American Hardwood Supplement 2019

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Published in collaboration with the American Hardwood Export Council, this publication brings to light the latest updates and activities of US hardwood suppliers within the South East Asia region.

American

Hardwood

Southeast Asia Supplement 2019

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MICA (P) No: 079/05/2019 • ISSN: 0219-5704 • KDN: PPS 1453/11/2012(022879) • www.panelsfurnitureasia.com


AMERICAN HARDWOOD

Southeast Asia Supplement 2019

Editor’s Note 4

Message from John J.C. Chan,

AHEC Regional Director 6

8 10

Vietnamese growth offsets

challenging year in China for

U.S. hardwoods 8

Red Oak – the Main American

Hardwood 10

Interview with Ted Rossi:

Cherry – “the Ferrari of American

hardwoods” 14

Why NHLA Grading? 16

AHEC at the Shows 20

AHEC sponsors Hoa Mai 2019

furniture design compeon 24

NHLA seminar in Indonesia 28

Designer John Kelly – on

American Hardwoods

in Furniture” 30

14 16

U.S. Hardwoods in China and

Southeast Asia Markets 34

Mike Snow: Furniture Export in

the Age of Illegal Timber

Regulaons – the American

Hardwood Advantage 36

2019 NHLA Annual Convenon

& Exhibit Showcase 38

20 24

AHEC Members Index 40

Keep in Touch with AHEC 50

Adversers’ Index 51

28 36

2


The Gold Standard

for American Cherry

from Emporium, PA

The Rossi Group’s State of the Art high-tech sawmill in Emporium

Pennsylvania now serves domestic and export markets from its

secure and sustainable company timber reserves located in the

Allegheny Forest. Truly, the “Gold Standard” for the highest quality

Cherry and many other hardwood species.

Rossi Group LLC,

www.rossilumber.com

Tel: 1(860) 6323505


AMERICAN HARDWOOD Southeast Asia Supplement 2019

Uncertainties in world trade prospects for 2019 cannot be

denied even when the politicians have moved from their

2018 positions – on trade wars, Brexit and FDIs – but here are

some real certainties to consider. Asia will remain a dynamic

region, especially with the aid of the Comprehensive and

Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) being enlarged

now with over 500 million consumers with a combined GDP of

$13.5 trillion, accounting for 13 per cent of global GDP.

Vietnam, with the expected continuation of its annual growth

around 7 per cent, will focus heavily on wood and wood products

as a key industry. The United States will continue to grow more

hardwoods than are harvested or lost by mortality, a true measure

of sustainability. There is data online to demonstrate the fact State

by State and species by species:

See www.americanhardwood.org/en/environmental-profile/

interactive-forest-map

Michael Buckley,

Consultant Editor

Front cover: American oak door manufactured

by AA Corporation in Vietnam

Photo credit: Turnstone Singapore

Some markets may shift and new ones emerge, but one thing is

certain – consumers like and trust American hardwoods for their

homes, offices and the hotels and hospitality places to which

they travel. Consumers in China will continue to need American

hardwoods. Popularity of species comes and goes as fashion

changes, so this supplement highlights red oak and cherry among

the twenty six commercial species that American exporters offer

to the world. They are widely available from members of the

American Hardwood Export Council listed at the end of this annual

supplement – also available online at www.ahec.org/all-members

Visitors to the website can sort AHEC company members by

species, product, and location to find, for example, companies that

can provide Appalachian or southern red oak or northern cherry.

2


AMERICAN HARDWOOD Southeast Asia Supplement 2019

Southeast Asia has been one of the most important

markets for American hardwood exports, setting

a new record in 2018 of US$363.8 million, now

ranked second single destination outside North

America in the world and third after China and

the whole European Union.

Total exports of U.S. hardwood products to Greater

China and Southeast Asian (SEA) markets reached

US$ 2.3 billion, accounting for about 59% of all global

exports. Exports to China were valued at US$1.9 billion; a drop of

10.4%. Meanwhile SEA markets set a record and grew by 9.6%

compared it to 2017. Last year 2018 was a year marked by great

uncertainty due to the U.S. - China trade war, yet it was the secondbest

year recorded for the U.S. hardwood trade with Greater China

and SEA markets. In the China Market, red oak has been still the

most popular species, although exports dropped 19%, while export

of walnut and cherry both grew 11% and 6% respectively. This

publication gives a good insight to the beauty and suitability of red

oak for furniture and interiors in a special four-page feature.

In SEA the Vietnam market for U.S. hardwood products favored as

the most popular species yellow poplar (tulipwood), white oak and

walnut. Compared to the record year of 2014 exports, the value of

hardwood lumber grew 21.2%, logs grew 7.6% and veneer grew 4.5%.

The Indonesian market for U.S. hardwood products grew only slightly

at 0.2%, valued at US$35.5 million. White oak took the first place there

followed by walnut and maple. U.S. hardwood products markets of Malaysia,

Singapore and Thailand were slow; dropping in 2018 while the Philippines

market was outstanding with growth rate of 66.7%, albeit from a small base

to US$3.28 million.

Looking forward to the rest of the year of 2019, AHEC is promoting the applications

of red oak as a supreme and sustainable species and also Thermal Modified Timber

(TMT) red oak in all Asian markets. AHEC displayed its booth at VIFA Expo 2019 in

HCMC, designed by Jarrod Lim in Singapore, featuring American red oak and it showcased

American red oak furniture.

John J. C. Chan,

Regional Director AHEC

In the short term China’s market for U.S. hardwood still faces the pressures of a slowing economy.

At this time of writing there is some dim light that some good news about the negotiation teams

from USA and China could reach an agreement to end the trade war. SEA is already a beneficiary

from that situation, as it has captured more orders for timber processed products.

At our Hong Kong office we are optimistic on the continuous growth of these markets for U.S. hardwood

material in the second half of 2019 and into 2020, given that the economy in the region seems to be surviving

and even starting a recovery. AHEC will continue to increase its promotional program to promote sustainable

American hardwood for furniture manufacturing and interior design.

John Chan – April 2019

6


AMERICAN HARDWOOD Southeast Asia Supplement 2019

Trade wars, tariffs, slowing Asian

economies, and even a harsh

winter all led to a challenging

year for US hardwood exports in 2018.

Nevertheless, thanks to a strong start to

the year and growing demand in SE Asia,

2018 still totaled the 2 nd best year ever

for exports of US hardwood products.

Last year the China market for American

lumber decreased by 16% in volume

and 13% in value YOY in comparison

to 2017. The trade was impacted by

multiple factors including Chinese

economic deceleration, depreciation

of the RMB, and continued market and

tariff uncertainty among other things. All

species of American hardwood lumber

decreased in trade year over year except

for walnut, birch, and beech. Red oak,

the most popular American species

in China, dropped by 18% in volume.

Ash and tulipwood (also called yellow

poplar) lumber also decreased by over

20% in volume in 2018, and white oak

was down 11%. Figure 1 shows the

trade of US hardwood lumber to China

month by month for 2016-2018. As

you can see, 2018 (in red) started off

strong, but as trade concerns became a

reality in early summer both the US and

Chinese industries were affected. There

was a slight jump in October when a

“tariff delay” was announced, but trade

immediately dropped back down to sub

2016 levels in November and December.

Even though the China market for US

hardwoods still posted the second

highest trade totals ever, the reduction

in trade from 2017 has many American

companies looking to new markets

for growth opportunities. The growing

market first and foremost in everyone’s

mind is Vietnam.

Vietnam has continued its dramatic

growth, leading SE Asia and now totaling

a larger volume of US hardwood lumber

imports than all of Europe (500,060m 3 vs

359,616m 3 ). This is particularly welcome

news for a US industry pushing for new

markets in the face of trade difficulties

Vietnamese

Growth Offsets

Challenging

Year in China for

US Hardwoods

Tripp Pryor, International Program Manager, American Hardwood Export Council

in China. In 2018 Vietnam grew 13% in

volume and 17% in value, led by strong

years for red & white oak, walnut, and

western red alder. Red oak in particular

grew by 42% in volume from 2017

to 2018. This growth represents over

$5.5 million USD in new sales of red oak

lumber. The total value of red oak shipped

Figure 1

from the United States to Vietnam

is now roughly even with walnut at

$22 million each. Figure 2 shows the

value growth in $USD for several major

species of US hardwoods. In total, the

Vietnamese market for US hardwood

logs and lumber is valued at over

$275 million USD.

US Lumber to China and Hong Kong (m 3 )

8


Southeast Asia Supplement 2019

AMERICAN HARDWOOD

Elsewhere in South East Asia, Indonesia

posted a strong year, up 12% by value

(to $25.9 million USD) and 13% by

volume (36,088m 3 ). The Malaysian

market faced difficulties, in part due to a

currency devaluation of 10% from March

to November 2018. This of course, makes

American hardwood products more

expensive. The Malaysian market for

US hardwood lumber decreased by

25% in value (to $16.8 million USD),

and 26% in quantity (to 24,835m 3 ).

The American Hardwood Export Council

has planned a full schedule of events

to promote US hardwood products in

2019. You can meet with AHEC and

the American hardwood industry at

events like our US Hardwood Pavilion

at VietnamWood this September in

Ho Chi Minh.

Figure 2

Tripp Pryor, International Program Manager,

American Hardwood Export Council

9


AMERICAN HARDWOOD Southeast Asia Supplement 2019

AHEC exhibition booth

made from red oak

Adapted and modified from an article by Mike Jeffree, courtesy Timber Trades Journal, UK

There has never been a better time to buy

American red oak. That’s partly because

it’s in plentiful supply, partly because it

is now very affordable and competitive, with

the price differential versus European oak as

wide as it’s ever been.

American Hardwood Export Council technical

consultant Neil Summers acknowledges that

both these positives for Asian buyers are to

some extent the consequences of a negative;

the fact that China, as part of ongoing trade

arm-wrestling with the U.S., last year imposed

a 10% tariff on American hardwood imports.

The Chinese are by far the biggest buyers of

U.S. red oak, and indeed American hardwoods

generally; recently accounting for up to

60% of all American exports. So the tariff

has left a lot of red oak seeking customers.

Mr Summers doesn’t deny that Chinese tariffs

pose a challenge for U.S. hardwood mills,

leading to price cuts to red oak in particular,

which have left 4/4 (1”) now 40% cheaper

10


Red oak designed by

BIBBINGS at the Building

Craft College UK

than the equivalent European oak. As red

oak has been particularly impacted, the

price gap with American white has also

widened.

“Initially wet weather restricted

harvesting, so the effect of the tariff was

muted to some extent, but with colder

temperatures, supply has picked up

and those mills with all their eggs in the

Chinese basket have found it a struggle,”

Summers said. “If the tariff is raised, and

particularly as the Chinese currency has

also devalued against the dollar, it will

be that much more difficult, leading to

possible cuts in production.”

However, in 2019 AHEC clearly aims for

price and availability to be far from the

only attractions of the species. Backed

by the efforts of its sawmill members

themselves, it is focusing promotional

and communications resources squarely

on it. It is working with designers, makers

and furniture students to highlight red

oak’s versatility, aesthetics and technical

performance. The timber is being taken

in new directions in terms of processing,

finishing and end use and it will take

centre stage at exhibitions such as

VIFA in Saigon. The marketing campaign

will also feature showcase projects,

including last year’s massive use of

red oak for flooring, acoustic cladding and

glulam at the new European HQ of financial

data and media colossus Bloomberg in

London and a new contemporary collection

of living furniture by designer John Kelly, to

be made in Vietnam.

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AMERICAN HARDWOOD Southeast Asia Supplement 2019

There will be a major emphasis on the

species’ sustainability credentials

too; the fact that it is America’s most

prolific hardwood, with two cubic metres

growing in the forest every second,

and total growth exceeding harvest by

21 million m 3 each year; representing about

30% of the American hardwood forest.

Summers concluded that mills and end

users are exploring new opportunities for

red oak. “It is being thermo treated which, of

course, makes it more durable, but also very

attractive and a natural substitute for U.S.

ash if supply continues to decline due to the

Emerald ash borer,” he said. “There is also a

trend to painting oak kitchen furniture, which

also logically opens the way to more use of

red oak.”

A completed table that was part of the

Rycotewood college red oak project

“Red oak is more porous than white oak and

machines just as well and finishes perhaps

better; it bends more easily and takes treatment

well for external use. It can also perfectly

well substitute a species like meranti, with

its similar density, permeability and grain.”

12


Among the red oak showcase projects this year, leading designer maker

Sebastian Cox will be making a circular bar area for the Wallpaper

magazine Handmade feature at the Milan furniture show in Italy.

“One of his innovations will be to force dye into the vessels of the

wood under pressure,” said Mr Summers.

One recent project was the success of AHEC’s design initiative with

students at Ryecotewood Furniture Centre in Oxford, UK last year.

Their challenge was to make a storage unit, also out of red oak.

Consequently they steamed, bent, planed, turned, oiled and stained

the timber, transforming it into everything from a coffee table with

a miniature oriental garden under glass, to a shoe cabinet comprising

painted woven red oak veneer strips. Interestingly the students

said they’d be happy to use the timber again, as did Michael Jones,

project architect on the Bloomberg building at Foster+Partners – and

it used 37,160m 2 of red oak for the flooring, 1,858m 2 for the

panelling and 1,350 m 3 for the glulam.

The American red oak Vortex of Bloomberg HQ in London by Foster + Partners

The aim of AHEC promotion is for more people in Asian markets,

especially in ASEAN, to discover the untapped potential of red oak,

with the emphasis that there’s never been a better time to do it.

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AMERICAN HARDWOOD Southeast Asia Supplement 2019

Interview

with

Ted Rossi

on Cherry

Most observers of the hardwood business for furniture and interiors agree that this is partly a fashion business.

Species come and go in popularity. The most extreme example was maple in Japan during the bowling alley craze,

when importers airfreighted maple lumber from the USA to Japan. More recently American cherry has experienced

cycles of demand, so we asked Mr Ted Rossi, a major cherry producer, to comment.

Q: Ted, recently the cherry market has dipped in some Asian

markets such as Vietnam – down 75% in 2018, although it

still sells well in China, which took 87% of global exports in

2018. Why do you think that is?

A: That may be partly cultural, as Chinese people love

the colour and sheen of cherry, and partly because cherry

is very competitive at the moment. Perhaps cherry needs

more promotion in markets like Vietnam where it is less

familiar.

Q: Ted, why do you think that cherry has such a turbulent

time in overseas markets?

A: Well cherry has always been popular in the U.S. domestic

market, mainly because of its physical properties and

characteristics, of colour, brightness, grain and finishing to a

very fine surface. I call it ‘the Ferrari of American hardwoods’.

