Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

As AUR grew steadily, its demand for more<br />

space to host more students became<br />

imperative. In addition, student strikes and<br />

squatting at the CIVIS facilities made the<br />

use of the space on the Nomentana less<br />

than ideal. It was then that President Colin<br />

arranged for the renting of a space in the<br />

Prati neighborhood, more precisely on Viale<br />

delle Milizie, 6. The facilities there consisted<br />

of three classrooms, an office-seminar<br />

room, and a garden. The administrative<br />

offices, a student lounge, and a classroom<br />

remained in the Colin property near Piazza<br />

di Spagna and the library space used by<br />

students was the British Council Library.<br />

This was a temporary solution, as the<br />

University was growing at a fast pace.<br />

The Viale delle Milizie facilities were shared<br />

with the Istituto delle Comunicazioni led<br />

by a Mr. Alberto J. Sciaky, who was part<br />

of a prominent Jewish family and an<br />

acquaintance of Colin. Having left CIVIS,<br />

housing for students was in lodging houses<br />

or pensioni. Some of the lodging houses<br />

that had an agreement with AUR were<br />

Pensione Paradiso, Pensione Chindano,<br />

and Pensione De Petris. Most of these still<br />

exist today.<br />

1. Viale delle Milizie<br />

in 1982. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.<br />

149


PART II.<br />

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Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

3<br />

1<strong>50</strong><br />

2. Prof. Michael Rudd<br />

(top right) teaching<br />

Roman Literature in<br />

Translation in 1983<br />

at AUR. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.<br />

3. Students outside<br />

Pensione Paradiso.<br />

Photo from AUR<br />

archives.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

4<br />

Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

5<br />

4. Students in a<br />

room of one of the<br />

pensioni. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.<br />

5. Viale delle Milizie today.<br />

Photo by Ellie Johnson.<br />

151


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<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

Via Marche, 54<br />

Scala B, 5th floor<br />

152


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

1<br />

In June 1984, The American University of<br />

Rome moved to Via Marche, 54. A couple<br />

of minutes away from the American<br />

Embassy and Via Veneto, AUR facilities<br />

included administrative offices, classrooms,<br />

a conference room, and a small library<br />

with mostly course-related books.<br />

Classes were still held mostly on-site and<br />

academic fieldtrips were a pivotal part of<br />

the curriculum. Today, the apartment is a<br />

private residence. The doorwoman there<br />

has worked in the building since before AUR<br />

was there.<br />

Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

1. Entrance to<br />

Via Marche in<br />

the early 1980s.<br />

Photo from AUR<br />

archives.<br />

153


PART II.<br />

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Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

3<br />

154<br />

2. Entrance to Via Marche today.<br />

Photo by Ellie Johnson.<br />

3. Roberto, the barista of Caffe Tazza d’Oro<br />

on Via Marche. He has been working at the<br />

coffee bar since the 1970s and still remembers<br />

AUR students and professors who came to<br />

have coffee there. Photo by Ellie Johnson.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

4<br />

Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

5<br />

4. Via Marche street<br />

view today. Photo by<br />

Ellie Johnson.<br />

5. Via Marche street<br />

view in 1983. Photo<br />

from AUR archives.<br />

155


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Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

Piazza Sallustio, 24<br />

156


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

1<br />

As AUR grew, its expansion project<br />

continued. In 1986, the University rented<br />

an apartment overlooking the ancient Villa<br />

of Sallust where the Gardens of Sallust—<br />

formerly the Gardens of Caesar—once<br />

blossomed. The Via Marche apartment<br />

remained the main headquarters, with<br />

administrative offices, library, and<br />

auditorium, while the Piazza Sallustio, 24<br />

location hosted most classrooms.<br />

Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

1. Piazza Sallustio<br />

street view. Photo<br />

from AUR archives.<br />

157


PART II.<br />

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Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

