Madison Messenger - April 18th, 2021

columbusmessenger

madison

April 18, 2021 www.columbusmessenger.com Vol. XXXVI No. 19

Tips for home repair and

yard/garden information from

local Master Gardeners

pages 8-12

A fitting

tribute

By Theresa Hennis

Staff Writer

When you find your calling in life, it

feels like everything fits and makes sense.

Perry Yoder, former owner of Yoder’s

True Value Hardware in Plain City, found

his perfect fit 40 years ago, and he dedicated

his life to helping his customers

solve their home repair challenges.

“I just like to show people how things

fit together and work,” Yoder said. “This

is not a place to shop. People come here

because they have a need. More and more

people are trying to do their own repair

work at home, and I like to help them do

that and be satisfied when they leave the

store.”

On April 8, the Plain City community,

Yoder’s friends and family, and former

and current staff celebrated him with a

proclamation honoring his lifetime of

service in his business and to his community.

“Perry’s store was the epitome of

small-town local business,” said Plain

City Mayor Jody Carney. “You could walk

in and ask him any question about a project,

and he’d know the exact location of

what you were looking for and help you if

you weren’t sure what to do. I’d bring my

kids into the store, and he always offered

them balloons and interacted with them.

We always felt very at home in his store.”

Though he plans on working fewer

hours, Yoder will continue to do what he

loves–helping customers at the hardware

store which will be renamed Plain City

Hardware. Along with the wide variety of

products Yoder carried, new owner

Richard Chene has introduced plants,

new brands like Stihl, and will have a

point-of-sale system.

Chene has worked in retail his entire

career, and when the opportunity arose to

buy the store, he was happy to carry on

Yoder’s legacy of people first.

“Customers say, ‘Perry, can you help

me with this?’, and 99 times out of a 100

they walk out with the problem solved. He

wants to wait on and help people. He’s

welcome here for as long as he likes,’”

Chene said. “We will make some changes

and evolve but stay a hometown hardware

store.”

Messenger photo by Theresa Hennis

Perry Yoder sorts plumbing parts in Yoder’s True Value Hardware Store in Plain City.

The former owner likes the plumbing section in particular because he enjoys showing

people how things fit together.

The village of Plain City presented Perry Yoder (center), former owner of Yoder’s True

Value Hardware, with a lifetime service award. Friends, family, former and current staff

members, and village officials were on hand for the April 8 presentation.

Jefferson Local Schools

$1 million

budget cut

By Linda Dillman

Staff Writer

Years of deficit spending are catching up

with Jefferson Local Schools as the district

takes steps to balance the budget between

total expenditures and total revenue.

According to Treasurer Mark Ingles, several

factors have caused the district’s expenses

to outpace revenues in recent years,

including flat state funding, flat enrollment,

and an increase in costs.

In 2018, the district was $440,742 in

deficit spending. In 2019, that number was

$866,918. Last year, deficit spending

pushed past the $1 million mark to $1.045

million.

“The current state funding bill froze our

funding at FY (fiscal year) 2019 levels and,

with the COVID-19 pandemic, our funding

was cut at the end of FY 2020 by over

$200,000,” Ingles reported. “The cuts enacted

at the end of FY 2020 have continued

over into FY 2021.”

As a result of flat enrollment figures, the

district does not receive Enrollment Growth

supplemental funding from the state.

“While our funding has remained flat,

our expenses have not,” Ingles continued.

“Examples include health insurance increasing

by an average of 6 percent over the

last five years and supplies and materials

increasing with inflation.”

With expenditures outpacing revenue,

Jefferson Local’s general fund balance

eroded to the point where there is a potential

to end the 2024 fiscal year with a negative

balance.

To correct the budget situation, on April

12 school board members approved a RIF

(reduction in force) resolution that shaves

$1.02 million off the budget with minimal

impact on staff and students.

It is expected that attrition and increases

in income tax and federal funding will pull

the district through tough economic times.

“There will not be a single employee that

will lose their job,” Superintendent William

Mullett pointed out. “No cuts to sports. No

cuts to extracurriculars. We were very

lucky.

“What we have here is necessary.

Growth will be costly, and we have to pre-

See BUDGET page 2


PAGE 2 - MADISON MESSENGER - April 18, 2021

www.madisonmessengernews.com

Lots of show dates set for Alder’s ‘My Fair Lady’

By Kristy Zurbrick

Madison Editor

For many reasons, “My Fair Lady”—a musical about a Cockney

flower girl who takes speech lessons from a professor in order to

pass as a lady—is an ideal choice for a stage production this particular

spring.

God Bless Everyone

& Stay Safe at Home

Malek &

ATTORNEYS AT LAW

Malek

WORK INJURIES

WORKERS’

COMPENSATION

SAFETY VIOLATIONS

WRONGFUL DEATH

PERSONAL INJURY

SLIP & FALL INJURY

DOG BITE INJURY

Douglas, Ed, Jim

and Kip Malek

Ben Churchhill

“Hablamos Español”

FREE Initial Consultation

www.maleklawfirm.com

614-444-7440

1227 S. High St., Columbus, OH 43206

“We’ve always wanted to do ‘My Fair Lady,’ but the

problem has been that it’s kind of a small cast and the

scenes are mostly made up of small groups, but that

presents a perfect scenario for a year like this,” said

Nick Mayes, director of Jonathan Alder’s upcoming production

of the George Bernard Shaw classic.

Limiting group sizes is an ongoing safety measure

during the pandemic, so a smaller cast fits with the

times. A light storyline with a timely message is welcome,

too, in a year when reality has been heavy.

“The show has a good message about the nature of

change and how we grow as people,” Mayes said. “We

also wanted to do something light, and I think we have

the perfect kids to do it, too.”

Honour Lackey, a senior, has jumped wholeheartedly

into her role as Eliza Doolittle, the musical’s title character.

“I’m not sure I have ever met a student who has been

as prepared for this role as Honour has. She is going to

kill the role of Eliza Doolittle, in a good way,” Mayes

said.

He is equally as impressed with Evan Stage, a sophomore,

who is tackling what Mayes argues is one of the

toughest roles in theater, that of Henry Higgins. The

professor character has lots and lots of lines.

“This is Evan’s first big role, and he has tackled it

with grace. He is an amazing singer and performer,”

Mayes said.

The director also had glowing praise for the other

two main leads in the musical. Riley Gluntz, a senior,

is putting his own twist on the character of Colonel

Pickering, another linguist who makes a bet with Higgins

about his ability to transform Eliza into a lady.

“Riley is one of the most nuanced actors I’ve worked

with. He is very good at adding to the scene,” Mayes

said. “The colonel reminds everyone about morals and

is not a particularly funny character, but somehow

Riley has made him into an endearing, funny character...

that takes talent.”

Senior Elijah Thorpe, one of the most experienced actors

to hit the Alder stage this spring, plays Eliza’s father,

Alfred P. Doolittle.

“Eli has played the most diverse types of roles (over

the years). He was a little boy in ‘Seussical,’ an immigrant

from Asia (‘Anything Goes’), a southern high

schooler (‘Footloose’), and now an old British guy,”

Mayes said. “The second he walks on the stage, he’s a

scene stealer.”

The cast as a whole is a mix of mostly freshmen and

seniors, making for an excited and exciting combination

of newcomers and veterans.

“This cast really has come into their own. They keep

pushing themselves and are very resilient to change,”

BUDGET

Continued from page 1

Jonathan Alder High School’s theater department will

present “My Fair Lady.” Six shows are planned between

April 22 and May 2, including two matinee options.

Socially distanced seating will be available at

every show in the high school auditeria.

Mayes said.

The theater department has gone all out this year,

renting almost all the costumes and springing for some

spectacular set furnishings, including a real spiral

staircase for the two-story set that serves as Higgins’s

study.

“Anyone who comes to see the show, there’s no doubt

they will enjoy it,” Mayes said.

Tickets are $15 for general admission, $13 for

Jonathan Alder students and adults 65 years old and

up. Those interested in attending have several dates

from which to choose. Shows are set for April 22-25,

April 30, and May 2. Showtime is 2 p.m. on April 25

and May 2. Showtime is 7 p.m. for all other dates.

Tickets can be purchased online at www.jambarts.org/my-fair-lady.html.

A reduced capacity in the

auditeria will allow for six feet of social distancing between

seats.

pare for it, as well.”

As part of the FY 2022 reductions, the district will

not fill vacancies in the high school English department,

Norwood Elementary’s bridge class, and technology integration.

Two summer custodial positions will go unfilled,

as well.

When middle school Principal Debbie Omen retires

at the end of the school year, the position will be combined

with the high school principal position for a savings

of more than $120,000.

Mullett said the district has slowly worked toward a

combined high school/middle school administration,

starting with combining the athletic director and dean

of students positions into one and now the principal positions.

The district increased employee insurance pickup

costs, reduced Chromebook purchases, and worked out

an agreement with the village of West Jefferson to increase

Community Reinvestment Area income sharing

by $661,230. A $105,016 savings adjustment also benefitted

the bottom line.

By implementing the reduction plan, Ingles reported,

the district will start down a path to healthier

financial footing with the five-year forecast showing a

“drastically reduced deficit” and “the potential of operational

surpluses.”

“The administration and board of education will

continue to monitor the financial health of the district,

recommending changes to its operations as necessary

to provide quality services in a fiscally responsible

manner,” he said.


www.madisonmessengernews.com April 18, 2021 - MADISON MESSENGER - Page 3

Cases rise and variants detected

Breakfast and silent auction slated

The Friends of Madison County Parks & Trails (FMCPT) will

hold their annual pancake and sausage breakfast as a drivethrough

event from 8 to 10 a.m. May 22 at the Madison County

Senior Center, 280 W. High St., London. The cost is $7 and includes

pancakes, sausage, scrambled eggs, a fruit cup, and water or juice.

The annual silent auction has moved online. Bidding is open now

through May 15. New and gently used items are up for bid. For details,

go to www.charityauctionstoday.com/auctions/FMCPT-Silent-

Auction-2021-21641. Winning bidders can pick up their items during

the pancake breakfast drive-through on May 22, 8-10 a.m. The alternate

pickup day is May 23, 11 a.m.-noon, at the senior center.

Cases of COVID-19 in Madison

“variants of concern.” This includes

County are on the rise again, according

to Madison County Public

called the UK strain, and one case

six cases of the B.1.1.7 variant,

Health.

of the B.1.429 variant, known as the

Public health data shows that

California strain. Studies of both

case incidence in the county has

variants show significant evidence

more than doubled in the last two

that they can be passed from person

weeks. On April 1, Madison County

to person much more easily; however,

there are conflicting studies

was averaging 26 new cases per

week. As of April 13, the county is

about the severity of disease the

averaging 55 new cases per week.

variants can cause.

According to Madison County

“Only a small number of

Health Commissioner Chris Cook,

COVID-19 cases are tested for the

the county has not seen this type of

type of variant that caused the illness.

But we know that the variants are in Madison

rapid increase since Nov. 15, right before the winter

surge.

County and across Ohio and are spreading easily,” Cook

“This increase might be from spring break and said. “While the vaccines do a good job of protecting us

Easter activities, but we are starting to see evidence of from the variants, these new strains have the capability

a sustained increase again,” Cook said. “Our case incidence

is higher than most of our neighboring counties.” ful.”

of pushing us into another surge if we are not very care-

But it is more than the number of cases that concerns

Cook. The people getting sick from COVID-19 more people get vaccinated and everyone stays vigilant.,

Cook says that things can still stay under control if

right now are younger than at any time during the pandemic.

Dating back to March 2020, the average age of a has invested a significant amount of time and resources

but it will not be easy. Madison County Public Health

case in Madison County has been 45. This April, the average

age has been 34. Cook also reports that in the last cultural Center. As case numbers rise, an already over-

into their vaccination clinic at OSU’s Molly Caren Agri-

week, pediatric cases have increased rapidly.

taxed public health system will be pushed to the limit

“We are seeing a sizeable jump in the 0- to 19-yearold

age group right now,” Cook said.

“We will continue to vaccinate, isolate cases, and

again, he said.

Over the course of the last year, 6 percent of all cases quarantine contacts. Public Health will always answer

in the county have been in the 0-19 age group. Since the call, but we are once again asking for everyone’s

April 1, 26 percent of all new cases have been age 0-19; help,” Cook said.

furthermore, in the last week, 30 percent of all new He is asking everyone to do four things right now:

cases have been in this young age group.

1) Wear your mask the right way (over your mouth

“With more adults vaccinated, we would expect a and nose);

shift in the age group affected. But the combination of 2) Keep gatherings small;

our increased case incidence and one out of every three 3) Move indoor activities outside; and

new cases age 19 or younger is worrisome,” Cook said. 4) Get your vaccine. Everyone age 16 and older can

Further complicating the situation is the discovery get a free COVID-19 vaccine.

of multiple COVID-19 variants in the county. This Visit covidvaccine.madisonph.org to pre-register and

month, at least seven cases of COVID-19 have been on view clinic days and times offered through Madison

the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s list of County Public Health.

Pitstick racks up expo awards

The 33rd Ohio Beef Expo Junior

Show was held March 18-21 at the

Ohio Expo Center in Columbus.

Madison County resident Abbygail

Pitstick came away with some top

finishes, including champion Hereford

in the breeding heifers category

and champion Hereford in the market

animals category.

This year’s show also included

separate championship drives for the

Buckeye Breeders Series (BBS), a division

of the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association’s

Beef Exhibitor Show Total

program that features registered cattle

born, bred and raised in Ohio. Pitstick

registered another top finish

with the champion BBS Hereford in

the market animals category.

Jeffrey E. Buskirk

& Associates

Attorneys At Law

4178 Broadway, Grove City, OH 43123

Serving the Community for over 30 years

Social Security, Wills,

Estates, Probate

614-875-7220

jbuskirk2125@yahoo.com

614-875-0480 Fax

Abbygail Pitstick showcases her

market animal that took home

Champion Hereford and Champion

Buckeye Breeders Series Hereford

at the Ohio Beef Expo.


PAGE 4 - MADISON MESSENGER - April 18, 2021

www.madisonmessengernews.com

West Jeff Schools considers online ticketing system

By Linda Dillman

Staff Writer

Supporters of Jefferson Local Schools

sports, theatrical and musical presentations,

and fundraisers could soon turn to the

Internet for their next ticket purchase or donation

if the district joins an online ticketing

service.

“This is something slowly gathering momentum

throughout the state of Ohio,” said

high school/middle school Athletic Director

Mitch Daulton, noting that the Jonathan

Alder and London school districts use the

HomeTown Ticketing digital service.

“This program can be used for many different

options... All schools I spoke with are

going to continue the online system after

this year, as well.”

According to Daulton, the benefits of

touchless digital ticketing include sales

recordkeeping and collecting, an automatic

event financial report, and transfer of revenues

to a school account within a day.

“Fraud is a big thing in this world, and it

is pretty much eliminated with this system,”

Daulton said.

The system also eliminates duplicate

ticketing and the need to deal with bounced

checks because transactions are processed

via credit cards.

Athletic passes could be administered

through HomeTown Ticketing. At the April

12 school board, Daulton said the district

should make student passes available to the

entire student body, not just grade specific.

Easy-to-use purchasing and redemption

options are part of HomeTown Ticketing’s nity and senior citizens accustomed to

service, along with custom box offices, event point-of-sale ticketing, Superintendent

and fan specific reporting tools, and secure William Mullett said further discussion is

financial management. HomeTown never necessary before making a decision.

touches an event organizer’s funds, which

are available and accessible within 24 hours

of a ticket sale.

“This costs zero money for the district to

sign up,” Daulton said. “The costs (service fee

assessed to the purchaser) come when you

Daulton suggested conducting a fundraiser

as a test of the system.