But in overseas markets, it competes with tropical species of

similar colour and so is very price sensitive.

Q: Ted, the popularity of cherry stretches way back to the early

European settlers who discovered this unique species (Prunus

serotina) which is richer in colour than the European cherry

they were used to. Has it always been popular in the USA?

A: Yes, because woodworkers and furniture makers love it as a

raw material.

Q: Ted, you recently re-built your Emporium sawmill after a

devastating fire. Why?

A: Emporium is in the heart of Northwest Pennsylvania’s cherry

forest resource, where we have traditionally specialized in cutting

cherry sustainably for many years. We have no difficulty in

buying local cherry of consistent colour and have no intention

of stopping with such a good resource base.

There is no doubt that when overseas consumers see American

cherry, which is rare these days other than in China, they will

love it too.

14


Why NHLA Grading?

By Michael Buckley FIWSc MPhil

There are good reasons why the North American natural

hardwood forest resource and the grading system and

Rules of the National Hardwood Lumber Association

(NHLA) for lumber production are so important to Asian

manufacturers.

Firstly by using American hardwoods

from forests that are continuously

increasing, no forests are threatened,

which is one way to take the pressure off

Asia’s natural hardwood forest resources.

In any case many of the native American

species offered are highly acceptable in

world markets ensuring market access for

wood product manufacturing exporters

in Asia. While the USA contains only

8 per cent of the world’s hardwood

forests, it is by far the largest exporter

of graded hardwood lumber, the majority

of which is shipped to Asia, surely a

demonstration of its availability and

competitive pricing. Added to this is

a grading system that predicts yield

and ensures quality consistency from

exporters throughout North America.

In each and all of the U.S. states growing

hardwood commercially, for which there is

now accurate scientific data, the annual net

growth exceeds the harvest and mortality.

That is one real measure of sustainability.

And while on the subject of measurement,

the accuracy of predicted production

yield of sawn lumber is one of the key

advantages of the American hardwood

grading system that has been developed

and administered under the remit of the

NHLA since 1898. In some regions of the

world, the sawmilling system is based on

cutting only clear lumber by eliminating

the co-called defects, which may actually

be the characteristics of hardwood that

consumers appreciate. So in effect, a

Dana Spessert,

Chief Inspector,

NHLA, grading lumber

percentage of that material, which may

be useable, is actually consigned to the

chipper or the boiler or even wasted.

Under NHLA Grading Rules, the decision

to cut around, or to include, the inherent

characteristics of a given species is left

to the ultimate user – the furniture and

flooring makers and joiners. These Rules

predict the yield for each specific grade

so that full sized boards are supplied to

those users where the decision to cut

is more appropriate. Since the cost of

lumber is so closely related to yield in

product production it must surely be the

user, not the saw-miller, who decides what

further cuts to the lumber to make, for

any designed product. That can also be

considered as environmentally beneficial

addressing the need to minimise waste of

valuable natural resources.

It’s difficult to imagine a world without

industry standards which are published

documents that establish specifications

and procedures designed to ensure the

reliability of the materials, products,

methods, and services people use every

day. U.S. hardwood industry standards

for the hardwood lumber industry were

created in 1898 by the establishment of

NHLA and its subsequent ‘Rules for the

Measurement & Inspection of Hardwood

& Cypress’. These Rules for the inspectors

of lumber are uniform in construction

and application but also carry with them

the element of stability and are the

product of the process of evolutionary

development; and that process is

still in operation.

While they were developed

initially for the domestic

market within the U.S., they

have become internationally

known and accepted for the

increasing international trade in

American hardwood species. It

is that international nature of the

hardwood trade for which the

Rules now facilitate trade more easily.

With modern communications, trading

by digital means can obviate the need

to make personal inspections as in the

past – but is still necessary with some

supply countries not operating consistent

grades. In many parts of Europe, the lack

of internationally accepted hardwood

grades may require frequent mill visits

to inspect individual shipments. However

that does not mean that U.S. exporters

and Asian buyers never visit. NHLA

Rules do mean that both parties to any

American hardwood order know exactly

what quality standard they are discussing

from however far apart in the world they

may be. And talking of visits, one of the

most mobile people in the industry and

trade is Dana Spessert, NHLA’s Chief

Inspector. He is now well acquainted

with Asian markets from years of Asia-

Pacific regional inspections from China

to Australia, grading demonstrations at

trade shows, seminars and presentations

– often in cooperation with AHEC, of which

NHLA is a member.

NHLA has a team of inspectors also ready

and able to make corporate inspections

where needed. Most American and

Canadian hardwood exporters employ

NHLA certified graders on their production

lines and all use NHLA grades as

their standard, albeit sometimes with

modifications where agreed between

buyer and seller. The net result of all this

is that the hardwood exporting industry

increasingly understands Asian markets

and its needs and Asian buyers know what

is on offer. Ultimately consistency is the

bottom line required by buyers, especially

when huge volumes are required by

massive factories in Asia on a regular

basis, which NHLA Rules facilitate.

Finally, American hardwood exporters

increasingly understand the requirements

of Asian manufacturers and their need

to work together – at such events as

the AHEC and NHLA conventions in Asia

and the USA, where many producers

and traders gather together annually

under one roof. The next NHLA

Convention will take place in New Orleans

2 – 4 October 2019.

This article by Michael Buckley, Fellow of

the Institute of Wood Science, was first

published in Memphis by NHLA. He is an

independent wood industry consultant

specialised in temperate hardwoods since

1988.

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AMERICAN HARDWOOD Southeast Asia Supplement 2019

AHEC

at the

AHEC attends many trade shows in Asia, some

simply by a visit to network and promote

American hardwoods, some to represent

the U.S. industry with a promotion booth

and some to head up a pavilion populated

by AHEC exporting members with their

own displays. Here are some details from

a selection over the last eighteen months:

shows

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Southeast Asia Supplement 2019

AMERICAN HARDWOOD

Interzum, Guangzhou 2018

AHEC hosted a pavilion of 199sqm where 29 companies

exhibited their product offering including the National

Hardwood Lumber Association (NHLA) and the Hardwood

States Export Group. Exhibiting companies were:

American Lumber, AMOS-Hill, Baillie, Bingaman, Boss,

Buchanan, CLC Hardwoods, Collins, Hartzell, Hermitage,

Linden, MacDonald & Owen, Mayfield, Missouri Walnut,

Northland Corporation, Penn-Sylvan, Republic Forest

Products, Ron Jones, Shannon, Snowbelt, Somerset

Wood, Sonoking Corporation, Summit Forest, Turman

and TYR Wood. AHEC received over-whelming feedback

from the 4-day trade show and its members said that the

show was the most impressive one they have ever had

and planned to return.

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AMERICAN HARDWOOD Southeast Asia Supplement 2019

Sylvawood, Shanghai 2018

The fourth year of Sylvawood Expo

was held in the Shanghai Mart

Expo in June - a niche expo which

specializes in the timber-trade in

China. It is a good platform for the

wood industry to network, brings

more than 150 exhibitors from

15 countries and China’s exhibitors

and associations together. The

space was more than 6,000sqm

with a dedicated area for veneer

exhibitors attracting about 10,000

visitors, who were from all sectors

including flooring, furniture, kitchen

cabinets, doors, windows, interior

furnishing markets, construction

and architecture sectors. AHEC’s

27sqm-booth and its pavilion were

located at a prime location next to

the entrance, occupying 342sqm with 35 exhibitors in standard

booths, including the Hardwood States Export Group

Exhibiting companies were

Robinson Lumber, MacDonald &

Owen, Sonoking, Northwest, TRN

USA Forest, Brownlee, Ron Jones,

Kennebec, Wheeland, Northland

Corporation, American Lumber,

Somerset Wood, Baillie, Midwest,

Bingaman, Yoder, Rolling Ridge

Wood, Polaris, Cascade, Snowbelt,

UFP Int., Graf Brothers, Hermitage,

Kretz, Atlantic-Pacific, Turman,

Hardwoods of America, W.M. Cramer,

JT Shannon, Cole, Missouri Walnut,

Thompson, Mayfield and HHP. Other

members such as NHLA, North

Carolina Department of Agriculture,

Verde Wood, Penn-Sylvan and

foreign partner Qingdao CX Joy,

had their own booths.

IFMAC/WOODMAC, Jakarta 2018

The annual IFMAC/WOODMAC

international woodworking industry

show held in Jakarta, Indonesia in

September is mainly for machinery

manufacturers. Wood material

exhibitors were confined to exporters

from USA, Canada, France Germany,

Latvia and some Asian countries.

AHEC, housed in a thermally modified

timber (TMT) red oak pavilion, was

clearly the leading overseas timber

supplier. The pavilion and furniture

display was constructed of TMT

red oak, supplied by AHEC member

Bingaman, processed in Indonesia by

Omega Mas in Surabaya, with newly

designed TMT red oak furniture designed by Jarrod Lim.

A number of U.S.-based AHEC wood exporters, such as Gutchess

International, Robinson and Allegheny

Wood Products, visited the show; not to

forget a full team of five staff from AHEC

Foreign Partner Member APP Timber

based in Malaysia. The sole AHEC

member exhibiting independently was

the new AHEC Foreign Partner Member,

Global Timber, also based in Malaysia.

This AHEC category now numbers

17 companies. The veneer sector

was also quite well represented at

the show. Riga Veneer from Latvia, a

former Danzer Group company but

now independent, was offering a wide

range of temperate species including

American hardwood veneers. Tops

Timber and Veneers from Nanjing offered a worldwide range of

hardwood veneers including most American species.

FMC Premium, Shanghai 2018

The 24 th FMC in Shanghai’s New International Expo Center

(SNIEC) in September 2018 covered nearly 300,000sqm for both

furniture categories and machinery and attracted over 40,000

visitors from all over the world. It aimed to promote industrial

materials upgrading and establish a one-stop communication

platform for latest technologies, products and solutions,

thus providing an excellent opportunity for AHEC, NHLA, the

Hardwood States Export Group and the U.S. hardwood industry

to meet directly with interested wood buyers. The AHEC Pavilion

exhibited some TMT red oak furniture and totalled 31 booths of

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Southeast Asia Supplement 2019

AMERICAN HARDWOOD

30 AHEC members including Allegheny, American Lumber, Baillie,

Battle, Bingaman, Blue Mountain, CK International, Cascade, CLC,

Cole, Global, , Hartzell Hardwoods, Hermitage, Kamps, Kennebec,

Linden, Midwest Hardwoods, Midwest Walnut, Northwest,

Pioneer, Republic Forest Products, Shannon, Somerset,

Sonoking, TRN USA Forest, Turman, Verde and W. M Cramer.

AHEC director John Chan said the FMC show is an excellent

platform for AHEC members and AHEC to network with the wood

traders, importers, designers and architects and media. AHEC

collected around 200 trade contacts during the 4-day show.

VIFA, Saigon 2019

AHEC made a spectacular promotion of Red oak at VIFA 2019

show, joining forces with the Handicraft and Wood Industry

Association of HCMC (HAWA). Nobody could have missed the

red oak prominently on display this year with an exhibition

stand entirely constructed of red oak lumber and 18 selected

pieces of red oak furniture, located in the entrance lobby to

the show. The winning furniture designs by contestants in the

annual Hoa Mai furniture design competition, all made

with red oak lumber donated by the Rossi Group, were

displayed in a red oak pavilion The VIFA Expo show is

now considered the ‘must visit’ international event in

the March series of furniture shows in Southeast Asia.

advertising American Red Oak and the AHEC pavilion distributed

AHEC publications and a bi-lingual flyer explaining the purpose

of the display.

The full corporate names of all AHEC member companies

mentioned in this report can be found at the end of this

publication and online at www.americanhardwood.org

Clearly the largest (25,000sqm) so far with

514 exhibitors, VIFA provided many examples of

furniture products in various species of U.S. hardwoods

manufactured in Vietnam by joint venture companies as

well as local wholly-owned Vietnamese manufacturers.

Among the usual exhibitors of wood materials were

10 North American companies (and three trade

associations) including Classic American Hardwoods,

Midwest, Northwest Hardwood, Oak Valley, Ontario

Hardwood Products, Peladeau, Primewood, Thompson,

Trans-Pacific Trading and W.M. Cramer as well as local

Vietnamese companies offering U.S. hardwood such

as Go My Co. The show catalogue included a full page

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AMERICAN HARDWOOD Southeast Asia Supplement 2019

Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Sixteen years after the Handicraft

and Woodworking Association of

Ho Chi Minh City (HAWA) launched

its first furniture design completion Hoa

Mai, the 2019 competition was launched

in October 2018. Platinum Sponsor

is the American Hardwood Export

Council (AHEC) which has enjoyed a

long cooperation with HAWA. As always,

the competition is intended to foster

furniture design skills by young designers

and, as last year, the competition

focused on the use of red oak (Soi Do)

in furniture.

By Michael Buckley, Consultant to HAWA

Launching the new competition

Mr Nguyen Quoc Khanh, Chairman of

HAWA, emphasised that successful

designers also need successful companies

if their work is to become meaningful.

“The shortlisted candidates will have the

opportunity to develop their prototypes

with commercial manufacturing company

members of HAWA who support the

competition” he announced.

Hoa Mai is also co-sponsored by seven

organisations in support of HAWA,

which is committed to call for entries

Mr Nguyen Quoc Khanh, Chairman of HAWA launching Hoa Mai furniture design competition

across the whole of Vietnam – aided

this year by the innovation of online

submissions to the judging panel to

select a shortlist. Judges are drawn from

local and international organisations

working with the Vietnamese furniture

industry and then together all meet for

the final judging. Entries were required

by 22 nd November 2018, after which a

shortlist was announced, calling on up

to 24 successful entries to produce their

prototypes for judging in the New Year.

The winners in several categories would

share prizes ranging from VND30 million

(US$1,300) to VND5 million (US$215)

with eight different awards. The winning

prototypes were to be displayed

at the entrance to the VIFA EXPO

2019 international furniture fair in

Ho Chi Minh City running from 6 th to 9 th

March 2019.

Speaking at the launch Mr Ly Qui Trung,

General Manager of Nha Xinh and CEO

of AKA Furniture Group, suggested

that it is not the money but rather

the publicity and exposure that the

winners receive as their main benefit.

He said, “Beautiful, or great furniture

is the one that has its uniqueness, its

very own characters. However it has to

be practical, usable and meet the real

demand of customers - no matter how

beautiful or unique the furniture is. And

this “uniqueness” should be applied not

only to the furniture but also the way,

the attitude, the view, the approach of

the architect or designer towards the

whole process of the making and selling

of furniture. In other words, an excellent

architect or designer should own several

skills other than just technical skills.