3<br />

158<br />

2. Piazza Sallustio<br />

AUR headquarters.<br />

Photo from AUR<br />

archives.<br />

3. Possibly student<br />

lounge at Piazza<br />

Sallustio. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

4<br />

Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

5<br />

4. Entrance to<br />

Piazza Sallustio 24<br />

today. Photo by Ellie<br />

Johnson.<br />

5. Classroom at<br />

Piazza Sallustio.<br />

Photo from AUR<br />

archives.<br />

159


PART II.<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

Via Sallustiana, 1A<br />

160


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

Shortly after renting the first apartment<br />

in Piazza Sallustio, the need for a<br />

more practical space for the library led<br />

then- President John Falconieri to search<br />

for somewhere to move the library closer<br />

to the Sallustio quarters. He found a spot<br />

right on the Piazza, in an elegant corner<br />

building. In this way, the disposition was<br />

more efficient, with the administrative<br />

offices on Via Marche and most of the<br />

teaching, studying, and conferences<br />

focused at the Sallustio locations.<br />

Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

1<br />

1. View of the Gardens<br />

of Sallust from a window<br />

of Via Sallustiana<br />

1A. Photo from AUR<br />

archives.<br />

161


PART II.<br />

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2<br />

3<br />

Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

3<br />

162<br />

2. The entrance of<br />

Via Sallustiana 1A<br />

today. Photo by Ellie<br />

Johnson.<br />

3. The doorman of the Sallustiana<br />

Center was known for his charm<br />

and humor, so much so that he<br />

was featured in the AUR catalogue<br />

of 1989-1990. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

4<br />

Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

5<br />

4. AUR students at<br />

Library front desk.<br />

Photo from AUR<br />

archives.<br />

5. AUR students studying at the<br />

Library of the Sallustiana Center.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

163


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Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

7<br />

164<br />

6. Prof. Alex Liberto<br />

in the classroom<br />

at the Sallustiana<br />

Center in 1989. Photo<br />

from AUR archives.<br />

7. AUR students<br />

studying at the<br />

Library of the Sallustiana<br />

Center. Photo<br />

from AUR archives.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

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Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

8. The American University<br />

of Rome facilities map.<br />

Academic catalogue 1989-1990.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

165


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Via Collina, 24<br />

166


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PART II.<br />

1<br />

By the end of 1990, AUR left the Via Marche<br />

apartment and fully completed the triangle<br />

of the ruins of the Villa of Sallust. Moving<br />

out of the close vicinity of Via Veneto,<br />

the administrative offices, the computer<br />

laboratory, the bookstore, and some<br />

classrooms were housed in the Via Collina<br />

apartment. The other two apartments on<br />

the Piazza continued to host classrooms,<br />

offices, and the AUR Library.<br />

Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

1. View from Via<br />

Collina 24. Photo<br />

from AUR archives.<br />

167


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168<br />

2. Interior view of<br />

AUR facilities at Via<br />

Collina. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.<br />

3. Entrance to<br />

Via Collina 24 today.<br />

Photo by Ellie Johnson.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

4<br />

Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

4. The American University<br />

of Rome facilities map. Academic<br />

catalogue 1991-1992/1992-1993.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

169


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6<br />

170<br />

5. Non-smoker student<br />

lounge at Via Collina<br />

facilities. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.<br />

6. Computer laboratory,<br />

Via Collina. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

7<br />

Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

8<br />

7. AUR students outside<br />

Via Collina. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.<br />

8. Computer laboratory,<br />

Via Collina. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.<br />

171


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Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

Via Pietro Roselli, 4<br />

172


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

The American University of Rome was<br />

growing at a fast pace. Moving to a single<br />

space that would resemble an American<br />

university campus had been a goal for<br />

AUR’s leadership for quite some time. In<br />

1993, with Robert Severino as President,<br />

AUR found a building atop the Janiculum<br />

Hill that was a fitting solution for the needs<br />

of the time. Owned by the Vatican and<br />

administered by the Barnabite order, the<br />

property was a drastic change in location:<br />

from the city center to the primarily<br />

residential Monteverde.<br />

Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

1. Building B when<br />

AUR first moved to<br />

Via Pietro Roselli 4<br />

in 1993. Photo from<br />

AUR archives. 173


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Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