“I think it’s clearly the way of the future,”

Mullett said. “For older folks, it’s an

adjustment.”

During regular action, the school board

buy a ticket or a pass, but you can’t get employed Matt Adams as middle

around this. We cannot do anything about it.”

Jefferson Local Schools Treasurer Mark

Ingles said the system is good from a cash

handling standpoint. He said he does not

see financial downsides.

With the potential impact on the commu-

school/high school principal on a three-year

contract. The district combined the high

school and middle school principal positions;

the salary for Principal Michael Bute

was increased by $5,000 to cover the additional

duties.

Hall of Fame nominations

The London Academic Boosters is seeking

nominations for individuals to be considered

for induction into the London

Academic Hall of Fame.

The purpose of the Hall of Fame is to recognize

individuals who have made an important,

positive impact upon the school,

local community or global community. The

individual must have attended a school in

the London City School District, been employed

by the school district, worked as a

volunteer in the school district, or in some

other direct way made a significant contribution

to the academic success of the

schools in the district or other educational

institutions.

Nominations for the Academic Hall of

Fame may be made by anyone connected to

the London community. Nomination applications

are available at the London High

School office and at London Public Library.

Applications must be turned in to the London

High School principal’s office, 336 Elm

St., London OH 43140, by May 10.

EZZO SAUSAGE COMPANY IS HIRING!

OPEN INTERVIEW JOB FAIR

APRIL 20TH, 21ST AND 22ND 11 AM - 1 PM

Ezzo Sausage Company, a 100-year old family owned sausage and

pepperoni manufacturer, is looking for production/processing workers

with a drive to get things done to join our growing team.

Ezzo Sausage Company, located at 683 Manor Park Dr. in

Columbus, is taking applications for immediate hire. We offer great

pay, overtime, fully paid medical benefits (after 30 days), a great

dental plan and monthly attendance bonuses!

Join us and find out what Ezzo Sausage Company is all about!

Call 614-445-8841 for more information or stop by at

683 Manor Park Drive and fill out an application.


www.madisonmessengernews.com

A

PAID ADVERTISING

April 18, 2021 - MADISON MESSENGER - Page 5

INSTRUCTIONS: This is the Ox xford Capacity Analysis Te est (OCA)

).

Answer every question as to how you feel RIGHT NOW. Do not

stay too long with any one qu estion, but answer as soon as you

understand and then go on to

the next question. The accuracy

depends on the truthfulness of

your answers. Each question may

be answered one of three ways s, by marking one of the boxes nex xt

to each column:

(+) means definitely yes or mostly yes

(m) means maybe or uncertain. Not a definite yes or no.

(-) means definitely no or mostly no

This is a free public service and there is no obligation. This is done

with the idea that people can know and improve themselves.

NAME: ____________________________________________________

_

ADDRESS: ______________________________________________

CITY: _______________________ STATE: TE: ______ ZIP: ___________ _

EMAIL: ________________________________________________ _

PHONE:_______________________ A GE:____ DATE: ___________

(+) (m) (-)

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

m m m

THE OXFORD CAPACITY ANALYSIS TEST

1. Do you make thoughtless remarks or accusations which later you

regret?

2. When others are getting rattled, do you remain fairly composed?

3. Do you browse through railway timetables, directories, or

dictionaries just for pleasure?

4. When asked to make a decision, would you be swayed by your like

or dislike of the personality involved?

5. Do you intend two or less children in your family even though your

health and income will permit more?

6. Do you get occasional twitches of your muscles, when there is no

logical reason for it?

7. Would you prefer to be in a position where you did not have the

responsibilities of making decisions?

8. Are your actions considered unpredictable by other people?

9. Do you consider more money should be spent on social security?

10. Do other people interest you very much?

11. Is your voice monotonous, rather than varied in pitch?

12. Do you normally let the other person start the conversation?

13. Are you readily interested in other people’s conversations?

14. Would the idea of inflicting pain on game, small animals or fish

prevent you from hunting or fishing?

15. Are you often impulsive in your behavior?

16. Do you speak slowly?

17. Are you usually concerned about the need to protect your health?

18. Does an unexpected action cause your muscles to twitch?

19. Are you normally considerate in your demands on your employees,

relatives or pupils?

20. Do you consider that you could give a valid “snap judgment”?

21. Do your past failures still worry you?

22. Do you find yourself being extra-active for periods lasting several

days?

23. Do you resent the efforts of others to tell you what to do?

24. Is it normally hard for you to “own up and take the blame”?

25. Do you have a small circle of close friends, rather than a large

number of friends, speaking acquaintances?

26. Is your life a constant struggle for survival?

27. Do you often sing or whistle just for the fun of it?

28. Are you considered warm-hearted by your friends?

29. Would you rather give orders than take them?

30. Do you enjoy telling people the latest scandal about your

associates?

31. Could you agree to “strict discipline”?

32. Would the idea of making a complete new start cause you much

concern?

33. Do you make efforts to get others to laugh and smile?

34. Do you find it easy to express your emotions?

35. Do you refrain from complaining when the other person is late for an

appointment?

36. Are you sometimes considered by others a “spoilsport”?

37. Do you consider there are other people who are definitely unfriendly

toward you and work against you?

38. Would you admit you were wrong just to “keep the peace”?

39. Do you have only a few people of whom you are really fond?

40. Are you rarely happy, unless you have a special reason?

41. Do you “circulate around” at a social gathering?

42. Do you take reasonable precaution to prevent accidents?

43. Does the idea of talking in front of people make you nervous?

44. If you saw an article in a shop obviously mistakenly marked lower

than its correct price, would you try to get it at that price?

45. Do you often feel that people are looking at you or talking about

you behind your back?

46. Are you “always getting into trouble”?

47. Have you any particular hate or fear?

48. Do you prefer to be an onlooker rather than participate in any active

sport?

49. Do you find it easy to be impartial?

50. Have you a definitely set standard of courteous behavior in front of

other members of your family?

51. Can you “start the ball rolling” at a social gathering?

52. Would you “buy on credit” with the hope that you can keep up the

payments?

53. Do you get an after-reaction when something unexpected such as

an accident or other disturbing incident takes place?

54. Do you consider the good of all concerned rather than your own

personal advantages?

55. When hearing a lecturer, do you sometimes experience the idea that

the speaker is referring entirely to you?

(+ ) ( m) (-)

m

m

m

56. Does “external noise” rar

rely interfere with your concentration?

(+) (m) (-)

m

m

m

135. Do the “petty foibles” of others make you impatient?

m m m 57. Are you usually “up-to-date” on everyday affairs?

m m m 136. Do children irritate you?

m m m 58. Can you confidently plan

and work towards carrying out an event

in m m m 137. Are you less talkative than your associates?

six months time?

m m m 138. Do you usually carry out assignments promptly and systematically?

m m m 59. Do you consider the modern “prisons without bars” system doomed

m m m 139. Would you assist a fellow

traveler rather than leave it to the

to failure?

officials?

m m m 60. Do you tend to be careless?

m m m 140. When voting, do you vote the same party ticket straight rather than

m m m

61. Do you ever get a “dreamlike” feeling toward life when it all seems

s

studying the candidates

and issues?

unreal?

m m m 141. Do you frequently dwell on your past illnesses or painful

m m m 62. Do you speedily recover from the effects of bad news?

experiences?

m m m 63. When you criticize, do yo ou at the same time try to encourage? m m m 142. Do you get very ill at ease in disordered surroundings?

m m m 64. Are you normally considered “cold”?

m m m 143. Do you usually criticize a film or show that you see or a book that t

m m m 65. Are your opinions insufficiently important to tell other people?

you read?

m m m 66. Are you so self-assured that it sometimes annoys others?

m m m 144. When recounting some amusing incident can you easily imitate the

m m m 67. Do you keep “close contact” on articles of yours which you have

mannerisms or the dialect in the original incident?

loaned to friends?

m m m 145. In subjects about which you are not expert, are your own ideas of

m m m 68. Do you enjoy activities of your own choosing?

sufficient importance as to tell others?

m m m 69. Does emotional music have quite an effect on you?

m m m 146. Do you have a tendency to tidy up a disorder of somebody else’s

household?

m m m 70. Do you completely cond emn a person because he is a rival or

opponent in some aspect of your relations with him?

m m m 147. Can you accept defeat ea asily without the necessity of “swallowing

your disappointment”?

m m m 71. Do you often “sit and think” about death, sickness, pain and sorrow?

m m m 148. Do you often feel depressed?

m m m 72. Are you perturbed at the idea of loss of dignity?

m m m 149. Are you ever ill at ease in the company of children?

m m m 73. Are you always collecting things which “might be useful”?

m m m 150. Do you get frustrated at not being able to do something rather than

m m m 74. Would you criticize faults

and point out the bad points on someone

finding a substitute activity or system?

else’s character or handiwork?

m m m 151. Are you sometimes completely unable to enter the spirit of things?

m m m 75. Are you openly appreciative of beautiful things?

m

m

m

152. Do you rarely express your grievances?

m m m 76. Do you sometimes give away articles which strictly speaking do not

belong to you?

m m m 153. Do you work in “spurts,” being relatively inactive and then furiously

active for a day or two?

m m m 77. Do you greet people effusively?

m m m 154. Does the number of uncompleted jobs you have on hand bother

m m m 78. Do you often ponder on previous misfortunes?

you?

m m m 79. Are you sometimes considered forceful in your actions or opinions? m m m 155. Do people enjoy being in your company?

m m m 80. Do you accept criticism easily and without resentment?

m m m 156. Could you allow someone to finish those “final two words” in a

m m m 81. Are you usually undisturbed by “noises off” when you are trying to

crossword puzzle without interfering?

rest?

m m m 157. Do you consider the best points of most people and only rarely

m m m 82. Are you likely to be jealous?

speak slightingly of them?

m m m 83. Do you tend to put off doing things and then discover it is too late? m m m 158. Do you laugh or smile quite readily?

m m m 84. Do you prefer to abide by the wishes of others rather than seek to m m m 159. Are you definite and emphatic in voice and manner?

have your own way?

m m m 160. Are you effusive only to close friends if at all?

m m m 85. Do you find it easy to ge t yourself started on a project?

m m m 161. Are your interests and fields of knowledge so important as to give

m m m 86. Do you bite your fingernails or chew the end of your pencil?

little time for anything else?

m m m 87. Do you “turn up the volu me” of your emotions just to create an m m m 162. Would you like to “start a new activity” in the area in which you live?

effect?

m m m 163. Would you take the necessary actions to kill an animal in order to

m m m 88. If we were invading anot her country, would you feel sympathetic

put it out of pain?

towards conscientious objectors in this country?

m m m 164. Is it easy for you to relax?

m m m 89. Are there some things about yourself on which you are touchy? m m m 165. Do you have little regret on past misfortunes and failures?

m m m 90. Do you have few interest ts and activities that are your own choice? m m m 166. Does the idea of fear or apprehension give you a physical reaction?

m m m 91. Do you ever get a single thought which hangs around for days? m m m 167. Can you trust the decision of your judgment in an emotional

m m m 92. Are you a slow eater?

situation in which you are involved?

m m m 93. Can you be a stabilizing influence when others get panicky? m m m 168. Could someone else consider that you were really active?

m m m 94. Would you stop and find out whether a person needed help even m m m 169. Do you find it hard to get started on a task that needs to be done?

though they had not dire ectly asked you for it?

m m m 170. Are you opposed to the “probation system” for criminals?

m m m 95. Are you prejudiced in favor of your own school, college, club or m m m 171. Do you spend much time on needless worries?

team, etc.?

m m m 172. In a disagreement do you find it hard to understand how the other

m m m 96. Do you pay your debts a nd keep your promises when it is possible?

person fails to see your side, and thus agree with you?

m m m 97. Do you sleep well?

m m m 173. Do you cope with everyday problems of living quite well?

m m m 98. Would you use corporal punishment on a child aged ten if it refused m m m 174. Are you usually truthful to others?

to obey you?

m m m 175. Would you rather “wait for something to happen” as opposed to

m m m 99. Do you prefer to take a passive role in any club or organization to

you causing it?

which you belong?

m m m 176. Do you spend too freely in relation to your income?

m m m 100.Are you logical and scientific in your thinking?

m m m 177. Can you take a “calculated risk” without too much worry?

m m m 101. Does the youth of today have more opportunity than that of a

generation ago?

m m m 178. If you were involved in a slight car accident, would you really take

the trouble to see that any damage you did was made good?

m m m 102. Do you throw things away only to discover that you need them

later?

m

m

m

179. Do others push you around?

m m m 103. Would you give up easily

on a given course if it were causing you a

m m m 180. Do you make allowances for your friends where with others you

considerable amount of inconvenience?

might judge more severely?

m m m 104. Do you “wax enthusiastic” about only a few subjects?

m m m 181. Do you often ponder over your own inferiority?

m m m 105. Do you rarely suspect the actions of others?

m m m 182. Do people criticize you to others?

m m m 106.Do you sometimes wond der if anyone really cares about you?

m m m 183. Are you embarrassed by a hearty greeting such as a kiss, hug, or pat

on the back, if done in public?

m m m 107. Do you turn down responsibility because you doubt your fitness to

cope?

m m m 184. Do you frequently not do something you want to do because of

other people’s desires?

m m m 108. Do you sometimes feel compelled to repeat some interesting item

or tidbit?

m m m 185. Are you sometimes convinced of the correctness of your opinions

about a subject even though you are not an expert?

m m m 109. Do you tend to exaggerate a justifiable grievance?

m m m 186. Do you often find yourself “going off in all directions at once”?

m m m 110. Is your facial expression varied rather than set?

m m m 187. Do your acquaintances seem to think more of your abilities than

m m m 111. Do you usually need to justify or back up an opinion once stated?

you do?

m m m 112. Do you openly and sincerely admire beauty in other people? m m m 188. Is the idea of death or even reminders of death abhorrent to you?

m m m 113. Would it take a definite effort on your part to consider the subject m m m 189. Having settled an argument out do you continue to feel disgruntled

of suicide?

for a while?

m m m 114. Would you consider your rself energetic in your attitude toward life? m m m 190. Are you friendly in voice, attitude and expression?

m m m 115. Would a disagreement afffect your general relationship with another m m m 191. Does life seem rather vague and unreal to you?

person?

m m m 192. Do you often feel upset about the fate of war victims and political l

m m m 116. Does a minor failure on your part rarely trouble you?

refugees?

m m m 117. Do you sometimes feel that you talk too much?

m m m 193. Do “mere acquaintances” appeal to you for aid or advice in their

m m m 118. Do you smile much?

personal difficulties?

m m m 119. Are you easily pleased?

m m m 194. If you lose an article, do you get the idea that “someone must have

m m m 120. When met with direct opposition would you still seek to have your

stolen or mislaid it”?

own way rather than give

in?

m m m 195. If you thought that someone was suspicious of you and your

m m m 121. Provided the distance were not too great, would you still prefer to

actions, would you tackle them on the subject rather than leaving

ride rather than walk?

them to work it out?

m m m 122. Do you ever get disturbe ed by the noise of the wind or a “house m m m 196. Do you sometimes feel that your age is against you (too young or

settling down”?

too old)?

m m m 123. Is your opinion influenced

by looking at things from the standpoint m m m 197. Do you have spells of being sad and depressed for no apparent

of your experiences, occupation or training?

reason?

m m m 124. Do you often make tactless blunders?

m m m 198. Do you do much grumbling about conditions you have to face in

m m m 125. Are you suspicious of people who ask to borrow money from you?

life?

m m m 126. Are your decisions swaye ed by personal interests?

m m m 199. Do you tend to hide your feelings?

m m m 127. Can you get quite enthusiastic over “some simple little thing”? m m m 200. Do you consider you have many warm friends?

m m m 128. Do you frequently take action even though you know your own

good judgment would indicate otherwise?

m

m

m

129. Are you in favor of color bar and class distinction?

Bring or mail to the Church of

m m m 130. Are you aware of any habitual physical mannerisms such as pulling

your hair, nose, ears or such like?