Understanding the customer or the

market is very important, but to me

one of the most important skills that

most young architects of designers

often overlook is to be able to build a

personal brand. It is a very long term task

that requires awareness, patience and

continuity. Winning any prize of Hoa Mai

contest is a perfect way to start personal

brand building,” he concluded.

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AMERICAN HARDWOOD

A HAWA ‘Road Show’ to promote the

competition at 13 universities and

design schools around HCM City and

Ha Noi is now an essential and regular

part of the whole programme. It seeks

to educate young designers about the

use of wood in furniture and its benefits

to the environment on account of its

low embodied energy, renewability

and sustainability. On behalf of AHEC,

Mr Michael Buckley suggested that

choosing a sustainable and legal

material that is “fit for purpose and

fashionable in key markets” is a good

recipe for success when using American

hardwoods. While American white oak is

well known and widely used in Vietnam,

red oak which is more plentiful in the

USA is underutilised despite being

highly suitable for furniture and

interiors.

When the entry period of designs was

completed in November over 200 had

been submitted by young designers

from all over Vietnam. The second

round introduced ‘online judging’ for the

panel of professional judges to select a

shortlist. The five criteria set by HAWA

were:

1. Functionality - Does the concept fulfil

all requirements of handling, usability,

safety and product feasibility? Does it

fulfil a need or function? Is it practical

in terms of its size, weight and storage?

2. Marketability - What is the potential

of the product for commercialisation?

Does it appeal to the market that it

was designed for?

3. Aesthetic - Does the design have good

furnishing, hardware, structure? Is it

a trend or adapted for any market?

4. Creative and Unique - Is the design

Mr Ly Qui Trung, CEO of AKA Furniture Group

at Hoa Mai launch

concept new? How did the new design

come about and what is the design

process? Is there innovative use of

technology?

5. Environmental - What are the choices

of materials and their source? Is

there efficient use of material resulting

in low wastage? Is the furniture readyto-assemble,

knockdown or flat-pack

friendly?

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AMERICAN HARDWOOD Southeast Asia Supplement 2019

The judges initially selected 25 designs

for submission of prototypes for the

final judging to be held on 5 th March

immediately before the VIFA EXPO

2019 furniture show in HCM City.

During January and February those

selected were allocated to manufacturing

companies (large and small) to help them

produce the prototypes to be submitted

for final judging. That process inevitably

yielded needs for modification, a great

experience for young designers. On

behalf of AHEC and HAWA, Mr Buckley

attended some prototyping sessions,

giving advice on the properties and

applications of red oak and how to

recognise it as a species.

The final judging panel consisted of

12 professionals from six countries as

well as leaders from Vietnam to assess the

18 prototypes assembled at Ton

Duc Thang University in HCM City,

according to the competition criteria.

Most agreed that this was the best

standard seen in the competition’s

15 years, with a wide variety of designs

all featuring American red oak in an

array of finishes and textures from

its natural colour to dark-stained. A

presentation on behalf of HAWA was

made to the successful designers on how

to present their prototypes to visitors

at the VIFA show where all 18 would be

displayed in what is a great personal

opportunity. Chairman of the judges

Nguyen Quoc Khanh suggested that

several may be commercially appealing

to some production companies.

Michael Buckley, Hoa Mai judge illustrates PR

for Hoa Mai winners

AHEC-HAWA booth drew huge attention at VIFA furniture fair

1 2

1&2: Prototyping in progress

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AMERICAN HARDWOOD

The award ceremony on the opening day

of VIFA EXPO was attended by VIPs

from Vietnam and overseas, including

John Chan, regional director of AHEC

and Ted Rossi, Past President of NHLA

and former Chairman of AHEC.

Winner of Hoa Mai 2019 was the ‘Lego’

cabinet by Do Thi Thu Trinh; second was

‘Sen’ nightstand by Nguyen Ngoc Quynh

Giao and third was ‘Chacha’ folding table

desk by Nguyen Duc Huynh. Consolation

prizes were awarded to five designs each

recognising their success for high marks

from the judges in meeting one of the

criteria.

For further information: gaihoamai.

hawa.vn

Ted Rossi (left) with some winners of Hoa Mai 2019

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AMERICAN HARDWOOD Southeast Asia Supplement 2019

By Arief Odon, Pose, Jakarta

For many years AHEC and the National

Hardwood Lumber Association

(NHLA), which is a member of AHEC,

have cooperated in developing the

understanding of the NHLA Grading

Rules and how they predict yield for users

throughout Asia with a long-standing

series of seminars presented by NHLA

staff from Memphis TN. The latest was in

Indonesia.

The NHLA Grading Seminar of 2018

was successfully presented at the

Po Hotel in Semarang, Central Java

on 11 th December 2018. The total

audience attending who signed up

was over 100 delegates, of whom

30% came from online IMOOJI -

the new digital marketing system

of organiser Pose. The balance

of 70% was attracted by a mixsystem

manual, direct networking

and phone calls by Pose’s staff.

This combination to invite the

audience for the event proved very

successful.

At the seminar there were several

wood-traders who participated, such as

Indorona, APP Timber, ETH, Global Timber,

EL-Wood and Kayu Bagus International.

The presenter was Dana Spessert,

Chief Inspector of NHLA based in

Memphis TN, who was able to hold

discussions with individuals during the

break and at lunchtime. Dana was thus

able to understand more information

about the local timber trade and grading

Audieces of Grading Seminar 2018

systems in the market, according to

feedback from the wood-traders. Their

comments regarding the hardwood

market proved very valuable in order to

smooth the way for improved trading in

American hardwoods graded to NHLA

standards, given the competition from

new wood traders in European & Russian

timber, some of which exhibited at the

IFMAC wood show, last September in

Jakarta.

Chief Inspector Dana Spessert at seminar in Indonesia

One delegate Mr Yakub Firdaus

(a member of the Indonesian furniture

association HIMKI) suggested

Mr Spessert offer similar grading training

in Jakarta or Kendal City in Central Java.

He is one of the senior people who run and

manage the new POLITEKNIK FURNITURE

in Kendal City (Kendal Industrial Area,

west of Semarang). This is the new school

built by the local government in 2017. In

addition there were other woodworking

Dana Spessert with PIKA’s student

Dana during his presentation

schools attending such as PIKA –

a an organisation specialising in

technical wood processing, with

which AHEC has cooperated in the

past editions of the Indonesian

Furniture Design Competition, now

lapsed. SMK LUMERIA School in

Kudus City, east of Semarang, was

another participant.

From the furniture industry

itself many firms were

very busy to finalize their

yearly production target

in December so future such events

would be better scheduled in October.

Mr Spessert commented after the seminar

“The enthusiasm and eagerness to learn

the NHLA hardwood grading rules in

Semarang is unequaled in the global

industry. The NHLA would be honored

to continue education throughout all

of Indonesia in the coming years

on any date.”

Given that President of Indonesia

Jokowi, himself a former

furniture trader, has

pushed for increased

exports, as well as the

increasing domestic

demand for furniture of

quality needing imported

hardwoods such as oak

and walnut. American

hardwood lumber

imports by Indonesia

were worth US$26

million in 2018.

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AMERICAN HARDWOOD Southeast Asia Supplement 2019

Designer John Kelly has worked with American

hardwoods most of his life and has participated

with AHEC since he first addressed its inaugural

Convention in London more than two decades ago.

We put some questions to John.

Q: John, you grew up with the forests of West Virginia as

a background. How did this influence your approach to

designing furniture with wood?

More than you could possibly imagine!

My family was in the coal, gas, oil and timber industry; and I

spent an entire summer during high school, cruising timber

and cutting down trees in rural West Virginia. This was

essentially when I began to learn about American hardwoods,

more specifically; red and white oak, cherry, walnut, popular,

sycamore and ash. As a future architect and furniture

designer, this experience proved to be invaluable, because

I was able to understand how each species actually grew in

the forest; the diversity of the forest; and also each individual

species in terms of their inherent qualities, densities and

characteristics.

I learned from an early age that wood was an incredible

material: it regenerates; it’s sustainable; and it has immense

commercial value. Moreover, as the primary material of

architecture, wood has perhaps an even greater human value!

It is not coincidental that humans around the world most

often choose to “fit out” the most tactile elements of their

home with wood; including stairs, doors, floors and ceilings;

and also with their furnishings; including beds, case goods,

tables and chairs. So naturally, as I eventually became an

architect and furniture designer, I began designing with

American hardwoods.

Q: You have been associated in various ways with the

American hardwood industry for many years. What has been

your experience?

Yes, I have been involved with AHEC and the American

hardwood industry for over twenty years; basically, ever

since Michael Buckley discovered me at the furniture show

in Birmingham. During that time, I was very fortunate to be

involved with industry programs and seminars with AHEC in

France; United Kingdom; China; Korea; Japan; Singapore;

Malaysia; Vietnam; Indonesia; Thailand and India. I’m

incredibly grateful for all of those opportunities, and I hope

that I have been influential in helping to promote the use

of American hardwoods around the world; not only with my

design intent; but also through its realisation and introduction

in the international furniture market.

Again, I think it goes back to that summer I spent cruising

timber in West Virginia. When I began designing furniture,

I started by using resources that were local, and materials

that I understood. I was very lucky that AHEC found me and

allowed me to tell my story. It was very easy, because it was

so genuinely a part of me.

Q: Recently you have been commissioned to create a

collection of furniture in American red oak. How do you feel

about that?

For me, this American red oak design project is dual purposed.

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AMERICAN HARDWOOD

Obviously, I’m trying to create an intelligent and attractive

collection of furnishings that is responsible and commercially

viable. However, with this collection I am also attempting to

change people’s impressions and pre-conceived notions about

using red oak in furniture design. It’s an interesting challenge

that I am hoping will yield a variety of interpretations and

possibilities for this amazingly plentiful American hardwood.

My hope is that by creating this red oak furniture collection

and bringing it to the marketplace, it will help to encourage

and influence other furniture designers to reconsider potential

uses for American red oak.

doesn’t really matter what everyone else is doing. The whole

point of design is to be a trend setter, not a trend follower;

and you can only accomplish this when you are fully focused

on your own vision of life.

Q: At the recent shows in USA, which you visited, what do

you see as the latest trends in wood furniture?

I think that perhaps the most pervasive trend in furniture

design today is to create furniture that is more ambidextrous

Q: As a designer with much

experience of working in the

wood industries in Asia, what

advice would you give to young

Asian designers?

As a teacher for almost thirty years,

my advice to young designers is

always the same. Stop looking

inside your phone; and start looking

inside yourself. All the answers are

already inside you, you don’t need

to shoplift them from the internet.

I explain to my students that

all design starts with an idea.

Once you understand the idea,

all the other decisions you make

during the design development

process will slowly evolve through

reflection, and those decisions

should always relate to your

original concept and serve to

reinforce it; aesthetically; formally;

structurally; and in terms of its

construction.

I believe that design is about basic

existential questions like, “What do

you think you can do to make the

world a better place?” and “What

are people’s relationships to both

the natural and man-made world?”

“What is still meaningful to people

in today’s world?”

The great thing about design is that

there are no right or wrong answers;

only differences of opinion. The

whole point of becoming a designer

is to give expression to your own

interpretation of the world, so it

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AMERICAN HARDWOOD Southeast Asia Supplement 2019

from mixed materials. This trend is emerging

because, as humans, we are beginning to

utilise the living spaces in our modern homes

differently, and we are starting to see our home

as the primary interface between our natural and

man-made worlds. Not only is the distinction between

indoor and outdoor furniture becoming increasingly

blurred; but also living and dining spaces in traditional

homes are becoming commingled and, then when you throw

the obligatory home office demands into the mix, the result

is an entirely different notion of home than your parent’s

generation.

As a result, we are starting to buy furniture in a different

way to encompass those new preferences and attitudes

towards our modern way of living. Just as our distinction

between indoor and outdoor; and living, dining and home

office have become increasingly blurry; furniture design is

becoming blurry too; and that means more ambidextrous!

As a consequence and expression of this ambidexterity,

an increasingly sophisticated and diverse palette of mixed

materials is also emerging in furniture design. I’m finding

new materials at virtually ever show I visit recently for

both indoor and outdoor furniture.

Q: Did you see these trends reflected in the South

East Asian shows, such as VIFA in Saigon?

Yes, we are starting to see these trends at VIFA in

HCM City. The show has improved dramatically in the

last two years, which perhaps lends credence to the old

mantra that “trade shows follow manufacturing”. Accordingly,

I believe that as Vietnam becomes more relevant as a furniture

manufacturing country, VIFA will continue to grow and become more

relevant as a furniture show.

The local Vietnamese manufacturers have really evolved to accommodate the ongoing

China furniture manufacturing exodus. In addition, many foreign manufacturers have now

settled in Vietnam, with European and US customer bases, either to escape tariffs or just increase

their margins, in general.

N-10-14 Bow Bed Rear

The net result is that the quality and

perceived value of furnishings now being

produced in Vietnam would not have been

even imaginable a few years ago. The

learning curve has been short and steep;

and the supply chain in Vietnam is improving

every day. At VIFA 2019, in addition to the

usual materials associated with furniture

making, such as; wood, metal, upholstery,

glass, and stone; I found resources and

manufacturers for concrete, rattan, straw,

lacquerware, and resin products.

Kis table

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AMERICAN HARDWOOD Southeast Asia Supplement 2019

By Judd Johnson, Hardwood Market Report, Memphis TN

It is impossible to exclude China from

any outlook of future demand for U.S.

hardwoods. Admittedly, there is a lot

of fatigue surrounding the China market

today. Who really wants to read another

story about how tariffs and economic

deceleration have derailed activity

and that uncertainty is overshadowing

business? U.S. suppliers and Chinese

buyers understand the situation all too

well; they are living with it every day.

That said, taking a fresh look at how

U.S. hardwood business with China

transpired and how it broadly influences

activity elsewhere may be worth the

effort. It should not be overlooked that

the collective force of other U.S. export

markets rivals that of China, and all

markets are important.

China First

U.S. exports to China increased by a

stunning 466 per cent in the 10 year

period from 2008 through 2017. There

was a significant downward market

adjustment in 2015. Yet, the market

adjustment was short-lived and had

little lingering effects, except for one

notable difference: more safeguards were

added to subsequent sales/purchase

transactions that lowered financial risk

to sellers from abrupt order cancellations.

This one development was a large step

in the maturation process of business

relationships.

In just two years after the 2015 setback,

U.S. hardwood lumber exports to China

increased 48.5 per cent to a record high of

2,406,038 cubic metres. As impressive as

that total is, the critical influence of China

to U.S. hardwoods has never been volume

alone. Rather, it is the species and grades

of lumber that make up the volume.