AUR initially rented and refurbished<br />

only one of the buildings (what today<br />

is known as Building A). Formerly a<br />

radio broadcasting studio, the building<br />

underwent several renovations to make it<br />

suitable to the University’s needs. As the<br />

students increased and there was more<br />

need for space, AUR started expanding,<br />

renting a portion of the adjacent Barnabite<br />

building (now known as Building B) and<br />

the Barnabite guest house (which once<br />

housed administrative offices, and is today<br />

the site of the AUR Library). The Auriana<br />

Auditorium, the Carini Building, and Masina<br />

Art Studios were added later, extending the<br />

campus to three nearby locations.<br />

3<br />

174<br />

2. Terrace of Building A<br />

before AUR moved in 1993.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

3. Building A before<br />

renovations:<br />

Entrance and garden<br />

in 1993. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

4<br />

5<br />

6<br />

Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

4. Building A before<br />

renovations: radio station,<br />

ground floor of Building A<br />

in 1993. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.<br />

5. Building A before<br />

renovations: this was<br />

the radio recording<br />

studio in 1993. Photo<br />

from AUR archives.<br />

6. Building A after<br />

renovations in 1995.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

175


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Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

8<br />

9<br />

176<br />

7. AUR auditorium<br />

and classroom, ground<br />

floor of Building A in 1995.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

8. Ground floor of<br />

Building A, from auditorium<br />

to computer lab. Photo<br />

from AUR archives.<br />

9. Building A Terrace.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

10<br />

11<br />

Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

10. Staircase of Building A<br />

(no elevator yet).<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

11. AUR Library in Building B,<br />

1st floor. Photo from AUR archives.<br />

177


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Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

13<br />

178<br />

12. AUR Garden in the<br />

early 1990s. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.<br />

13. Building A in 2003.<br />

Photo by Anthony Fassero.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

14<br />

15<br />

Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

14. AUR Garden in 2003.<br />

Photo by Anthony Fassero.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

15. Building B in 2003.<br />

Photo by Anthony Fassero.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

179


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Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

17<br />

180<br />

16. AUR Library,<br />

Evans Hall, in 2005.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

17. Inside the AUR<br />

Library, Evans Hall,<br />

in 2008. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

18<br />

Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

19<br />

18. Ground floor of Building A,<br />

from computer lab to lounge<br />

in 2017. Photo by Luigi Mistrulli.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

19. Garden Entrance<br />

to AUR. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.<br />

181


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20. AUR aerial view in 2013.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

183


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Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