Scientology Central Ohio

m m m 131. Can you quickly adapt and make use of new conditions and

situations even though they may be difficult?

1266 Dublin Road

m m m 132. Do some noises “set your teeth on edge”?

m m m 133. Can you see the other fellow’s point of view when you wish to?

Columbus, OH, 43215

m m m 134. Do you go to bed when you want to, rather than “by the clock”?

© 2021 Church of Scientology of Central Ohio. All Rights Reserved. OXFORD CAPA CITY ANALYSIS, SCIENTOLOGY, and THE SCIENTOLOGY SYMBOL are trademarks and service marks owned by Religious Technology Center and are used with its permission.


PAGE 6 - MADISON MESSENGER - April 18, 2021










www.madisonmessengernews.com

New housing on Plain City’s radar

School district plans for influx

By Kristy Zurbrick

Madison Editor

In the next three to five years, residential housing in the village

of Plain City could grow by 1,400 units. Leaders at Jonathan Alder

Local Schools are watching the numbers and making plans for an

influx of students.

At the April 12 school board meeting, Jonathan Alder Superintendent

Gary Chapman said the district will reconvene its strategic

planning committee which last met in 2019. Much has changed

since that time, he said, referring to the increase in the projected

number of additional housing units coming to the area.

Should the district conduct another enrollment study? Does the

district need to survey the community again about their vision for

the future of the school district? What does Jonathan Alder’s future

look like in the next five to 10 years? These are questions the committee

and the district as a whole will tackle.

As part of the process, Chapman invited Taylor Brill, Plain City’s

zoning official, to update school board members on current proposals

for new housing in the village. Brill referred to the village’s “development

story map,” accessible to the public via the village’s

website at www.plain-city.com/planning---

zoning. Plain City officials update the map

as developments move through different

phases and as new developments are proposed.

Brill reviewed five residential housing

projects, each of which is in a different

phase of development and approval.

• Darby Station—MI Homes is proposing

the construction of 500 to 700 housing units

on 335 acres known as the former McKitrick

farmland along State Route 161. The development

would feature a mix of single-family

homes, condominiums, and multi-family

units. A central green area would include a

clubhouse and swimming pool for residents.

On April 21, the final plan for the entire development,

as well as the final development

plan for the first phase (102 homes), goes

before Plain City’s planning commission.

• Jefferson Village—Homewood Corp. is

proposing construction of approximately

100 townhomes and apartments on 6.5

acres along U.S. Route 42. The company has

submitted a final record plan. The village is

waiting on engineering details. A final plat

approval is pending. Brill said Homewood

plans to kick off construction in the next

three to four months.

Madison Meadows—Highland Real Estate

Group/DR Horton plans to build 250

single-family homes and condos on 104

acres along Lafayette Plain City Road and

Perry Pike. A 12-acre park, walking trails

and ponds are part of the plans. Brill said

85 housing units are planned in the first

phase; construction should start this fall.

The final development plan has been approved.

The final plat goes before Plain

City’s planning commission on April 21.

• Oak Grove—Plain City One LLC/Evergreen

Land Co. plans to build single-family

homes on 235 lots on 98 acres along the

west side of U.S. Route 42, south of the intersection

of 42 and Perry Pike. A park area

and trails are planned. The final development

plan has been approved. The village is

waiting on engineering details. The last

time the developers were in contact with the village was last fall,

Brill said.

• The Run at Hofbauer House—Rockford Homes is proposing the

construction of 100 single-family homes on 39 acres on North Chillicothe

Street, north of Noteman Road and directly across from Pastime

Park. A central open space will feature a nature sensory park.

A multi-use path also is planned. Rezoning and a preliminary development

plan have been approved.

Following the presentation, school board member Bill McCartney

asked Brill about the status of Plain City’s water taps. He said he

had heard the village is running out of taps for new development.

Brill confirmed that the tap numbers is an issue. She said the

village has submitted plans for upsizing the wastewater treatment

facility and is awaiting approval, pending a review by the Environmental

Protection Agency (EPA).

“The upsizing will accommodate more incoming development,”

she explained.

Based on conversations with the EPA and others, village leaders

are confident the expansion will move forward but cannot confirm

the plans at this time, Brill said.

Lady Eagles snag big win

Kirstin Eades (left) and Rylee Davis celebrate Madison-Plains’

dominating 22-8 win over Springfield Catholic Central on April 6

in Ohio Heritage Conference South Division play. Davis pitched

all six innings, allowing eight runs on seven hits and six strikeouts.

Cidny Long led the charge on offense, going three for four

at the plate with one walk and four RBIs. The victory brought the

Lady Eagles’ record to 2-1 in league play and 2-5 overall. Madison-Plains’

varsity baseball team also played Catholic Central

on April 6; they, too, came away with a win, 7-4, taking them to a

1-1 record in league play and a 2-1 record overall.


www.madisonmessengernews.com

2021 State Fair won’t be

open to general public

April 18, 2021 - MADISON MESSENGER - Page 7

The Ohio Expositions

Commission announced

on April 8 that the 2021

Ohio State Fair will not

be open to the public. Instead,

it will focus on agricultural

and educational

competitions for exhibitors,

their families,

and guests.

When discussing plans for the 2021 Ohio

State Fair, members of the commission expressed

concern for public health, as well as

the financial impact of hosting a fair that

would adhere to current safety protocols

and the lasting impacts of the long-term viability

of the Ohio State Fair.

“Although vaccination rates are improving

significantly each day, Ohio continues to

fight the battle against COVID-19. Where

we are today in this battle makes it challenging

to plan a large-scale entertainment

event, not knowing where we will be or

what Ohio will look like in late July,” explained

General Manager Virgil Strickler.

“In addition, the important safety protocols

that have been put in place to protect

Ohioans, like indoor seating capacities, may

lead to attendance that is considerably

lower than previous years. The financial

ramifications of hosting a typical Ohio State

Fair with the same overhead costs but far

less revenue could be devastating to our organization.

In a typical year, the Ohio State

Preschool continues

By Josephine Birdsell

Staff Writer

London City Schools announced on April 6 that it will continue

its preschool program next year.

The district renewed its partnership with the Madison County

Board of Developmental Disabilities and the Madison Champaign

County Educational Service Center to hold its preschool program with

the Fairhaven Early Learning Academy in the 2021-22 school year.

Next year marks the district’s second year holding preschool at

Fairhaven.

“Holding preschool at Fairhaven went well for us, all things considered.

Last year we pooled resources to keep Fairhaven open and

transitioned some classes over there which worked pretty well for

us,” said Dr. Lou Kramer, London City Schools superintendent.

Fairhaven mixes students from the Madison-Plains and London

school districts but is led by a London employee. The district is excited

to continue the partnership, Kramer said.

In other news, in the first week of April, the district had its lowest

number of COVID-19 quarantines and isolations for the entire

2020-21 school year.

“We’re trending very, very well,” Kramer said.

With COVID-19 cases decreasing, the district is looking forward

to an in-person prom at the high school on May 1. The district is

fitting guidance from Madison County Public Health into their

prom plans, Kramer said.

The district also will hold an in-person outdoor graduation on

May 27.

London High School is selling yearbooks until May 15. Yearbooks

cost $60 ($65 for a yearbook with a personalized name plate). Yearbooks

are sold in person at the high school and online at pictavo.com.

Fair’s budget is designed

to break even, with a

nominal profit, if any.

Hosting a full fair this

year would likely lead to

significant financial loss.”

Many of the typical

things associated with

the Ohio State Fair—rides,

concerts, entertainers,

live music, food vendors, and shopping—are

expected to return in 2022. The 2021 Ohio

State Fair will be limited to exhibitors and

family members for youth and senior livestock

competitions, along with educational

project judging for non-livestock competitions,

such as 4-H.

“I wish we had a crystal ball, but we

don’t,” Strickler continued. “As such, the

safest decision is to greatly limit the traditional

aspects of the Ohio State Fair, sticking

to our roots in agriculture. While this is

a difficult decision, we feel it is the best path

to protect the long-term viability of the Ohio

State Fair, as well as the safety of those involved

by limiting the scope significantly.”

Detailed plans for the livestock and educational

competitions are forthcoming. At

this time, staff anticipates that the livestock

shows will begin on July 19 and conclude on

Aug. 8. The deadline for exhibitors to enter

livestock competitions is June 20.

The 2022 Ohio State Fair is slated for

July 27-Aug. 7.

Dwyer Chiropractic

Dr. Heather Dwyer & Dr. Penny Shepherd

139 S. Main St., London, Oh 43140

740-852-1965 ~ www.dwyerchiropractic.com

“With the help of Dr. Heather my pregnancy went super amazing.

She kept my hips aligned and gave me the best workout plan for

easier delivery. I gave birth to my little boy in 7hrs 100% drug free.

I can’t thank her enough.” F.W. 11/7/18


PAGE 8 - MADISON MESSENGER - April 18, 2021

www.madisonmessengernews.com

To learn more about the Madison County Master

Gardeners program, call the OSU Extension Office

at (740) 852-0975.

HOME-AUTO-BUSINESS

CHANEY & THOMAS

INSURANCE

Since 1927

Call your Local Independent Agent

for a quote!

104 Lafayette St., London, OH 43140

740-852-2323

Representing

The Cincinnati Insurance Co.

ADVANCED

TECHNOLOGY

for

ADVANCED COMFORT

NELSON & BALL

HEATING & COOLING

740-852-9696

132 E. Center Street, London, OH

State ID#25864

• Free Estimates

• Residential, Commercial, and Industrial

• Factory-Trained Technicians

• Licensed, Bonded, Fully Insured

www.carrier.com

Deeann, Ty, Gloria, Ty, Tina Tina

cntinsurance@live.com

People are

comfortable

around us.

Very, merry, merry marigolds!

Harriet Dana

Madison County Master Gardener

Spring has arrived. You’re itching to go

to the garden center. You want to make a

colorful splash. You want to impress the

neighbors. You also want to attract butterflies

and hummingbirds. But the last thing

you want is to commit to hours “babying”

fussy flowers. What to plant? Marigolds!

Marigolds are very fragrant, especially

when the leaves are crushed. They are often

planted to repel insects. (When visiting

India, we were handed marigold “leis” to

ward off flying insects.) Marigolds are very

tolerant of deer and central Ohio’s heavy

clay soil. They like to be planted in a sunny

spot (six-plus hours of sunlight), and they

like to be watered occasionally, especially

during summer dry spells. To improve the

appearance and promote more flowering,

cut off the old seed heads periodically

through the summer.

There are several types of marigolds:

American or African (Tagetes erecta),

French (Tagetes patula), triploid hybrids

(Tagetes erecta x Tagetes patula) and signet

(Tagetes tenuifolia). All varieties are annuals,

which means you need to plan them

every year, bloom throughout the summer,

and die after fall’s first frost.

The American or African marigold (T.

erecta) is tall (1 to 3 ft.) and has large globular

(2-4”) flower heads in shades of yellow,

orange, bicolored or white. Although often

called “African,” this plant is native to Mexico

and Central America. Because of its

height, the American marigold needs to be

planted toward the back of the flowerbed

and may require staking.

The French marigold (T. patula) is compact

and typically grows 0.5 to 1 foot tall.

Its flower can be single, semi-double, double,

or crested and comes in shades of orange,

yellow, red and bicolor. It, too, is

madison

Messenger

Distribution: 13,500 • Published Sundays

Jim Durban ......................Office Manager

Grant Zerkle .............Advertising Manager

Kristy Zurbrick .................................Editor

Becky Barker....................Office Assistant

Brittany Zerkle ...............Graphic Designer

78 S. Main St.

London, Ohio 43140

(740) 852-0809

madison@columbusmessenger.com

www.madisonmessengernews.com

Marigolds come in a variety of colors, sizes and heights, attract

butterflies and hummingbirds, and are easy to grow.

native to Mexico and Central America.

Triploid hybrids combine the large flowers of the American

marigold with the compact size of the French marigold. These vigorous

hybrids, which appear to be unaffected by intense summer

heat, grow 10 to 18 inches tall, and their flowers are typically 2 to

3 inches. The lesser known signet marigold (T. tenuifolia) has

smaller flowers and leaves than other marigolds. It, too, comes in

yellow, orange, gold or bicolored. Its height will be about 1 to 2 feet.

You can start marigolds from seed four to six weeks prior to the

last frost day, usually around the first week of April, or you can

wait until the soil is warm and sow the seeds directly into the

ground. A third option is to purchase seedling plants at your favorite

garden store and plant after Mother’s Day. Each plant will

create a mound. Seedlings should be planted about a foot apart to

allow for ample bushing.

Marigolds have few problems. The most common pest is mites,

which causes the leaves to lose their green color and have a weblike

appearance. Occasionally, especially during wet weather,

Botrytis blight causes the flowers to turn brown with a gray mold.

Should this happen, pick off and destroy the infected flowers.

Merry, merry planting — marigolds!

Did you know?

Outdoor remodels and

landscaping projects can add

valuable curb appeal to

homes. The National Association

of Realtors and the National

Association of

Landscape Professionals

agree that certain projects

offer significant returns when

selling a home. The NAR says

these are the 10 most appealing

outdoor features to buyers:

• standard lawn care;

• overall landscape upgrade;

• new patio;

• new wood deck;

• softscaping;

• sod lawn;

• seed lawn;

• outdoor firepit;

• outdoor fireplace;

• new pool.


www.madisonmessengernews.com

April 18, 2021 - MADISON MESSENGER - Page 9

Take time to figure out

right insulation for you

West Jeff will hold Shred-It Day on May 8

West Jefferson will hold a shred-it day from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on May 8 at village hall.

Documents can be dropped off for shredding; binder clips must removed but staples can remain.

For more information, call the Water Department at (614) 879-8655, option 1.

When thinking about renovating their

homes, homeowners may imagine changing

wall colors, expanding room sizes or upgrading

appliances and fixtures. However, unless

people take inventory of the less

glamourous components of the home, such

as structure, plumbing, heating and cooling,

and insulation, other improvements may be

for naught.

A home insulation project certainly doesn’t

offer the wow factor of a kitchen remodel,

but insulation serves a vital function in the

house that helps keep people comfortable

and reduces energy consumption. Insulation

is typically placed in areas where air

escapes, such as between the stud cavities

inside the walls and in the attic, and serves

to slow and reduce heat transfer.

The U.S. Department of Energy says between

50 percent and 70 percent of the energy

used in homes is for heating and

cooling. By improving home insulation,

homeowners can make their homes more

comfortable, consistent and efficient. In

fact, the ENERGY STAR program overseen

by the U.S. Environmental Protection

Agency, says homeowners stand to save an

average of 15 percent on heating and cooling

costs by adding proper insulation. To do so,

homeowners can take a crash course in

home insulation and find the products that

fit their needs.

• Blanket batts and rolls. Blanket batts

and rolls typically are constructed with

fiberglass, so proper safety gear, such as a

mask and gloves, is needed when handling

them. Installing this type of insulation is

relatively easy since the materials are designed

to fit the standard width between

studs, rafters and floor joists.

• Loose fill. Loose fill is usually made of

fiberglass or cellulose (recycled paper fiber).

It is blown or sprayed into place with pneumatic

equipment. Loose fill can be ideal for

hard-to-reach areas in attics or inside wall

cavities. It is good for adding insulation to

irregularly shaped areas. Since it requires

special equipment, this is a job best left to

professionals.