Included in Table 1 are highly

merchantable U.S. hardwood species.

Among them are Red Oak and White Oak,

the top two species of US growing stocks

by volume. White Oak has traditional

values in markets worldwide, therefore

is not overly dependent on demand from

any one country. Red Oak does not have

the same broad global appeal as White

Oak and is far more reliant on U.S. and

China markets.

Ash and Cherry are less abundant growing

stocks than Oak, but they are prevalent

and valuable to U.S. production. China is

clearly a dominant market for these two

species. The presence of the Emerald Ash

Borer in the U.S. may be a contributor to

that. Many export markets have tighten

controls on Ash imports from the U.S. due

to the Borer. China, of course, does not

have that same concern, as this insect is

a native species.

Cherry is widely dispersed throughout

Eastern U.S. hardwood forests, but heavy

concentrations of growing stocks are

localised within parts of the Appalachian

region. Consequently, hardwood sawmills

in areas having large quantities of Cherry

growing stocks inevitably will produce

Cherry lumber.

China accounts for a critical mass

of global demand for this group of

commercially valuable species. Because

of the species makeup of growing stocks

and the volumes involved, the U.S.

hardwood lumber supply system is highly

dependent on China as a market outlet.

Any significant change in business status

with China has a direct and substantial

impact on the U.S. hardwood supply

grid, regardless if the change involves

expansion or contraction. Notably, abrupt

changes in market status are damaging.

Everyone Else

There is a universal saying about putting

too many eggs into one basket. Admittedly,

U.S. hardwood suppliers have too much

exposure in China and, therefore, are

vulnerable to market swings. The trouble

is, there is not another international

basket like China for U.S. hardwood

suppliers to turn to.

But there are other baskets – countries

that consume U.S. hardwoods in the

manufacture of goods for domestic

and export purposes. These are

the markets that can be fostered and

Percentage of Grwoing China Percentage of Export to the World - 2018

Species Stocks on US Timberland

Lumber

Logs

Red Oak 19.5% 70.5% 59.6%

White Oak 14.4% 34.1% 52.6%

Tulipwood 8.2% 33.3% 54.7%

Ash 4.9% 70.1% 92.4%

Cherry 2.5% 85.0% 72.9%

Walnut 1.0% 39.8% 68.0%

Source: USDA Forest Service, Forest Inventory Analysis (FIA) and USDA Foreign Agricultural Service Table: HMR

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in 2018 reached a new record high.

Japan, Taiwan, and Hong Kong are

important for US hardwood lumber

exports, but they are thought of more

for facilitating raw material supplies

and commerce than wood products

manufacturing, specifically. However,

because they are mature, wealthy markets,

they are influential for merchandising U.S.

hardwood species used in manufactured

goods.

possibly developed into larger, thriving

outlets for U.S. hardwoods. (Figure 1)

Economic growth by emerging and

developing economies is the engine that

can drive demand for U.S. hardwoods

higher. One obvious impact is increased

employment and disposable income will

elevate consumer spending. According

to International Monetary Fund (IMF),

ASEAN economies (collectively) should

expand 5.1 per cent and 5.2 per cent,

respectively, this year and next.

Another development that can add to

U.S. hardwood demand in Southeast Asia

nations is continued economic growth

by China. Escalated wages for Chinese

workers have already pushed some

wood products manufacturing to lower

cost labor countries. Continued wage

increases will force more manufacturing

elsewhere over time and, simultaneously,

elevate consumer spending. In

the aforementioned IMF report, China’s

economy is projected to expand

6.2 per cent in both 2019 and 2020.

Vietnam may have been the first beneficiary

of wood products manufacturing

relocating from China. But whether or

not it was first, Vietnam absolutely

embraced this and other opportunities

to become a major manufacturing hub

for the world.

As a market outlet for U.S. hardwood

lumber, Vietnam ranks third in volume

- well behind China, only slightly less

than Canada, and substantially more

than Mexico and the UK, which hold the

fourth and fifth place slots. Stripping out

Canada’s re-exports of U.S. hardwood

lumber would likely make Vietnam the

second largest destination for U.S.

hardwood lumber.

Another consideration about Vietnam is

the marketplace is still on the rise as a

manufacturing centre for the world. The

country has committed to infrastructure

development necessary to participate in

global commerce at a high level. All the

while, Vietnam’s economic growth will

improve incomes and consumer spending

capabilities, which will add to economic

vibrancy going forward.

Indonesia, Malaysia, and Thailand are

other member countries of ASEAN that

rank high (10 th through 12 th ) as market

destinations for U.S. hardwood lumber.

Volumes to Malaysia and Thailand dipped

sharply last year due to China’s pullback

in outsourced manufacturing. However,

that activity will resume at some point.

Additionally, Malaysia and Thailand

are established manufacturing supply

sources that have the capability of

attracting new business from other

countries. Volumes exported to Indonesia

Located outside of the Greater China region

is a sleeping giant. India. The country is

not currently a global manufacturing

centre as we think of Vietnam or China. Nor

is India expected to be. Instead, India’s

economic engine is fuelled in large part by

service and technology industries, which

will drive demand for commercial and

residential construction.

Growth in construction and economic

expansion of a country with over a billion

people makes India a potential major

market force for U.S. hardwoods. China,

Southeast Asia, and other established

markets for U.S. hardwoods are poised to

benefit from India’s economic growth by

offering readily available manufacturing

capabilities. However, marketing efforts

will be necessary for US hardwoods

to capture a meaningful share of new

business developing from India’s

designers, engineers, and specifiers.

The good news is that AHEC has been

deeply involved with marketing U.S.

hardwoods in India for quite some time. In

fact, it is AHEC’s assessment that India’s

growth as a consumer of wood products

will increase wood products manufacturing

in established U.S. hardwood markets.

There is no timetable set for India’s growth

to energise manufacturing activity and

demand for U.S. hardwoods – any more

than there is a known time when business

in China will regain traction and advance.

But, there is reasonable assurance

that both will occur and that economic

growth worldwide will provide greater

opportunities for U.S. hardwoods.

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AMERICAN HARDWOOD Southeast Asia Supplement 2019

By Michael Snow, Executive Director AHEC

It is clear that Asia is well placed

to exploit comparative advantages

in the global market for wooden

furniture and handicrafts. Backed by

a strong woodworking tradition, high

skills, and competitive labour rates, the

region’s manufacturers have earned

a strong international reputation for

their ability to supply high quality and

fashionable products at a competitive

price. To maintain this growth, however,

manufacturers must deal with the related

challenges of depletion of traditional

sources of wood supply.

Manufacturers will need a strong focus

on avoiding any wood products that

might come from illegal sources when

finished goods are shipped to the major

consuming countries of North America,

Japan, Australia and Europe. This

demand for environmental assurances is

driven by the introduction and tightening

of laws which make importers of all wood

products, including furniture, liable to

sanction if any illegal wood is identified

in the products they sell. The sanctions

for failure to comply with these laws can

be severe. This is most vividly illustrated

by the US$13.5 million fine imposed

Michael Snow, Executive Director AHEC

on Lumber Liquidators for US Lacey

Act violations in relation to flooring

manufactured in China from hardwood

sourced from Russia and Myanmar. To

date the largest sanction imposed for

non-conformance to the EU Timber

Regulation (EUTR) is a fine of €80,000

in Sweden linked to imports of Myanmar

teak. On top of the direct financial

effects of these sanctions is the severe

reputational damage due to prosecution.

While the details of the various laws

introduced in the US, EU and Australia

differ, they all share one critical feature.

They are all risk-based. The need for

far-reaching measures to track wood to

individual forest management unit, or to

seek FSC or PEFC certification of supply

chains, apply only to those countries, or

regions, where there is a risk of illegal

harvest. If the risk can be shown to be

“negligible” at national level (using the

terminology of EUTR), then there is no

need to trace timber further than to the

port of export from the supply country.

This opens the door to a very simple

solution for Asian manufacturers

interested in expanding markets for

their products in the EU and the US:

they should manufacture their products

using wood imported from countries

where there is a negligible risk of illegal

harvest.

Of course, there are many wood

exporting industries that claim all their

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wood is legally sourced. However only

one globally significant supplier of

hardwoods, the United States, has

invested time and resources to ensure

this is independently demonstrated and

documented to ensure conformance to

laws like the Lacey Act and EUTR.

A decade ago, the American Hardwood

Export Council (AHEC) commissioned

the world’s first independent sectorwide

study to quantify the real risk

of illegal wood entering the supply

chain. This report, which was recently

reviewed and fully updated, confirms

that there is a negligible risk of any U.S.

hardwood containing wood from illegal

sources, specifically that stolen timber

represents much less than 1% of total

U.S. hardwood production. The authors

conclude that they have “high confidence

regarding legal compliance in the U.S.

hardwood sector”.

The assurance offered by this study, often

referred to as the “Seneca Creek report”

after the company responsible for its

preparation, is already well recognised

by importers, and by US Lacey Act and

EUTR authorities, as providing the kind

of documented assurance of legality

required to demonstrate conformance.

In addition to providing the required

legality assurances, there is reliable

forest inventory data, collected at

regular intervals for nearly a century,

to confirm that the resource is not only

abundant, but are expanding rapidly.

U.S. hardwood forests cover around

111 million hectares, equivalent to about

one third of the entire land area of India.

The volume of hardwoods standing in

U.S. forests, which now exceeds 13 billion

cubic meters, has more than doubled in

the last 50 years and is still expanding

(after harvesting) at a rate of around

150 million cubic meters per year, nearly

5 cubic meters every second.

And of course, the hardwoods available

from the U.S., species like oak, ash, and

tulipwood, are already fashionable in the

U.S. and European wood furniture sectors.

There is a tremendous opportunity to

combine Asian woodworking skills and

styles with American hardwoods to

produce globally competitive furniture

products.

By using American hardwoods, Asian

wood product manufacturers can

transform laws like EUTR and Lacey Act

from a threat to their competitiveness,

into a major opportunity.

37


AMERICAN HARDWOOD Southeast Asia Supplement 2019

For 122 years, this

annual meeting has

brought together the

leaders of the hardwood

lumber industry to form

new partnerships,

strengthen existing ones,

learn about emerging

issues and opportunities

and promote the

growth and overall

success of the hardwood

industry.

The NHLA Annual

Convention is open to

members and non-members

alike. With more than 1,200

attendees expected, 130 exhibits, numerous learning sessions

and networking opportunities, the NHLA Annual Convention is the

most important North American hardwood lumber event in

the world.

The National Hardwood Lumber Association will

host the 2019 NHLA Annual Convention & Exhibit

Showcase on October 2-4 at the Sheraton Hotel

in New Orleans, Louisiana.

NHLA encourages

attendance by international

hardwood traders to

understand better the

North American hardwood

supply chain, the NHLA

hardwood lumber grading

rules, issues that affect the

markets, environmental

responsibility and more.

“Trade is incredibly

important to our industry,

as nearly fifty percent of all

hardwood grade lumber is

exported,” stated NHLA CEO

Lorna Christie. “The NHLA

Annual Convention provides

an excellent opportunity for

North American producers to strengthen relationships with

current customers in the international market as well as to cultivate

new partnerships. We look forward to welcoming the world

once again to the global gathering of the hardwood industry.”

Registration is available online please visit www.nhla.com for more information

about the National Hardwood Lumber Association.

38


AMERICAN HARDWOOD Southeast Asia Supplement 2019

ABENAKI TIMBER CORPORATION

P.O. Box 699

Kingston, NH03848

Telephone: (603) 642-3304

Fax: (603) 642-3057

Email: grd-atc@abenakitimber.com

Web address: www.abenakitimber.com

Contact: Steven French

AFP LOG & LUMBER LLC

P.O. Box 2228

Buckhannon, WV 26201

Telephone: (304) 472-2996

Fax: (304) 472-3002

Email: nboyles@afpcorp.com

Web address: www.afpcorp.com

Contact: Nick Boyles

AHC EXPORT LUMBER

P.O. Box 666

Huntersville, NC28070

Telephone: (704) 992-6772

Fax: (704) 947-1220

Email: ahcexport@hardwoodweb.com

Web address: www.hardwoodweb.com

Contact: Patrick Altham

AHEC ADMIN

1825 Michael Faraday Dr.

Reston, VA20190

Telephone: (703) 435-2900

Fax:

Email: tpryor@ahec.org

Web address: www.ahec.org

Contact: Tripp Pryor

ALLEGHENY VENEER COMPANY, INC.

25 Scotts Crossing Road

P.O. Box 33

Corry, PA16407

Telephone: (970) 846-7848

Fax: (814) 664-7966

Email: leamark1@yahoo.com

Web address: www.veneerlogs.com

Contact: Mark E. Lea

ALLEGHENY WOOD PRODUCTS, INC.

P.O. Box 867, Airport Road

Grant County Industrial Park

Petersburg, WV26847

Telephone: (304) 257-1082

Fax: (304) 257-5231

Email: info@alleghenywood.com

Web address: www.alleghenywood.com

Contact: Dean Alanko

AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL LOG & LUMBER CORP.

7628 Bella Verde Way, Addison Reserve CC

Delray Beach, FL33446

Telephone: (561) 495-1665

Fax: (561) 495-7749

Email: Amerintl2@aol.com

Web address:

Contact: Phyllis Gersoff

AMERICAN LUMBER COMPANY

707 West 33 rd St. Erie, PA16508

Telephone: (814) 438-7888

Fax: (814) 438-3086

Email: inquiry@alumber.com

Web address: www.alumber.com

Contact: Jon Swanson

AMOS HILL ASSOCIATES, INC.

112 Shelby Ave, PO Box 7

Edinburgh, IN 46124

Telephone: (812) 526-2671

Fax: (812) 526-5842

Email: stephenb@amoshill.com

Web address: www.amoshill.com

Contact: Stefan Bergmann

ANDERSON-TULLY LUMBER COMPANY, INC.

P.O. Box 38

1725 N. Washington Stree

Vicksburg, MS39181-0038

Telephone: (601) 629-3283

Fax: (601) 629-3284

Email: arnieh@Andersontully.com

Web address: www.andersontully.com

Contact: Arnie Hogue

APPALACHIAN HARDWOOD MANUFACTURERS, INC.