22<br />

184<br />

21. We are AUR<br />

during Open Day<br />

2017. Photo from<br />

AUR archives.<br />

22. 4th of July celebrations<br />

with fireworks in 2018.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

23<br />

Chapter 4. The Locations of AUR<br />

23.AUR Garden view<br />

in April 2015. Photo<br />

from AUR archives.<br />

185


PART II.<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

Chapter 5. AUR’s Neighborhood<br />

Chapter 5:<br />

AUR’S NEIGHBORHOOD<br />

The American University of Rome has,<br />

coincidentally, been located at the two<br />

locations of the Horti Caesaris, or the<br />

gardens that once belonged to Julius<br />

Caesar. The first locations of AUR,<br />

around Piazza Sallustio, were the site of<br />

the gardens belonging to Caesar on the<br />

Quirinal. After the death of Julius Caesar,<br />

Sallust acquired the gardens, hence their<br />

name. On the Janiculum, where AUR is<br />

today, the gardens of Caesar are famed<br />

for having hosted Cleopatra in 44 BC.<br />

186<br />

1. Triennale di<br />

Milano in May<br />

1968


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

1<br />

Chapter 5. AUR’s Neighborhood<br />

1. View from the Janiculum Hill, Rome,<br />

with the Villa Aurelia, Fontana dell’Acqua Paola<br />

and San Pietro in Montorio, J.M.W. Turner, 1819.<br />

Graphite and watercolor on paper. Tate Britain.<br />

187


PART II.<br />

<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

Chapter 5. AUR’s Neighborhood<br />

The Janiculum Hill<br />

and Monteverde<br />

Although not one of the famous seven<br />

hills of Rome, Monteverde is the second<br />

highest hill of the city. Mostly a rural area,<br />

the neighborhood that extended from<br />

the Tiber and up the slope, hosted mainly<br />

small cottages and bigger villas, gardens,<br />

and vineyards. Monteverde was an area of<br />

summer houses and entertainment. The<br />

land where AUR is today, in fact, once<br />

encompassed all of the adjacent Villa<br />

Sciarra and much of the land that extends<br />

down to the river. In 1886, the then owner<br />

of the estate, Maffeo Barberini Colonna<br />

di Sciarra, and the Compagnia Fondiaria<br />

Italiana divided the land into lots to be<br />

sold. The Villa Sciarra and a portion of the<br />

surrounding gardens (what we know as the<br />

park today) remained, however, owned by<br />

the Colonna di Sciarra family.<br />

188


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

2<br />

The early 20th century saw the most<br />

activity atop the Janiculum. Even though<br />

a city plan for Monteverde had been in<br />

the works since the 1880s, it was only<br />

with Rome’s Mayor Ernesto Nathan that<br />

the plan was carried out. AUR’s current<br />

location was purchased by the Vatican and<br />

distributed amongst several congregations,<br />

some of which had recently fled from an<br />

increasingly secular France, back to Italy.<br />

Chapter 5. AUR’s Neighborhood<br />

2. View of Rome from the<br />

Janiculum from the early 1900s.<br />

Image available on the World Wide<br />

Web and part of public domain.<br />

189


PART II.<br />

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3<br />

Chapter 5. AUR’s Neighborhood<br />

Monteverde underwent extensive<br />

construction that started in the 1920s,<br />

with the growth of the Fascist regime<br />

and its urban projects. Via di Donna<br />

Olimpia and its welfare housing were a<br />

relocation project that would allow the<br />

construction of Via della Conciliazione:<br />

one of the many Fascist initiatives to<br />

“re-monumentalize” Rome. A once<br />

aristocratic rural area, Monteverde quickly<br />

became a blend of people. Monteverde<br />

Vecchio saw the arrival of wealthy<br />