• Sprayed foam. Sprayed foam is just as

the name implies, a foam made from

polyurethane, polyisocyanurate, cementitious,

or other materials that are applied by

a spray container. DIYers who need only

small applications can use canned products.

Large quantities are pressure-sprayed by

professionals.

• Foam board/rigid foam panels. Ideal for

unfinished walls, such as basement or foundation

walls, floors and ceilings, these are

boards of polyurethane or polystyrene.

Foam boards tend to reduce energy consumption

more effectively than other types

of insulation.

BOYD GARAGE DOORS & OPENERS

Opening Doors Since 1992

RESIDENTIAL

COMMERCIAL

SALES & SERVICE OF ALL DOORS & OPENERS

DO IT YOURSELF PACKAGES

SERVING MADISON & ALL SURROUNDING COUNTIES

EMERGENCY SERVICE AVAILABLE

Homeowners considering upgrading their insulation or amending existing insulation

should do their homework on the type of insulation that will be most effective for their

homes.

Great Service & Fair Pricing

CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATES ON

NEW & REPLACEMENT DOORS.

(740) 852-2483


PAGE 10 - MADISON MESSENGER - April 18, 2021

www.madisonmessengernews.com

140 S. Main St., London, OH 43140 • (740) 845-1543

BEAT THE

SPRING

RUSH

25% OFF

Bulk Mulch

Delivery Charge with

presentation of

this ad

IT’S THAT TIME OF YEAR

TO GET YOUR MOWER

TUNED UP!

QUICK TURN

AROUND ON

REPAIRS!

FREE local pickup and delivery until May 1 st

The SPRING SPECIAL!

Zero Zero Turn Turn . . . . Riders.................. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 199.99 $239.99

.

*single cylinder

tractor

Riding Small Tractor Engine Service Riders............. . . . . . . . . . . .

$ 159.99 $174.99

Push Push Mower Mowers......................... Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 59.99 79.99

Check out our Pre-owned Equipment Page at

www.greenskeepersales.com

Know when to prune

spring-blooming shrubs

By Jane Kutzley

Madison County Master Gardener

Question: My forsythia shrub looks big and

healthy, but it had very few blooms this spring.

It was gorgeous last year. What happened?

If your shrub appears to be healthy,

other than the lack of blooms, then it was

probably pruned at the wrong time of year.

Knowing when to prune flowering shrubs is

important. If done at the wrong time, the

blooms will be eliminated or greatly reduced

in number.

Some shrubs bloom on old wood. Forsythia

is one example. This means that the

shrub sets its blooms for the next year

shortly after blooming this year. So, up to

nine or 10 months before it blooms, even

though you can’t actually see it, a forsythia

has started to develop blooms for the next

spring. By the time it actually blooms, the

branches are nearly a year old and are considered

old wood.

When pruning shrubs that bloom on old

wood, it is critical not to prune between the

time the buds are set and the time it actually

flowers. That means that there is only

a small window of time shortly after the

shrub blooms when it can be pruned without

worry about reducing next year’s

blooms.

Other shrubs bloom on new wood. Butterfly

bush and button bush are two examples.

These set their buds shortly before

they bloom, so the branches are younger

and the time from bud set to bloom is much

shorter. New wood shrubs can be pruned

much later in the season without reducing

the quantity of blooms.

A general rule of thumb is that springflowering

shrubs bloom on old wood while

summer flowering shrubs bloom on new

wood. There are exceptions, of course, and

just to make things even more interesting,

some families of shrubs have members that

bloom on old wood and others that bloom on

new wood. Hydrangea macrophyllum

(bigleaf hydrangea) blooms on old wood but

Hydrangea arborescens (smooth hydrangea)

and Hydrangea paniculata (panicled hydrangea)

bloom on new wood. Spirea is another

example. Spring-blooming spirea

blooms on old wood. Summer-blooming

spirea blooms on new wood.

A quick Internet search will tell you

whether your shrub blooms on old or new

wood. If you don’t know what kind of shrub

you have and you want to have as many

blooms as possible, then limit your pruning

to the month after your shrub finishes its

annual bloom cycle. Then there’s no need to

worry about old or new wood. However, you

must resist the urge to “neaten it up” as the

season progresses.

One more interesting twist is that some

of the newer shrub cultivars bloom on both

old and new wood and are called rebloomers.

This means that whenever you

prune, you will be eliminating some blooms.

Current advice is to prune a reblooming

shrub as infrequently as possible and to do

any pruning at the end of a particularly

heavy bloom cycle.


www.madisonmessengernews.com

April 18, 2021 - MADISON MESSENGER - Page 11

Well maintained gutters prevent foundation woes

Compromised gutters can contribute to

water issues in basements and adversely affect

a home’s foundation if not addressed immediately,

so it behooves homeowners to

learn the signs that gutters are in need of

repair or replacement.

• Gutters hanging off the home. Gutters

were once installed predominantly with

spikes. However, many industry professionals

now install gutters with hanger brackets.

Why the change? Spikes loosen over

time, leading to the gutters hanging off the

home. That can contribute to serious issues

if left untreated.

Gutters hanging off the home need not

necessarily be replaced, but rather secured

to the home, ideally with hanger brackets

instead of spikes. Brackets hook into the

front of the gutter and are then screwed into

the fascia of a home. A professional who specializes

in gutter repair can perform this

task relatively quickly, and it's an inexpensive

yet highly effective solution.

• Gutter separation. Gutters that are no

longer fastened together can leak and contribute

to issues that affect the home’s foundation,

siding and appearance. Clogs and

the accumulation of debris can cause gutters

to separate because they are not designed to

hold too much weight. Replacement of separated

gutters may or may not be necessary

Be sure to inspect your home’s gutters and have any issues fixed

to prevent water issues in your basement and in your home’s

depending on how big the problem is and

foundation.

What are those purple weeds?

the condition of the existing gutters. If replacement is not necessary,

separated gutters may be remedied by securing the joints, another

relatively simple and inexpensive fix.

• Peeling exterior paint. Paint that appears to be peeling off of

your home may indicate that water is seeping over the edge of the

gutter closest to your home. When that happens, water is coming

down the side of the house, causing the paint to peel. In such instances,

replacing the gutters is often necessary.

• Basement flooding. Not all signs of deteriorating gutters are

outside a home. Many a homeowner has been flummoxed by flooding

in their basements, and such flooding can be caused by aging,

ineffective gutters. That’s because deteriorating gutters sometimes

allow water to leak near the foundation of a home, contributing to

basement flooding.

Harriet Dana

Madison County Master Gardener

Because people know that I am a plant person, I get

asked lots of questions. Recently, someone asked, “What

are these purple plants? They’re all over my flower ed.

How do I get rid of them?”

This plant is purple deadnettle (Lamium purpureum),

a very invasive common weed.

Purple deadnettle is a member of the mint family. It

is a winter annual. The seeds begin to germinate in the

fall. The plant develops a small rosette close to the

ground and survives over the winter months. In the

spring, the plant will mature and form flowers and

seeds. As summer heat develops, the purple deadnettle

plant will wilt and die, but the seeds will survive in the

ground. Come fall, the new seeds germinate and the

cycle starts again.

How do you get rid of these weeds? If you don’t have

too many, you can pull them by hand in the spring before

the plant sets seeds. You can also kill purple deadnettle

with a general herbicide spray, being careful to

follow all directions on the label and to avoid zapping

desired plants. Once the mature plants are destroyed,

you can treat the area with a preemergence herbicide

in the late summer/early fall to inhibit further germi-

Purple deadnettle is an invasive weed, but it provides

food for pollinators, such as honeybees.

nation.

Although these plants are considered weeds, they

can be beneficial. Purple deadnettle, as well as dandelions

and crocus, provide much needed food for pollinators,

such as honeybees, in the early spring.

CHECK OUT OUR

**** FRIDAY SPECIALS ****

NOW THRU

SEPTEMBER 24, 2021

Buy 10 Bags of Softener Salt

& Get One FREE! (pickup only)

Hours: Mon.-Fri. 7:30 am - 4:00 pm

(740) 852-3709 - (888) 852-3709

731 Rt. 42 S.W., LONDON, OHIO

CALL FOR DETAILS


PAGE 12 - MADISON MESSENGER - April 18, 2021

www.madisonmessengernews.com

Watch for details about the Madison

County Master Gardners’ new “Ask A

Master Gardener” Help Line,

coming soon.

#1 in CENTRAL OHIO

GILBERTS

Masonry/Restoration Co.

614-946-8871

Lic.-Bonded-Insured

32 Years in Business

• Brick • Block • Stone

• Cultured Stone • Stucco

• Concrete • Tuck Pointing

• Chimney Work

• Glass Block Windows

• Basement Waterproofing

Free Estimates

Tough love aids transition to outside

By Marlene Dorko

Madison County Master Gardener

Whether started at home or purchased

from a greenhouse or big box store, indoor

grown plants will benefit from some tough

love before being planted outside.

Plants grown in the sheltered environment

of a greenhouse are ill prepared to

withstand the hot blazing sun, drying

winds, heavy rains and near freezing nights

that are all part of the spring norm here in

Ohio. Placing greenhouse plants directly

into the garden environment can cause

them to go into shock, stopping growth,

damaging foliage and possibly even killing

the plant.

Hardening off is a process that can help

transition plants from the nearly ideal conditions

of the greenhouse to the harsher environment

of the outdoors. It should be

started 10 days to two weeks before the

planned planting date. Outdoor temperatures

should be above 45 degrees.

A few days before starting the hardening

off process, reduce watering of indoor

plants. The soil should be allowed to dry a

bit between waterings but not to the point

MERCHANTS

NATIONAL BANK

where the plants begin to droop. Stop fertilizing

from this point until the plants are

placed in the ground.

Start by setting the plants in a shady

sheltered place for two to three hours. Depending

on outside temperatures, you may

want to do this during the warmest part of

the day. An open garage, shaded porch or

under the dappled shade of a tree are good

places. A cold frame can be a great place to

harden off, provided you are able to control

the amount of exposure to sun and wind.

Each day, increase the time spent outdoors

by an hour or two. Gradually increase

the plants’ exposure to sun and wind by

moving them into more open areas of sunlight.

Watch the plants for signs of stress,

such as wilting or drying leaf edges. Monitor

soil moisture carefully. Small containers can

dry out quickly on sunny, windy days. If the

soil feels moist but the plants are wilting,

cut back on the amount of sun/wind exposure.

After plants are in full sun for 10 to 12

hours per day, begin leaving the plants out

overnight. If there is a frost warning, move

plants inside until temperatures warm to

above 45 degrees. Once plants have been

outside a few full days and nights, they are

Hardening off is a process that can help

transition plants from the nearly ideal conditions

of the greenhouse to the harsher environment

of the outdoors.

ready to be planted in the garden.

Try to choose a cloudy windless day for

planting in the garden. If it’s a sunny day,

plant early in the morning or late in the

evening. Give plants a drink of diluted fertilizer

at this time to help get them growing

again.

Hardening off causes the plants to slow

growth. It allows the plants to develop more

roots, accumulate more carbohydrates, reduce

the amount of freeze-prone water in

the leaves and to thicken cell walls in the

leaves and stems. These changes make the

plants better able to handle the variations

in moisture, temperature and air movement

encountered outside. It might still be necessary

to cover plants should a late frost

threaten, but the plants will be much less

stressed by the fluctuations in temperature.

These tough sturdy plants will soon catch

up to or even surpass stress damaged plants

put in the ground earlier without the hardening

off process.

ose aren’t worms or

aliens; they’re sprouts!

HOME LOAN SPECIAL

CLOSING COSTS - $495 FIXED RATE LOANS

Limited time Offer! O

Contact Cassie assie Williams

for details!

279 Lafayette StrS

treet, London, Ohio O

43140

Phone: 740-852-4900 Ext. E

50122

email: cwilliams@merchantsnat.com

chantsnat.com

By Barbara J. Myers

Madison County Master Gardener

Have you ever cut into a tomato and found

white squiggly-looking things inside? Those

are not worms or aliens that made their way

to the center, but rather tomato seeds that

have started to germinate. This phenomenon—when

seeds start growing while still inside

or attached to the mother plant—is

known as vivipary, Latin for “live birth.” It is

common in certain varieties of tomatoes, peppers,

apple, pears, and some citrus.

Vivipary happens when the hormone

controlling the seed dormancy is exhausted

or runs out, letting the seed grow in the

moist environment inside the fruit. This

warm, moist environment is perfect for germinating

seeds to grow. If the tomato were

left uncut in warm conditions, the new plant

sprout would eventually poke through the

skin of the now decomposing tomato.

These new plants can be potted where

they will grow into a large tomato plants

I cut into this tomato the other day and

thought it was wormy. Actually, the seeds

inside the tomato were sprouting.

and even produce tomatoes. The tomato

will not be a clone of the mother plant, because

it grew from a seed that had to be pollinated

by another tomato flower,

introducing new parent genes into the seed

that will produce the new plant. The tomatoes

off of the plant are entirely edible and

quite possibly delicious. Check out the

seeds inside your fruit or vegetable the next

time you slice into it.


www.madisonmessengernews.com

obituaries

April 18, 2021 - MADISON MESSENGER - Page 13

INGLES (BERNIER)

Cathy M. Ingles, 47, of London died on April 1, 2021,

in Doctors Hospital, Columbus. Born on Nov. 28, 1973,

in Tampa, Fla., she was the daughter of Norman and

Irene (Purdum) Bernier. Cathy attended Lafayette

United Methodist Church and had worked at Dollar

General in London and, for the past several years, was

at the Popeye’s Chicken in London. Survivors include:

her daughter, Rebecca Bernier; mother, Irene Bernier;

fiancée, Raymond Vincent; aunts and uncles, George

(Hazel) Purdum, Kathleen Yutzy, Ruth (Bob) Manns,

Rose (Bob) Holycross, Doris Richards, Winona Purdum;

and many cousins. She was preceded in death by: her

father; husband, John H. Ingles; aunts and uncles,

Dorothy and Rogene Lehman, Mary and Al Renner,

Vada Gay, Raymond Harsh, and John Purdum. A memorial

service was held on April 14 in Lafayette United

Methodist Church, London, with Pastor Wayne Stuntz

officiating. The family was served by Eberle-Fisher Funeral

Home and Crematory, London. Condolences may

be sent to www.eberlefisherfuneralhome.com.

HENRY

Jeffrey Glenn Estepp, 67, went to be with our Heavenly

Father on April 3, 2021. He was born on Oct. 14,

1953, in Columbus, Ohio, son of Glenn and Lucy

(Adams) Estepp. He was preceded in death by his parents

and sister, Belinda Karen Oppihle. He graduated

from the “Last Class” of Madison South High School in

1971. He worked for National Electric Coil in Columbus

for 43 years and retired from there in 2019. He was baptized

in 2009 at Heritage Christian Church in Westerville,

where he was involved in local mission work,

helping after storms in Kentucky, and regularly served

breakfast to homeless families at the YWCA Family

Center. He regularly attended Central College Presbyterian

Church in Westerville. He is survived by: his

partner of 33 years, Michael A. Duncan; sisters, Jennifer

G. (John Grady) Cline of Jamestown, Ohio, and

Brenda J. (James) Stambaugh of London, Ohio; numerous

nieces, nephews and cousins; and dogs, Maggie and

McKenzie. A funeral was held on April 12 at Porter-

Tidd Funeral Home, Mount Sterling, with Pastor Jim

Zippay officiating. Interment followed in Bethel Cemetery.

Memorial contributions may be made at www.ywcacolumbus.org

or mailed to: YWCA Family Center, 900

Harvey Ct., Columbus, OH 43219. Please share your

favorite memories of Jeff or send your condolences to

his family by visiting www.portertiddfuneralhome.com.