PO Box 427

High Point, NC27261

Telephone: (336) 885-8315

Fax: (336) 886-8865

Email: tom@appalachianwood.org

Web address: www.appalachianwood.org

Contact: Thomas R. Inman

APPALACHIAN PARTNERSHIP FOR ECONOMIC GROWTH

35 Public Square

Nelsonville, OH 45764

Telephone: (740) 648-0360

Email: froberts@apppart.org

Web address: www.apeg.com

Contact: Frank Roberts

ATI INTERNATIONAL LLC

6522 Monet Dr

Roanoke, VA 24018

Telephone: (540) 725-3510

Fax: (540) 266-3800

Email: Paul@atiwood.com

Web address: www.atiwood.com

Contact: Paul Zheng

ATLANTIC-PACIFIC HARDWOODS, LLC

24870 SE Mirrormont Drive

Issaquah, WA 98027

Telephone: (425) 932-8358

Fax: (828) 879-8360

Email: jason@aphardwoods.com

Web address: www.aphardwoods.com

Contact: Jason Green

ATLANTIC VENEER CORPORATION

P.O. Box 660

2457 Lennoxville Road

Beaufort, NC28516-0660

Telephone: (252) 728-3169

Fax: (252) 728-4203

Email: jtaylor@moehring-group.com

Web address: www.moehring-group.com

Contact: Jack Taylor

ATLAS TRADING INTERNATIONAL

PO Box 1589

Beaverton, OR 97075

Telephone: (503) 626-4800

Fax: (503) 626-4809

Email: israel@atlastradinginternational.com

Web address: www.atlastradinginternational.com

Contact: Israel Gonzalez

BAILLIE LUMBER COMPANY

4002 Legion Drive

P.O. Box 6

Hamburg, NY14075

Telephone: (716) 649-2850

Fax: (716) 649-2811

Email: info@baillie.com

Web address: www.Baillie.com

Contact: Tony Cimorelli

BANKS HARDWOODS, INC.

69937 M-103

White Pigeon, MI 49099

Telephone: (269) 483-2323

Fax: (269) 483-2483

Email: SteveBanks@bankshardwoods.com

Web address: www.bankshardwoods.com

Contact: Steve Banks

BATTLE LUMBER COMPANY

P.O. Box 1147

Wadley, GA 30477

Telephone: (478) 252-5210

Fax: (478) 252-1364

Email: craig@battlelumberco.com

Web address: www.battlelumberco.com

Contact: Craig Miller

BESSE FOREST PRODUCTS GROUP

P.O. Box 352

Gladstone, MI49837

Telephone: (906) 428-3113

Fax: (906) 428-3310

Email: info@bessegroup.com

Web address: www.bessegroup.com

Contact: Greg Besse

BINGAMAN AND SON LUMBER, INC.

1195 Creek Mountain Road

Kreamer, PA17833

Telephone: (570) 374-1108

Fax: (570) 374-3901

Email: dwhitten@bingamanlumber.com

Web address: www.bingamanlumber.com

Contact: David Whitten

BLUE MOUNTAIN HARDWOOD INC.

9818 NE 24 th St

Bellevue, WA 98004

Telephone: (425) 440-1313

Email: maggie_bp@yahoo.com

Contact: Maggie Bing Peng

BLUE RIDGE LUMBER COMPANY, LLC.

P.O. Box 89

Fisherville, VA22939

Telephone: (540) 885-5055

Fax: (540) 885-0119

Email: jnaylor@blueridgelumber.net

Web address: www.blueridgelumber.net

Contact: Joe Naylor

BOIS POULIN, INC.

P.O. Box 6066

The Arnold Trail

Coburn, ME04936

Telephone: (819) 549-2090

Fax: (819) 549-2045

Email: marcovachon@boispoulin.ca

Web address: www.boispoulin.ca

Contact: Marco Vachon

BPM LUMBER, LLC

P.O. Box 2800

London, KY 40741

Telephone: (606) 877-1228

Fax: (606) 877-1230

Email: sstaryak@bpmlumber.com

Web address: www.bpmlumber.com

Contact: Steve Staryak

BRENNEMAN LUMBER CO.

51 Parrott St.

P.O. Box 951

Mount Vernon, OH43050

Telephone: (740) 397-0573

Fax: (740) 392-9498

Email: doug@brennemanlumber.com

Web address: www.brennemanlumber.com

Contact: Doug Brenneman

BROWNLEE LUMBER INC.

2652 Hazen Richrdsville Road

Brookville, PA 15825

Telephone: (814) 328-2991

Fax: (814) 328-2422

Email: tim@brownleelumber.com

Web address: www.brownleelumber.com

Contact: Tim Brownlee

BUCHANAN HARDWOODS INC.

P.O. Box 424

Aliceville, AL35442

Telephone: (205) 373-8710 x 263

Fax: (205) 373-6982

Email: glo@buchananhardwoods.com

Web address: www.buchananhardwoods.com

Contact: G.L. “Butch” Ousley

C/K INTERNATIONAL, LLC

3604 Shannon Road

Suite 300

Durham, NC 27707

Telephone: (919) 956-7781

Fax: (919) 956-7458

Email: exports@mail.ckinter.com

Web address: www.ckinter.com

Contact: Steven Sievers

CANYON TIMBER INTERNATIONAL, INC.

P.O. Box 26

Monroe, NH 03771

Telephone: (819) 552-9020

Email: info@canyontimberint.com

Web address: www.canyontimberint.com

Contact: Claude Lapointe

CARDIN FOREST PRODUCTS, LLC

P.O. Box 356

South Pittsburg, TN 37380

Telephone: (423) 837-4041

Fax: (423) 837-9838

Email: ruthcardin@cardinfp.com

Web address: www.cardinfp.com

Contact: Ruth Cardin

CARUSO, INC.

P.O. Box 161, 18000 Eltham Rd

West Point, VA 23181

Telephone: (804) 514-4865

Fax: (804) 843-4587

Email: stancaruso@yahoo.com

Web address: www.carusowood.com

AMERICAN WALNUT MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION

505 East State Street

Jefferson City, MO 47906

Telephone: (573) 635-7877

Fax: (573) 636-2591

Email: brian@walnutassociation.org

Web address: www.walnutassociation.org

Contact: Brian Brookshire

B & B FOREST PRODUCTS

251 NY Route 145

Cairo, NY 12413

Tel: (518) 622-8019 ext 2

Fax: (518) 622-0937

Email: bbfp.jen@outlook.com

Contact: Jennifer DeFrancesco

BOSS LUMBER

47 Poplar Knob Rd.

Galax, VA24333

Telephone: (276) 238-3346

Fax: (276) 238-3348

Email: jmjimenez.calderon@tamalsa.com

Web address: www.bosslumber.com

Contact: Jose Miguel Jimeniz

CARUSO HARDWOOD, LLC

PO Box 269

Chehalis, WA 98532

Telephone: (360) 345-1313

Fax: (260) 767-0660

Email: rick@chgsales.com

Web address: www.cascadehardwood.com

Contact: Rick Barrett & Jeff Lockey

40


Southeast Asia Supplement 2019

AMERICAN HARDWOOD

CASCADE HARDWOOD, LLC

PO Box 269

Chehalis, WA 98532

Tel: (360) 345-1313

Fax: (360) 767-0660

Web: www.cascadehardwood.com

Contact: Rick Barret

CERSOSIMO LUMBER COMPANY

1103 Vernon St.

Brattleboro, VT05301

Telephone: (802) 254-4508

Fax: (802) 254-5691

Email: blarson@cersosimo.com

Web address: www.cersosimolumber.com

Contact: Barbara Larson

CFP INTERNATIONAL - CHERRY FOREST PRODUCTS

501 Camp Road

PO Box 221

Hamburg, NY14075

Telephone: (519) 763-1466 ex. 232

Fax: (519) 763-7353

Email: jacob@cherryforest.ca

Web address: www.cherryforest.ca

Contact: Jacob Baranski

CLARK LUMBER COMPANY

552 Public Well Rd.

Red Boiling Springs, TN37150

Telephone: (615) 699-3497

Fax: (615) 699-3036

Email: hclark@clarklumbercompany.com

Web address: www.clarklumbercompany.com

Contact: Hugh W. Clark

CLASSIC AMERICAN HARDWOODS, INC.

1245 N 7 th St.

Memphis, TN38107

Telephone: (901) 522-9663

Fax: (901) 522-9664

Email: wdonoho@cahmemphis.com

Web address: www.cahmemphis.com

Contact: Will Donoho

CLC HARDWOODS

P.O. Box 741

Ruston, LA71273

Telephone: (318) 255-3585

Fax: (318) 255-6376

Email: wbishop@clchardwoods.com

Web address: www.clchardwoods.com

Contact: William Bishop

COLE HARDWOOD, INC.

1611 W. Market Street

Logansport, IN46947

Telephone: (574) 753-3151

Fax: (574) 753-2525

Email: colexx@colehardwood.com

Web address: www.colehardwood.com

Contact: Dave Bramlage

COLLINS WOOD

29100 SW Town Center Loop W, Suite 300

Wilsonville, OR 97070

Tel: (800) 329-1219

Fax: (503) 807-8768

Email: bhammond@collinsco.com

Web address: www.collinswood.com

Contact: Bo Hammond

CONCANNON LUMBER COMPANY

2950 SE Stark St.

Suite 230

Portland, OR97214

Telephone: (503) 231-8881

Fax: (503) 236-5614

Email: Martin.Maier@concannonlumber.co

Web address: www.concannonlumber.com

Contact: Martin Maier

CONTINENTAL HARDWOOD, INC.

3488 Huntington Lane

St. Charles, MO63303

Telephone: (636) 441-4333

Fax: (636) 441-0179

Email: takenaka@charter.net

Contact: Teiji Takenaka

CROWN HARDWOOD CO., INC.

1270 Baltimore Pik

West Grove, PA 19390

Telephone: (610) 869-8771

Fax: (610) 869-4166

Email: sjones@crown-wood.com

Web address: www.crown-wood.com

Contact: Sandy Jones

CUMMINGS LUMBER CO. INC.

21756 Route 14 North

Troy, PA16947

Telephone: (570) 297-4771

Fax: (570) 297-2766

Email: norms@clc1.com

Web address: www.clc1.com

Contact: Norm Steffy

DANZER LUMBER & VENEER

119 A.I.D. Drive

P.O. Box 444

Darlington, PA16115

Telephone: (724) 827-8366

Fax: (724) 827-8373

Email: vijay_reddy@danzerveneer.com

Web address: www.danzer.com

Contact: Vijay Reddy

DEER PARK LUMBER, INC.

3042 SR 6

Tunkhannock, PA 18657

Telephone: (570) 836-1133

Fax: (570) 836-8982

Email: joe@deerparklumberinc.com

Web address: www.deerparklumberinc.com

Contact: Joe Zona

DV - LAUZON INTERNATIONAL

2711 Centerville Rd.

Suite 400

Wilmington, DE19808

Telephone: (450) 435-8320

Fax: (450) 435-2483

Email: stephanie.vandystadt@boisdv.ca

Web address: www.boisdv.ca

Contact: Stephanie Vandystadt

EAGLE FOREST LLC

517 Mason Ave

St. Louis, MO 63119

Tel: (573) 560-8202

Fax: (314) 962-3368

Email: ashimotani@outlook.com

Contact: Allen Yoshinobu Shimotani

EDWARDS WOOD PRODUCTS, INC.

2215 Old Lawyers Rd

P.O. Box 21

Marshville, NC28103

Telephone: (704) 624-5098

Fax: (704) 624-3656

Email: mattharris@ewpi.com

Web address: www.ewpi.com/

Contact: Matt Harris

FITZPATRICK & WELLER, INC.

12 Mill Street, Ellicotville,

NY14731-0490

Telephone: (716) 699-2393

Fax: (716) 699-2893

Email: sales@fitzweller.com

Web address: www.fitzweller.com

Contact: Dana G. Fitzpatrick

FRANK MILLER LUMBER COMPANY, INC.

1690 Frank Miller Rd.

Union City,

IN47390

Telephone: (765) 964-3196

Fax: (765) 964-7647

Email: mmiller@frankmiller.com

Web address: www.frankmiller.com

Contact: Mark Miller

FTI AMERICA

603 West Sumner Avenue

Spokane, WA 99204

Telephone: (509) 744-0688

Fax: (509) 744-0806

Email: callarson@aol.com

Web address: www.fitamerica.com

Contact: Cal Larson

GATEWAY VENEER & EXPORT

1200 S. Broadway

Salem, Illinois 62881

Phone: (618) 322-5946

Fax: (618) 548-8181

Email: mtimber22@yahoo.com

Contact: Micah Mulvany

GEORGIA FORESTRY COMMISSION

15133 GA Hwy 129 North

Claxton, GA 30417

Tel: (912) 739-4734

Fax: (912) 739-9061

Email: rwillard@gfc.state.ga.us

Web address: www.GaTrees.org

Contact: Risher Willard

GMC HARDWOODS, INC.

93 West Street

Medfield,

MA 02052

Telephone: (508) 359-6580 x4

Fax: (508) 359-6515

Email: s.glidden@GMCHardwoods.com

Web address: www.GMCHardwoods.com

Contact: Sam Glidden

GRAF BROTHERS LUMBER & FLOORING

679 Johnson Lane

P.O. Box 458

South Shore, KY41175

Telephone: (606) 932-3117

Fax: (606) 932-3156

Email: dave@grafbro.com

Web address: www.grafbrothersflooring.com

Contact: David Graf

GRAF AND THOMAS LUMBER

7071 Holly Branch Road

Vanceburg, KY 41179

Telephone: (740) 727-1003

Fax: (606) 796-2786

Email: damon@grafwood.com

Contact: Damon Graf

GRANITE VALLEY FOREST PRODUCTS

500 City Hwy S

New London,

WI 54961

Telephone: (920) 250-5410

Email: CMoore@granitevalley.com

Web address: www.granitevalley.com

Contact: Chris Moore

GLOBAL LUMBER INC

4832 Cooper Rd, #188

Blue Ash, Ohio 45242

Telephone: (415) 885-9888

Fax: (740) 616-8031

Email: RonniePan@GlobalLumberinc.com

Contact: Ronnie Pan

GUTCHESS INTERNATIONAL, INC.

P.O. Box 5435

100 McLean Road

Cortland, NY 13045

Telephone: (607) 753-8201

Fax: (607) 753-6384

Email: gii@gutchessinternational.com

Web address: www.gutchessinternational.com

Contact: David Engst

GUTCHESS LUMBER COMPANY, INC.

890 McLean Road

Cortland, NY13045

Telephone: (607) 753-3393

Fax: (607) 753-6234

Email: CTCaldwell@gutchess.com

Web address: www.gutchess.com

Contact: Tom Caldwell

HANAFEE BROS. SAWMILL CO., INC.

520 E. Harper Street

P.O. Box 157

Troy, TN38260

Telephone: (731) 536-4682

Fax: (731) 536-4758

Email: donald.hanafee@gmail.com

Web address: www.hanafeebros.com

Contact: Donald Hanafee,Jr.