Americans (such as those connected to<br />

the building of the American Academy in<br />

Rome and the Wurts Family, who bought<br />

Villa Sciarra) and religious congregations,<br />

while the close by Monteverde Nuovo took<br />

in merchants and laborers.<br />

Monteverde has had its fair share of<br />

famous personalities walk its streets.<br />

Maurits Cornelis Escher, world renowned<br />

Dutch graphic designer, lived for almost<br />

a decade in a house on Via Poerio. After<br />

World War II, Monteverde saw the presence<br />

of important Italian personalities such<br />

as Giovanni “Gianni” Rodari (poet and<br />

author, famous for his children’s books),<br />

Pier Paolo Pasolini (film director, poet, and<br />

author), Attilio Bertolucci (poet, father<br />

of the famous film director Bartolomeo<br />

Bartolucci), and Miriam Mafai (journalist,<br />

politician, and one of the founders of the<br />

La Repubblica newspaper). Pasolini lived a<br />

portion of his life in the neighborhood: first<br />

on Via Fonteiana 86 and later on Via Carini<br />

45. Today, Monteverde is still the home<br />

of artists and intellectuals, such as film<br />

director Nanni Moretti, the sculptor Peter<br />

190<br />

3. Detail of the fountain<br />

of fauns near the entrance<br />

of Villa Sciarra.<br />

Photo by Jacob Moore.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

4<br />

Chapter 5. AUR’s Neighborhood<br />

Rockwell (son of famous painter Norman<br />

Rockwell), actresses Paola Cortellesi and<br />

Serena Dandini, actors Carlo Verdone and<br />

Pino Insegno, and pianist Nicola Piovani.<br />

When the lands of Maffeo Barberini<br />

Colonna di Sciarra were allotted and put<br />

on the market, Villa Sciarra was sold as<br />

well. Just across the street from AUR, Villa<br />

Sciarra is a place that has been meaningful<br />

to our community since the University<br />

moved to the Janiculum in 1993. The park,<br />

as all places in the Eternal City, has quite<br />

an interesting history. In 1902, George<br />

Washington Wurts, a retired American<br />

diplomat from Pennsylvania bought the<br />

Villa for 300,000 lire. Wurts had spent<br />

several years in Rome before being a<br />

diplomat in Russia, and once retired, he<br />

moved back to the city that had conquered<br />

his heart. In 1902, Wurts and his second<br />

wife Henrietta Tower moved back to the<br />

Italian capital and after purchasing the<br />

Villa, they invested all their time and<br />

energy in the restoration of the Villa and<br />

the gardens. Avid collectors of art and<br />

furniture, the Wurts restored the grandeur<br />

of the Villa and took the 19th-centurystyle<br />

gardens one step further. Filling the<br />

grounds with statues purchased in auction<br />

from Villa Visconti at Brignano (Lombardy),<br />

the gardens became an oasis of winding<br />

paths and suggestive imagery. In 1930,<br />

after the death of George Wurts, Henrietta<br />

Tower donated the estate to the state of<br />

Italy, or more precisely, to Mussolini. The<br />

donation, however, included the clause<br />

that the park be made public. In 1932,<br />

the Villa itself became the venue of the<br />

Istituto Studi Germanici, an institution that<br />

occupies it still today.<br />

4. Historical Map of<br />

Monteverde Vecchio<br />

from 1925. Valerio<br />

Varrale Collection.<br />

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PART II.<br />

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5<br />

Chapter 5. AUR’s Neighborhood<br />

192<br />

5. Detail of one of the sculptures<br />

of Villa Sciarra. Photo by Jacob<br />

Moore. Photo from AUR archives.


<strong>50</strong> <strong>YEARS</strong> <strong>OF</strong> HI<strong>STORY</strong><br />