DILLARD

Paul H. Dillard, 98, of London died on Easter Sunday,

April 4, 2021, surrounded by his loving family in

Loveland, Ohio. Born on Jan. 15, 1923, in South

Charleston, Ohio, he was a son of Thomas W. and

Emma Pearl (Strain) Dillard. An electrical contractor,

Paul had owned and operated his own business in London.

He proudly served his country as a World War II

Army Air Corps veteran, spending most of his tour in

India. Paul and his brother, Bill, participated in the

Honor Flight for WWII veterans with his son-in-law,

Gregory Jeranek, as their guardian. Paul attended the

United Methodist Church in London, where he also volunteered

countless hours. He had also been a member

of Chandler Lodge 138 F&AM, where he was a 32nddegree

Mason and two-time Past Worshipful Master.

He is survived by: his daughter, Paula Dillard Jeranek,

and her husband, Gregory Jeranek of Loveland; grandson,

Adam Jeranek, and his wife, Christina, of Loveland;

great-grandchildren, Jane and Christopher Jeranek,

both of Loveland; sisters-in-law, Mary McNary of

London, Betty Dillard of South Charleston and Louise

Pegan of Florida; several nieces and nephews. Paul was

preceded in death by: his beloved wife of over 50 years,

Lucy Jane (Warnock) Dillard; his parents; and siblings,

Carol Dillard Greer, Bill Dillard, Victoria Dillard, Mary

Dillard Downing and Wayne Dillard. A graveside service

was held on April 12 at Kirkwood Cemetery, London,

with Pastor Dave Leckrone officiating. The family was

served by Eberle-Fisher Funeral Home and Crematory,

London. Condolences may be sent to www.eberlefisherfuneralhome.com.

KNISLEY

Ronny E. Knisley, Dec. 13, 1939-April 4, 2021. Ronny

passed away peacefully on Easter Sunday. Ronny was

a lifetime resident of Washington Court House. Ronny

graduated from Washington High School in 1957 and

shortly after joined the National Guard where he retired

as a lieutenant. As a young man, he learned to

work hard at his parents’ Pontiac dealership when he

wasn’t serving at the National Guard. His hard work

was only matched by his determination to get finished

with his work for the day do he could go play basketball

in his younger years or golf later in life. After his dad

retired and sold the family automobile dealership,

Ronny opened Knisley’s Collison Repair. He loved golf,

basketball, socializing with friends, spending time with

his grandkids, and chewing on an unlit cigar. His infectious

laugh and fun-loving spirit will be missed by all.

Ronny was preceded in death by his parents, Loren

Jack Knisley and Juanita Mae Knisley, and his first

wife, Gail Detweiler Knisley. He is survived by: his loving

wife, Sharon Knisley; children, Brent (Missi) Knisley

and Brad Knisley; grandchildren, Loren and Max

Knisley; and step-daughter, Stephanie Creech, whom

he referred to as a daughter. At Ronny’s request, no

services were held. Donations in Ronny’s name may be

sent to: Neuroscience Center, 3535 Olentangy River

Rd., Columbus, OH 43214. Porter-Tidd Funeral Home,

Mount Sterling, assisted the Knisley family.

MYERS

Eugene E. Myers, 89, of Westerville passed peacefully

on April 10, 2021. He was born in Clyde, Ohio, on

March 16, 1932, to Lester and Thelma (Creeger) Myers.

Gene was the eldest of three sons. He was a proud U.S.

Navy veteran serving aboard the USS Kaskaskia AO-

27 during the Korean War. Gene worked in the meat

department at Kroger for 47 years, retiring from the

Westerville Kroger. He had formerly attended McKendree

United Methodist Church in Columbus before

transferring to the Church of the Messiah in Westerville.

A huge OSU football fan, he was a member of the

Quarterback Club. HO scale railroading and gardening

were among his favorite hobbies. An Honor Flight to

Washington D.C. and U.S. Naval Tiger Cruises with his

brother aboard his nephew’s ships were personal highlights.

Survivors include: his wife of 64 years, Doris (Wilson)

Myers; daughter, Linda (Hugh) Fredendall;

brother, George (Marty) Myers; sister-in-law, Barbara

Myers; and several nieces and nephews. He was preceded

in death by his parents and brother, Jim Myers.

Private graveside services will be held at the convenience

of the family in Riverside Cemetery, Columbus.

In lieu of flowers, the family suggests memorials in

Gene’s name be directed to the Alzheimer’s Association

at www.alz.org or Kindred Hospice. The family is being

served by Eberle-Fisher Funeral Home and Crematory,

London. Condolences for the family may be sent to www.eberlefisherfuneralhome.com.

BARKER

Jerri Robin Barker, a loving daughter and sister, went home to

be with her Lord on April 6, 2021, while surrounded by her family.

She was born on Sept. 26, 1960, in Phoenix, Ariz. She is the daughter

of Jerry and Janet Hamilton of Springfield, Ohio. Jerri was very

kind hearted and had a great sense of humor. She loved animals,

music and karaoke. For many years, Jerri attended Oakgrove

CCCU in Mechanicsburg, Ohio. She is survived by: her mother,

Janet Hamilton; sisters, Joni (Dick) Wickline and Joy (Steve)

Miller; her twin, Jeane (Erwing) Martinez; Aunt Jody Zerkle; Uncle

Jerry Cordell; and numerous nieces, nephews and cousins. Jerri

was preceded in death by: her father, Jerry Hamilton; grandparents,

Frank and Lockie Cordell, and James and Mary Hamilton;

and nephew, Greg Miller. Visitation was held on April 11 at Lynch

Family Funeral Home & Cremation Service, London. A graveside

service was held on April 12 at Oak Hill Cemetery, London, with

the Rev. David Cox officiating. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions

may be made in Jerri’s memory to: American Kidney Fund,

Inc., 11921 Rockville Pike, Suite 300, Rockville, MD 20852. Condolences

may be sent to www.lynchfamilyfuneralhome.com.

CAVE

Jeremy Regret Cave, 45, of London died on April 9, 2021, at his

residence. He was born on Oct. 29, 1975, in London, the son of

David Phillip and Celia (Bennett) Cave. Jeremy had been employed

by Chemcote in Dublin. He enjoyed fishing and taking apart and

rebuilding bicycles. Jeremy is survived by: his mother, Celia of London;

children, Harley Cave of Grove City, Jared Cave and Peyton

Cave, both of London; siblings, David (Penney) Cave of Florida,

April (Russell) Caldwell of London; grandchildren, Karson, Jordyn,

Kamdyn and Jaydyn; nieces and nephews; and aunts and uncles,

including caring and loving aunt and uncle, Gene and Carol Dennen.

He was preceded in death by: his father; his very best friend,

Trevor; maternal grandparents, Anna and Elden Bennett; paternal

grandparents, Dave and June Cave. Calling hours were held on

April 15 at Lynch Family Funeral Home & Cremation Service, London.

A graveside service will be held at a later date. Memorial contributions

may be made to the funeral home to help with expenses.

There is a “donate” button on Jeremy’s obituary page. Online condolences

may be sent to www.lynchfamilyfuneralhome.com.

Gary Lee Payne II, age 45, of Amelia, OH, passed away unexpectedly

on April 6, 2021. He was born October 25, 1975, at Madison County Hospital

inLondon, OH, the son of Em ma Jean Carson Work and Gary Payne I.

He served 12 years in the US Army where he earned the rank of Sergeant. He

served two tours in Iraq and as a result, he battled severe PTSD. He loved playing

the guitar and was self-taught. He had a great sense of humor and loved to make

people laugh. His laughter was contagious. He was soft-spoken and had a

beautiful voice. He was a very creative, loving, generous, sensitive, and

compassionate son, father, husband, and friend.

He was survived by his wife Lara (Kidd) Payne; mother and step-father Emma

Jean and Dale Work, step-mother Jeanie (Shaw) Payne, children Christina Dowis

of South Carolina, Lucas, Joshua (Haley), Olivia Payne of Georgia, Bethany

Payne of London; step-children Willow, Benjamin, and Isabelle of Cincinnati;

granddaughter Autumn Lewis; brother Jeremy (Amanda) Payne of Columbus

and sister Annette Adams of Markle, Indiana; step-sisters Stephanie (Brian) Noel

and Barb (Rick) Dixon both of Columbus, Nikki (Brian) Topp and Amber

(Steve) Athan both of Indiana; nephew Jordan Payne and niece Jessica (Rosie)

Adams; many aunts, uncles, cousins. He was preceded in death by his father,

infant daughter Lindsey Ann Payne, maternal grandparents Elmer and Grace

Carson, and paternal grandmother Rebecca Rake.

Family and friends are invited to E.C. Nurre Funeral Home, 177 W. Main Street,

Amelia on Tuesday for visitation from 2:00 – 4:00 pm. Graveside service will be

held promptly on Wednesday at 11:00 AM at Dayton National Cemetery in

Dayton, Ohio with full military honors.


PAGE 14 - MADISON MESSENGER - April 18, 2021

community calendar

www.madisonmessengernews.com

Household Hazardous Waste

Disposal in Plain City

Village of Plain City residents are invited

to dispose of their household hazardous

waste materials for free on April 24, 8 a.m.-

noon, at the new municipal building, 800

Village Blvd. Participants must show their

utility bill or license to verify their residency.

Items that will be accepted are:

smoke detectors, paint (latex, oil), household

aerosols, solvents, thinners, cylinders

(propane less than 20 pounds, oxygen, helium,

Freon, C02), fluorescent bulbs, light

ballasts, E-cigarettes, pesticides, batteries

(alkaline, ni-cad, lithium, mercury), and

gasoline. Items that will not be accepted are:

asbestos, appliances, tires, ammunition,

trash, needles, pharmaceuticals, and medical

waste.

5-Week Online Group

for Parents

6:00-8:00 PM

Learn how to get more of the behavior you like

from your children and less of what you don't.

614-382-2445

alyles@actionforchildren.org

Workshops are open to parents and

guardians of children ages 0-8.

Archaeology Society

The Darby Creek Chapter of the Archaeological

Society of Ohio will meet on April

21 at the Madison County Historical Society

building, 260 E. High St., London. The

building will open around 5:30 p.m. for socializing

and individually wrapped snacks.

The meeting will start at 6 p.m. No presenter

or presentation is scheduled. Anyone

who attends must wear a facemask that covers

the nose and mouth. Social distancing is

planned. Anyone showing or who thinks

they may have COVID-19 symptoms or

other flu-like symptoms, or who has recently

been around someone having or showing

symptoms of having COVID-19 or other flulike

symptoms is asked not to attend. Anyone

interested in Native American and/or

metal detecting artifacts is welcome.

Drug Take-Back Day

The Madison County Sheriff’s Office is

holding a Drug Take-Back Day from 10 a.m.

to 2 p.m. April 24 at the Sheriff’s Office

building at 222 Garfield Ave., London, and

behind the town hall at 1 S. London St.,

Mount Sterling. Deputies will retrieve the

expired and/or unused prescription drugs

from your car; you do not need to get out.

Rockin’ on the Run

Each year, Rockin’ on the Run raises

money and awareness for pediatric brain

tumor research. The focal point is a 5K run,

which is virtual this year. Several other

fundraisers are taking place in conjunction

with the event, as well.

• Virtual 5K run—suggested dates are

May 9-15. Go to www.rockinontherun.org..

• Silent auction—May 1-15. Visit biddingowl.com/rockinontherun;

• M&M Diner—May 3. Homemade

chicken and noodles with mashed potatoes

and corn. The cost is $10. Meals will be sold

from 4 to 7 p.m. (or until sold out) in a drivethrough

format at the diner, 165 E. Center

St., London. No call-in orders. Bring extra

cash for the 50/50 drawing.

Spring Dinner

Trinity United Methodist Church is hosting

a spaghetti dinner from 4 to 7 p.m. April

19 at Ann & Tony’s Restaurant in West Jefferson.

The meal includes spaghetti, salad,

roll, dessert and bottled water. The cost is

$12. Meals are available for carryout only.

Baked Steak Dinner

First United Methodist Church, 52 N.

Main St., London, is hosting its 59th semiannual

spring dinner on April 27 for 4 to 7

p.m. The dinner will be served in a drivethrough

format. The church is not permitted

to serve walk-up or carryout meals due to

COVID-19 restrictions.

The meal includes a choice of baked

steak or pork tenderloin, real mashed potatoes,

seasoned green beans, chocolate Texas

sheet cake, homemade cole slaw, ice cream

and water.

Chamber of Commerce

The Madison County Chamber of Commerce

and Community Improvement Corporation

(CIC) are holding the following

meetings, programs, and events.

Solar 101: April 20. Learn about the solar

industry and the economic impact it has in

a community during a “Solar 101” program

set for April 20. The program is free and will

take place over Zoom. For login information,

contact David Kell at david@madisoncountyohio.org

or (740) 490-8110.

Annual Chamber Golf Outing: May 20.

The golf outing will be held May 20 at the

London Country Club. For more information,

contact Suzanne Williams at suzanne@madisoncountyohio.org

or (740) 852-2250.

Deercreek Township Trustees

The Deercreek Township trustees will

meet on the following dates in 2021. Meetings

take place at 7 p.m. at the township

hall, 75 Middle St., London: April 19, May

3 and May 17, June 7 and June 21, July 5

and July 19, Aug. 2 and Aug. 16, Sept. 6 and

Sept. 20, Oct. 4 and Oct. 18, Nov. 1 and Nov.

15, Dec. 6 and Dec. 20.

HBMLibrary

Hurt-Battelle Memorial Library, 270

Lilly Chapel Rd., West Jefferson, offers the

following activities and services. For details,

call (614) 879-8448 or visit hbmlibrary.org.

• Storytimes. In-library storytimes will

resume in May. Space is limited; registration

is required. Check the library’s Facebook and

website for April’s virtual storytimes.

• Curbside Service and Limited In-Library

Services. Monday, Wednesday and

Friday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Tuesday and Thursday,

10 a.m.-7 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

• HBMLibrary Feeding Program. The library

is working with Children’s Hunger Alliance

to help feed children during the

school year. Snacks/meals are available for

children ages 2-18 from 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

weekdays. There are no income requirements.

Call the library information desk for

details. The program runs through the end

of May.

• Prom Dress Drive. Prom attire is available

at the library throughout the month of

April. You do not need an appointment to

browse the selections. To donate a dress,

call the information desk at (614) 879-8448.

• Family STEAM: Earth Day. On April 19,

pick up a children’s program-to-go that contains

everything needed to create a mason

bee house. First come, first served.

London Public Library

London Public Library, is located at 20

E. First St. Call (740) 852-9543 or visit

www.mylondonlibrary.org for details. The

library building is closed to the public; the

library is offering curbside pickup only at

this time.

• Friends of the Library. The group will

meet at 6 p.m. April 26.

• Computer Assistance. Allison, circulation

assistant at the library, is offering oneon-one

computer assistance via Zoom. She

can assist with basic computer skills, e-

mail, and Microsoft products such as Word,

PowerPoint and Excel. Call the library for

dates and times and to register.

• Virtual Story Times. Toddler story

times are held at 10 a.m. on Tuesdays and

are for children ages 0 to 3 years old. Story

times are held at 11 a.m. on Tuesdays and

are for children ages 3 to 6 years old. E-mail

Mary Anne at mwood@mylondonlibrary.org

for a link to participate.

Mount Sterling Library

Mount Sterling Public Library is located

at 60 W. Columbus St. Call (740) 869-2430

or visit www.mtsterlingpubliclibrary.org.

The library is open with regular hours and

continues to offer curbside pickup. Facemasks

are required inside the building.

• Book Club. The group will discuss “All

Creatures Big and Small: The Warm and

Joyful Memoirs of the World’s Most Beloved

Animal Doctor” by James Herriot at 7 p.m.