HARDWOOD MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION

665 Rodi Rd., Ste 305

Pittsburgh, PA15235

Telephone: (412) 244-0440

Fax: (412) 244-9090

Email: LJovanovich@hardwood.org

Web address: www.hardwoodinfo.com

Contact: Linda Jovanovich

HARDWOOD MARKET REPORT

780 Ridge Lake Blvd., Suite 102

Memphis, TN 38120

Telephone: (901) 767-9126

Fax: (901) 767-7534

Email: judd@hmr.com

Web address: www.hmr.com

Contact: Judd Johnson

HARDWOOD PLYWOOD AND VENEER ASSOCIATION

1825 Michael Faraday Dr.

Reston, VA20190

Telephone: (703) 435-2900

Fax: (703) 435-2537

Email: hpva@hpva.org

Web address: www.hpva.org

Contact: Kip Howlett

HARDWOOD REVIEW GLOBAL

P.O. Box 471307

Charlotte, NC28247-1307

Telephone: (704) 543-4408

Fax: (704) 543-4411

Web address: www.hardwoodpublishing.com

Contact: George Barrett

HARDWOODS OF AMERICA, LLC

P.O. Box 188

Fayette, MS39069

Telephone: (601) 786-3473

Fax: (601) 786-3802

Email: scottw@nettervillelumber.com

Web address: www.hardwoodsofamerica.net

Contact: Scott Wesberry

HAROLD WHITE LUMBER INC.

2920 Flemingsburg Road

Morehead KY 40351

Telephone: (606) 784-7573

Fax: (606) 784-2624

Email: rwhite@harlodwhitelumber.com

Web address: www.haroldwhitelumber.com

Contact: Ray White

41


AMERICAN HARDWOOD Southeast Asia Supplement 2019

HARTZELL HARDWOODS INC.

1025 S. Roosevelt Ave.

P.O. Box 919

Piqua, OH45356

Telephone: (937) 773-7054

Fax: (937) 773-6160

Email: khostetter@hartzellhardwoods.com

Web address: www.hartzellhardwoods.com

Contact: Kelly Hostetter

HERMITAGE HARDWOOD LUMBER SALES, INC.

105 Ridgedale Dr.

P.O. Box 698

Cookeville, TN38503

Telephone: (931) 526-6832

Fax: (931) 526-4769

Email: lawson@hermitagehardwood.com

Web address: www.hermitagehardwood.com

Contact: Lawson Maury

HHP INC.

P.O. Box 489

14 Buxton Industrial Drive

Henniker, NH 03242

Telephone: (603) 428-3298

Fax: (603) 428-3448

Email: bdahn@hhp-inc.com

Web address: www.hhp-inc.com

Contact: Bruce Dahn

HULL FOREST PRODUCTS

101 Hampton Rd.

Pomfret Center, CT06259

Telephone: (860) 974-0127

Fax: (860) 974-2963

Email: benhull@hullforest.com

Web address: www.hullforest.com

Contact: Ben Hull

IKE TRADING COMPANY, LTD.

8905 SW Nimbus Ave

Suite 475A

Beaverton, OR97008

Telephone: (503) 643-6688

Fax: (503) 641-7335

Email: cj@iketrading.com

Web address: www.iketrading.com

Contact: Seiji Yano

INDIANA STATE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

414 Main St. Jasper, IN47546

Telephone: (812) 634-9140

Fax: (812) 634-9269

Email: mseidl@isda.in.gov

Web address:

Contact: Mike Seidl

INDUSTRY INTELLIGENCE, INC.

1990 S. Bundy Dr. Suite 380

Los Angeles, CA 90025

Tel: (310) 553-0008

Email: audrey.dixon@industryintel.com

Web address: www.industryintel.com

Contact: Audrey Dixon

INTERNATIONAL WOOD PRODUCTS ASSOCIATION

4214 King Street, Alexandria, VA22302

Telephone: (703) 820-6696

Fax: (703) 820-8550

Email: cindy@iwpawood.org

Web address: www.iwpawood.org

Contact: Cindy Squires

J AND J LOG AND LUMBER CORP.

528 Old Rt. 22,

Box 1139

Dover Plains, NY 12522

Telephone: (845) 832-6525

Fax: (845) 832-3757

Email: rcafiero@msn.com

Contact: Robert Cafiero

JL GARDNER HARDWOODS, LLC

1199 Muse Field Road

Rocky Mount, VA 24151

Telephone: (540) 420-2133

Fax: (540) 483-0874

Email: leeland@jlgardner.org

Web Address: www.jlgardner.org

Contact: Leeland Gardner Jr

J.M. JONES LUMBER COMPANY

P.O. Box 1368

Natchez, MS39121

Telephone: (601) 442-7471

Fax: (601) 446-7448

Email: hjones@jolumco.com

Web address: www.jolumco.com

Contact: Lee Jones

JIM C. HAMER COMPANY

P.O. Box 418

Kenova, WV25530

Telephone: (304) 453-6381

Fax: (304) 453-6587

Email: twebb@jimchamer.com

Web address: www.jimchamer.com

Contact: Todd Webb

KAMPS HARDWOODS, INC.

6925 Dutton Industrial Park Dr SE

Dutton, MI 49316

Telephone: (616) 554-9339

Fax: (616) 554-9779

Email: robk@kampshardwoods.com

Web address: www.kampshardwoods.com

Contact: Rob Kukowski

KENDRICK FOREST PRODUCTS

P.O. Box 457

601 South Washington

Edgewood, IA52042

Telephone: (563) 928-6431

Fax: (563) 928-7215

Email: myest@kendrickinc.com

Web address: www.kfpiowa.com

Contact: Matt Yest

KENNEBEC LUMBER COMPANY

105 South Main St., Route 201

Solon, ME 04979

Telephone: (207) 643-2110

Fax: (207) 643-2113

Email: mmallet@kennebeclumber.com

Web address: www.kennebeclumber.com

Contact: Max Mallet

KENTUCKY DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

111 Corporate Drive

Frankfort, KY40601

Telephone: (502) 564-4983

Fax: (502) 564-0303

Email: jonathan.vanbalen@ky.gov

Web address: www.kyagr.com

Contact: Jonathan Van Balen

KRETZ LUMBER CO., INC.

W11143 County Highway G

P.O. Box 160

Antigo, WI54409

Telephone: (715) 623-5410

Fax: (715) 627-4399

Email: timk@kretzlumber.com

Web address: www.kretzlumber.com

Contact: Tim Kassis

KRUEGER LUMBER COMPANY, INC.

21324 USH 151, Valders, WI54245

Telephone: (920) 775-4663

Fax: (920) 775-4339

Email: larry@kruegerlumber.com

Web address: http://www.kruegerlumber.com

Contact: Larry Krueger

LAUFER GROUP INTERNATIONAL

7007 NE Parvin Rd

Kansas City, MO 64117

Telephone: (314) 456-7893

Fax: (636) 529-1115

Emai: dmeresak@laufer.com

Web address: www.laufer.com

Contact: David Meresak

LAWRENCE LUMBER COMPANY, INC.

3360 Cansler Circle

Maiden, NC28650

Telephone: (828) 428-5601

Fax: (828) 428-5602

Email: beam292@gmail.com

Web address: www.lawrencelumberinc.com

Contact: Kim Beam

LEADMAN FLOORING, LLC.

300 Brogdon Road Suite 140

Suwanee, GA 30024

Telephone: (770) 817-1430

Fax: (770) 817-1431

Email: davidyan@leadmanga.com

Web Address: www.leadmanflooring.com

Contact: David Yan

LEWIS BROTHERS LUMBER COMPANY, INC.

P.O. Box 334

1031 13 th Street, NW

Aliceville, AL35442

Telephone: (205) 373-2496

Fax: (205) 373-2122

Email: joe@lewisbrotherslumber.com

Contact: Joe B. Lewis

LINDEN LUMBER, LLC

23741 US HWY 43

P.O. Box 480369

Linden, AL36748

Telephone: (334) 295-2554

Fax: (334) 295-8088

Email: tthornburgh@redcrown.com

Web address: www.lindenlumber.com

Contact: Tim Thornburgh

M. BOHLKE VENEER CORPORATION

8375 North Gilmore Rd

Fairfield, OH45014

Telephone: (513) 874-4400

Fax: (513) 682-1469

Email: email@mbohlkeveneer.com

Web address: www.mbveneer.com

Contact: Manfred Bohlke

MACDONALD & OWEN LUMBER

1900 Riley Road

Sparta, WI 54669

Telephone: (608) 269-4417

Fax: (608) 269-4418

Email: adam@hardwoodlumber.net

Web address: www.hardwoodlumber.net

Contact: Adam Hyer

MATSON LUMBER COMPANY

132 Main Street

Brookville, PA15825

Telephone: (814) 849-5334

Fax: (814) 849-3811

Email: mcaruso@matsonlumber.com

Web address: www.matsonlumber.com

Contact: Mike Caruso

MAYFIELD LUMBER COMPANY

P.O. Box 848

McMinnville, TN 37111

Telephone: (931) 668-3252

Fax: (931) 668-2363

Email: mayfieldlbr@blomand.net

Web address: www.mayfieldlumber.com

Contact: David Mayfield

MCCLAIN FOREST PRODUCTS/LEGACY WOOD

PRODUCTS

1050 Girdley St.

West Plains, MO65775

Telephone: (417) 257-7795

Fax: (417) 257-7193

Email: Email: dmurray@mcclainforestproducts.com

Web address: www.mcclainforestproducts.com

Contact: Darwin Murray

MCGEE LUMBER COMPANY INC.

1305 Baptist Line Rd.

Aliceville, AL35442

Telephone: (205) 373-6704

Fax: (205) 373-2042

Email: mcgee001@centurytel.net

Web address: www.mcgeelumberco.com

Contact: John McGee

MICHIGAN DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND

RURAL DEVELOPMENT

525 W. Allegan Street

Lansing, MI 48909

Telephone: (517) 614-5518

Email: lacourtd2@michigan.gov

Web address: www.michigan.gov/mdard

Contact: Donna LaCourt

MIDDLE TENNESSEE LUMBER CO., INC.

240 Gum Branch Road

Burns, TN 37029

Telephone: (615) 740-5100

Fax: (615) 446-

Email: elacey@midtnlumber.com

Web address: www.midtnlumber.com

Contact: Eric Lacey

MIDWEST HARDWOOD CORP.

9540 83rd Ave. N

Maple Grove, MN55369

Telephone: (763) 391-6716

Fax: (763) 391-6742

Email: inquiries@midwesthardwood.com

Web address: www.midwesthardwood.com

Contact: William Parks

INTERNATIONAL WOOD TRADE PUBLICATIONS, INC.

5175 Elmore Road, Ste. 23

Memphis, TN38134

Telephone: (901) 372-8280

Fax: (901) 373-6180

Email: editor@millerpublishing.com

Web address: www.woodpurchasingnews.com

Contact: Gary Mille

KEPLEY-FRANK HARDWOOD CO., INC.

975 Conrad Hill Mine Road, Lexington, NC27292

Telephone: (336) 746-5419

Fax: (336) 746-6177

Email: kepleyfrank@gmail.com

Web address: www.kepleyfrank.com

Contact: James H. Kepley, Jr.

MACBEATH HARDWOOD

320 North Kyle Street

Edinburgh, IN 46124

Telephone: (317) 503-3993

Fax: (812) 526-9749

Email: rclark@macbeath.com

Web Adddress: www.macbeath.com

Contact: Richard Clark

MIDWEST WALNUT COMPANY

1914 Tostevin Street

Council Bluffs, IA51503

Telephone: (712) 325-9191

Fax: (712) 325-0156

Email: larrym@midwestwalnut.com

Web address: www.midwestwalnut.com

Contact: Larry Mether

42


Southeast Asia Supplement 2019

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AMERICAN HARDWOOD Southeast Asia Supplement 2019

MISSISSIPPI DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY

Woolfolk Office Building, 501 N. West St.

P.O. Box 849

Jackson, MS39205

Telephone: (601) 359-3618

Fax: (601) 359-3605

Email: chelfrich@mississippi.org

Web address: www.mississippi.org

Contact: Courtney Helfrich

MISSOURI DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

P.O. Box 630

1616 Missouri Boulevard

Jefferson City, MO 65102

Telephone: (573) 751-7213

Fax: (573) 751-2868

Email: Kayla.Otto@mda.mo.gov

Web address: www.agriculture.mo.gov

Contact: Kayla Otto

MISSOURI WALNUT LLC

11417 Oak Road

Neosho, MO64850

Telephone: (417) 455-0972

Fax: (417) 455-0255

Email: william@missouriwalnut.com

Web address: www.missouriwalnut.com

Contact: William Qian

MISSOURI-PACIFIC LUMBER CO. INC.

694 DD Highway

Fayette, MO65248

Telephone: (660) 248-3000

Fax: (660) 248-2508

Email: gcook@mopaclumber.com

Web address: www.mopaclumber.com

Contact: Grafton Cook

MOUNTAIN STATE HARDWOODS

P.O. Box A

Bancroft, WV 25011

Telephone: (304) 543-2591

Fax: (304) 586-3382

Email: sengland@mtnstatehardwoods.com

Web address: www.mtnstatehardwoods.com

Contact: Scott England

MOUNTAIN TOP FLOORS INC.