PART II.<br />

The gardens hold a myriad of wonders<br />

that are not commonly known. Firstly,<br />

within the gardens lie a Syrian sanctuary<br />

that was unveiled in 1906. The sanctuary<br />

probably dated to the late 1st century AD<br />

and hosted syncretized Romanized Syrian<br />

deities. The sculptures within the gardens<br />

also tell stories worth hearing. Originating<br />

from the Lombard aristocratic family<br />

of Visconti, several sculptures within the<br />

park, starting with the fountain of fauns at<br />

the entrance of the park in front of AUR,<br />

allude to the grass snakes depicted on the<br />

Visconti family shield. Worthy of note are<br />

also the Fountain of Vices (Rage, Lust,<br />

Greed, and Gluttony) and the statues for<br />

the Twelve Months of the Year. Villa Sciarra<br />

is an urban oasis that hosts Monteverde<br />

natives, their families, and their pets,<br />

as well as the artists and scholars of<br />

the American Academy and the young<br />

dream-filled students of The American<br />

University of Rome.<br />

Chapter 5. AUR’s Neighborhood<br />

6<br />

6. Pathway in Villa Sciarra.<br />

Photo by Jacob Moore.<br />

Photo from AUR archives.<br />

193


PART III.<br />

<strong>THE</strong> FUTURE<br />

<strong>THE</strong><br />

FUTURE<br />

194


<strong>THE</strong> FUTURE<br />

PART III.<br />

“Rome is our classroom, Italy<br />

is our laboratory, the world<br />

is our potential.”<br />

-David T. Colin -<br />

195


PART III.<br />

<strong>THE</strong> FUTURE<br />

Chapter 6. Janus<br />

Chapter 6:<br />

JANUS<br />

By Laura Estrada Prada<br />

The American University of Rome has<br />

been a pillar of American education in<br />

Rome for the past <strong>50</strong> years. Offering<br />

students high caliber education in a city<br />

that serves as an open text book for culture,<br />

politics, philosophy, and civilization,<br />

AUR has established itself as a place<br />

that transcends higher education and<br />

offers life-changing experiences. In 2019,<br />

AUR marks its <strong>50</strong>th Anniversary:<br />

celebrating <strong>50</strong> years of history while<br />

looking forward to the years ahead. What<br />

better symbol for this than the Roman<br />

god Janus, who gave the name to the hill<br />

where AUR stands today.<br />

Janus is the god of endings and new<br />

beginnings, of passages, transitions, and<br />

time. He is usually depicted with a dual<br />

face: one that looks back at the past, and<br />

another that looks forward to the future.<br />

The Janiculum—the “door” from Rome to<br />

Etruria—is named after the god Janus, as<br />

is made evident from the Gianicolense<br />

neighborhood shield. Whilst the actual<br />

nature and precise purpose of invoking<br />

Janus is debated, given that there is no<br />

evidence of temples or priests devoted<br />

to this deity, most modern scholars agree<br />

that —like Jupiter— he was summoned at<br />

the beginning of many rites.<br />

A god of time and progression, Janus<br />

symbolizes movement and change,<br />

past and future, youth and adulthood.<br />

Furthermore, as the god of all beginnings,<br />

Janus is also associated with omens and<br />

auspices. All these attributes make Janus<br />

the perfect way to “end” this narration of<br />

AUR’s history.<br />

AUR is changing for the better, aware of its<br />

past, and ready to embrace its future. It is<br />

an institution that serves as a formative<br />

cradle for students: a stepping stone<br />

between adolescence and adulthood, both<br />

educationally as well as professionally and<br />

personally.<br />

Therefore, let us all celebrate the first <strong>50</strong><br />

years of The American University of Rome,<br />

and raise a toast for the many decades<br />

still to come.<br />

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<strong>THE</strong> FUTURE<br />