April 29 in the large event room at the

Mount Sterling Community Center, 164 E.

Main St. Facemasks are required. Anyone

joining the club for the first time is asked to

RSVP by calling or texting the facilitator at

(614) 315-7939.

The Zoom Book Club will discuss Herriot’s

book at 7 p.m. May 4.

• Preschool Storytime. The library has

reinstated preschool storytime. Sessions

take place at 10:30 a.m. on Mondays. The

group is for children ages 3 to 5 years old.

• Mount Sterling Community Museum.

Located on the library’s lower level, the museum

is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Monday,

Wednesday and Friday. All visitors

must wear masks to enter and stay six feet

apart while in the museum. The current display

honors Mount Sterling veterans. Call

Steve Chambers, director, at (740) 869-9305

for information about the museum.

Plain City Library

For up-to-date information about library

services, visit plaincitylib.org/covid-19 or

call (614) 873-4912. The library is located at

305 W. Main St.

• Library Board. The board will meet at

6:30 p.m. April 19.

• Kids’ Food Pickup. On Mondays from

5:30 to 6:30 p.m., pick up five shelf-stable

meals per child each week at the library.

The child does not need to be present.

Other Kids’ Food Pickup locations in the

Plain City area include:

- Mondays, 3:15-4:30 p.m. at Trinity

Chapel CCCU, 77 W Center St., Milford

Center;

- Tuesdays, 2:30-4:00pm at Canaan Community

Mobile Home Park, 5130 Plain City

Georgesville Rd., Plain City;

- Tuesdays, 3:30-4:00 p.m. at Green

Meadows Mobile Home Park, 1 Thorn Locust

Ln., London;

- Thursdays, 2-3 p.m. at Journey Community

Church, 11100 Lafayette-Plain City

Rd., Plain City.

Project partners are Children’s Hunger

Alliance, D.N.A. Community Center, Journey

Community Church and Maranatha

Community Fellowship.

• Online Storytime. Mondays at 10:30

a.m. Visit the library’s Facebook, Youtube

and Twitter channels for online storytimes

complete with songs, rhymes and books for

all ages.

• Bedtime Storytime. Tuesdays at 6:30

p.m. Visit Facebook, Youtube and Twitter

for live storytimes, including stories,

rhymes and songs.


wwww.madisonmessengernews.com

April 18, 2021 - MADISON

2021 - MADISON

MESSENGER

MESSENGER

-

-

Page

PAGE

15

15

Alder school board applauds top winter athletes

On April 12, the Jonathan Alder Local

Schools board of education recognized

Jonathan Alder High School students for

their achievements during the winter sports

season.

Boys’ basketball—CBC champions and

district runner-up;

Zach Ross—Central District coach of the

year;

Jackson Izzard—first-team CBC; CBC

player of the year; first-team Central District;

second-team All-Ohio;

Joey Walker—first-team CBC, third-team

Central District;

Grant Welsch—second-team CBC, honorable

mention Central District;

Gavin Heimlich—special mention CBC;

Tyler Begin—Sportsmanship Award CBC.

Girls’ basketball—CBC co-champions;

district runner-up;

Mary Ferrito—first-team CBC; first-team

Central District; special mention All-Ohio;

Emma Shepherd—first-team CBC; honorable

mention Central District;

Evan Platfoot—second-team CBC; thirdteam

Central District;

Maddie Wilson—second-team CBC;

Ellie Heisler—special mention CBC;

sportsmanship award CBC.

Boys’ bowling—CBC champions; district

qualifier;

Nathan Clark—first-team CBC; fifth in

district (individual state qualifier);

John Jordan—first-team CBC;

Jackson Lane—first-team CBC; sectional

- second-place individual;

Levi Honigford—second-team CBC;

Jon Santini—sportsmanship award CBC;

Team—(Jackson Lane, Levi Honigford,

John Jordan, Dominic Dellapina, Nathan

Clark, Matt McMillen) seventh place sectionals

(district qualifier).

Girls’ bowling—sectional champions; district

runner-up; state qualifier;

Lana Kirts—first-team CBC;

Danielle Phipps—first-team CBC; sectional

- first-place individual;

Kadie Walter—first-team CBC;

Satavia Kempton—second-team CBC;

Shea Huntington—special mention CBC;

Chloey Boyer-Burns—sportsmanship

award CBC;

Team—(Danielle Phipps, Kadie Walter,

Lana Kirts, Satavia Kempton, Shea Huntington,

Jenise Jordan) first-place sectional,

second-place district, state qualifier.

Boys’ Swimming—Eli Stol—first-team

CBC (100-yard butterfly and 100-yard backstroke),

CBC swimmer of the year, sectional

champion (100 backstroke/100 fly - set meet

records in both and the pool record at

Columbus Academy in the 100 backstroke),

district champion (100 backstroke/100 fly -

set district record in the 100 backstroke),

fourth in state (100 fly), state runner-up

(100 backstroke);

Alec Paige—sportsmanship award CBC.

Girls’ swimming—Claire Dygert—firstteam

CBC (200-yard individual medley),

second-team CBC (200 medley relay), special

mention CBC (500 freestyle), district

qualifier (200 IM/500 free/200 medley

relay);

Allie Piccolantonio—second-team CBC

(200 medley relay), district qualifier (200

medley relay);

Avery Wynk—second-team CBC (200

medley relay), special mention CBC (50

freestyle/100 breaststroke), district qualifier

(50 free/100 breast/200 medley relay);

Maggie Matessa—second-team CBC (200

medley relay), sportsmanship award CBC,

district qualifier (200 medley relay);

Boys’ wrestling—CBC champions, sectional

champions;

Xavier Pierce—first-team CBC, second

place sectionals, fifth place district;

Josh Proper—first-team CBC; second

place sectional; third-place district, state

qualifier;

Oliver Byerly—first-team CBC, second

place sectional, third place district, state

qualifier;

Reece Chapman—second-team CBC; firstplace

sectional; second place district, state

qualifier, Academic All-Ohio;

Aspen Cameron—second-team CBC;

Carson Greiner—second-team CBC,

third-place sectional, district qualifier;

Pryce Watson—special mention CBC;

fourth place sectional, district qualifier;

Dom Kroninger—special mention CBC;

sixth place sectional;

Zach Yates—sportsmanship award CBC;

sixth place, sectional;

Eli Trbovich—third place sectional, district

qualifier;

Owen Crabtree—fourth place sectional,

district qualifier;

Will Heisler—fifth place, sectional;

Damon Hay—sixth place sectional.

Junior Achievement

sets golf outing for

May 27 in London

Junior Achievement Mad River Region

will host a golf outing on May 27 at

the London Country Club. Golf nine

holes, break for lunch, then golf the second

nine. Proceeds benefit Junior

Achievement’s K-12 entrepreneurship,

financial literacy, and workforce readiness

program.

For details about signing up or becoming

a sponsor, contact Crystal Steiner at

csteiner@jrachieve.net or (937) 323-4725,

ext. 12.

CLASSIFIED ADS

Deadline: Tuesdays at 2 p.m.

To place an ad, call 740-852-0809 or stop by the London office at 78 S. Main Street

xInformation

ASSOCIATION ADS

HOME BREAK-INS take

less than 60 SECONDS.

Don’t wait! Protect your

family, your home, your

assets NOW for as little as

70¢ a day! Call 866-409-

0308

ASSOCIATION ADS

Attention oxygen therapy

users! Inogen One G4 is

capable of full 24/7 oxygen

delivery. Only 2.8

pounds. Free info kit.

Call 877-929-9587

INFORMATION

WANTED

Catchers / Pitchers

for Men’s Adult

BASEBALL League

18+ & 25+ Yrs. old

Call/Text

614-316-9600

Want to Make Millions

in Selling?

Want to Make People Really

WANT

Your Product?

Learn human

communication secrets

at the

Personal Efficency Seminar

614-221-5024

1266 Dublin Rd.

Columbus, OH 43215

ASSOCIATION ADS

Attention Active Duty &

Military Veterans! Begin a

new career & earn a

Degree at CTI! Online

Computer & Medical

training available for

Veterans & Families! To

learn more, call 888-449-

1713.

5/9 A/M

ASSOCIATION ADS

Wants to purchase minerals

and other oil and gas

interests. Send details to

P.O. Box 13557, Denver,

CO. 80201

AT&T Internet. Starting

at $40/month w/12-mo

agmt. 1 TB of data/mo.

Ask how to bundle &

SAVE! Geo & svc restrictions

apply. 1-888-796-

8850

SELL YOUR ANTIQUE

OR CLASSIC CAR.

Advertise with us. You

choose where you want

to advertise. 800-450-

6631 visit macnetonline.

com for details.

Thinking about installing

a new shower? American

Standard makes it

easy. FREE design consulation.

Enjoy your

shower again! Call 1-

833-769-0995 today to

see how you can save

$1,000 on installation, or

visit www.newshowerdeal.com/mac

New authors wanted!

Page Publishing will help

self-publish your book.

Free author submission

kit! Limited offer! 866-

951-7214

xAdult Care

VISITING ANGELS

Senior Home Care

by ANGELS

We send you the Best Home Caregivers

1 Hr. up to 24 Hr. Care

Prepared and Ready but still operating COVID Free.

Rates as low as $15.21 an hour!

“We Do Things Your Way”

614-80-ANGEL (614-802-6435)

Call or text for info. www.v-angels.com

xFocus on Rentals

CATAWBA APARTMENTS

10900 Schadel Lane

Mt. Sterling, OH 43143

740-869-0159

For Hearing Impaired only

Call TTY 711

1 & 2 BEDROOMS

Rent Includes: Water, Sewer and

Weekly Trash Pickup

On Site Laundry Available

HUD Vouchers Accepted

“This institution is an

equal opportunity

provider”


PAGE 16 - MADISON MESSENGER - April 18, 2021

www.madisonmessengernews.com

CLASSIFIED ADS

Deadline: Tuesdays at 2 p.m.

To place an ad, call 740-852-0809 or stop by the London office at 78 S. Main Street

xLegal Notices

NOTICE OF LEGISLATION PASSED BY THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF LONDON, OHIO

Noce is hereby given to the passage of the following ordinances or resoluons of

the London City Council. The complete text of each ordinance or resoluon may be

obtained or viewed at the offices of the City Law Director or the City Auditor at 60

South Walnut Street, London, Ohio, or online at the London City website:

www.londonohio.gov

Ordinance 111­21 An ordinance vacang an alley

Date of passage: 03/18/21

Ordinance 112­21 An ordinance vacang an alley

Date of passage: 03/18/21

Ordinance 113­21 An ordinance vacang an alley

Date of passage: 03/18/21

Ordinance 114­21 An ordinance vacang an alley

Date of passage: 04/01/21

Resoluon 129­21 A resoluon amending resoluon 124­21

Date of passage: 03/04/21

Ordinance 130­21 An ordinance approving and authorizing the execuon and

delivery of a community reinvestment area agreement, and declaring an emergency

Date of passage: 03/04/21

Resoluon 131­21 A resoluon increasing appropriaons

Date of passage: 04/01/21

Resoluon 132­21 A resoluon increasing appropriaons

Date of passage: 04/01/21

Ordinance 133­21 An ordinance for strengths on job descripons

Date of passage: 04/01/21

Ordinance 134­21 An ordinance amending ordinance 242 of the codified

ordinances

Date of passage: 04/01/21

Resoluon 136­21 A resoluon assessing the costs and collecng delinquent water

charges

Date of passage: 04/01/21

Resoluon 137­21 A resoluon authorizing the Safety Service Director to parcipate

in contracts of the State of Ohio Department of Transportaon

Date of passage: 04/01/21

Resoluon 138­21 A resoluon increasing appropriaons

Date of passage: 04/01/21

Amy Rees

Clerk of London City Council

MM APRIL 11 & 18, 2021

NOTICE OF

COMMUNITY MEETING

Notice is hereby given that the Village of Mount Sterling

Planning Commission will hold a community meeting on

Tuesday May 18, 2021 from 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm at the

Community Center, 164 East Main Street, Mount Sterling,

OH 43143 to discuss/display changes to zoning districts

within the Village limits.

For Information on the above case(s)

please contact Tom Hale 614-379-5246.

MM APRIL 18, 2021

MM2021240

MM2021229

ASSOCIATION ADS

Looking for auto insurance?

Find great deals

on the right auto insurance

to suit your needs.

Call today for a free

quote! 866-924-2397

!!OLD GUITARS WANT-

ED!! GIBSON, FENDER,

MARTIN, Etc. 1930’s to

1980’s. TOP DOLLAR

PAID. CALL TOLL FREE

1-866-433-8277

DISH TV $64.99 FOR 190

Channels + $14.95 High

Speed Internet. Free Installation,

Smart HD DVR

Included, Free Voice Remote.

Some restrictions

apply. Promo expires

7/21/21. 1-855-270-5098

PROBATE COURT OF

MADISON COUNTY, OHIO

CHRISTOPHER J. BROWN,

JUDGE

IN RE: CHANGE OF NAME

OF

Hazel Marie Klink Powers

to

Marie Klink Powers

Case No. 20216016

NOTICE OF HEARING ON

CHANGE OF NAME

[R.C. 2717.01]

Applicant hereby gives notice to all

interested persons that the applicant

has filed an Application for

Change of Name in the Probate

Court of Madison County, Ohio,

requesting the change of name of

Hazel Marie Klink Powers to Marie

Klink Powers. The hearing on the

application will be held on the 10th

day of June, 2021, at 2:30 o’clock

P.M. in the Probate Court of

Madison County, located at 1

North Main Street, London, Ohio

43140.

MM APRIL 18, 2021

MM2021236

ASSOCIATION ADS

Pest Control

Find Pest Control Experts

Near You! Don’t let

pests overtake your

home. Protect your loved

ones! Call to find great

deals on Pest Control

Services - 833-872-0012

HEARING AIDS!! Bogo

free! High-quality rechargeable

Nano hearing

aids priced 90% less

than competitors. Nearly

invisible! 45-day money

back guarantee! 833-

669-5806

IMPORTANT

NOTICE

The following states: CA,

CT, FL, IA, IL, IN, KY,

LA, MD, ME, MI, MN,

NE, NC, NH, OH, OK,

SC, SD, TX, VT and WA

requires seller of certain

business opportunities to

register with each state

before selling. Call to

verify lawful registration

before you buy.

Eliminate gutter cleaning

forever! LeafFilter, the

most advanced debrisblocking

gutter protection.

Schedule a FREE LeafFilter

estimate today. 15% off

Entire Purchase. 10% Senior

& Military Discounts.

Call 1-855-791-1626

PROBATE COURT OF

MADISON COUNTY, OHIO

CHRISTOPHER J. BROWN,

JUDGE

IN RE: CHANGE OF NAME

OF

Ryker Winchester Colwell

to

Ryker Winchester Curry

Case No. 20216013

NOTICE OF HEARING ON

CHANGE OF NAME

[R.C. 2717.01]

Applicant hereby gives notice to all

interested persons and to Coty

Colwell, whose last known address is

Market St., Mt. Sterling, Ohio that the

applicant has filed an Application for

Change of Name in the Probate Court

of Madison County, Ohio, requesting

the change of name of Ryker

Winchester Colwell to Ryker

Winchester Curry. The hearing on the

application will be held on the 10th

day of June, 2021, at 2:00 o’clock P.M.

in the Probate Court of Madison

County, located at 1 North Main

Street, London, Ohio 43140.

MM APRIL 18, 2021

MM2021237

ASSOCIATION ADS

The Generac PWRcell

solar plus battery storage

system. Save money,

reduce reliance on

grid, prepare for outages

& power your home. Full

installation services. $0

down financing option.