32 Cinder Road Suite 14

Edison, NJ 08820

Telephone: (908) 267-8338

Email: M.Zhao@mt-floors.com

Contact: Michael Zhao

MUTH LUMBER COMPANY

1301 Adams Lane

Ironton, OH45638

Telephone: (740) 533-0800

Fax: (740) 533-0725

Email: muthy27@yahoo.com

Web address: muthlumbercompany.com

Contact: Mark Muth

NATIONAL HARDWOOD LUMBER ASSOCATION

P.O. Box 34518

6830 Raleigh LaGrange

Memphis, TN38184-0518

Telephone: (901) 377-1818

Fax: (901) 382-6419

Email: info@nhla.com

Web address: www.nhla.com

Contact: Lorna Christie

NATIONAL WOOD FLOORING ASSOCIATION

111 Chesterfield Industrial Blvd.

Chesterfield, MO63005

Telephone: (636) 519-9663

Fax: (636) 519-9664

Email: michaelm@nwfa.org

Web address: www.nwfa.org

Contact: Michael Martin

NEW YORK WOOD PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL

10B Airline Drive

Albany, NY 12235

Telephone: (518) 457-6773

Fax: (518) 457-2716

Email: theresa.sweeney@agriculture.ny.gov

Contact: Theresa Sweeney

NINA COMPANY, LLC

774 Adele Avenue, Arnold, MD21012

Telephone: (410) 647-8990/(443) 994-0975

Fax: (410) 647-0974

Email: mlipschitz@ninacompany.com

Web address: www.ninacompany.com

Contact: Mark Lipschitz

NORTH CAROLINA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

& CONSUMER SERVICES

1020 Mail Service Center

Raleigh, NC 27699-1020

Phone: (919) 707-3160

Fax: (919) 715-0083

Email: clay.altizer@ncagr.gov

Web address: www.agr.state.nc.us/markets/internat

Contact: Clay Altizer

NORTH CASCADES FOREST PRODUCTS, LLC

202 Pine Court

Pittsgurgh, PA 15237

Phone: (206) 550-8114

Fax: (412) 235-2690

Email: ryjordan@northcascade.com

Contact: Robert Jordan

NORTHEASTERN LOGGER’S ASSOCIATION

PO Box 69

3311 State Rt. 28

Old Forge, NY13420

Telephone: (315) 369-3078

Fax: (315) 369-3736

Email: jphaneuf@northernlogger.com

Web address: www.northernlogger.com

Contact: Joseph Phaneuf

NORTHERN HARDWOODS

45807 HWY M-26

Southrange, MI 49963

Telephone: (715) 533-6193

Fax: (906) 487-6417

Email: rpeterson@northernhardwoods.com

Web Address: www.northernhardwoods.com

Contact: Ryan Peterson

NORTHLAND CORPORATION

P.O. Box 265

2600 Highway #146 East

LaGrange, KY40031

Telephone: (502) 222-2527

Fax: (502) 222-5355

Email: orng@northlandcorp.com

Web address: www.northlandcorp.com

Contact: Orn E. Gudmundsson, Jr.

NORTHLAND FOREST PRODUCTS, INC.

P.O. Box 369

16 Church Street

Kingston, NH03801

Telephone: (603) 642-3665

Fax: (603) 642-8670

Email: jfrench@northlandforest.com

Web address: www.northlandforest.com

Contact: Jameson French

NORTHWEST HARDWOODS

820 A Street, Suite, 500

Tacoma, WA98402

Telephone: (253) 568-6800

Fax: (253) 301-3231

Email: jacob.schriner@northwesthardwoods.com

Web address: northwesthardwoods.com

Contact: Jacob Schriner

OAKS UNLIMITED, INC.

3530 Jonathan Creek Road Waynesville, NC28786

Telephone: (828) 926-1621

Fax: (828) 926-3383

Email: mail@oaksunlimited.com

Web address: www.oaksunlimited.com

Contact: Joe Pryor

OHIO INTERNATIONAL LUMBER, LLC

Po Box 309

Waverly, OH

Telephone: (434) 660-6491

Fax:(740) 941-1333

Email: rickfaulkner@me.com

Web address: www.ohiointernationallumber.com

Contact: Richard Faulkner

PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATES, INC.

16000 Christensen Road

Suite 130, Tukwila, WA98188

Telephone: (206) 267-0300

Fax: (206) 248-9388

Email: keiko@pia-usa.com

Web address: www.pia-usa.com

Contact: Keiko Gates

PACIFIC RIM EXPORT, INC.

11811 N. Tatum Blvd.,

Suite 3031

Phoenix, AZ85028-1621

Telephone: (602) 788-4277

Fax: (602) 788-8996

Email: nickn@pacificrimexport.com

Web address: www.PacificRimExport.com www.

hardwood.jp

Contact: Hayato “Nick” Nakamura

PENN LUMBER INC

3150 Middle Road Richfield,

PA17086

Telephone: (819) 478-7721

Fax: (819) 477-6636

Email: wgenest@primewood-lumber.com

Web address: www.primewood-lumber.com

Contact: William Genest

PENN-SYLVAN INTERNATIONAL, INC.

P.O. Box 111

Spartansburg, PA 16434

Telephone: (814) 694-2311

Fax: (814) 654-7155

Email: j.reese@earthlink.net

Web address: www.lumber12.com

Contact: Jay Reese

PENNSYLVANIA HARDWOODS DEVELOPMENT

COUNCIL

2301 N. Cameron Street, Rm 308

Harrisburg, PA17110-9408

Telephone: (717) 772-3715

Fax: (717) 705-0663

Email: dbender@state.pa.us

Web address: www.agriculture.state.pa.us

Contact: D. Wayne Bender

PIKE LUMBER COMPANY, INC

719 Front St.

P.O. Box 247

Akron, IN46910

Telephone: (574) 893-4511

Fax: (574) 893-7400

Email: cbrouyette@pikelumber.com

Web address: www.pikelumber.com

Contact: Craig Brouyette

PIONEER FOREST PRODUCTS

2615 Burnett Road

Cutler, Ohio 45724

Telephone: (740) 885-9563

Email: eawalters758@gmail.com

Contact: Eugena A. Walters

POLARIS HARDWOOD PRODUCTS, LLC

4501 Cartwright Rd.,

Suite 304

Missouri City, TX 77459

Telephone: (217) 836-2716

Email: KongSL@genesisforest.com

Contact: Siang Lian Kong

PJ LUMBER COMPANY

1401 Saint Stephens Road

Prichard, AL 36610

Telephone: (251) 452-3451

Fax: (251) 456-0709

Email: ignacio.olavide@pjlumber.nl

Web address: www.pjlumber.com

Contact: Ignacio Olavide

R&B HARDWOOD CORP.

13300 Amar Road

City of Industry,

CA 91746

Telephone: (626) 968-5768

Fax: (626) 968-9362

Email: info@rnbhardwood.com

Contact: Xiangmin Lin

RALPH TAYLOR LUMBER COMPANY, INC.

560 Erin Drive

Memphis, TN 38117

Telephone: (901) 684-1400

Fax: (901) 684-1404

Email: adam@rtlumber.com

Web address: www.rtlumber.com

Contact: Adam Taylor

RAM FOREST PRODUCTS, INC.

1716 Honeoye Road, Shinglehouse,

PA16748

Telephone: (814) 697-7185

Fax: (814) 697-7190

Email: ramsales@frontiernet.net

Web address: www.ram-forest.com

Contact: Mike Tarbell

REPUBLIC FOREST PRODUCTS

560 Airport Rd; PO Box 1627

Gallatin, TN 37066

Telephone: (615) 230-7355

Fax: (615) 451-3299

Email: bfowler@fowlerlumber.com

Web address: www.republicforest.com

Contact: Bill Fowler

RFL GROUP, INC.

P.O. Box 361

Lake Osweego,

OR97034

Telephone: (503) 684-0774

Fax: (503) 684-0776

Email: hprice@rflgroup.net

Web address: www.rflgroup.net

Contact: Hayden Price

ROBERT S. COLEMAN LUMBER COMPANY, INC.

7019 Everona Rd. Culpepper,

VA22701

Telephone: (540) 854-4628

Fax: (540) 854-5096

Email: jamie.coleman@hotmail.com

Web address: www.rscolemanlumber.com

Contact: Jamie Coleman

ROBINSON LUMBER COMPANY

4000 Tchoupitoulas Street

New Orleans,

LA70115

Telephone: (800) 874-1165

Fax: (504) 897-0820

Email: Mallory@roblumco.com

Web address: www.roblumco.com

Contact: Mallory Robinson

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AMERICAN HARDWOOD Southeast Asia Supplement 2019

ROLLING RIDGE WOODS A DIVISION OF

YODER LUMBER CO.

10095 Emerson Avenue

Parkersburg, WV26104

Telephone: (304) 464-4980

Fax: (304) 464-4988

Email: kaseyc@yoderlumber.com

Web address: www.rollingridgewoods.com

Contact: Kasey Chaney

RON JONES HARDWOOD SALES, INC.

2 East High Street, P.O. Box 232

Union City, PA 16438

Telephone: (814) 438-7622

Fax: (814) 438-2008

Email: steve@ronjoneshardwood.com

Web address: www.ronjoneshardwood.com

Contact: Steve Jones

ROSSI GROUP, LLC

213 Court St, Middletown, CT 06457

Telephone: (860) 632-3500

Fax: (860) 613-3727

Email: trossi@rossilumber.com

Web address: www.rossigroup.net

Contact: Theodore “Ted” Rossi

ROY ANDERSON LUMBER COMPANY, INC.

1115 Columbia Ave

P.O. Box 275

Tompkinsville, KY42167

Telephone: (270) 487-6590

Fax: (270) 487-9441

Email: info@ralumber.com

Web address: www.ralumber.com

Contact: Lowery Anderson

SEELAND WOOD, LLC

42902 Bittner Sq, Ashburn, VA 20148

Telephone: (215) 343-5798

Email: lcusa1234@gmail.com

Web address: www.seelandwood.com

Contact: Lin Chen

SHANNON LUMBER INTERNATIONAL

P.O. Box 16929, Memphis, TN38186

Telephone: (800) 473-3765

Fax: (662) 280-2063

Email: jacks@jtshannon.com

Web address: www.jtshannon.com

Contact: Jack Shannon III

SHOMAKER LUMBER COMPANY INC.

24895 Hwy 22 North

P.O. Box 698

McKenzie, TN38201

Telephone: (731) 352-5777

Fax: (731) 352-9301

Email: shomakerlumber@bellsouth.net

Web address: www.shomakerlumbercompany.com

Contact: Ronnie Shomaker

SND HARDWOODS COMPANY

P.O. Box 40743

Nashville,

TN37204

Telephone: (615) 889-3030

Fax: (615) 889-3633

Email: sndhardwood@bellsouth.net

Web address:

Contact: Elie Joseph Ghanem

SNOWBELT HARDWOODS, INC.

345 Ringle Drive

Hurley, WI54534

Telephone: (715) 561-2200

Fax: (715) 561-2040

Email: bfrancois@snowbelthardwoods.com

Web address: www.snowbelthardwoods.com

Contact: Brady Francois

SOMERSET WOOD PRODUCTS

138 East Antioch Avenue

Burnsidet, KY42519

Telephone: (606) 561-4146

Fax: (606) 561-6337

Email: gcrawford@somersetwood.com

Web address: www.somersetwood.com

Contact: George Crawford

SONOKING CORPORATION

#5 Northern Boulevard Unit #2

P.O. Box 1055

Amherst, NH 03031-1055

Telephone: (603) 886-4600

Fax: (603) 886-4626

Email: info@sonoking.com

Web address: www.sonoking.com

Contact: Alex Chiang

SOUTHERN GROUP OF STATE FORESTERS

SGSF c/o Texas Forest Service

200 Technology Way Ste 1120

College Station, TX 77845-3424

Telephone: (979) 458-6683

Fax: (979) 458-6622

Email: wib.owen@southernforests.org

Web address: www.southerforests.org

Contact: Wib Owen

SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI TRADING

797 Industrial Park Rd

Waynesboro, MS 39367

Telephone: (601) 671-3260

Fax: (601) 735-2602

Email: jonathan.mcmichael@smtmiss.com

Web address: https://smtmiss.com/

Contact: Jonathan McMichael

STEPHENS HARDWOOD, LLC

314 Norma Rd, Huntsville,

TN 37756

Tel: (423) 663-2564

Fax: (423) 663-4172

Contact: Jerry Stephens

Email: stephenshardwood@highlands.net

Web: www.stephenshardwood.com

SUMMIT FOREST PRODUCTS

4213 N. Buffalo Street Suite 2

Orchard Park, NY 14127

Telephone: (716) 508-3674

Fax: (716) 508-3673

Email: matt@summit-forest.com

Web Address: www.summit-forest.com

Contact: Matt Bubar

SUPERIOR HARDWOODS OF OHIO, INC.

P.O. Box 606

Wellston, Ohio 45692

Tel: (740) 384-5677

Email: aconway@shlumber.com

Web: shlumber.com

Contact: Adam Conway

SWANSON FOREST PRODUCTS

5837 29 th Avenue Drive

Vinton, Iowa 52349

Tel: (319) 472-5213

Email: eijikawahara@frontier.com

Web: swansonforestproduct.com

Contact: Eiji Kawahara

TENESSEE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY

DIVISION

440 Hogan Road, Bruer Building

Nashville, TN37220

Telephone: (615) 837-5437

Fax: (615) 837-5003

Email: kerry.r.livengood@tn.gov

Web address: www.state.tn.us/agriculture/forestry

Contact: Kerry Livengood

THE FREEMAN CORPORATION

P.O. Box 96

Winchester, KY40392

Telephone: (859) 744-4312

Fax: (859) 744-4363

Email: gfreeman@freemancorp.com

Web address: www.freemancorp.com

Contact: George Freeman

THOMPSON APPALACHIAN HARDWOODS

100 Harless Drive

Huntland, TN37345

Telephone: (931) 469-7272

Fax: (931) 469-7269

Email: lauraann@taphardwoods.com

Web address: www.taphardwoods.com

Contact: Laura Ann Thompson

THOMPSON HARDWOODS, INC.

P.O. Box 788

320 J.A. Yawn Road

Hazlehurst, GA 31539

Telephone: (912) 375-5174 ext. 384

Fax: (912) 375-9191

Email: jstevenson@thompsonhardwoods.com

Web address: www.thompsonhardwoods.com

Contact: John Stevenson

TIGERTON LUMBER COMPANY

121 Cedar St

Tigerton, WI54486

Telephone: (715) 535-2181

Fax: (715) 535 - 2997

Email: mike@tigertonlumber.com

Web address: www.tigertonlumber.com

Contact: Mike Schulke

TIOGA HARDWOODS, INC.

12685 State Rte 38

Berkshire, NY13736

Telephone: (607) 657-8686

Fax: (607) 657-8689

Email: ScottS@tiogahardwoods.com

Web address: www.tiogahardwoods.com

Contact: Scott Snyder

TM WOOD PRODUCTS

345 Barrett Lane, Cabot, AR72033

Telephone: (501) 941-3706

Fax: (501) 941-0823

Email: tmwoodproducts2007@yahoo.com

Web address: www.tmwoodproducts.com

Contact: Mary Wood

TMX SHIPPING COMPANY, INC.

P.O. Box 747

Morehead City, NC28557

Telephone: (252) 726-1111

Fax: (252) 726-9097

Email: cstruyk@tmxship.com

Web address: www.tmxship.com

Contact: Curtis Struyk

TRACY EXPORT, INC.

18525 US 20W

East Dubuque, IL61025

Telephone: (815) 747-2550

Fax: (815) 747-2591

Email: craig@tracyexportinc.com

Web address: www.tracyexportinc.com

Contact: Craig Tracy

TRI-STATE TIMBER, LLC

PO Box 6983

Bloomington, IN47407

Telephone: (812) 829-9999

Fax: (812) 829-9998

Email: brett@tristatetimber.com

Web address: www.tristatetimber.com

Contact: Cheryl Franklin

TRN USA FOREST LLC.

2 Lincrest St. Syosset, NY11791

Telephone: (516) 605-0562

Fax: (516) 605-0563

Email: trnlumber@gmail.com

Web address:

Contact: Lishan Zhong

TUMAC LUMBER COMPANY, INC.

805 SW Broadway, Suite 1500

Portland, OR97205

Telephone: (503) 721-7680

Fax: (503) 721-7669

Email: gsoper@tumac.com

Web address: www.tumac.com

Contact: Gray Soper

TURMAN TRADING, LLC

3504 Mudpike Road

Christiansburg, VA24073

Telephone: (540) 639-3562

Fax:

Email: josh@theturmangroup.com

Web address: www.theturmangroup.com

Contact: Joshua Bond

TURN BULL LUMBER COMPANY

P.O. Box 310

474 Sweet Home Church Road

Elizabethtown, NC28337

Telephone: (910) 862-4447

Fax: (910) 862-7753

Email: pemjenkins@turnbulllumber.com

Web address: www.turnbulllumber.com

Contact: Pembroke Jenkins

TUSCARORA HARDWOOD, INC.

2240 Shermans Valley Road

P.O. Box 64 Route 274

Elliottsburg, PA17024

Telephone: (717) 582-4122

Fax: (717) 582-7438

Email: sales@tuscarorahardwoods.com

Web address: www.tuscarorahardwoods.com

Contact: Aquillas Peachey

TYR WOOD PRODUCTS, INC.

Jefferson Station

400 SW Sixth Ave Suite 600, Portland, OR97204

Telephone: (503) 644-5666

Fax: (971) 544-7380

Email: sven@tyrwood.com

Web address: tyrwood.com

Contact: Sven Melbo

U-C COATINGS CORPORATION

P.O. Box 1066

Buffalo, NY14215

Telephone: (716) 833-9366

Fax: (716) 833-0120

Email: norm@uccoatings.com

Web address: www.uccoatings.com

Contact: Norman Murray

UFP INTERNATIONAL, LLC

10300 N.W. 121 st Way

Medley, FL 33178

Telephone: (305) 556-8003

Fax: (305) 556-7883

Email: mnuclo@ufpi.com

Web address: www.ufpi.com

Contact: Michael Nuclo

USA WOODS INTERNATIONAL INC.

P.O. Box 38507, Memphis, TN38183-0507

Telephone: (901) 753-7718

Fax: (901) 753-7815

Email: ron@usawoods.com

Web address: www.usawoods.com

Contact: Ron Carlsson

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Southeast Asia Supplement 2019

AMERICAN HARDWOOD

CAPTURING

WOOD’S ESSENCE

We will keep you informed of the

latest trends and developments in

wood and architecture with an

Asian perspective.

Facebook.com/panelsfurnitureasia

TM

LinkedIn.com/company/panelsfurnitureasia

@wood.ia

WWW.PANELSFURNITUREASIA.COM

47


AMERICAN HARDWOOD Southeast Asia Supplement 2019

VERDE WOOD INTERNATIONAL

5826 Fayetteville Road

Suite 206, Durham, NC USA 27713

Telephone: (919) 306-0965

Fax: (866) 563-5256

Email: mark@verde-wood.com

Web address: www.verde-wood.com

Contact: Mark Hopper

VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE &

CONSUMER SERVICES

102 Governor Street, Room 330

Richmond, VA 23219

Telephone: (804) 371-8991

Fax: (804) 225-4434

Email: caitlin.clark@vdacs.virginia.gov

Web address: www.vdacs.virginia.gov/international

Contact: Caitlin Clark

W.M. CRAMER INTERNATIONAL, INC.

P.O. Box 2768, Augusta, GA30914

Telephone: (706) 736-2622

Fax: (706) 736-2652

Email: rburnett@cramerlumber.com

Web address: www.cramerlumber.com

Contact: Rick Burnett

WAGNER LUMBER COMPANY

4060 Gaskill Road, Owego, NY13827

Telephone: (607) 687-5362

Fax: (607) 687-2633

Email: shouseknec@aol.com

Web address: www.wagnerlumber.com

Contact: Stephan Houseknecht

WALNUT LOG BUYERS OF AMERICA

17711 State Route D

St. Joseph, MO 64505

Telephone: (888) 413-3451

Email: walnutbuyers@gmail.com

Web address: walnutlogbuyersofamerica.com

Contact: David DuVall

WALTER M. FIELDS LUMBER COMPANY

2401 Harbor Ave. P.O. Box 13231

Memphis, TN38113

Telephone: (901) 948-7751

Fax: (901) 948-7752

Email: wally@fieldslumber.com

Web address: www.fieldslumber.com

Contact: Wally Fields

WEST VIRGINIA DEVELOPMENT OFFICE

1900 Kanawha Blvd. Bldg. #6, Room 531

Charleston, WV25305

Telephone: (304) 558-2234

Fax: (304) 558-1957

Email: dmartin@wvdo.org

Web address: www.wvdo.org

Contact: Debra Martin

WESTERN HARDWOOD ASSOCIATION (WHA)

P.O. Box 1095,

Camas, WA 98607

Telephone: (360) 835-1600

Fax: (360) 835-1910

Email: wha@westernhardwood.org

Web address: www.westernhardwood.org

Contact: Dave Sweitzer

WHEELAND LUMBER COMPANY, INC.

3558 Williamson Trail

Liberty,

PA16930

Telephone: (570) 324-6042

Fax: (570) 324-2127

Email: ray@wheelandlumber.com

Web address: www.wheelandlumber.com

Contact: Ray E. Wheeland

WHG INVESTMENT-1, LLC

P.O. Box 62092

Sunnyvale, CA 94088

Telephone: (408) 518-2063

Email: elw1248@vip.163.com

Contact: Eugene L. Wei

WHITSON LUMBER COMPANY

P.O. Box 212

Oak Park, IL 60603-0212

Telephone: (615) 491-7111

Fax: (773) 654-4914

Email: primmj@sbcglobal.net

Web address: www.whitsonlumber.com

Contact: Joseph Primm

WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

2811 Agricultural Drive

Madison, WI53713

Telephone: (608) 224-5102

Fax:

Email: jennifer.lu@wi.gov

Web address:

Contact: Jennifer Lu

WOOD COMPONENT MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION

5353 Wayzata Blvd, Suite 350

Minneapolis, MN55416

Telephone: (952) 564-3046

Fax: (952) 252-8096

Email: wcma@woodcomponents.org

Web address: http://woodcomponents.org

Contact: Amy Snell

WOOD HOLLEY LUMBER COMPANY

P.O. Box 640157

Nanafalia, AL 36764

Tel: (334) 430-2705

Email: Thomas.Crawford@woodholleylumber.com

Web: www.woodholleylumber.com

Contact: Thomas Crawford

WOOD PRODUCTS INC.

442 South 8 th St.

Oakland, MD21550

Telephone: (301) 334-9451

Fax: (301) 334-3054

Email: bbrown@woodproductsinc.com

Web address: www.woodproductsinc.com

Contact: Brian Brownw

AMERICAN HARDWOODS PTY LTD

14 Duffy Street

Borwood, Vic 3125, Australia

Telephone: +61 398085001

Fax: +61 398084007

Email: richard.bugg@americanhardwoods.com.au

Web address: www.americanhardwoods.com.au

Contact: Richard Bugg

DALIAN HAIFENG WALNUT CO., LTD

No. 113 Northwest Street, Taiping Industrial Zone

Pulandian, Dalian, LiaoNing, China 116200

Tel: +86 0411-39512600

Fax: +86 0411-39512600

Contact: Zi-Xin Zhao

Email: hf_walnut@163.com

MADERAS LA MISION S.A. DE C.V.

Caxena 2491 Colonia Provencia

Guadalajara, JAL, 44630

Mexico

Telephone: +52 33 36 42 08 01

Email: monica.day@maderaslamision.com

Web address: www.maderaslamision.com

Contact: Monica Day

SHANGHAI ZHAOZHENG WOOD INDUSTRY CO.

175, Guanshon Road

Shanghai, China 200433

Telephone: (+86) 158-0092-2988

Fax: (+86) 21-3508-0597

Email: nonoleo2012@126.com

Web address: www.zhongji-sh.com

Contact: Zhiyong Lin

APP TIMBER

No. 21, Jalan Utarid U5/11

Mah Sing Industrial Park

Shah Alam, Selangor

Malaysia

Telephone: (+60) 12-289-0658

Email: info@apptimber.com

Web address: www.apptimber.com

Contact: Michael Hermens

BRENSTOL LLC

Peterburi tee 44

Tallinn, Harju

Estonia

Telephone: (+372) 5621-1110

Email: marko@brenstol.ee

Web address: www.thermory.com

Contact: Marko Kajandu

BROOKS BROTHERS (UK) LTD

Blackwater Place, The Causeway

Maldon, Essex CMg4GG

England

Telephone: 01621 877400

Fax: 01621 859054

Email: Darren.McCarthy@brookstimber.co.uk

Web: www.brookstimber.com

Contact: Darren McCarthy

D&L TIMBER PRODUCTS & SERVICES CORP LTD.

2/F 40A Tai Mong Tsai

Sai Kung, Hong Kong

Tel: +52 9681-0097

Email: plaifonglo@icloud.com

Contact: Patty Lo

DONGGUAN SENYONG WOOD CO., LTD

No. 22 Building 13 th , JiLong Timber Market

Dalingshan Town, Dongguan,

Guangdong China

Telephone: (+86) 769-82186190

Fax: (+86) 769-82186191

email: sungemlumber@163.com

Contact: Bonnie Wang

FALCON LUMBER

678 S.W. Foresta Terrace

Portland, OR97225

Telephone: (503) 719-5798

Fax: (503) 477-6158

Email: brin.langmuir@falconlumber.com

Web address: www.falconlumber.com/

Contact: Brin Langmuir

GLOBAL TIMBER ASIA SDN BHD

Lot A-06-09, Menara Prima

Jalan PJU 1/39

Kuala Lumpur - Petaling, Selangor Malaysia

Tel: +60 3 76102049

Fax: +60 203 555 76

Web address: www.globaltimber.dk

Contact: Mr. Per Friis Knudsen

GUONGXI YIHUAHENGLIN INDUSTRIAL

No. 358 Zinhua Road

Qinzhou, Guongxi

China 53500

Telephone: (+86) 158-8036-9555

Fax: (+86) 777-280-0019

Email: zhonghuajian117@126.com

Web address: www.yihuahenglin.com

Contact: Huajian Zhong

NOVAWOOD

Gerede OSB No: 101

Bolu, Turkey 14900

Telephone: (+90) 212-670-3825

Fax:(+90) 212-670-3825

Email: yakup.kayatas@novawood.com

Web address: www.novawood.com

Contact: Yakup Kayatas

PABLO PUBLISHING PTE LTD

3 Ang Mo Kio Street 62 #01-23 Link@AMK

Singapore 569139

Telephone: (+65) 6266-5512

Email: info@pabloasia.com

Web address: www.pabloasia.com

Contact: William Pang

QINGDAO CX JOY HARDWOODS COMPANY, LTD

721 Lanzhoudonglu, Jiaozhou

Qingdao, Shandon Province

China

Telephone: (+86) 532-8826-7842

Fax: (+86) 532-8826-7802

Email: sales@cx-joy.com

Web address: www.cx-joy.com

Contact: Heng-yi Lin

ROCK LUMBER LTD.

Unit 1101, 11/F, Tower 1, Cheung Sha Wan Plaza

833 Cheung Sha Wan Td

Hong Kong, SAR, China

Tel: +86 13918909398

Fax: +852 2125 8287

Email: Shirmae.lin@gmail.com

Contact: Shirmae Lin

TRADEWOOD & CO.

547 A Lisburn Road

Belfast BT9 7GQ

Telephone: (+44) 2890381861

Fax: (+44) 2890682842

Email: edith@tradewoodandco.co.uk

Web address: www.tradewood.co.uk

Contact: Bryan W. Cochrane

TIMSPEC

64 Stoddard Rd

Mt Roskil, Auckland, 1440

New Zealand

Tel: +64 21 2836960

Fax: +64 92620 0261

Email: Chris@timspec.co.nz

Web: www.timspec.co.nz

Contact: Chris Wiffen

YUANSHUN (FUJIAN) WOODEN PRODUCTS CO., LTD

Fuqing Export Processing Zone, Xincuo Town eb:

Fuqing City Fujian 350312

China

Tel: +86 591-8389-9997

Fax: +86 591-8569-8799

Email: jiushun.com@163.com

Web: www.fjyuanshun.com

Contact: Lin Huang

48


Southeast Asia Supplement 2019

AMERICAN HARDWOOD

Trust America’s Hardwoods Company.

KEEP PIONEERING

northwesthardwoods.com

Trust the on-grade quality of Northwest Hardwoods, America’s largest and only

coast-to-coast hardwood lumber producer. Our inspection and grading ensures that

our lumber quality and appearance are both exceptional and consistent. That’s why

our customers rank us above other brands – we always live up to our responsibility.

49


AMERICAN HARDWOOD Southeast Asia Supplement 2019


AHEC

Southeast Asia Supplement 2019

FC, IFC, IBC, OBC

AMERICAN HARDWOOD

ALLEGHENY WOOD PRODUCTS, INC 7

AMERICAN LUMBER 11

BAILLIE LUMBER 9

CROWN HARDWOOD CO., INC 13

HARDWOOD MARKET REPORT 33

IKE TRADING CO, LTD 15

J. M. JONES LUMBER CO. 33

KUANG YUNG MACHINERY CO., LTD 31

MACDONALD & OWEN LUMBER COMPANY 23

MALAYSIAN WOOD EXPO 2019 5

MATSON LUMBER COMPANY 21

MIDWEST WALNUT COMPANY 12

MISSOURI WALNUT LLC 39

NATIONAL HARDWOOD LUMBER ASSOCIATION 17

NORTHLAND FOREST PRODUCTS, INC 27

NORTHWEST HARDWOODS 49

PANELS & FURNITURE ASIA 43

PIKE LUMBER COMPANY, INC 25

QINGDAO CX JOY HARDWOODS CO, LTD 51

ROSSI LUMBER 3

SOFTWOOD EXPORT COUNCIL 52

SONOKING CORPORATION 1

THOMPSON HARDWOODS, INC 29

VIETNAM INTERNATIONAL FURNITURE

FAIR 2019 45

WOOD IN ARCHITECTURE 47

YODER LUMBER AND ROLLING

RIDGE WOODS 18, 19

51

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