PART III.<br />

1<br />

Chapter 6. Janus<br />

1. Head of Janus, Vatican<br />

Museums, Rome. Photo by<br />

Loudon Dodd. Image licensed<br />

under the Creative Commons<br />

Attribution-Share Alike.<br />

197


PART III.<br />

<strong>THE</strong> FUTURE<br />

Conclusion<br />

Conclusion<br />

By Dr. Richard Hodges, OBE<br />

198


<strong>THE</strong> FUTURE<br />

PART III.<br />

‘IF WE COULD BE<br />

REBORN WHEREVER<br />

WE CHOSE,<br />

HOW CROWDED<br />

<strong>ROME</strong> WOULD BE,<br />

POPULATED BY<br />

<strong>SO</strong>ULS<br />

WHO HAD SPENT<br />

<strong>THE</strong>IR PREVIOUS<br />

LIVES LONGING TO<br />

INHABIT A VILLA<br />

ON <strong>THE</strong> JANICULUM<br />

HILL’<br />

Conclusion<br />

(Francine Prose, The New York Times review<br />

of Robert Hughes, Rome, 2 December 2011).<br />

199


PART III.<br />

<strong>THE</strong> FUTURE<br />

Conclusion<br />

AUR’s Brave New World<br />

The world is changing faster than any time<br />

in its history. Some historians have found<br />

parallels in the Renaissance when massproduced<br />

books, printed for the first time,<br />

and the bold discovery of the New World<br />

were just two elements that transformed<br />

European (and world) culture forever.<br />

Today, social media and globalization are<br />

two elements that have paved the way<br />

for a future in which robotics will displace<br />

many traditional jobs and call for a radical<br />

re-thinking of society. Jobs for life are a<br />

thing of the past. Instead, we need to<br />

envisage seven or more different careers,<br />

involving periodic re-training.<br />

200


<strong>THE</strong> FUTURE<br />

PART III.<br />

Many found the Renaissance to be<br />

terrifying as it up-ended traditions that<br />

were age-old. It is no secret that Gen<br />

Z, raised with digital tools, are just as<br />

concerned about the immense changes<br />

now overtaking us. Universities in the<br />

Renaissance provided places where the<br />

cultural and economic revolution was<br />

mediated and then advanced. So, today,<br />

universities must first and foremost<br />

confront change and equally provide the<br />

secure space for young minds to confront<br />

the digital revolution that is accelerating.<br />

AUR as it looks to its next <strong>50</strong> years is well<br />

aware of its responsibility to our students.<br />

We can look back with confidence on the<br />

evolution of our community. This is the<br />

basis for our belief in the future.<br />

More students than ever will want to<br />

experience globalization in this formative<br />

moment in their lives. In other words, AUR<br />

naturally serves a purpose that is growing<br />

in global importance as students want to<br />

leave their home comfort zones and face<br />

immersion in a genuinely international<br />

experience. What better place to do this<br />

than Italy, home of the Renaissance?<br />

What better city than Rome, where<br />

the past meets the present in so many<br />

different ways? Rome has become a multifaceted<br />

city. Famous for the Colosseum,<br />

the Forum of Rome, the Vatican and works<br />

by Caravaggio and Michelangelo, to name<br />

just a few of its attractions, it is the world’s<br />

supreme heritage city. Yet, of course, it is<br />

more than this. Half-way between Asia<br />

and America, and Europe’s window on<br />

Africa, the eternal city has a contemporary<br />

importance not just as a European capital<br />

but also as the seat of major global<br />

agencies handling critical strategies for<br />

feeding and managing future populations.<br />

Rome may be dazzlingly rich in terms of its<br />

artistic and archaeological heritage, but it<br />

is no less rich as a great global capital.<br />

AUR aims to be more than a place-holder<br />

in Rome. It is developing its curriculum<br />

for the coming decades, confident that<br />

its (Middle States) accredited signature<br />

programs will advance its students<br />

anywhere in the world. It aims to educate<br />

its students in critical thinking, problemsolving<br />

and communication, skills which<br />

in a robotic universe will have increasing<br />

importance. It aims, too, to create citizens<br />

of the world, passionate about what<br />

they do, and armed with international<br />

peer networks that endure for a lifetime.<br />

Lastly, it aims to immerse its students<br />

in international real-life experiences<br />

as distinctive parts of the curriculum.<br />

Conclusion<br />

201


PART III.<br />

<strong>THE</strong> FUTURE<br />

Conclusion<br />

One goal is to create opportunities for<br />