Request free no obligation

quote. Call 1-855-

270-3785

GENERAC Standby Generators

provide backup

power during utility power

outages, so your home

and family stay safe and

comfortable. Prepare

now. Free 7-year extended

warranty ($695 value!).

Request a free

quote today! Call for additional

terms and conditions.

1-855-465-7624

NEED IRS RELIEF

$10K-$125K+ Get Fresh

Start or Forgiveness.

Call 1-844-431-4716

Monday through Friday

7am-5pm PST

Elminate gutter cleaning

forever! LeafFilter, most

advanced debris-blocking

protection. Schedule

Free Estimate. 15% off

Purchase. 10% Senior

& Military Discounts. Call

1-855-995-2490

The following matters are the subject of this public notice by the Ohio

Environmental Protection Agency. The complete public notice, including

any additional instructions for submitting comments, requesting

information, a public hearing, or filing an appeal may be obtained at:

http://www.epa.ohio.gov/actions.aspx or Hearing Clerk, Ohio EPA, 50

W. Town St. P.O. Box 1049, Columbus, Ohio 43216. Ph: 614-644-3037

email: HClerk@epa.ohio.gov

Final Issuance of Permit-To-Install and Operate

Eberle Fisher Funeral Home Inc

103 North Main St, London, OH 43140-1144

ID #: P0130008

Date of Action: 04/06/2021

Renewal PTIO for an existing 150 lb/hr human crematory unit.

Final Approval of Plans and Specifications

Plain City Village

PO Box 167, Plain City, OH 43064

Facility Description: Community Water System

ID #: 1410493

Date of Action: 04/02/2021

This final action not preceded by proposed action and is appealable to

ERAC.

Detail Plans for PWSID:OH4901112 Plan No:1410493 Regarding Madison

Meadows-Section 1.

MM APRIL 18, 2021

ASSOCIATION ADS

DENTAL INSURANCE-

Physicians Mutual Insurance

Company. Covers

350 procedures. Real

insurance - not a discount

plan. Get your free

dental Info kit! 1-888-

623-3036 . www.dental50plus.com/58

#6258

Directv Now. No Satellite.

$40/mo 65 Channels.

Stream news, live

events, sports & on demand

titles. No contract/

commitment. 1-866-825-

6523

Protect your home w/home

security monitored by

ADT. Starting at $27.99/

mo. Get free equipment

bundle including keypad,

motion sensor, wireless

door & windows sensors.

833-719-1073

DISH TV $64.99 190

Channels + $14.95 high

speed internet. FREE installation,

Smart HD DVR

included. Free Voice Remote.

Some Restrictions

apply. Promo Expires

7/21/21. 1-833-872-2545

HEARING AIDS!!

Buyone/get one FREE!

Nearly invisible, fully rechargeable

IN-EAR

NANO hearing aids

priced thousands less

than competitors! 45-day

trial! Call1-877-436-0234

PROBATE COURT OF

MADISON COUNTY, OHIO

CHRISTOPHER J. BROWN,

JUDGE

IN RE: CHANGE OF NAME

OF

Vanessa Gayle Mercer

to

Vanessa Gayle McCoy

Case No. 20216012

NOTICE OF HEARING ON

CHANGE OF NAME

[R.C. 2717.01]

Applicant hereby gives notice to all

interested persons that the applicant

has filed an Application for

Change of Name in the Probate

Court of Madison County, Ohio,

requesting the change of name of

Vanessa Gayle Mercer to Vanessa

Gayle McCoy. The hearing on the

application will be held on the 3rd

day of June, 2021, at 2:00 o’clock

P.M. in the Probate Court of

Madison County, located at 1

North Main Street, London, Ohio

43140.

MM APRIL 18, 2021

MM2021238

MM2021235

PROBATE COURT OF

MADISON COUNTY, OHIO

CHRISTOPHER J. BROWN,

JUDGE

IN RE: CHANGE OF NAME

OF

Baylor James Ryder

to

Baylor James McCoy

Case No. 20216011

NOTICE OF HEARING ON

CHANGE OF NAME

[R.C. 2717.01]

Applicant hereby gives notice to all

interested persons that the applicant

has filed an Application for

Change of Name in the Probate

Court of Madison County, Ohio,

requesting the change of name of

Baylor James Ryder to Baylor

James McCoy. The hearing on the

application will be held on the 3rd

day of June, 2021, at 2:00 o’clock

P.M. in the Probate Court of

Madison County, located at 1

North Main Street, London, Ohio

43140.

MM APRIL 18, 2021

MM2021239


www.madisonmessengernews.com

April 18, 2021 - MADISON MESSENGER - PAGE 17

xEmployment

BE YOUR OWN BOSS!

INDEPENDENT

CONTRACTORS

WANTED

If you have a reliable

car and would like to

earn extra money,

then why not deliver?

• Full-Time Warehouse Associates - All Shifts

$15/Hr & Shift Diff.

• Maintenance Technician, 2nd Shift

• Inbound Supervisor, 2nd Shift

WHAT YOU CAN EXPECT

• Weekends off and paid holidays

• Incentive bonuses and shift differential

• Medical, dental, vision, and company-matched 401(K)

• Tuition reimbursement

Due to current safety guidelines,

ALL candidates are encouraged to apply on-line at:

jobs.mscdirect.com

Applicants must successfully pass a background check and drug screen.

Equal Opportunity Employer: minority, female, veteran, individuals with disabilities, sexual orientation/gender identity.

WANTED

SW CITY SCHOOLS

SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS

The South-Western City School

District is currently hiring drivers

for the 2020-2021 school year

$16.55/HR

Available positions are for substitute drivers

that can develop into “Regular” positions with

benefits. Interested individuals should submit

an application on our website at swcsd.us.

Follow the employment link. Applicants should

have an excellent driving record and must

submit to drug, alcohol, and background

screening. A high school diploma or equivalent

is required.

EOE

• Deliver 1 or 2 days a week

• Flexible delivery hours

• Work close to home - often

in or near your neighborhood

CONTACT US

1-888-837-4342

www.thebag.com

• Deliver 7 days a week

• Delivery before dawn

• Work close to home - often

in or near your neighborhood

CONTACT US

614-461-8585

www.dispatch.com/delivery

DRIVERS WANTED

• Home Daily

• Class A CDL (can assist with tanker endorsements)

• benefits offered: health insurance, retirement, paid

vacation, uniforms

• annual income between 60 and 100K

• no slip seating

We are essential workers

If interested contact:

PENCE’S MILK TRANSPORT

Germantown, Ohio

Cell: 937-313-0768 Office: 937-696-2032

ASSOCIATION ADS

Attention: If you or aloved

one worked around the

pesticide Roundup

(glyphosate) for at least 2

years and has been diagnosed

with non-Hodgkin’s

lymphoma, you may be

entitled to compensation.

855-341-5793

GENERAC Standby

Generators. The weather

is increasingly unpredictable.

Be prepared for

power outages. FREE 7-

year extended warranty

($695 value!) Schedule

FREE in-home assessment.

1-844-334-8353

Special financing if qualified.

AFFORDABLE HOME

SOLUTIONS! Foreclosures.

Rent to Own. Short

sales and more! Call Toll

Free 844-275-0948

ASSOCIATION ADS

Want Faster & Affordable

Internet? Get internet

service today with

Earthlink. Best internet &

WiFi Plans. Call us Today

to Get Started. Ask

about our specials! 866-

396-0515

VIAGRA and CIALIS

USERS! 50 Generic pills

SPECIAL $99.00 FREE

Shipping! 100% guaranteed.

24/7 CALL NOW!

888-445-5928 Hablamos

Espanol

READY TO BUY, SELL

OR RENT YOUR

VACATION HOME OR

HUNTING CAMP?

Advertise it here and in

neighboring publications.

We can help you. Contact

MACnet MEDIA @

800-450-6631 or visit our

site at MACnetOnline.

com

INDEPENDENT

CONTRACTORS

NEEDED:

Deliver The Columbus Dispatch in the

London area.

Requires early hours, ability to work on

your own. Dedication and

dependable transportation needed

Make up to $300 weekly

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

Call, text (614-496-1715) or

email rcottman@dispatch.com

ASSOCIATION ADS

HERNIA REPAIR? DID

YOU RECEIVE A HERNIA

MESH PATCH between

2009 and present? Did

you suffer complications

from removal surgery,

bowel perforation, infection,

abdonminal wall

tears, puncture of abdominal

organs or intestinal fistulae

after placement of

this deivce? You may be

entitled to compensation.

Attorney Charles Johnson

- 1-800-535-5727

VIAGRA & CIALIS! 60

pills for $99. 100 pills for

$150 FREE shipping.

Money back guaranteed!

1-844-596-4376

Train online to do medical

billing! Become a

Medical Office Professional

at CTI! Get trained

and certified to work in

months! 888-572-6790.

(M-F 8-6 ET)

ASSOCIATION ADS

Life Alert. One press of a

button sends help fast

24/7! At home and on

the go. Mobile Pendant

with GPS. Free first aid

kit (with subscription).

877-537-8817 Free brochure

The Generac PWRcell, a

solar plus battery storage

system. SAVE money,

reduce your reliance on

the grid, prepare for power

outages and power

your home. Full installation

services available. $0

Down Financing Option.

Request a FREE, no obligation,

quote today. Call

1-855-900-2894

Donate your car to kids!

Fast free pickup running

or not - 24 hour response.

Maximum tax

donation. Help find missing

kids! 877-831-1448

Penske Logistics seeks warehouse associates, order

selector/picker/forklift operator, to become part of our

excellent team in Groveport, OH. This is a great

opportunity for individuals who are safety conscious

and have a pleasant, outgoing attitude who want to

excel in a warehouse environment. Multiple shifts

available.

Penske values the well-being of our employees and

their families. That's why we offer competitive wages

and a wide range of benefits, including medical and

dental insurance, 401k and pension plans, flexible

dependent care and medical spending accounts,

spouse and child life insurance, employee referral

bonus, and discount with Penske partners.

833-320-1201

“HELP WANTED”

SIGN NOT WORKING?

TO ADVER

VERTISE

Call

The Madison Messenger

740-852-0809

For or More Info


PAGE 18 - MADISON MESSENGER - April 18, 2021

www.madisonmesssengernews.com

xAuctions

LARGE GUN AUCTION

SATURDAY, APRIL 24, 2021 @ 10AM

FAYETTE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS SALE ARENA

213 FAIRVIEW AVE., WASHINGTON CH., OHIO 43160

ATTENTION:

AUCTIONEERS

PISTOLS: RUGER SR1911, .45 AUTO; RUGER MARK 3, .22; SIG SAUER P320, 9MM; BROWNING BUCK MARK,

.22LR; RUGER SR9C, 9MM; SPRINGFIELD ARMORY XD9, 9MM; CHIAPPA SAA17, 17HMR; RUGER VAQUERO,

.357 MAGNUM; RUGER SUPER BLACK HAWK, .44 MAGNUM; SMITH AND WESSON 5906, 9MM; RUGER

BLACK HAWK, .45; D’ARMS DE SAINT FRENCH ORDINANCE REVOLVER, 8MM LEBEL; TAURUS JUDGE

.410/.45; INTER ARMS FIRE STAR, 9MM; TAURUS MILLENIUM G2 PT111, 9MM; BERSA THUNDER 22, .22LR;

NORTH AMERICAN ARMS MINI 22, .22 MAGNUM; SIG SAUER P250, 9MM; ROHMGMBHSONTHEIM/BRENZ

RG17, .38 SPECIAL; COBRA FIREARMS CB9CR, 9MM; GLOCK 42, .380 AUTO; TAURUS 1911SS, 9MM; SPRING-

FIELD 1911A1 RANGE OFFICER, .45; RUGER 22 CHARGER, 22LR; RUGER 22 CHARGER, .22LR; WITNESS

45ACP, .45; TAURUS M941, .22 MAGNUM; ANDERSON AM-15, MULTI CAL,

MUZZLE LOADERS: CVA WOLF, .50 CAL; THOMSON CENTER ENCORE, 209X50 MAG

RIFLES: SPRINGFIELD M1 GRANDE, .30 CAL WITH BAYONET; RUGER AR556, 5.56 CAL; ANDERSON AM-

15, MULTI CAL; ANDERSON AM-15, 223/556; MOSSBERG 715T, .22; CENTURY INTERNATIONAL M70A82

(AK-47), 7.62X39; SKS, 7.62X 39; JAPANESE ARISAKA W/ CHRYSANTHEMUM, 8MM; JC HIGGINS 29, .22LR;

SAVAGE 93R17, 17HMR; MOSSBERG 100ATR, 270 WINCHESTER; WINCHESTER 70, 300 WIN MAG;

WEATHERBY VANGUARD, 200 WBY MAG; SAVAGE AXIS, 308 WINCHESTER; SAVAGE 116, 338 WIN MAG;

CVA HUNTER, 444 MARLIN; H&R HANDY RIFLE, 444 MARLIN; WEATHERBY VANGUARD 300 WBY MAG;

BRAZTECH S411280, .22LR; AK-47, 7.62X39; HENRY H006, 44 REM MAG; HENRY GOLDEN BOY, .22 CAL;

MARLIN 1936, .32 SPECIAL; TAURUS CIRCUIT JUDGE, .45LC/410; MARLIN 336, .30-.30 WIN; HENRY 17HMR;

STEVENS 121, .22 SHORT/LR; HENRY, 22LR; STOEGER UBERTI CAT1555, .22 LR; OF MOSSBERG 46M,

.22S-L-LR; SAVAGE NRA MATCH, .22LR; MOSIN NAGANT, 7.62X54 W/ BAYONET; AGAWAM ARMS CO 68,

.22 S-L-LR; WINCHESTER 190, .22 LR; DAISY 25 BB GUN

SHOT GUNS: REMINGTON SPORTSMAN, 12 GA AUTO; BROWNING AUTO 5 - DUCKS UNLIMITED 50TH

ANNIV, 12 GA AUTO; BROWNING WETLANDS FOR AMERICA - TERRY REDLIN, 12 GA PUMP; BERETTA

OUTLANDER A300, 12 GA AUTO; BROWNING BELGIUM 20, 20 GA AUTO; WINCHESTER 1300, 12 GA SLUG

BARREL; MOSSBERG 500A, 12 GA PUMP; REMINGTON 1100, 12 GA AUTO; MOSSBERG 500A, 12 GA PUMP

RIOT; REMINGTON 870, 20 GA PUMP; MARLIN 17-S, 12 GA PUMP; JC HIGGINS 583.18, 16 GA BOLT;

RUSSIAN BAIKAL IZH-18M-M, .410; SS KRESGE 151, 12 GA; SAVAGE 24V SERIES B OVER/UNDER, 30-30

WIN 20 GA; NEW ENGLAND TOPPER 58, 20 GA; COMPANHA BRASILLIRA 151, .410; MISSISSIPPI VA, .410

AMMO: RIFLE/PISTOL- .17HMR; .22; .22 MAG; .243; 30-06; .308; .270; 303 BRITISH; 35 REMINGTON; 7MM;

8MM; 44-40; .45; .357; 25 AUTO; 32 AUTO; 444 MARLIN; 7.62X39 RUSSIAN; .45-500 GOVT; 7.62X54; 44

SPECIAL; 338 WIN MAG; .50 CAL;

SHOTGUN SHOT AND SLUGS- .410; 20 GA; 12 GA; 16 GA

HOLSTERS, SCOPES, TRIGGER LOCKS

AUCTIONEERS NOTE: THIS IS ONE MANS PRIVATE COLLECTION. OWNERS NAME WITHHELD FOR

SECURITY.