our students in a range of places from<br />

archaeological excavations and businesses<br />

that operate within conditions that offer<br />

a genuine intellectual challenge to each<br />

and every one of our community. We feel<br />

sure that whatever these internships and<br />

experiences consist of, they will provide<br />

a vital and unforgettable stepping stone<br />

to a work-place where changing careers<br />

repeatedly is the new norm.<br />

AUR is also being bold about its future<br />

campus location. Over the past <strong>50</strong> years<br />

we were initially in the centro storico, and<br />

then in a Barnebite monastery on the<br />

Janiculum Hill, part of Monteverde above<br />

Trastevere. We want to remain in this<br />

attractive district of Rome, but we aim to<br />

grow in size and offer increased facilities.<br />

world our students will take courage from<br />

their internationalization, their diversity,<br />

and their intellectual reasoning to become<br />

contemporary leaders.<br />

One final thought about our brave new<br />

world. We at AUR have faith that our<br />

future students will, to paraphrase the<br />

words of President John F. Kennedy,<br />

declaim proudly: We chose to go to AUR<br />

not because the program is easy, but<br />

because it is hard; because that will serve<br />

to organize and measure the best of our<br />

energies and skills, because the challenge<br />

is one that we are willing to accept, one<br />

we are unwilling to postpone, and one we<br />

intend to win.<br />

In this new educational context AUR aims<br />

to draw upon Rome’s eternal attraction<br />

to have visiting professors in residence to<br />

provide new and alternative experiences<br />

for our students. Our aim is to equip our<br />

students with an intellectual curiosity that<br />

will serve as armor in a world being defined<br />

by global standardization and robotics.<br />

Like the great seats of learning in the<br />

Renaissance, we want to take advantage<br />

of the new thinking and new opportunities<br />

that a digital world will provide. Our<br />

students must become resilient argonauts<br />

who sail without fear to new destinations<br />

and invent new ways of resolving old<br />

problems. In confronting this brave new<br />

202


<strong>THE</strong> FUTURE<br />

PART III.<br />

Conclusion<br />

President Richard Hodges and Laura Estrada Prada<br />

at Commencement ceremony in 2016.<br />

Photo by Luigi Mistrulli, AUR archives.<br />

203


References<br />

206<br />

(Image on previous page) AUR<br />

student on a field trip in Umbria<br />

in 1979. Photo from AUR archives.


Anon. “Villa Sciarra.” Roma Segreta. 18<br />

May 2013. https://www.romasegreta.it/<br />

trastevere/villa-sciarra.html<br />

Colin, David. Letter presented to 1st Lt.<br />

James D. Walsh. Dated 30 November<br />

1945. Declassified file. Office of Strategic<br />

Services Personnel Files from World War<br />

II. The U.S. National Archives and Records<br />

Administration.<br />

Costanzo, Ezio. “Uno 007 in Sicilia.<br />

” La Repubblica. 10 July 2010.<br />

La Repubblica online archives.<br />

Gassaway, Special Agent J. H. Dated May<br />

26, 1942, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, “Vittorio<br />

Umberto Tesoro; Internal Security - Ij<br />

Alien Enemy Control.” Declassified file.<br />

Office of Strategic Services Personnel<br />

Files from World War II. The U.S. National<br />

Archives and Records Administration.<br />

Geffcken, Katherine A., and Norma<br />

W. Goldman. The Janus View from<br />

The American Academy in Rome:<br />

Essays on the Janiculum. 2007:<br />

Mundus Media, New York.<br />

Spaulding, Stacy. “Exiled from Italy:<br />

The Golden Voice of Italy’s Propaganda<br />

Broadcasts (1932-1937).” Paper submitted<br />

to the History Division of the 2006 AEJMC<br />

annual convention.<br />

Spaulding, Stacy. “Totalitarian Refugee<br />

or Fascist Mistress?” Journalism History,<br />

34:3 (Fall 2008).<br />

Tasca di Cutò, Alessandro. Un Principe<br />

in America. 2004. Enzo Sellerio Editore,<br />

Palermo.<br />

Toaff, Daniel. “Quattro storie Americane.”<br />

Sorgente di Vita. Documentary film by<br />

RAI DUE. 1987.<br />

Zita, Tiziana. “Un salotto popolare a Roma:<br />

Monteverde.” Cronache Letterarie. http://<br />

cronacheletterarie.com/2014/10/06/unsalotto-popolare-a-roma/<br />

…And the photographic and document<br />

archives of The American University of<br />

Rome.<br />

Lisa Sergio papers, Booth Family Center<br />

for Special Collections, Georgetown<br />

University Library, Washington, DC.<br />

207

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