TERMS AND CONDITIONS: CASH AND CHECK ONLY WITH PROPER ID. NO BUYERS PREMIUMS OR SALES

TAX. NO CREDIT OR DEBIT CARDS WILL BE ACCEPTED. ALL ITEMS SOLD AS IS, WHERE IS WITH NO

WARRANTIES IMPLIED. ANNOUNCEMENTS THAT DAY TAKE PRECEDENCE OVER WRITTEN MATERIAL. NOT

RESPONSIBLE FOR ACCIDENTS OR ITEMS ONCE SOLD! MORE GUNS MAY BE ADDED AS WE SORT.

HALTERMAN AUCTION SERVICE & BINEGAR AUCTION SERVICE

ROD HALTERMAN 614-736-7101

GARY BINEGAR, MATT BINEGAR 937-981-4614

WWW.BINEGARAUCTIONEERS.COM

LICENSED BY THE OHIO DEPT OF AGRICULTURE

ADVERTISE

Your Auction

with us and

reach a lot

more

customers!

For Display Rates

Call The

MADISON

MESSENGER

740-852-0809

ASSOCIATION ADS

READER

ADVISORY

The National Trade Association

we belong to has

purchased the following

classifieds. Determining

the value of their service

or product is advised by

this publication. In order

to avoid misunderstandings,

some advertisers do

not offer “employment”

but rather supply the

readers with manuals, directories

and other materials

designed to help

their clients establish mail

order selling and other

businesses at home. Under

NO circumstance

should you send any

money in advance or give

the client your checking,

license ID or credit card

numbers. Also beware of

ads that claim to guarantee

loans regardless of

credit and note that if a

credit repair company

does business only over

the phone it’s illegal to request

any money before

delivering its service. All

funds are based in US

dollars. Toll Free numbers

may or may not

reach Canada. Please

check with the Better

Business Bureau 614-

486-6336 or the Ohio Attorney

General’s Consumer

Protection Section

614-466-4986 for more

information on the company

you are seeking to

do business with.

BATH & SHOWER UP-

DATES in as little as

ONE DAY! Affordable

prices - No payments for

18 months! Lifetime warranty

& professional installs.

Senior & Military

Discounts available. Call

855-761-1725

ASSOCIATION ADS

Never pay for covered

home repairs again!

Complete Care Home

Warranty covers all major

systems & appliances. 30-

day risk free. $200.00 off

+ 2 free months! 1-866-

396-2490

ATTENTION DIABETICS!

Save money on diabetic

supplies! Convenient

home shipping for

monitors, test strips,

insulin pumps, catheters &

more! To learn more, call

now! 877-810-0063

Donate your car to kids.

Your donation helps fund

the search for missing

children. Accepting trucks,

motorcycles & RV’s too!

Fast free pickup - running

or not - 24 hr response -

maximum tax donation -

Call 888-515-3813

INSURANCE

Low Cost Insurance

lowcostburialsolutions.com

HELP WANTED

HIRING

Weekend

Bartenders

Apply at

EAGLES 950

16 S. Union,

London OH

Between 11:00-11:00

Immediate

Openings

5/2 M

HELP WANTED

FOOD

MANUFACTURING

OPERATORS

1st Shift, FT-PT Avail.

Competitive wages

Health/Dental/Vision Ins.

Matching 401K

740-852-9243

ksmith@ohioprocessors.com

244 E. 1st St.

London, 43140 4/18

M

Janitorial

Position

Available

Deer Creek Lake

Daytime hours

$17.00/hr

Call

800-284-0112 or

cuiservices.com

for info & application

WANT TO BUY

WANTS TO Purchase

minerals and other oil &

gas interests. Send details

to: P.O. Box 13557,

Denver, CO 80201

ANTIQUES

WANTED

Victrolas, Watches,

Clocks, Bookcases

Antiques, Furn.

Jeff 614-262-0676

or 614-783-2629

4/11 M

WANT TO BUY

We Buy Junk Cars &

Trucks. Highest Prices

Paid. 614-395-8775

MISCELLANEOUS

FOR SALE

TORO Riding Mower

Model #1438-$450, Great

cond. 740-506-0335

Epson WF360 Color Printer-$50,

Martin Acoustic

Guitar model D1251-$650,

Brinkley Towable Yard

Sweeper-$100. OBO. All

like new. 740-506-0335

Different Mowers

Different Prices. Very good

mowers - 937-324-3444

RENTALS

102 Elmhurst, London

3 BR house. $1000 mo

$1000 dep. 614-419-3852

London (Newport) across

from Fire Dept. 2 BR 1 BA

upstairs apt. Appliances

incl. w/d hookup. Great

location. $600 mo. plus

dep. Trash & Water incl.

614-879-7940

VACATION RENTALS

Englewood, Florida

Palm Manor Resort

Within minutes of white

sand Gulf beaches,

world famous Tarpon

fishing, golf courses, restaurants/shopping,

Bush

Gardens. 2 BR 2 BA

condos with all ammenities,

weekly/monthly, visit

www.palmmanor.com

or call 1-800-848-8141


www.madisonmessengernews.com

April 18, 2021 - MADISON MESSENGER - PAGE 19

xClassified Services

GARAGE

DOORS

GARAGE

DOORS

HOME

IMPROVEMENTS

HOME

IMPROVEMENTS

PEST

CONTROL

PEST

CONTROL

ROOFING

ROOFING

BLACKTOP

SANTIAGO’S

Sealcoating & Services LLC

Quality Materials Used

SPRING IS HERE!

Driveway Seal & Repair!

Top Seal Cracks!

Residential & Commercial

Mulching, Edging & Clean-ups

“Ask for whatever you need.”

BBB Accredited-Fully Insured

5/9 A/M

Call or text for Free Est.

614-649-1200

CARPET CLEANING

DIRT BUSTERS

SPRING SPECIAL!

Any 5 areas ONLY $75.

614-805-1084

Specializing in Pet Odors

CONCRETE

ALL-CITY CUSTOM

CONCRETE

All Types Concrete Work

New or Tear Out-Replace

39 Yrs. Exp.

(614) 207-5430

Owner is On The Job!

Buckeye City

Concrete & Excavating

* Concrete * Foundations

* Waterlines * Drains

*Catch Basins

614-749-2167

buckeyecityconcreteand

excavating@yahoo.com

IINFORMATION

Jeff Boyd

5/9 A/M

CONCRETE

EDDIE MOORE

CONSTRUCTION

Quality Concrete Work

Lt. Hauling & Room Add.,

Block Work & Excavation

Stamp Patios,

Bsmt. Wall Restoration

35 Yrs Exp - Lic & Ins.

Free Ests. 614-871-3834

DOG GROOMING

Kountry Klipping LLC

Pet Grooming

Daycare

By Terri Lynn

46 N. London St.

Mt. Sterling, OH 43143

(614) 354-7716

Bring in this ad for $5 off

FENCING

EAZY FENCE

Chain Link - Wood

No Job Too Big or Small

All Repairs ~ Free Est.

Insured. 614-670-2292

IINFORMATION

FOR ONLY

$26.00

You Can Reach

Over 15,000 Homes

For 4 Weeks In Our

Madison Messenger

For Info Call

740-852-0809

IINFORMATION

LOOK TO

THE PROFESSIONALS

IN OUR

SERVICE DIRECTORY

For Service

“That Is Out Of This World”

4/11 M

P.O. Box 514

Washington C.H.,

Ohio 43160

740-505-9902

gh.riley@yahoo.com

• Pole Barns • Roofing • Siding

• Decks • Concrete

Gary Riley - Owner

740-505-9902

HAULING

Dumpster Rental

4 days - $250.00

to drop off & haul away

$25 extra/day over 4 days

Tires - $10.00 each

No Hazardous Materials

Contact Zane Tabor

on Facebook or

Call 614-254-1131

JUNK REMOVAL

& MORE

• Junk Removal

• Estate Clean-out

• Interior Demolition

• Gutter Cleaning

10% off for Senior Citizens

Free Estimates

Mike Redding

614-352-0442

HOME

IMPROVEMENTS

Handyman Cafe

“Serving Up Solutions

For All Your Handyman

Remodeling Needs”

Painting, Flooring,

Bathrooms, Kitchens,

Doors/Windows,

Siding/Roofing

Home Repairs/Maintenance

740-837-0287

Accepting MC/Visa/AE/Discover

SINCE 1973

Phil Bolon Contr.

Windows & Siding

Decks, Kitchens, Baths

Room Additions,

Flooring, Roofing

Bsmt Waterproofing

Deal With Small Non-Pressure Co.

47 Yrs. Exp. - Refs. Avail.

Lic.-Bond-Ins.

Free Est. - Financing Avail.

Member BBB Of Cent. OH

O.C.I.E.B. ID #24273

614-419-3977

or 614-863-9912

4/25 M

5/9

A/M

5/2 M

Dan - Sales

740-313-2034

HOME

IMPROVEMENTS

For Free Estimates

On Carpenter Work,

Roofs,

Siding,

Foundations,

Floors Jacked Up,

Call: 4/18 M

740-426-6731

740-505-1094

Ask For Marvin

Mid-Ohio

Kitchen

and Bath, LLC

Joe Ober

Residential/Commercial

614-879-5827

Choose Local & Save

midohiokitchenandbath.com

SLAGLE

HOME REMODELING

Baths, Kitchen,

Plumbing and Electrical.

All your Handyman needs

No Job too Big or Small

Over 30 Yrs. Exp. Lic.-Bond-Ins.

Jerry

614-332-3320

LANDSCAPING

QUALITY

LAWN &

LANDSCAPE

Steve Mast

COMMERCIAL &

RESIDENTIAL

• Mowing

• Mulching

• Trimming

• Removals

614-309-3338

Fully Insured

Free Estimates

4/4 M

5/2 M

5/2 M

Classified Services

TERMITE & PEST CONTROL

3093 W. Broad St., Cols.

614-367-9000

TERMITES? PESTS?

BED BUGS?

$100 OFF New Termite Services!

With This Ad

Monthly & Quarterly Pest Services

Great Prices!!

Licensed & Insured

Free Termite Inspection

MOVING

Aaron Allen

Moving

Local Moving since 1956

Bonded and Insured

614-299-6683

614-263-0649

Celebrating

over 60 yrs

in business

PLASTERING

DRYW

YWALL &

PLASTER

4/25

A&M

REPAIR

Textured Ceilings

614-551-6963

Residential/Commercial

BIA

POWERWASHING

MDB POWERWASH

We Specialize In Decks.

Clean, stain, reseal,

revitalize any deck.

Quality work at fair prices.

Guarantee All Work 3 Yrs.

25 Yrs Exp. Free Est.

614-327-9425

SEWING MACHINE

REPAIR

REPAIR all makes 24 hr.

service. Clean, oil, adjust

in your home. $49.95 all

work gtd. 614-890-5296

TREE SERVICES

Brewer & Sons Tree Service

• Tree Removal

• Tree Trimming 4/25

A&M

• Stump Grinding

• Bucket Truck Services

Best Prices • Same Day Service

614-878-2568

5/9 A&M

5/9 A

INFORMATION

DON’T

BE

LEFT OUT!

Deadline Is

Tuesdays by

2:00pm

For Following

Sundays Paper

740-852-0809

Tree Trimming

Tree Removal

Stump Grinding

FREE ESTIMATES

740-845-LAWN

SHOP THE CLASSIFIEDS!!

Only $1 per line

❏ Check for one additional FREE week.

Telephone: _________________________________________________________

Print Your Name:____________________________________________________

Last

First

Print Your Address:___________________________________________________

Print Your City:__________________________ State:_______ Zip:____________

Print Your Ad Below…

One word each space. BE SURE YOUR TELEPHONE NUMBER OR ADDRESS is included in your

advertisement. The lessor of 4 words or 22 characters per line. We reserve the right to use abbreviations

when actual space exceeds amount purchased.

1. __________ __________ __________ __________

2. __________ __________ __________ __________

3. __________ __________ __________ __________

4. __________ __________ __________ __________

5. __________ __________ __________ __________

6. __________ __________ __________ __________

Madison Messenger

78 S. Main St. • London, Ohio 43140

740-852-0809

$

Not Valid for Garage Sales

TREE

SSERVICE

❏ Cash

❏ Check

❏ Money Order

❏ VISA ❏ MC

TREE

SSERVICE

Credit Card Information

_____________________________

Credit Card Number

_____________________________

Exp. Date

Minimum Charge $5.00


PAGE 20 - MADISON MESSENGER - April 18, 2021

Rotary Student of the Month: Madison-Plains

Top student-athlete

The London Rotary Club is

pleased to honor senior Corey

Cress as Madison-Plains High

School’s April Student of the

Month.

Students of the month are

selected by school administrators

based on their academic

and extracurricular achievement

and positive character.

Cress has a 3.794 grade

point average, and his favorite

subject is math. He is a threeyear

member of the varsity

football team and powerlifting

team, and he has been on the

varsity baseball team for two years. Cress is

a member of the National Honor Society and

a four-year member of the Madison-Plains

FFA chapter, earning his chapter degree.

Cress was nominated for the Madison-

Champaign Educational Service Center’s

Community STAR student award; students

were selected based on service, teamwork,

attitude and reliability.

When asked to name a school staff member

who inspires him, Cress replied, “Coach

(Mike) Siders because he pushes us to do

and be the best.”

About Cress, Siders stated, “Corey Cress

Corey Cress

represents the entire student

body at Madison-Plains Local

Schools on how to be the pinnacle

student-athlete. He is

one of the top students in his

graduating class and one of

our top athletes at Madison-

Plains. Cory is a two-sport

varsity athlete and a top lifter

on our Madison-Plains Tradition

Powerlifting Team. He is

currently ranked fifth in the

state of Ohio for powerlifting

in Divisions 5, 6, and 7, and

he helped his team finish

third in the state this year.

Three things to sum up this young man's

character are desire, dedication and determination."

Cress plans to attend a four-year university

and major in electrical engineering. He

is the son of James and Debbie Cress of London.

The London Rotary Club has a proud history

dating back to 1929. It is a member of

Rotary International, a volunteer organization

of 1.2 million businesses and professional

leaders united worldwide to provide

humanitarian service and help build good

will and peace.

www.madisonmessengernews.com

Rotary Student of the Month: London

Hard work & precision

The London Rotary Club

is pleased to honor senior

Logan Minner as Madison-

Plains High School’s April

Student of the Month.

Students of the month are

ence teacher Todd Boyd.

“Mr. Boyd is a positive

role model who promotes an

interactive classroom and a

welcoming environment,” he

said.

selected by school administrators

About Minner, Boyd

based on their aca-

demic and extracurricular

achievement and positive

character.

Minner has a 4.39 grade

point average (GPA) and is

ranked second in his class.

commented, “Logan is a

great young man. He works

very hard to complete tasks

early and with amazing precision.

He is wonderful at

helping fellow students and

explaining assignments to

His favorite class is

them. It has been a pleasure

anatomy. Minner has been

Logan Minner

teaching him.”

on the merit honor roll the

After graduation, Minner

past three years and has been a National

Honor Society member the past two years.

He enjoys playing baseball and has participated

on the varsity team for three years.

He played football for two years and has

received the Academic Athletic Award

each year since 2017. Recipients of the Academic

Athletic Award must maintain a

minimum 3.5 GPA while competing in a

season.

When asked to name a school staff person

plans to attend the University of

Cincinnati to study mechanical engineering.

He is the son of Thomas and Kristie

Minner of London.

The London Rotary Club has a proud

history dating back to 1929. It is a member

of Rotary International, a volunteer

organization of 1.2 million businesses and

professional leaders united worldwide to

provide humanitarian service and help

build good will and peace.

who inspires him, Minner named

sci-

DRIVE-THRU ONLY!!!

Tuesday, April 27, 2021

FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

SERVING

4PM TO 7PM

No Reservations

Required

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines